Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Haul out and Coppercoat


Andrew & Kate Lamb
 

Bill - I said – “close your ears”! J

 

But point taken – we now have if nothing else 4 layers of epoxy and have the option to apply a more traditional “antifouling” method if necessary although our previous experience of Coppercoat has been very good albeit limited to the Med and western France  – although I am not sure I agree that Coppercoat can’t be categorized as antifouling as in “Treatment of a boat’s hull with a paint or similar substance designed to prevent fouling.” – as Copper is one of the strongest biocidal substances around and the final step in the process is to gently rub the coating to expose the copper particles . I will be interested to hear how those sailing in tropical areas with Coppercoat are getting on.

 

Andrew

 

 

Ronpische

SM2k 472

Canet en Roussillion, France

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2015 2:35 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Haul out and Coppercoat

 

 

Ha! Coppercoat!

Well, I think it is good protection for the gelcoat because it is epoxy. I would not call it "antifouling" because it does nothing chemically or on a molecular level to cause growth and barnacles to fall off, or not adhere. I believe that if you do not mind cleaning and scraping the hull, Coppercoat will serve you well.

Also I think it depends on where the boat will be. You will clean and scrape twice as much in the tropics as you will in the Med.

All that said, Coppercoat is normally bought for the right reason which is to buy a product that you consider is the best for your boat and its area of operation.

I am sure that you hear the same things I do from a significant number of saliors talking about the latest, cheapest bottom paint. Those arm-chair experts will always be there and always lead people new to sailing astray.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+39 333 121 8115 Italy Mobile
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On Jun 11, 2015 2:16 PM, "Andrew Lamb andrew.lamb@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We took our SM out last weekend for the first time this year  since fitting new hydranet vertical batten sails, removing ten years of old antifouling, overhauling the engine and propeller,  she sailed very nicely in light winds – difficult for us to compare though as our last sails were near end of life when we purchased the boat.

 

This year we scraped the hull back to the gelcoat and (close your ears Bill!) applied Coppercoat– with two of us working pretty hard, the whole process took about 2 weeks - we scraped 10 years of antifouling off with tungsten carbide bladed scrapers (we bought 4 different types of scrapers only the Bahco 665 scrapers were any good - fortunately we bought two of each type)  – the scraping took 6 days, sanding the primer took 2 days back to gelcoat, 3 coats of 3M GP120 epoxy took 2 days and the Coppercoat epoxy took 1 day + extra days after the boat was repositioned, for the rest of the keel and pads. We had the engine injectors changed earlier in the year and I overhauled the Autoprop while waiting for the epoxy coats to dry.

 

I have to say though that we do not seem at the moment to be able to get the main and mizzen sails rolled in such that only the UV strip is showing which is a bit disappointing.

 

With this work also the engine  (Yanmar 110HP)  was able to reach 3500+ revs easily.  

 

Andrew & Kate

 

Ronpische

SM2k 472

Canet en Roussillion, France

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, June 11, 2015 1:46 PM
To:
amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mainsail halyard

 

 

Derick,

Leinster Bay on St. John is one of my favorite spots. We will be crossing the Atlantic this coming Jan and hope to be there next year.

I never say, "I told you so." Now that your sails are at about half life, what do you think of the verticle battens on a SM? Was it worth it? Or, do you think your performace increase was a result of hydranet....oh, and what about the shape of hydranet....it is not supposed to stretch at all, and at seven years Dacron would likely be showing a little belly.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+39 333 121 8115 Italy Mobile
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On Jun 11, 2015 1:27 PM, "derickgates@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thank you all, I was able to get the halyard down to deck level by using the "two bowline" technique to attach the line extension and then sending someone up the mast.  The thin line was indeed attached to a swivel on the foil, with a long black pin sticking through the slot in the mast.  Found no damage, the previous rigger's knots had just come undone.  Tied it back up with multiple loops through the fabric loop at the head of the sail using bowlines instead of half hitches, leaving about 4 inches between the head of the sail and the swivel.  With this length, the luff could still be properly tensioned (I would not use more length than 4 inches).  

 

I took advantage of the mainsail being down to sew up some rather frayed vertical batten pockets (Bill Rouse can say "I told you so" about using vertical battens).  The sails are Hydranet and about 7 years old, and except for the wear on the batten pockets seem to be in very good shape.

 

All is now back to normal.  Thanks for the help.

 

Derick

 

SM2K#400 Brava

 

Currently in Leinster Bay, St. John, USVI 

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