Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shore power cord

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Eric,
I guess you know not to leave any surplus cable length coiled up. It can cause the wire to overheat and catch on fire.
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealnd

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 11 Jan 2018 9:05 a.m., "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Ryan,

I bought 100 feet of 10 gauge round black rubber coated wire from Home depot about 8 years ago. It is rated at 30 amps. I hooked  it up to a 50 amp USA twist-lock plug and use only the red, black and green ground. DO NOT HOOK UP THE WHITE NEUTRAL. 

It works well with everything on board running including 3 AC units. The AC units are on timers so they all do not start at once.

I have never seen over 16 amps when everything is running.

It looks exactly like the factory stock wire supplied by Amel.

100 feet is long but on occasion it comes in handy.

I am currently working to make a box to connect into the wire near the pedestal plug with a 35 amp circuit breaker in it. This is because the breaker on the 50  amp pedestal is 50 amps.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

I pulled the wire all the way from the stern to the transfer case so there are no splices.

I have made a number of adapters for the 30 and 50 amp European plugs that just plug into the 50 amp twistlock.

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 2:19 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Generator charging question

 

 

Interesting that so many marinas as so limiting on power.  Is it possible to run all three air conditioners on 16A?  I've never measured the draw.

 

My SM has a shore power cord and main breaker sized for 35A (I was under the impression this is true for all SM).  I believe the generator runs through that same 35A breaker, so that's the max there as well (it's basically moot since it's a 9kW generator).  My shore power cord could use a replacement, so I've been investigating the possibility of upgrading it to handle 50A.  It would be handy to have the extra power to run the heat in the winter.  My boat came from the factory with extra dedicated heater circuits, which I don't think are standard, so it would be no trouble at all to exceed 35A draw from the panel.  The biggest challenge is fitting a larger cord through the conduit to the panel.

 

Ryan

SM 233 Iteration

Boston, MA, USA

 

 

On Wed, Jan 10, 2018 at 2:10 PM, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Ryan;

 

We have a 100A and a 40A charger aboard. If the batteries are being drained to proper levels for optimal life, the 100A charger will only be at max output for 10-15 minutes before the charge rate drops below the max output, so there is minimal advantage in running the two charges together. The disadvantages are, at least to a certain extent, unknown and are dependent on many factors.

 

As far as the shore power connections in other parts of the world, in the Med, there are many marinas and harbors that only have 16A connections. However there are many that also have 32A connections. Some have higher output connections as well. The limiting factor on the Amels, is the shore power connection and wiring to the panel. On our 54, it is sized for 32A. Therefore there is a 32A breaker in the aft lazarette that feeds the panel. You have to check on your SM to see the wire sizing and shore power breaker sizing.

 

The only way to get the full 50A 230V to the panel is by the generator.

 

 

Respectfully;

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, January 10, 2018 9:39 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Generator charging question

 

At first glance, I thought it could be dangerous to use multiple smart chargers because they could get into different states, but after thinking through all the possible combinations, I've convinced myself it is actually safe -- provided the total current is less than what the batteries can accept.  It might not produce the optimal results for your battery lifespan, though: they could transition from bulk to acceptance or acceptance to float before the battery is actually ready, because each charger can only sense its own contribution to the charge current.  Chargers in different stages shouldn't fight each other directly because they sense the current/voltage of the system.  Floating at different voltages should be safe; the charger with the lower float voltage would just not be doing anything.  If one or more chargers has a float voltage above that which the batteries are designed to handle, that would be bad... but that's also bad with just one charger.

 

I do not think it is safe to mix smart chargers and dumb chargers without knowing exactly how the dumb charger works.  It is conceivable that the dumb charger just puts out a constant voltage, and would act as a sink for a higher voltage -- then you'd get the two chargers directly fighting each other, possibly tripping breakers, and definitely wasting power.  The same could happen with two dumb chargers that have different voltage setpoints; presumably the ones Amel installed as stock were configured with the same voltage and/or were smart enough to shut off if they started acting as a sink.

 

As an aside, is a 16A shore power connection typical in some parts of the world?  At 230V, that's about the same wattage as the "small boat" 30A@120V connections in the USA.  A larger yacht like a Super Maramu is expected to connect to 50A@240V in the US, but usually also has the option of connecting to two 30A@120V connections.  I assume you can't connect to two 16A@230V connections because the 230V parts of the world don't use a split-phase power system like we do in the US, but perhaps I'm wrong about that.

 

Thanks,

Ryan

SM 233 Iteration

Boston, MA, USA

 

 

On Wed, Jan 10, 2018 at 2:11 AM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Our solar chargers by Genasun are not properly adjustable to the voltages required by Trojan for our AGM batteries.  So we disconnect solar when on shorepower to prevent over-voltage charging of full batteries.

 

We routinely turn on both battery chargers as follows:

 

(1) When charging from the generator.

(2) When we will have shore power for only one day or two.

 

Evidently after one hour or less the batteries charge at less than 100 A, and at this point it makes no difference whether you have one or both chargers on.  So we routinely turn one off.

 

Cheers,

 

Peregrinus

SM2K N. 350 (2002)

Herzliya

 

 

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