Re: Heave-to


karkauai
 

Good advice, Mark,
I forgot Todo that and have to replace that sheet now.
Kent

On Jun 19, 2020 6:58 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

Kent and Iris,

 

Great info!

I would add, using chafing protection is a must. I have a length of fire-hose that I made three ply. I cut it lengthwise so I can position the hose over the forward main halyard to protect the jib sheet from chafing on the wire.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Tahiti, French Polynesia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of karkauai via groups.io
Sent: Friday, June 19, 2020 6:46 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heave-to

 

Hi Paul,

Every boat is going to be a little different depending on load distribution (center of lateral resistance) and even sail shape (center if effort). That's what works on Kristy and should be a pretty good place to start with most Amel SuperMaramus. I haven't tried it on a SN or A54.

 

I generally start with the sails furled as if I were sailing in the maximum wind I expect.  I recommend trying it in 15-20 kts until you know how your boat will react so you don't have to make too many adjustments in big breaking seas. 

 

Where ever you start, if you are pointing too high, try adding a bit of jib or reducing the amount of Mizzen. If you are falling off, reduce jib and/or let more Mizzen out. Once you are between 80 & 90 deg off the wind, if you are still sailing out if the slick, bring the Mizzen traveler upwind some more and)or sheet the Genoa in a bit.  You'll probably have to fall off and jibe to make changes in very high winds, then heave-to again.

 

If you are sailing short-handed and just need some rest, or a hot meal, or need to wait for sunrise before entering an unknown harbor, this calms everything down dramatically. I don't like to bash tacking upwind in steep seas, just don't make enough headway to be worth the wear and tear, so if I expect the wind to shift in a day or two, I heave-to and sail again when it's not so hard on the boat and crew.

 

I haven't hove-to in anything bigger than 12-15' seas, but I think it should be a pretty good technique in up to 60kts)20ft seas. After that running with a warp or drogue may be a better approach.

 

Have fun with it, l bet you'll find that you use it more often than you anticipate.

Kent and Iris

Kristy

SM 243

 

On Jun 19, 2020 9:08 AM, Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown <paul.dowd@...> wrote:

Kent,

 

That is an excellent explanation, and one presumably specific to Amel ketches?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98 - Grenada

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of karkauai via groups.io
Sent: 19 June 2020 00:33
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Heave-to

 

That's correct Victor. A bit less than we were sailing with before we hove to, because the winds were picking up.  Leave the jib sheeted in and tack without changing jib sheets (backwind the jib) then turn the helm hard upwind and tie it off there.  Then go aft and bring the Mizzen traveler up at least half way to windward. You may have to experiment with how much jib and Mizzen you have out, and how much the Mizzen traveler needs to be brought upwind.  I never could make Kristy slide directly downwind with theain out even a little...she always sailed forward out of the slick at 1-2 kts.

Kent

Kristy

SM 243

 

On Jun 18, 2020 4:01 PM, VICTOR MOLERO <victor.moleroxx@...> wrote:

Hello Ken and Iris.

I am very interested in the heave to operation. I understand from your mail that you only used a bit of jib, a third of the mizzen and the main down. Is this correct?

Thank you in advance.

Victor 

SM #314 Alendoy

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 


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