Date   

Re: Gennaker furling

Dave_Benjamin
 

Not on a SM, but there's no difference in the install. You can add a bale to the anchor roller platform and use a friction block (approx $45 USD) on the bottom of the furler to keep it stable. A sprit pushes the tack further forward which is better but not absolutely necessary. Joel Potter probably knows specifics related to install on a SM.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "sabbatical3" <mark_pitt@...> wrote:

Has anyone installed a gennaker or asymmetric spinnaker furler, like those from Facnor, on a Super Maramu? Any tips or photos would be appreciated. I am wondering if I need a sprit to make this work.

Mark (currently in the US)
"Sabbatical III" ASM #419, currently at Pangkor, Malaysia


Gennaker furling

Mark Pitt
 

Has anyone installed a gennaker or asymmetric spinnaker furler, like those from Facnor, on a Super Maramu? Any tips or photos would be appreciated. I am wondering if I need a sprit to make this work.

Mark (currently in the US)
"Sabbatical III" ASM #419, currently at Pangkor, Malaysia


Re: [Amel] Down wind sailing

Dave_Benjamin
 

We prefer a Facnor foil-less furler over a sock. A bit more money but so easy to roll up when not needed.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...> wrote:

For those without the Amel mouse system on the forestay,  twin headsails, and the Amel poles, can require some thought, particularly if you are on a long passage, with single watchkeepers.
Our technique, used on both Atlantic and pacific crossings, was to put the balooner, ( and a second light weight genoa in case the winds got too strong for the balooner), in a "snuffer" and "loose luff" it using the anchor cleat. Then, at night we could keep the balooner up, but contained by the snuffer sock, so that the single person on watch could reduce the foresail from the cockpit.

   Daylight and all awake the sail could be re-hoisted by lifting the snuffer sock, in a moment.
A hidden advantage was that on the "long roll" that you get on downwind ocean passages, the gap between the two sails allowed air to escape and the luffs never stalled. Also, in the sock it was simple to drop the sail every 2-3 days to check for "chafe" on the halyards.

Mike
SN 027 (sloop)



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 10:42 PM
Subject: [Amel] Down wind sailing


 
Please, this forum will be more valuable in the future if the subject line reflects the current subject.

Dave, with the Amel Ballooner, the second sail (either a lightweight ripstop nylon ballooner or a lighter weight genoa ) is hoisted independently on a second headfoil groove and clips into a magnificently simple device that allows you to remove the second sail’s halyard so it will furl with the genoa on an infinite basis. When you want to take the second sail down you hoist another marvelously simple device called a ‘mouse’ that unhooks the head of the sail from the furler swivel and the sail comes down while the normal genoa stays up. This system is a lot better and easier to use than sewing two sails together at the luff as that’s the way we used to do it years ago before Mr.Carteau and The Captain invented the hardware that I described above. If you have yet to enjoy this system, hitch a ride on a so equipped later model Amel. I have crossed oceans with this system and it is a doddle to manage all the off the wind energy, especially if you
get a special light weight genoa to replace the fragile nylon ballooner.

Ask anyone who has used the Super Maramu ballooner what they think of it.

All the best,

Joel F. Potter

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@...> jfpottercys@...

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of jonathan681684
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 11:08 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: going to weather

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2 balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey

In amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@> wrote:

Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape? I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard? Wouldn't it just backwind the main more? Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


Â
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented â€Å"skinny†keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the
cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_














Re: [Amel] Down wind sailing

Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
 

For those without the Amel mouse system on the forestay,  twin headsails, and the Amel poles, can require some thought, particularly if you are on a long passage, with single watchkeepers.
Our technique, used on both Atlantic and pacific crossings, was to put the balooner, ( and a second light weight genoa in case the winds got too strong for the balooner), in a "snuffer" and "loose luff" it using the anchor cleat. Then, at night we could keep the balooner up, but contained by the snuffer sock, so that the single person on watch could reduce the foresail from the cockpit.

   Daylight and all awake the sail could be re-hoisted by lifting the snuffer sock, in a moment.
A hidden advantage was that on the "long roll" that you get on downwind ocean passages, the gap between the two sails allowed air to escape and the luffs never stalled. Also, in the sock it was simple to drop the sail every 2-3 days to check for "chafe" on the halyards.

Mike
SN 027 (sloop)



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 10:42 PM
Subject: [Amel] Down wind sailing


 
Please, this forum will be more valuable in the future if the subject line reflects the current subject.

Dave, with the Amel Ballooner, the second sail (either a lightweight ripstop nylon ballooner or a lighter weight genoa ) is hoisted independently on a second headfoil groove and clips into a magnificently simple device that allows you to remove the second sail’s halyard so it will furl with the genoa on an infinite basis. When you want to take the second sail down you hoist another marvelously simple device called a ‘mouse’ that unhooks the head of the sail from the furler swivel and the sail comes down while the normal genoa stays up. This system is a lot better and easier to use than sewing two sails together at the luff as that’s the way we used to do it years ago before Mr.Carteau and The Captain invented the hardware that I described above. If you have yet to enjoy this system, hitch a ride on a so equipped later model Amel. I have crossed oceans with this system and it is a doddle to manage all the off the wind energy, especially if you
get a special light weight genoa to replace the fragile nylon ballooner.

Ask anyone who has used the Super Maramu ballooner what they think of it.

All the best,

Joel F. Potter

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@...> jfpottercys@...

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of jonathan681684
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 11:08 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: going to weather

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2 balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey

In amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@...> wrote:

Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape? I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard? Wouldn't it just backwind the main more? Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


Â
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny†keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the
cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: better going to weather

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Eric, Please understand I do not see myself as an expert on this topic, I am just sharing what I find works. Once I applied myself to the problem I was pleased with the results.
I forgot to mention in my last post that while the SM keel is fat, it does have a good foil shape which does work if you helm correctly, but note what I said about the join.
 
Now the question. What constitutes heavy weather? 20 knots, 30, or 40. Sea state is critical, in sheltered waters life is good even in very strong winds but if you get wind against the tide, or rough and broken water for any other reason it is a different story. We do have a big wide boat and heavy seas do impact us when going to windward. Same principals apply as to sail shape, my main holds very good shape partially furled. Firstly no boat likes to be over powered and most of us leave too much sail up. If you are consistantly healing more than 20 degrees on the SM you will go better with less sail, they have a powerful hull form and if you have excessive heal there is a lot of power on. We have a high cut 90% heavy weather headsail and in any wind ahead of the beam it is the sail in anything over 15 knots. Not that I always change to it at that strength, too lazy, but if  I anticipate strong wind lasting some time ahead of the beam I change down. If
it is intermittent, I furl the big headsail accordingly. If the wind is seriously strong, consistantly  30 knots plus, and I have to beat to my destination I would seriously consider chosing another destination or slow down and wait for it to pass. It always does and we are supposed to be enjoying ourselves. However if I had to do it I would reduce sail according to the principals above, always leaving some main or mizzen up to get that leach effect and helm as I said, not pinching and keeping the power on. If it gets seriously uncomfortable you step down through the options of feathering and just maintaining steerage (very useful tactic when caught with too much sail in a heavy squall) to heaving to. The issue of storm tactics is beyond this topic of going to windward in a SM.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui
New Zealand

From: Sailormon <kimberlite@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sunday, 27 May 2012 10:42 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel] Re: better going to weather


 
Danny,

What do you do in heavy weather?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 5:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: better going to weather

Hi all, all my life I have been a racing yachtsman, albeit at club level and
my last boat was a high performance 42 footer that when properly trimmed and
sailed would sail to windward in moderate conditions at 7.5knots at 23
degrees to the apparent wind. We bought Ocean Pearl because of the Amels
impressive pedigree as a short handed ocean cruiser. However in the early
months I was in shock at her lack of performance in light air and trying to
go to windward and like many of you our motor got much use in these
conditions. Then I began thinking and having read of the Amel doing well in
some ocean races I began to wonder what I was doing wrong so I began to
experiment with sail trim. First thing to know. A yacht drives to widward
off the leach of the MAIN.(and in the case of a ketch the mizzen too) Our
hollow cut main and mizzen leaches do not stand up so what to do? I slacked
off the foot so there was a lot of shape, in the centre of the sail it would
be at least 200mm or 300mm out from the boom. (same principal but a bit less
for the mizzen) Then adjust the sheeting so there is downward pressure to
make the leach stand up. I actually marked the sheets so I was able to
record sheeting against performace and have it repeatable instead of having
to experiment every time.Result I had a leach that would stand up to help to
windward. Also I now had enough power to drive her in winds as light as 5 or
6 knots. In flat water in this wind strength with the true wind at about 50
degrees to the head I can achieve a boat speed of equal to or greater than
wind speed sailing at 30 degrees to the apparent wind. This is because we
sail in the apparent wind, not the true wind and the apparent wind is up to
around 8 knots or more. This requires gentle, careful and consistant helming
starting with the sails slightly eased and slowly over and hour or so,
tightening until you are at the 30 degrees. All the while
maintaining that 50 degrees to the true. ( I am blessed with instrumentation
that gives me this information)
Now in fresher winds. I target 30 degrees to the apparent. Same principal
for sail trim but slightly different sheeting tensions. Next thing.. Helming.
Do not pinch. That is don't continually try to sail closer to the wind, tend
to drive off slightly, that gets the water flowing around the keel and
rudder foils and you will find the boat will actually lift to windward
sideways, pinch and the foils stall and you go to leeward sideways. To check
yourself look the your compass course compared to the compass heading. The
compass heading is either on the steering compass (so long as you have it
fully adjusted for deviation) or your auto helm and the actual course made
good is on your chartplotter. The closer those two numbers are the better
you are doing. Be aware however if you are sailing in a current this can
give some strange results. Lastly, next time the boat is out of the water
fill the space between the back of the keel and the amel drive system
with a flexible filler as this gap at the back of the foil plays havock with
the water flow over the foil and has a lot to do with it stalling.
I noted with interest Kents comment that when he was motorless for a while
he learned how to make her sail.
So I encourage you, leave the motor off and try to get the sails set right,
the permutations are infinite and the results highly satifying.
Lastly, on ocean passages we are virtually never passed and overtake many
yachts. 200 mile days come easily if there is 15 to 20 knots of wind
Happy trimming.
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealand
,

From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@...
<mailto:dave_benjamin%40yahoo.com> >
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, 27 May 2012 4:04 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: going to weather

John,

The arrangement I'm referring to gets away from using the forestay foil for
anything other than the headsail.

The balloners are joined together (common luff) and flown from a foil-less
Facnor furler. There is no need for an additional stay. Attachment is
forward of the foil. Usually we'll set a boat up either with a short sprit
or add a bale to the anchor roller platform.

As for the cleats forward of the dodger, our boat does not have those.

With the smaller headsail, a cruising code zero, flown from the same Facnor
used for the ballooners, can be used for reaching angles too tight for the
ballooners or when a simpler downwind arrangement is desired.

I think Henri would heartily approve of this arrangement. It's only been in
more recent years that the foil-less furlers have become so reliable and
economical.

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "jonathan681684"
<jestonier@...> wrote:

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2
balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen
and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd
of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on
the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to
tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller
genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the
winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey


In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dave_Benjamin"
<dave_benjamin@> wrote:

Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to
hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat
will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point
about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the
Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for
downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer
a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the
balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Kent Robertson <karkauai@>
wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the
sheet a bit for better sail shape? I've not ever seen a barber hauler in
action. Where would you attach it inboard? Wouldn't it just backwind the
main more? Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather



You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject.

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting
factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel
that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger
in a grounding than more performance oriented "skinny" keels that intersect
the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite
quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from
Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave's company makes
really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with
too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while
listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel
and 'boom-splash' as you bang your way to your destination. You can use
barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one
from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel
with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the
wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but
the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall
approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much
more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The
difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from
the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance
on every point of sail but I'll also miss that water tank.

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as 'The Geezer' for
my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F.. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld..com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_







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Re: [Amel] Marina in the Med

Roque
 

Thank you all for the suggestions.
This is a really great group.

Roque
Atica, Amel 54, right now in Ile Embiez, France

Em quinta-feira, 24 de maio de 2012, Mike Johnson<
mike.k.johnson@...> escreveu:


Roque,

We stayed at Marina di Loana in July last year. Excellent facilities and
well motivated staff. Prices seem reasonable.

Mike & Peta

Solitude

SM2K 461

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of nilo.calvi
Sent: 23 May 2012 19:50
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: Marina in the Med

Roque, as you perhaps know Ligurian Marinas are the most expensive in
Italy.
Anyway I would suggest to check with Marina di Loano
http://www.marinadiloano.it/ a new harbour completed few month ago and
looking for clients. I know they're very aggressive on the market.

Kindest regards, Nilo

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Judy and Bill aboard SV
BeBe"
<yahoogroups@...> wrote:

Craig,

Thank you very much. I did not ask the question, but checked
en.buscoamarre.com out and will certainly use this during the next two
years.

Best,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387



--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "sv Sangaris" <sangaris@>
wrote:

Try a search on en.buscoamarre.com There are many listings from private
slip owners, often with good prices.
Craig Briggs SN#68 SANGARIS

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "EdisonR" <roque@> wrote:
....
Could anyone give advice on a marina with reasonable price but well
organised and secure in Ligurian Sea? ....

Roque
Atica, Amel 54
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Re: better going to weather

Sailormon <kimberlite@...>
 

Danny,

What do you do in heavy weather?

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 5:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: better going to weather





Hi all, all my life I have been a racing yachtsman, albeit at club level and
my last boat was a high performance 42 footer that when properly trimmed and
sailed would sail to windward in moderate conditions at 7.5knots at 23
degrees to the apparent wind. We bought Ocean Pearl because of the Amels
impressive pedigree as a short handed ocean cruiser. However in the early
months I was in shock at her lack of performance in light air and trying to
go to windward and like many of you our motor got much use in these
conditions. Then I began thinking and having read of the Amel doing well in
some ocean races I began to wonder what I was doing wrong so I began to
experiment with sail trim. First thing to know. A yacht drives to widward
off the leach of the MAIN.(and in the case of a ketch the mizzen too) Our
hollow cut main and mizzen leaches do not stand up so what to do? I slacked
off the foot so there was a lot of shape, in the centre of the sail it would
be at least 200mm or 300mm out from the boom. (same principal but a bit less
for the mizzen) Then adjust the sheeting so there is downward pressure to
make the leach stand up. I actually marked the sheets so I was able to
record sheeting against performace and have it repeatable instead of having
to experiment every time.Result I had a leach that would stand up to help to
windward. Also I now had enough power to drive her in winds as light as 5 or
6 knots. In flat water in this wind strength with the true wind at about 50
degrees to the head I can achieve a boat speed of equal to or greater than
wind speed sailing at 30 degrees to the apparent wind. This is because we
sail in the apparent wind, not the true wind and the apparent wind is up to
around 8 knots or more. This requires gentle, careful and consistant helming
starting with the sails slightly eased and slowly over and hour or so,
tightening until you are at the 30 degrees. All the while
maintaining that 50 degrees to the true. ( I am blessed with instrumentation
that gives me this information)
Now in fresher winds. I target 30 degrees to the apparent. Same principal
for sail trim but slightly different sheeting tensions. Next thing. Helming.
Do not pinch. That is don't continually try to sail closer to the wind, tend
to drive off slightly, that gets the water flowing around the keel and
rudder foils and you will find the boat will actually lift to windward
sideways, pinch and the foils stall and you go to leeward sideways. To check
yourself look the your compass course compared to the compass heading. The
compass heading is either on the steering compass (so long as you have it
fully adjusted for deviation) or your auto helm and the actual course made
good is on your chartplotter. The closer those two numbers are the better
you are doing. Be aware however if you are sailing in a current this can
give some strange results. Lastly, next time the boat is out of the water
fill the space between the back of the keel and the amel drive system
with a flexible filler as this gap at the back of the foil plays havock with
the water flow over the foil and has a lot to do with it stalling.
I noted with interest Kents comment that when he was motorless for a while
he learned how to make her sail.
So I encourage you, leave the motor off and try to get the sails set right,
the permutations are infinite and the results highly satifying.
Lastly, on ocean passages we are virtually never passed and overtake many
yachts. 200 mile days come easily if there is 15 to 20 knots of wind
Happy trimming.
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealand
,

From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@...
<mailto:dave_benjamin%40yahoo.com> >
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, 27 May 2012 4:04 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: going to weather


John,

The arrangement I'm referring to gets away from using the forestay foil for
anything other than the headsail.

The balloners are joined together (common luff) and flown from a foil-less
Facnor furler. There is no need for an additional stay. Attachment is
forward of the foil. Usually we'll set a boat up either with a short sprit
or add a bale to the anchor roller platform.

As for the cleats forward of the dodger, our boat does not have those.

With the smaller headsail, a cruising code zero, flown from the same Facnor
used for the ballooners, can be used for reaching angles too tight for the
ballooners or when a simpler downwind arrangement is desired.

I think Henri would heartily approve of this arrangement. It's only been in
more recent years that the foil-less furlers have become so reliable and
economical.

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "jonathan681684"
<jestonier@...> wrote:

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2
balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen
and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd
of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on
the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to
tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller
genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the
winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey


In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dave_Benjamin"
<dave_benjamin@> wrote:

Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to
hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat
will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point
about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the
Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for
downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer
a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the
balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Kent Robertson <karkauai@>
wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the
sheet a bit for better sail shape? I've not ever seen a barber hauler in
action. Where would you attach it inboard? Wouldn't it just backwind the
main more? Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather



You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject.

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting
factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel
that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger
in a grounding than more performance oriented "skinny" keels that intersect
the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite
quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from
Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave's company makes
really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with
too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while
listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel
and 'boom-splash' as you bang your way to your destination. You can use
barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one
from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel
with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the
wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but
the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall
approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much
more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The
difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from
the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance
on every point of sail but I'll also miss that water tank.

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as 'The Geezer' for
my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_







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Re: [Amel] Re: better going to weather

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi all, all my life I have been a racing yachtsman, albeit at club level and my last boat was a high performance 42 footer that when properly trimmed and sailed would sail to windward in moderate conditions at 7.5knots at 23 degrees to the apparent wind. We bought Ocean Pearl because of the Amels impressive pedigree as a short handed ocean cruiser. However in the early months I was in shock at her lack of performance in light air and trying to go to windward and like many of you our motor got much use in these conditions. Then I began thinking and having read of the Amel doing well in some ocean races I began to wonder what I was doing wrong so I began to experiment with sail trim. First thing to know. A yacht drives to widward off the leach of the MAIN.(and in the case of a ketch the mizzen too) Our hollow cut main and mizzen leaches do not stand up so what to do? I slacked off the foot so there was a lot of shape, in the centre of the sail it would
be at least 200mm or 300mm out from the boom. (same principal but a bit less for the mizzen) Then adjust the sheeting so there is downward pressure to make the leach stand up.  I actually marked the sheets so I was able to record sheeting against performace and have it repeatable instead of having to experiment every time.Result I had a leach that would stand up to help to windward. Also I now had enough power to drive her in winds as light as 5 or 6 knots. In flat water in this wind strength with the true wind at about 50 degrees to the head I can achieve a boat speed of equal to or greater than wind speed sailing at 30 degrees to the apparent wind. This is because we sail in the apparent wind, not the true wind and the apparent wind is up to around 8 knots or more. This requires gentle, careful and consistant helming starting with the sails slightly eased and slowly over and hour or so, tightening until you are at the 30 degrees. All the while
maintaining that 50 degrees to the true. ( I am blessed with instrumentation that gives me this information)
Now in fresher winds. I target 30 degrees to the apparent. Same principal for sail trim but slightly different sheeting tensions. Next thing. Helming. Do not pinch. That is don't continually try to sail closer to the wind, tend to drive off slightly, that gets the water flowing around the keel and rudder foils and you will find the boat will actually lift to windward sideways, pinch and the foils stall and you go to leeward sideways. To check yourself look the your compass course compared to the compass heading. The compass heading  is either on the steering compass (so long as you have it fully adjusted for deviation) or your auto helm and the actual course made good is on your chartplotter. The closer those two numbers are the better you are doing. Be aware however if you are sailing in a current this can give some strange results. Lastly, next time the boat is out of the water fill the space between the back of the keel and the amel drive system
with a flexible filler as this gap at the back of the foil plays havock with the water flow over the foil and has a lot to do with it stalling.
I noted with interest Kents comment that when he was motorless for a while he learned how to make her sail.
So I encourage you, leave the motor off and try to get the sails set right, the permutations are infinite and the results highly satifying.
Lastly, on ocean passages we are virtually never passed and overtake many yachts. 200 mile days come easily if there is 15 to 20 knots of wind
Happy trimming.
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui New Zealand
,

From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sunday, 27 May 2012 4:04 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: going to weather


 
John,

The arrangement I'm referring to gets away from using the forestay foil for anything other than the headsail.

The balloners are joined together (common luff) and flown from a foil-less Facnor furler. There is no need for an additional stay. Attachment is forward of the foil. Usually we'll set a boat up either with a short sprit or add a bale to the anchor roller platform.

As for the cleats forward of the dodger, our boat does not have those.

With the smaller headsail, a cruising code zero, flown from the same Facnor used for the ballooners, can be used for reaching angles too tight for the ballooners or when a simpler downwind arrangement is desired.

I think Henri would heartily approve of this arrangement. It's only been in more recent years that the foil-less furlers have become so reliable and economical.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "jonathan681684" <jestonier@...> wrote:

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2 balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey


In amelyachtowners@..., "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@> wrote:

Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape?  I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard?  Wouldn't it just backwind the main more?  Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


 
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny” keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


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Re: [Amel] from Monastir (Tunesia) to Corfu Greec

Dave_Benjamin
 

Kent,

A high cut headsail is never good going to weather. High clews are only good for reaching. There's an article on the Island Planet Sails Facebook page with some excerpts from Bob Perry that dispel some myths. It's in the Notes section.

As Joel Potter has mentioned, the keel is a limiting factor, but with the right sail design you can definitely improve on the upwind performance.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi Dave,
I do have a high-cut Yankee 110 % genoa that is great in anything over ~15 kts, but haven't led the sheets inboard to get a better pointing angle.  I haven't heard of anyone doing that on an Amel.  I would be interested to hear if someone has and what modifications were required to cope with stresses where inboard jib cars were mounted.  Joel, any thoughts?
Kent
1999 SM 243
Kristy
Currently Brunswick/St. Simons Island, GA



________________________________
From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 5:48 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] from Monastir (Tunesia) to Corfu Greec


 
Kent,

Since you seem to spend a lot of time hard on the wind, have you considered adding a proper upwind sail? Standard Amel genoas are notably poor upwind and the outboard chainplates don't help. We're going to add a non-overlapping headsail with some battens parallel to the luff so we can add some area. The only thing to work out is sheeting arrangements. I'd expect about 15-20 degrees higher angle and faster than the big genoa in all but the lightest airs.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Bon jour, Jean Paul.

Welcome and congratulations on your new Maramu.  I have a SuperMaramu, but I suspect the boats are very similar in passage-making speeds.  I have always averaged about 6 knots on passages, but then it seems like I'm always hard on the wind.  I just completed a 1200nm trip from Puerto Rico to the US with the 12-18kt winds on the beam and the seas abaft...we averaged 7.7 kts and made it in 6 1/2 days.  At times we were surfing at 11+kts. and on three of the days we did 200nm in 24 hrs.  If you are hard on the wind and banging into heavy seas you will probably not want to go any faster than about 5 kts as it gets very uncomfortable.  In a stiff breeze I can sail at about 50 degrees off the apparent wind, but that translates into about 110degrees on the compass and even less vmg on the chart.  If you're going upwind it will take you 2-3 times as long as if you are sailing the rhumb line.

Hope this helps, I'm sure that other Maramu owners will correct me if there's a significant difference.

Best of luck and enjoy your new boat!
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: JP Mans <maramu.goree@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 5:09 PM
Subject: [Amel] from Monastir (Tunesia) to Corfu Greec


 
Hi all
I am en new Maramu owner (Maramu 203) but I have never sailed on an Amel. This summer I'll sail from Tunisia to Malt, Syracuse and Corfu.
The first trajectory is about 195NM. I know it depends of the weather conditions (that should normally be favourable in these season) but in theory what statistic speed do you expect on normal conditions when you plan a travel like this?
Thanks for your advices
best regards
Jean-Paul




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: going to weather

Dave_Benjamin
 

John,

The arrangement I'm referring to gets away from using the forestay foil for anything other than the headsail.

The balloners are joined together (common luff) and flown from a foil-less Facnor furler. There is no need for an additional stay. Attachment is forward of the foil. Usually we'll set a boat up either with a short sprit or add a bale to the anchor roller platform.

As for the cleats forward of the dodger, our boat does not have those.

With the smaller headsail, a cruising code zero, flown from the same Facnor used for the ballooners, can be used for reaching angles too tight for the ballooners or when a simpler downwind arrangement is desired.

I think Henri would heartily approve of this arrangement. It's only been in more recent years that the foil-less furlers have become so reliable and economical.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., "jonathan681684" <jestonier@...> wrote:

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2 balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey


In amelyachtowners@..., "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@> wrote:

Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape?  I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard?  Wouldn't it just backwind the main more?  Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


 
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny� keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






Re: [Amel] going to weather

amelforme
 

Kent, save yourself the trouble, you will reach the same conclusion as we did when we tried “inside the shroud” sheeting of a blade type 100% jib.



I used three boom vangs and connected the bottom parts to the kick strap shackle at the base of the main mast, the u-shaped tack point for the mizzen staysail/ballooner, and the “ear” weldment on the vertical stanchion that you tack the main boom preventer to. I joined the three vangs at “the top” onto a snatch block with the sheet from the headsail in it. This way I could triangulate the lead to put the block where it allowed the most efficient shape for the headsail when pinching up to weather.

Maybe a couple degrees better windward performance in mill pond flat water, but the previously mentioned beautiful big fat keel would then abruptly stall and all was for naught. It chop, the boat would stop and fall off, albeit with a perfectly trimmed but abused headsail!

The bottom was clean, the leading edge of the keel was fair and smooth, but this keel quits ‘flying’ dramatically and suddenly when pushed where it doesn’t like to go.



All the best,

Joel F. Potter





Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@...> jfpottercys@...

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys



From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Kent Robertson
Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 8:36 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] going to weather





Thanks, Dave. If I was to try the barber-hauler, where would I attach it inboard? I'm guessing that the idea is to get a better shape to the jib by bringing the clew in and easing the sheet a bit?
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY

________________________________
From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@... <mailto:dave_benjamin%40yahoo.com> >
To: amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 11:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] going to weather



Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape? I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard? Wouldn't it just backwind the main more? Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@...>
To: amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather



You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny” keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@...> jfpottercys@...

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Down wind sailing

amelforme
 

Please, this forum will be more valuable in the future if the subject line reflects the current subject.



Dave, with the Amel Ballooner, the second sail (either a lightweight ripstop nylon ballooner or a lighter weight genoa ) is hoisted independently on a second headfoil groove and clips into a magnificently simple device that allows you to remove the second sail’s halyard so it will furl with the genoa on an infinite basis. When you want to take the second sail down you hoist another marvelously simple device called a ‘mouse’ that unhooks the head of the sail from the furler swivel and the sail comes down while the normal genoa stays up. This system is a lot better and easier to use than sewing two sails together at the luff as that’s the way we used to do it years ago before Mr.Carteau and The Captain invented the hardware that I described above. If you have yet to enjoy this system, hitch a ride on a so equipped later model Amel. I have crossed oceans with this system and it is a doddle to manage all the off the wind energy, especially if you get a special light weight genoa to replace the fragile nylon ballooner.

Ask anyone who has used the Super Maramu ballooner what they think of it.



All the best,

Joel F. Potter





Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@...> jfpottercys@...

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys



From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of jonathan681684
Sent: Saturday, May 26, 2012 11:08 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] Re: going to weather





Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2 balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey

In amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@...> wrote:

Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape? I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard? Wouldn't it just backwind the main more? Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


Â
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny” keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_






[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: going to weather

jonathan681684
 

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2 balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey


In amelyachtowners@..., "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@...> wrote:


Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape?  I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard?  Wouldn't it just backwind the main more?  Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


 
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny� keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: going to weather

jonathan681684
 

Dave,
can you be a little more specific re your comment on the balooner.
I have a mizzen and a larger balooner for the forestay. Do you have 2 balooners for the forestay foil, or are you suggesting you join the mizzen and main balooner ?

Would you need an additional attachment point at the top of the main fwd of the attachment point for the forestay foil. . Where would you attach on the deck, again it would have to be fwd of the foil ?

Also the cleats on the deck roof fwd of the main traveller can be used to tie blocks to with a spectra sling. The sheets for a storm sail or smaller genoa can then be directed along the outside of the deckhouse to the winches.

John Stonier
Santorin Azimuth
Kas, Turkey


In amelyachtowners@..., "Dave_Benjamin" <dave_benjamin@...> wrote:


Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape?  I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard?  Wouldn't it just backwind the main more?  Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


 
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny� keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@> jfpottercys@

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers

spritoaffine
 

Hi SteveAbout 3 years ago I bought a set of the duct vents direct from the factory, they were expensive I seem to remember but I couldn't find them anywhere else. I fitted the last one just last week and became aware of how yellow they soon become, the one I fitted last week was pristine whiteDavid Worthington Sharki #148 in Preveza Greece
To: amelyachtowners@...
From: yachtmaccabee@...
Date: Fri, 25 May 2012 03:48:51 +0000
Subject: [Amel] Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers


























The Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers, marked Nicoll 100 on my Sharki are in need of replacement. Several years ago I could find these on the Nicoll website but no longer.



Do anyone know of a source for these? What have other owners used to cover these large openings?



Steve Leeds

Yacht MACCABEE

Sharki #121


















[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Re : [Amel] Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers

Steve Leeds
 

Thanks!
Steve


________________________________
From: Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Friday, May 25, 2012 7:53 AM
Subject: Re : [Amel] Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers


 
Hi,

I purchased 6, 2 years ago from Amel.

Serge, V/Opera

Mango #51
De : yachtmaccabee <yachtmaccabee@...>
À : amelyachtowners@...
Envoyé le : jeudi 24 mai 2012 23h48
Objet : [Amel] Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers


 
The Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers, marked Nicoll 100 on my Sharki are in need of replacement. Several years ago I could find these on the Nicoll website but no longer.

Do anyone know of a source for these? What have other owners used to cover these large openings?

Steve Leeds
Yacht MACCABEE
Sharki #121





Re: [Amel] Alessandro

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Hi when we have crossed ease to west we cleared out of the Med headed west getting off the African coast until we picked up the trades going south. That is generally about 75-100 nm off shore. The headed for the Canaries. Plan on getting there AFTER the ARC has departed. They are wonderful islands to spend a few weeks in.

When departing the general rule is to head for 20n 30 w to get the trades. Take care to keep on a course that takes you to the islands of your choice. Stay well south you can always make northing it is harder to recover if you are to far north.

If you find the broad reaching has a bit to much yawlling layout warp in a "u" shape to stabilize to boat. It makes it easier on crew and autopilot.

Should decide to head to the Canal keep in mind that there is a lot of Govt paper work and a waiting period before you get to go.
Have fun be safe.

Regards

Richard Piller
SM209 for sale in Annapolis

Cell 603 767 5330

On May 24, 2012, at 10:14, Colin Streeter <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote:

Dear Alessandro & Jean-Paul

We sailed the Atlantic crossing from Canary Islands to Caribbean then
through Panama and across the Pacific to Australia this year. We did the
Atlantic crossing in January about 6 weeks after the ARC rally, leaving
Gran Canaria on 9th January and arriving St Lucia on 27th January. In our
opinion January is an excellent month to cross the Atlantic as the trade
winds have settled in nicely by this time.

Regarding distance we mostly averaged 160 - 170 NM per 24hrs which seems a
comfortable pace for the Super Maramu with the right winds. Every time when
we were on track to exceed 200NM in a day the wind would let us down before
reaching such a distance.

You can click on this link http://skipr.net/where-is/boat-pages/?boatid=799 or
this one http://www.skipr.net/ which tracked our progress. Click on the
map and use the "-" button to zoom out on the entire trip then you can
click on the red way points to see our comments of that part of the trip.
This is a free tracking service that you can use if you wish.

All the best with it. The Amels are wonderful ocean crossing boats!!

Fair Winds
Colin & Lauren Streeter
Island Pearl II - SM2k # 332

On Thu, May 24, 2012 at 5:55 PM, Alessandro Gennai <agennai@...> wrote:

**


Hi kent,
I'm buying a supermaramu red line here in italy and with my family
(daughter 3yrs old) i will cross atlantic in december then we're planning
to sail up to puerto rico to arrive in florida in may/june.
Could you give me any suggestions about, route, period and any other?
Further....have anyone experience in using parasailor with an amel?
Thanks and fair winds
Alessandro
www.settimocontinente.eu

Inviato da iPad

Il giorno 23/mag/2012, alle ore 23:30, Kent Robertson <karkauai@...>
ha scritto:

Bon jour, Jean Paul.

Welcome and congratulations on your new Maramu. I have a SuperMaramu,
but I suspect the boats are very similar in passage-making speeds. I have
always averaged about 6 knots on passages, but then it seems like I'm
always hard on the wind. I just completed a 1200nm trip from Puerto Rico to
the US with the 12-18kt winds on the beam and the seas abaft...we averaged
7.7 kts and made it in 6 1/2 days. At times we were surfing at 11+kts. and
on three of the days we did 200nm in 24 hrs. If you are hard on the wind
and banging into heavy seas you will probably not want to go any faster
than about 5 kts as it gets very uncomfortable. In a stiff breeze I can
sail at about 50 degrees off the apparent wind, but that translates into
about 110degrees on the compass and even less vmg on the chart. If you're
going upwind it will take you 2-3 times as long as if you are sailing the
rhumb line.

Hope this helps, I'm sure that other Maramu owners will correct me if
there's a significant difference.

Best of luck and enjoy your new boat!
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY

________________________________
From: JP Mans <maramu.goree@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Wednesday, May 23, 2012 5:09 PM
Subject: [Amel] from Monastir (Tunesia) to Corfu Greec



Hi all
I am en new Maramu owner (Maramu 203) but I have never sailed on an
Amel. This summer I'll sail from Tunisia to Malt, Syracuse and Corfu.
The first trajectory is about 195NM. I know it depends of the weather
conditions (that should normally be favourable in these season) but in
theory what statistic speed do you expect on normal conditions when you
plan a travel like this?
Thanks for your advices
best regards
Jean-Paul

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links



Re: [Amel] going to weather

karkauai
 

Thanks, Dave.  If I was to try the barber-hauler, where would I attach it inboard?  I'm guessing that the idea is to get a better shape to the jib by bringing the clew in and easing the sheet a bit?
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY


________________________________
From: Dave_Benjamin <dave_benjamin@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 11:49 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] going to weather


 
Kent,

Bringing the sheet inboard on a masthead rig like ours is not going to hurt the performance of the main. You may get a bit of a bubble but the boat will still be sailing higher and faster. Joel brings up an excellent point about the keel being a limiting factor. You definitely don't confuse the Amel with a Farr 40.

One of the issues with the smaller headsail is what do you do for downwind if you're using the twin poles. Obviously performance would suffer a bit with the smaller genoa. The best answer in my opinion is to join the balooners together with a common luff and fly them from a foil-less furler.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Kent Robertson <karkauai@...> wrote:

Thanks, Joel,
I'm guessing that leading the clew inboard allows you to ease the sheet a bit for better sail shape?  I've not ever seen a barber hauler in action. Where would you attach it inboard?  Wouldn't it just backwind the main more?  Not much help on my internet search of "barber hauler".
Kent
SM 243
KRISTY



________________________________
From: Joel F Potter <jfpottercys@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, May 24, 2012 7:41 AM
Subject: [Amel] going to weather


 
You guys ought to change the subject line when you change the subject…

Lots of experimentation has shown that, after a point, the limiting factor in squeezing up to weather is the keel. That big fat beautiful keel that contains all the fresh water and the bilge sump (and is much stronger in a grounding than more performance oriented “skinny” keels that intersect the boats bottom at 90 degrees) is not very efficient and stalls quite quickly when pinching to weather. The 110% Caribbean Blaster blade jib from Super Sailmakers and similar sails like the good one Dave’s company makes really help as they provide better lift without pushing the bow down with too much raw power. The high clew is easier to see under as you steer while listening to your crew scream bloody murder from the increased angle of heel and ‘boom-splash’ as you bang your way to your destination. You can use barber-haulers to bring the sheet lead inboard and this will discourage one from mounting permanent hardware as the cost/complexity/leak
potential is frankly not worth it.

By contrast, the new AMEL 55 has a much more performance oriented keel with a thinner genuine lifting foil section and more of a bulb than the wings we are used to. It has no room to carry the fresh water as before but the boat points higher and foots much better. You can feel the stall approach, like on a Lazer dinghy, and play the stall sweetly with the much more efficient rudder that is mounted much further aft than ever before. The difference was startling to me after having sailed every AMEL big boat from the Meltem to the Mango, Super Maramu, and the 54. Much better performance on every point of sail but I’ll also miss that water tank…

The young guys at AMEL are starting to refer to me as ‘The Geezer’ for my reverence with what came before.

All the best,

Joel

Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: <mailto:jfpottercys@...> jfpottercys@...

<http://www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys> www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys

_

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re : [Amel] Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers

Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
 

Hi,

I purchased 6, 2 years ago from Amel.

Serge, V/Opera

Mango #51
De : yachtmaccabee <yachtmaccabee@...>
À : amelyachtowners@...
Envoyé le : jeudi 24 mai 2012 23h48
Objet : [Amel] Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers


 
The Plastic engine blower duct vent louvered covers, marked Nicoll 100 on my Sharki are in need of replacement. Several years ago I could find these on the Nicoll website but no longer.

Do anyone know of a source for these? What have other owners used to cover these large openings?

Steve Leeds
Yacht MACCABEE
Sharki #121




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Re : [Amel] rudder cables

Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@...>
 

This is all great info from Mango owners, I will have a look for grease points on my cables. They are quite large Morse
type cables, I don't now how old they are. Looks like a big job to change them.
 
 


________________________________
From: Geza Szabo <rotormail@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Friday, 25 May 2012 6:56 AM
Subject: Re: Re : [Amel] rudder cables

Same setup on my Euros. I added a 2nd grease point from inside. Easy.

On Fri, May 25, 2012 at 8:47 AM, bent_jyllinge <bent_jyllinge@...>wrote:

**


On my Mango there are twomgrease points, but the upper is facing intomthe
hull, and is not accesable. I am thinking about drilling a small hole from
the cockpit to be able to grease this one.

--- In amelyachtowners@..., Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
wrote:

The new steering cables were greased with Superlube (a non drying,
synthetic grease) in 2005, since then, I have injected a few ounces of
CorosionX (a thin film high pressure lubricant) from the ends at the
helm. To access the cable entries, my mechanic had to take out the
panel with the motor controls & gauges,  unscrew part of the  mechanical
system in which the cables are set and use a large sringe. This was done 4
years ago. While I have not noticed any oil appearing at the other end of
the cables (at the rudder post, under the bed) I presume that the oil
injected at 6 feet higher must be flowing in that direction and I suspect
that the grease inside the cables at the rudder end may also be sealing any
oil seepage.
Â
In addition, every few years I add grease (Superlube) to the helm
connection mechanism thru a grease nipple affixed to the side of the
system. I do not know if this nipple has been installed by Amel or a
previous owner? What is strange is that there is only one nipple and it
only lubricates the steering mecanism connected to the top cable! For the
bottom, grease was added with a screwdriver when attempting to inject oil
in the bottom cable!
Â
In 2005, I also changed the chain connecting the helm to the Neco
autopilot (it is only maintained as a backup, but it proved useful when,
between Gibraltar and Grand Canaria, the Autohelm ceased to work). Probably
I could have kept the original chain and just wash it with a degreaser, but
I easily found a replacement in a bicycle shop while docked in the Old Port
of Marseille.

Serge

V/ Opera, Mango #51

De : Conn Williamson <connwilliamson@...>
À : "amelyachtowners@..." <
amelyachtowners@...>
Envoyé le : jeudi 24 mai 2012 6h09
Objet : Re: [Amel] rudder cables


Â
How do you go about greasing them.
Conn Williamson
SV  Jasmyn Mango #28

________________________________
From: Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
To: Amel owners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Thursday, 24 May 2012 8:22 AM
Subject: [Amel] rudder cables

Â
After 20 years of service the rudder cables had to be replaced on my
Mango (#51), regretably one of the cables (Morse Type) broke just a day
before entering the Med after a pleasant Atlantic crossing, and the
emergency tiller had to be rigged and was used for a few days...

These cables must be greased, once in a while... and as an added
security, before crossing the Atlantic from the Med, I installed a
Autohelm electric pilot directly connected to one of the "tiller" arms
connected to the controling cables, so that in the event of problems at
the the helm, the autopilot could be used to steer.

Serge V/OperaÂ



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