Date   

Mainsail furler gearbox - Amel 54

Martin <yachtcaduceus@...>
 

It appears that ou mainsail furler gearbox has a major problem under mtor it makes noises as of a collapsed bearing and is more or less seized and very difficult to turn using a winch handle. I have removed it from the mast but am having difficulty breaking into it. Can anyone offer advice please. It may be that I will require a replacement from Amel but would like to see what exactly has gone wrong in the gearbox. I have the earlier mainsail furler where the motor projects from the mast, similar to the SM2000.

Regards,
Martin Bevan
Caduceus
Amel 54 #56
Maine, USA


Re: [Amel] SM2000 Bow Thruster Removal

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Hi thanks Due to some personal matters we are selling her there will. E another Amel before long.

Regards

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Jul 28, 2012, at 15:27, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk> wrote:

Hi Richard,

luckily I am well stocked with seals. But I like your idea which is well
timed as there are two old wet suits of mine on the floor behind me that
I was going to throw out tomorrow. I will cut some material off and keep
it on board just in case.

I will be refitting the bow thruster Monday once the anti fouling work
is complete and launching Tuesday.

Good luck with the sale. What next?

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader

On 28/07/2012 16:01, Richard03801 wrote:

Hi you've done well. In the event you can not get the unit our buy
8-10 mm thick wet suit material using a hole saw the approx size of
the tube make new seals for outside the hull. Slit the material on an
angle and glue them in place with the slits at 12:00 and 0600 that
should work. Do the same with the one inside and keep THE PIN IN WHEN
NOT IN USE.

Regards SM 209 for sale at a deal in Annapolis.

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Jul 28, 2012, at 3:24, Bob Parry <ra.parry2@gmail.com
<mailto:ra.parry2%40gmail.com>> wrote:

Hi Ian,

We wondered how you were getting on. The bow thruster is certainly
the most
frustrating piece of equipment. The anti-torque plate was on our
boat when
we bought it in 2004 but had not been fitted (our bow thruster is from
1990). That tended to indicate that the bow thruster had not been
serviced
for a while. It was fitted when we finally had the bow thruster serviced
and re-installed.

We found the drop method to be quite traumatic and decided to quit
before
we did damage. We might try it again when (if) the need arises but
we would
not persevere.

We found that there was no corrosion of the splines and our only problem
was corrosion of the motor base making it grip the tube.

We have followed the discussion of the seals with interest. The Turkish
mechanic replaced our seals with identical ones that he bought
locally. We
sailed from Turkey to Australia without a drop of water entering
until New
Caledonia. That included beating for a week into 15-20+ knots on our
passage from Panama to Galapagos. It will be interesting to see what has
happened to the seal to cause the problem.

As a point of interest, we unpin our bow thruster only when we are
using it.

Kind regards,

Ann and Bob Parry

Nowornot, SM#33
On Wed, Jul 25, 2012 at 10:35 PM, Ian Shepherd
<sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>>wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

it did not go well. In fact it took one and a half days to remove the
bow thruster despite being soaked in Corrosion Block and other
lubes for
almost a week before we tried to remove it. Here is the saga and a sure
way to get it out next time.

First we tried the drop method mentioned on this site. The only success
we had with this technique was to splinter the trunk fibreglass and
remove the skin off my hands!

Then we tied one end of a rope to the thruster just above the gearbox
and tied the other end to a 6 foot steel square sectioned tube. One end
of the tube tucked under the forward hull support trestle. Downward
pressure and several persuasive beatings with a wooden block did
move it
about 3/16th of an inch but no further. Just enough in fact so that the
securing pins would not go back in, leaving the boat unusable. No
turning back now. More solvent, more beatings but no more movement. The
end of the day came and I retired to bed to lick my wounds and curse
this bow thruster even more than I have in the past.

Next morning, thinking that the splines on the drive shaft must have
corroded, I decided to dismantle the gearbox so that we could withdraw
the tube downwards and the motor and shaft upwards. Having removed the
prop shaft and major planet gear wheel, the drive shaft then dropped
down an inch, so obviously it was not the splines causing the trouble
but the fibre tube stuck to the inside of the motor housing despite
being well greased as were the splines when I last serviced the unit.

It was now clear that we had to twist the motor relative to the shaft.
To do this, we removed the ant-torque plate from the underside of the
motor and repositioned it 90 degrees anticlockwise so that the two
prongs faced aft into the cabin. (You will have to move the bolt that
does not hold the plate to the motor one step anticlockwise too so that
it aligns with the hole in the plate). - For those who do not have this
plate, then you are out of luck. It was added to the design after my
sinking to stop the bow thruster tube failing. Amel rightly made
modification kits for all SM's fitted with the larger motor, and if you
don't have one, then I would thoroughly recommend getting one. For two
reasons now.

We found a 3 foot tube that fitted over the anti-torque plate
prongs and
tried to twist the motor against the tube. After a huge amount of
effort
and and extension bar, we moved it a little then sprayed more lube in
though the locking pin holes. Gradually it freed up some more, but the
thruster still refused to pull free despite the leverage of the 6 foot
bar beneath. After many futile attempts I got the mechanic to twist the
motor whilst I put all of my weight on the bar below and eventually we
got the bow thruster out. This method will work, providing you have the
means to twist the motor.

Examination of the tube revealed no pitting and there was very little
rust on the inside of the motor housing. I believe that it was just
made
too tight. It always was very difficult to locate the tube in the fully
home position in the motor housing. There was no rust on the motor
lower
bearing, or the splines, both being well greased.

As a precaution I have ground out the inside of the motor housing using
my Dremmel so that the fit is now more agricultural and less prone to
seizure. I will also reassemble it with Corrosion Block anti corrosion
grease instead of plain water proof grease once the trunk fibreglass
repair is complete. Hopefully such a nightmare will not happen again.
Maybe a contributary factor is that since modifying the bow thruster to
run in grease with sealed bearings, it has not been necessary to remove
it so frequently to get rid of the mayonnaise. The last removal was
almost three years ago. (See next post).

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Built 2003 Location Mediterranean


On 18/07/2012 08:17, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

Good luck with it. As you can imagine, the oil in ours was like
mayonnaise.
It still worked well and sounded fine but it was probably on a short
fuse.
We don't know why it started to leak on our way from New Caledonia
but it
seems logical that the seal was somehow damaged when we went to
the fuel
dock. Up until then, it had been bone dry.

Hope all goes well. We will be interested to hear how it went.

Regards,

Ann and Bob
Nowornot SM#33

On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 5:46 PM, Ian Shepherd
<sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

I was joking when I said lift the foredeck of course! I was just
imagining the car jack trying to lift it up as it generated
pressure. I
hope to start work on the thruster next Saturday when I am back in
Cyprus.

As I have filled my thruster with grease instead of oil, it would be
possible to do all the servicing without disconnecting from the
motor,
but I know that if I don't get it apart now and re-grease the
splines,
then I probably never will. Thanks for the reminder on the neoprene
seal. I will have a good look at that too.

On my first SM I built a rubber dam around the entry area to the
inside
of the boat and fitted drain tubes that connected to the anchor
locker
drain pipe. This reduced considerably the amount of water ending up
under the floor adjacent to the forward heads.

When the thruster arrangement was re-designed following my
sinking, the
later boats have a watertight compartment for the thruster that
drains
into the chain locker pipe. End of problem.

I will post my findings when I have dismantled the thruster to
see how
the grease worked out. Audibly, it seems fine after almost three
years
of use using grease.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 09:20, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

I don't know what you have envisaged about the process that was
used in
Yalikivak but we DID NOT remove the foredeck. They removed the bow
thruster
motor to give room to move at the top of the bow thruster (motor was
dismantled) and the whole thing was supported under the boat push
against
the action of the jack. The bow thruster was in the up position and
they
jacked the top section upwards, hence the need to remove the
motor. We
had
the boat for 5 years before we managed to get it fixed. We had tried
everything including the drop method with the only result being
consternation among other people in the boat yard.

We have a rubber seal as well as the foam ones. It is similar to the
seals
used in irrigation systems and it has the "open" side down to stop
inflow
of water. Ours had become so bad that we had to put a bulge pump
in the
bilge outside the forward head. We have since travelled from
Turkey to
Brisbane in Australia and had no water come in until the last
leg from
New
Caledonia. It appears that the seal has suffered some damage.
Dare say
we
will find out during our next haul out.

Regards,

Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 4:29 PM, Ian Shepherd<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

**


Hi Bo& Ann,
thanks for the info. I will try Bill's drop suggestion first before
trying to lift the foredeck! I presume by seal you mean the
foam seals
that go around the shaft? There is a correct way to fit them as I
believe that one side is harder than the other. Can you please
remind
me
of the correct way round? I would assume that the hard side is
glued
to
the top and bottom of the hole and the soft side faces down and
up? Or
is it the other way round?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 00:32, Bob Parry wrote:
We had the same problem on our 1990 Super Maramu. It was finally
fixed
by
an Englishman and his Turkish assistant in Yalikavak. They removed
the
motor to give room at the top and used a hydraulic car jack.
The jack
was
inside the boat and the Turkish assistant supported the bottom
outside
the
boat. It took a bit of effort but it worked. Whoever serviced it
before
we
bought the boat had put a seal in upside down and the steel
rim had
corroded and was holding the fibreglass? tube in a vice-like grip.

Good luck with it.
Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33 in Brisbane

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:38 AM, sv_crusader<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

**

I am having difficulty removing my bow thruster to service it. It
seems
well and truly stuck when I try to pull it out of the boat. I
have
sprayed
the tube/motor housing connection with Corrosion Block and other
products
in the hope that it will free up in a few days, but I suspect the
shaft
splines may be corroded despite greasing them the last time
it was
assembled.

Has anyone discovered a way of freeing up the unit without
doing any
damage? The boat is on the hard (at your last haul out spot Bill&
Judy).
Ian Shepherd SM2000 414 Crusader Built 2003 Med





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Re: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi John,

I am getting close to running out of adjustment of the pressure setting
knob on my 160 l/h. Filters are new but I can only just bring the
pressure into the green band. It may be due to the very warm sea
temperatures at present, but I am wondering it it also may be due to
high pressure pump wear? The oil is changed every 200 hours. Total hours
are around 500.

Any thoughts?

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader Built 2003

On 27/07/2012 13:48, Anne and John Hollamby wrote:

The Email address for Martin is desaladoratyahoo .es as I see that
Yahoo cut it short in my message. John, SM319

From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe
Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 2:43 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H

Kilkea II,

The capacitor on BeBe's 160l Dessalator Low Pressure pump is rated at
12.5 microfarads (&#956;F or MFD). The voltage should be 460 to 500
volts. You will need a pigtail from the capacitor of about 6" to 8".
If you cannot get one that attaches like the original (nut threaded to
the end of the cap), you can wire-tie the cap to the motor housing.

Be sure to attach the wires to the same terminals on the motor as the
original cap. There is no polarity of the capacitor wires, but if you
wire it to the wrong terminals, it may cause the generator to stall.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Turkey

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "Anne and John
Hollamby" <annejohnholl@...> wrote:

I do not know owing to the strange habit of either Amel or
Dessalador of painting the capacitors so it is impossible to see what
size they are.
I suggest that you Email Martin de Jong who is their agent in Spain
and ask him. He is incredibly helpful and prompt in replying about any
problem relating to their watermakers. desalador@... I do know that
the capacitors on the high pressure motor are 30mfd each and 7cms x
4.5cms as a techie replaced them with ones 14 cms long and these made
the genset stall. Luckily I had kept the old ones!

Good starts, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM 319, Sicily

From: kilkea_2
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:54 PM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H


Hello we are in need of a capacitor/condensor but do not have the
specs and apparently it is important to have the right one. If anyone
know the specs of the capacitor would you please let us know.
Kilkea II #466





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] (unknown)

Ian Shepherd
 

Oh Oh,

this is spam. Looks like someone's account has been hijacked and needs
to have a yahoo password change.

Ian Shepherd


Re: [Amel] Re: MARAMU BEST SOLAR PANELS POSITION

Ian Shepherd
 

John,

I should have added that I don't use the clamps to hold the panels in
position. They merely act as hinges. The shock cord down to the mizzen
preventer attachment bracket via a snap shackle tensions one side and
the small diameter rope attached to the same point then led up to the
inside edge of the panel via a miniature jammer allows rapid adjustment
of the angle.

When the wind gets strong I lead the shock cord through the attachment
bracket and clip the shackle onto the lower horizontal stanchion wire
(life line) which gives sufficient extra tension.

When the panels are 'parked' in the vertical position for docking, the
shock cord holds then in place as it is stretched downwards and the
panels are slightly over centre.

What I have not been able to overcome is clumsy sailors backing into the
panels when mooring stern to alongside my boat! I am looking for some
attractive reflective tape to make the front edge of the panels more
obvious. This is the downside of rail mounting them and using them in port.

To overcome the shadow problem, I have considered adding sockets to the
connection boxes under the panels and making up jump leads so that on a
long passage, both panels could be mounted on the same side and wired in
parallel.

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader

On 27/07/2012 22:09, jjjk12s wrote:


I should add that we swivel our panel vertically out of the way
outside the rail not inside. If the ladder is on the same side it can
still swing out of the way but not quite vertical. It can be swung
inside as well of course. There is enough friction in the clamps that
no other means of securing the panels is used. I don't find shading a
big problem but it depends how much power you want, ie trickle charge,
top up other power source (our situation) or maximum possible.

The price of panels has come down a lot. I put a system on my house 2
years ago and now the same panels cost a lot less.

John #91 Maramu

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>, "jjjk12s" <jjjk12s@...> wrote:

Andy,

I have one solar panel mounted on the starboard rail. It swivels
vertically out of the way otherwise the angle can be adjusted to the
sun. It is easy to route the wires and a simple system. I like it. It
would be possible to do the other side too but then the ladder is on
that side and it would not be possible to put the panel vertical, not
a big problem. Doing it this way there is hardly any expense of
mounting so if you decided later to add a stern arch mounting not much
money has been spent. Another location could be the top of the dodger
but we like using that area. The number of panels depends upon what
you want to achieve.

Regards

John

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>, "Andy" <allezaubon@> wrote:

dear all ,especially Maramu owners, we are debating the pro's and
con's of various positions for mounting solar panels on our Maramu
-the two favorites are horizontally over our soft Bimini or on port
and starboard aft pushpits / rails / stanchions - how many solar
panels ? We have been thinking ~200W to 400W. 32 - 36 cells - Are the
number of cells critical , or as there are so many other factors such
as shading, this point is over emphasized ?? Looking forward to your
knowlegable feedback. Thanks in advance , Andy


Re: [Amel] SM2000 Bow Thruster Removal

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Richard,

luckily I am well stocked with seals. But I like your idea which is well
timed as there are two old wet suits of mine on the floor behind me that
I was going to throw out tomorrow. I will cut some material off and keep
it on board just in case.

I will be refitting the bow thruster Monday once the anti fouling work
is complete and launching Tuesday.

Good luck with the sale. What next?

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader

On 28/07/2012 16:01, Richard03801 wrote:

Hi you've done well. In the event you can not get the unit our buy
8-10 mm thick wet suit material using a hole saw the approx size of
the tube make new seals for outside the hull. Slit the material on an
angle and glue them in place with the slits at 12:00 and 0600 that
should work. Do the same with the one inside and keep THE PIN IN WHEN
NOT IN USE.

Regards SM 209 for sale at a deal in Annapolis.

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Jul 28, 2012, at 3:24, Bob Parry <ra.parry2@gmail.com
<mailto:ra.parry2%40gmail.com>> wrote:

Hi Ian,

We wondered how you were getting on. The bow thruster is certainly
the most
frustrating piece of equipment. The anti-torque plate was on our
boat when
we bought it in 2004 but had not been fitted (our bow thruster is from
1990). That tended to indicate that the bow thruster had not been
serviced
for a while. It was fitted when we finally had the bow thruster serviced
and re-installed.

We found the drop method to be quite traumatic and decided to quit
before
we did damage. We might try it again when (if) the need arises but
we would
not persevere.

We found that there was no corrosion of the splines and our only problem
was corrosion of the motor base making it grip the tube.

We have followed the discussion of the seals with interest. The Turkish
mechanic replaced our seals with identical ones that he bought
locally. We
sailed from Turkey to Australia without a drop of water entering
until New
Caledonia. That included beating for a week into 15-20+ knots on our
passage from Panama to Galapagos. It will be interesting to see what has
happened to the seal to cause the problem.

As a point of interest, we unpin our bow thruster only when we are
using it.

Kind regards,

Ann and Bob Parry

Nowornot, SM#33
On Wed, Jul 25, 2012 at 10:35 PM, Ian Shepherd
<sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>>wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

it did not go well. In fact it took one and a half days to remove the
bow thruster despite being soaked in Corrosion Block and other
lubes for
almost a week before we tried to remove it. Here is the saga and a sure
way to get it out next time.

First we tried the drop method mentioned on this site. The only success
we had with this technique was to splinter the trunk fibreglass and
remove the skin off my hands!

Then we tied one end of a rope to the thruster just above the gearbox
and tied the other end to a 6 foot steel square sectioned tube. One end
of the tube tucked under the forward hull support trestle. Downward
pressure and several persuasive beatings with a wooden block did
move it
about 3/16th of an inch but no further. Just enough in fact so that the
securing pins would not go back in, leaving the boat unusable. No
turning back now. More solvent, more beatings but no more movement. The
end of the day came and I retired to bed to lick my wounds and curse
this bow thruster even more than I have in the past.

Next morning, thinking that the splines on the drive shaft must have
corroded, I decided to dismantle the gearbox so that we could withdraw
the tube downwards and the motor and shaft upwards. Having removed the
prop shaft and major planet gear wheel, the drive shaft then dropped
down an inch, so obviously it was not the splines causing the trouble
but the fibre tube stuck to the inside of the motor housing despite
being well greased as were the splines when I last serviced the unit.

It was now clear that we had to twist the motor relative to the shaft.
To do this, we removed the ant-torque plate from the underside of the
motor and repositioned it 90 degrees anticlockwise so that the two
prongs faced aft into the cabin. (You will have to move the bolt that
does not hold the plate to the motor one step anticlockwise too so that
it aligns with the hole in the plate). - For those who do not have this
plate, then you are out of luck. It was added to the design after my
sinking to stop the bow thruster tube failing. Amel rightly made
modification kits for all SM's fitted with the larger motor, and if you
don't have one, then I would thoroughly recommend getting one. For two
reasons now.

We found a 3 foot tube that fitted over the anti-torque plate
prongs and
tried to twist the motor against the tube. After a huge amount of
effort
and and extension bar, we moved it a little then sprayed more lube in
though the locking pin holes. Gradually it freed up some more, but the
thruster still refused to pull free despite the leverage of the 6 foot
bar beneath. After many futile attempts I got the mechanic to twist the
motor whilst I put all of my weight on the bar below and eventually we
got the bow thruster out. This method will work, providing you have the
means to twist the motor.

Examination of the tube revealed no pitting and there was very little
rust on the inside of the motor housing. I believe that it was just
made
too tight. It always was very difficult to locate the tube in the fully
home position in the motor housing. There was no rust on the motor
lower
bearing, or the splines, both being well greased.

As a precaution I have ground out the inside of the motor housing using
my Dremmel so that the fit is now more agricultural and less prone to
seizure. I will also reassemble it with Corrosion Block anti corrosion
grease instead of plain water proof grease once the trunk fibreglass
repair is complete. Hopefully such a nightmare will not happen again.
Maybe a contributary factor is that since modifying the bow thruster to
run in grease with sealed bearings, it has not been necessary to remove
it so frequently to get rid of the mayonnaise. The last removal was
almost three years ago. (See next post).

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Built 2003 Location Mediterranean


On 18/07/2012 08:17, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

Good luck with it. As you can imagine, the oil in ours was like
mayonnaise.
It still worked well and sounded fine but it was probably on a short
fuse.
We don't know why it started to leak on our way from New Caledonia
but it
seems logical that the seal was somehow damaged when we went to
the fuel
dock. Up until then, it had been bone dry.

Hope all goes well. We will be interested to hear how it went.

Regards,

Ann and Bob
Nowornot SM#33

On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 5:46 PM, Ian Shepherd
<sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

I was joking when I said lift the foredeck of course! I was just
imagining the car jack trying to lift it up as it generated
pressure. I
hope to start work on the thruster next Saturday when I am back in
Cyprus.

As I have filled my thruster with grease instead of oil, it would be
possible to do all the servicing without disconnecting from the
motor,
but I know that if I don't get it apart now and re-grease the
splines,
then I probably never will. Thanks for the reminder on the neoprene
seal. I will have a good look at that too.

On my first SM I built a rubber dam around the entry area to the
inside
of the boat and fitted drain tubes that connected to the anchor
locker
drain pipe. This reduced considerably the amount of water ending up
under the floor adjacent to the forward heads.

When the thruster arrangement was re-designed following my
sinking, the
later boats have a watertight compartment for the thruster that
drains
into the chain locker pipe. End of problem.

I will post my findings when I have dismantled the thruster to
see how
the grease worked out. Audibly, it seems fine after almost three
years
of use using grease.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 09:20, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

I don't know what you have envisaged about the process that was
used in
Yalikivak but we DID NOT remove the foredeck. They removed the bow
thruster
motor to give room to move at the top of the bow thruster (motor was
dismantled) and the whole thing was supported under the boat push
against
the action of the jack. The bow thruster was in the up position and
they
jacked the top section upwards, hence the need to remove the
motor. We
had
the boat for 5 years before we managed to get it fixed. We had tried
everything including the drop method with the only result being
consternation among other people in the boat yard.

We have a rubber seal as well as the foam ones. It is similar to the
seals
used in irrigation systems and it has the "open" side down to stop
inflow
of water. Ours had become so bad that we had to put a bulge pump
in the
bilge outside the forward head. We have since travelled from
Turkey to
Brisbane in Australia and had no water come in until the last
leg from
New
Caledonia. It appears that the seal has suffered some damage.
Dare say
we
will find out during our next haul out.

Regards,

Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 4:29 PM, Ian Shepherd<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

**


Hi Bo& Ann,
thanks for the info. I will try Bill's drop suggestion first before
trying to lift the foredeck! I presume by seal you mean the
foam seals
that go around the shaft? There is a correct way to fit them as I
believe that one side is harder than the other. Can you please
remind
me
of the correct way round? I would assume that the hard side is
glued
to
the top and bottom of the hole and the soft side faces down and
up? Or
is it the other way round?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 00:32, Bob Parry wrote:
We had the same problem on our 1990 Super Maramu. It was finally
fixed
by
an Englishman and his Turkish assistant in Yalikavak. They removed
the
motor to give room at the top and used a hydraulic car jack.
The jack
was
inside the boat and the Turkish assistant supported the bottom
outside
the
boat. It took a bit of effort but it worked. Whoever serviced it
before
we
bought the boat had put a seal in upside down and the steel
rim had
corroded and was holding the fibreglass? tube in a vice-like grip.

Good luck with it.
Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33 in Brisbane

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:38 AM, sv_crusader<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk <mailto:sv_freespirit%40yahoo.co.uk>
wrote:

**

I am having difficulty removing my bow thruster to service it. It
seems
well and truly stuck when I try to pull it out of the boat. I
have
sprayed
the tube/motor housing connection with Corrosion Block and other
products
in the hope that it will free up in a few days, but I suspect the
shaft
splines may be corroded despite greasing them the last time
it was
assembled.

Has anyone discovered a way of freeing up the unit without
doing any
damage? The boat is on the hard (at your last haul out spot Bill&
Judy).
Ian Shepherd SM2000 414 Crusader Built 2003 Med





------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links






------------------------------------

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------------------------------------

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Re: [Amel] SM2000 Bow Thruster Removal

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Bob,

I agree. The bow thruster is the Achilles Heel of an otherwise fine boat. Nothing else in 58 years of sailing has brought me closer to to quitting.

Interesting that your point of stiction was also at the tube to motor housing joint. It begs the question as to whether it would be worth while opening up the housing some more and gluing a plastic sleeve to the inside of the motor so that the tube will be sliding into a non metallic rust free opening? Hopefully, having ground the motor casing hole to a larger size and adding anti corrosion grease, my problems will not happen again easily, but if they do, then I may try to do something more positive about it as outlined above.

Like you, I keep my thruster pinned when not in use. Regarding the tube to trunk seal, it is interesting that Amel supplied a spring-less lip seal. I guess they reason that the spring won't last long facing downwards to the sea.

Wishing you trouble free maintenance and dry bilges.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader Built 2003 LOcation Eastern Med

On 28/07/2012 07:24, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

We wondered how you were getting on. The bow thruster is certainly the most
frustrating piece of equipment. The anti-torque plate was on our boat when
we bought it in 2004 but had not been fitted (our bow thruster is from
1990). That tended to indicate that the bow thruster had not been serviced
for a while. It was fitted when we finally had the bow thruster serviced
and re-installed.

We found the drop method to be quite traumatic and decided to quit before
we did damage. We might try it again when (if) the need arises but we would
not persevere.

We found that there was no corrosion of the splines and our only problem
was corrosion of the motor base making it grip the tube.

We have followed the discussion of the seals with interest. The Turkish
mechanic replaced our seals with identical ones that he bought locally. We
sailed from Turkey to Australia without a drop of water entering until New
Caledonia. That included beating for a week into 15-20+ knots on our
passage from Panama to Galapagos. It will be interesting to see what has
happened to the seal to cause the problem.

As a point of interest, we unpin our bow thruster only when we are using it.

Kind regards,

Ann and Bob Parry

Nowornot, SM#33
On Wed, Jul 25, 2012 at 10:35 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk>wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

it did not go well. In fact it took one and a half days to remove the
bow thruster despite being soaked in Corrosion Block and other lubes for
almost a week before we tried to remove it. Here is the saga and a sure
way to get it out next time.

First we tried the drop method mentioned on this site. The only success
we had with this technique was to splinter the trunk fibreglass and
remove the skin off my hands!

Then we tied one end of a rope to the thruster just above the gearbox
and tied the other end to a 6 foot steel square sectioned tube. One end
of the tube tucked under the forward hull support trestle. Downward
pressure and several persuasive beatings with a wooden block did move it
about 3/16th of an inch but no further. Just enough in fact so that the
securing pins would not go back in, leaving the boat unusable. No
turning back now. More solvent, more beatings but no more movement. The
end of the day came and I retired to bed to lick my wounds and curse
this bow thruster even more than I have in the past.

Next morning, thinking that the splines on the drive shaft must have
corroded, I decided to dismantle the gearbox so that we could withdraw
the tube downwards and the motor and shaft upwards. Having removed the
prop shaft and major planet gear wheel, the drive shaft then dropped
down an inch, so obviously it was not the splines causing the trouble
but the fibre tube stuck to the inside of the motor housing despite
being well greased as were the splines when I last serviced the unit.

It was now clear that we had to twist the motor relative to the shaft.
To do this, we removed the ant-torque plate from the underside of the
motor and repositioned it 90 degrees anticlockwise so that the two
prongs faced aft into the cabin. (You will have to move the bolt that
does not hold the plate to the motor one step anticlockwise too so that
it aligns with the hole in the plate). - For those who do not have this
plate, then you are out of luck. It was added to the design after my
sinking to stop the bow thruster tube failing. Amel rightly made
modification kits for all SM's fitted with the larger motor, and if you
don't have one, then I would thoroughly recommend getting one. For two
reasons now.

We found a 3 foot tube that fitted over the anti-torque plate prongs and
tried to twist the motor against the tube. After a huge amount of effort
and and extension bar, we moved it a little then sprayed more lube in
though the locking pin holes. Gradually it freed up some more, but the
thruster still refused to pull free despite the leverage of the 6 foot
bar beneath. After many futile attempts I got the mechanic to twist the
motor whilst I put all of my weight on the bar below and eventually we
got the bow thruster out. This method will work, providing you have the
means to twist the motor.

Examination of the tube revealed no pitting and there was very little
rust on the inside of the motor housing. I believe that it was just made
too tight. It always was very difficult to locate the tube in the fully
home position in the motor housing. There was no rust on the motor lower
bearing, or the splines, both being well greased.

As a precaution I have ground out the inside of the motor housing using
my Dremmel so that the fit is now more agricultural and less prone to
seizure. I will also reassemble it with Corrosion Block anti corrosion
grease instead of plain water proof grease once the trunk fibreglass
repair is complete. Hopefully such a nightmare will not happen again.
Maybe a contributary factor is that since modifying the bow thruster to
run in grease with sealed bearings, it has not been necessary to remove
it so frequently to get rid of the mayonnaise. The last removal was
almost three years ago. (See next post).

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Built 2003 Location Mediterranean


On 18/07/2012 08:17, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

Good luck with it. As you can imagine, the oil in ours was like
mayonnaise.
It still worked well and sounded fine but it was probably on a short
fuse.
We don't know why it started to leak on our way from New Caledonia but it
seems logical that the seal was somehow damaged when we went to the fuel
dock. Up until then, it had been bone dry.

Hope all goes well. We will be interested to hear how it went.

Regards,

Ann and Bob
Nowornot SM#33

On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 5:46 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**

Hi Bob,

I was joking when I said lift the foredeck of course! I was just
imagining the car jack trying to lift it up as it generated pressure. I
hope to start work on the thruster next Saturday when I am back in
Cyprus.
As I have filled my thruster with grease instead of oil, it would be
possible to do all the servicing without disconnecting from the motor,
but I know that if I don't get it apart now and re-grease the splines,
then I probably never will. Thanks for the reminder on the neoprene
seal. I will have a good look at that too.

On my first SM I built a rubber dam around the entry area to the inside
of the boat and fitted drain tubes that connected to the anchor locker
drain pipe. This reduced considerably the amount of water ending up
under the floor adjacent to the forward heads.

When the thruster arrangement was re-designed following my sinking, the
later boats have a watertight compartment for the thruster that drains
into the chain locker pipe. End of problem.

I will post my findings when I have dismantled the thruster to see how
the grease worked out. Audibly, it seems fine after almost three years
of use using grease.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 09:20, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

I don't know what you have envisaged about the process that was used in
Yalikivak but we DID NOT remove the foredeck. They removed the bow
thruster
motor to give room to move at the top of the bow thruster (motor was
dismantled) and the whole thing was supported under the boat push
against
the action of the jack. The bow thruster was in the up position and
they
jacked the top section upwards, hence the need to remove the motor. We
had
the boat for 5 years before we managed to get it fixed. We had tried
everything including the drop method with the only result being
consternation among other people in the boat yard.

We have a rubber seal as well as the foam ones. It is similar to the
seals
used in irrigation systems and it has the "open" side down to stop
inflow
of water. Ours had become so bad that we had to put a bulge pump in the
bilge outside the forward head. We have since travelled from Turkey to
Brisbane in Australia and had no water come in until the last leg from
New
Caledonia. It appears that the seal has suffered some damage. Dare say
we
will find out during our next haul out.

Regards,

Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 4:29 PM, Ian Shepherd<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**


Hi Bo& Ann,
thanks for the info. I will try Bill's drop suggestion first before
trying to lift the foredeck! I presume by seal you mean the foam seals
that go around the shaft? There is a correct way to fit them as I
believe that one side is harder than the other. Can you please remind
me
of the correct way round? I would assume that the hard side is glued
to
the top and bottom of the hole and the soft side faces down and up? Or
is it the other way round?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 00:32, Bob Parry wrote:
We had the same problem on our 1990 Super Maramu. It was finally
fixed
by
an Englishman and his Turkish assistant in Yalikavak. They removed
the
motor to give room at the top and used a hydraulic car jack. The jack
was
inside the boat and the Turkish assistant supported the bottom
outside
the
boat. It took a bit of effort but it worked. Whoever serviced it
before
we
bought the boat had put a seal in upside down and the steel rim had
corroded and was holding the fibreglass? tube in a vice-like grip.

Good luck with it.
Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33 in Brisbane

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:38 AM, sv_crusader<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**

I am having difficulty removing my bow thruster to service it. It
seems
well and truly stuck when I try to pull it out of the boat. I have
sprayed
the tube/motor housing connection with Corrosion Block and other
products
in the hope that it will free up in a few days, but I suspect the
shaft
splines may be corroded despite greasing them the last time it was
assembled.

Has anyone discovered a way of freeing up the unit without doing any
damage? The boat is on the hard (at your last haul out spot Bill&
Judy).
Ian Shepherd SM2000 414 Crusader Built 2003 Med




------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links





------------------------------------

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------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links






------------------------------------

Yahoo! Groups Links




Re: [Amel] SM2000 Bow Thruster Removal

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Hi you've done well. In the event you can not get the unit our buy 8-10 mm thick wet suit material using a hole saw the approx size of the tube make new seals for outside the hull. Slit the material on an angle and glue them in place with the slits at 12:00 and 0600 that should work. Do the same with the one inside and keep THE PIN IN WHEN NOT IN USE.

Regards SM 209 for sale at a deal in Annapolis.

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Jul 28, 2012, at 3:24, Bob Parry <ra.parry2@gmail.com> wrote:

Hi Ian,

We wondered how you were getting on. The bow thruster is certainly the most
frustrating piece of equipment. The anti-torque plate was on our boat when
we bought it in 2004 but had not been fitted (our bow thruster is from
1990). That tended to indicate that the bow thruster had not been serviced
for a while. It was fitted when we finally had the bow thruster serviced
and re-installed.

We found the drop method to be quite traumatic and decided to quit before
we did damage. We might try it again when (if) the need arises but we would
not persevere.

We found that there was no corrosion of the splines and our only problem
was corrosion of the motor base making it grip the tube.

We have followed the discussion of the seals with interest. The Turkish
mechanic replaced our seals with identical ones that he bought locally. We
sailed from Turkey to Australia without a drop of water entering until New
Caledonia. That included beating for a week into 15-20+ knots on our
passage from Panama to Galapagos. It will be interesting to see what has
happened to the seal to cause the problem.

As a point of interest, we unpin our bow thruster only when we are using it.

Kind regards,

Ann and Bob Parry

Nowornot, SM#33
On Wed, Jul 25, 2012 at 10:35 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk>wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

it did not go well. In fact it took one and a half days to remove the
bow thruster despite being soaked in Corrosion Block and other lubes for
almost a week before we tried to remove it. Here is the saga and a sure
way to get it out next time.

First we tried the drop method mentioned on this site. The only success
we had with this technique was to splinter the trunk fibreglass and
remove the skin off my hands!

Then we tied one end of a rope to the thruster just above the gearbox
and tied the other end to a 6 foot steel square sectioned tube. One end
of the tube tucked under the forward hull support trestle. Downward
pressure and several persuasive beatings with a wooden block did move it
about 3/16th of an inch but no further. Just enough in fact so that the
securing pins would not go back in, leaving the boat unusable. No
turning back now. More solvent, more beatings but no more movement. The
end of the day came and I retired to bed to lick my wounds and curse
this bow thruster even more than I have in the past.

Next morning, thinking that the splines on the drive shaft must have
corroded, I decided to dismantle the gearbox so that we could withdraw
the tube downwards and the motor and shaft upwards. Having removed the
prop shaft and major planet gear wheel, the drive shaft then dropped
down an inch, so obviously it was not the splines causing the trouble
but the fibre tube stuck to the inside of the motor housing despite
being well greased as were the splines when I last serviced the unit.

It was now clear that we had to twist the motor relative to the shaft.
To do this, we removed the ant-torque plate from the underside of the
motor and repositioned it 90 degrees anticlockwise so that the two
prongs faced aft into the cabin. (You will have to move the bolt that
does not hold the plate to the motor one step anticlockwise too so that
it aligns with the hole in the plate). - For those who do not have this
plate, then you are out of luck. It was added to the design after my
sinking to stop the bow thruster tube failing. Amel rightly made
modification kits for all SM's fitted with the larger motor, and if you
don't have one, then I would thoroughly recommend getting one. For two
reasons now.

We found a 3 foot tube that fitted over the anti-torque plate prongs and
tried to twist the motor against the tube. After a huge amount of effort
and and extension bar, we moved it a little then sprayed more lube in
though the locking pin holes. Gradually it freed up some more, but the
thruster still refused to pull free despite the leverage of the 6 foot
bar beneath. After many futile attempts I got the mechanic to twist the
motor whilst I put all of my weight on the bar below and eventually we
got the bow thruster out. This method will work, providing you have the
means to twist the motor.

Examination of the tube revealed no pitting and there was very little
rust on the inside of the motor housing. I believe that it was just made
too tight. It always was very difficult to locate the tube in the fully
home position in the motor housing. There was no rust on the motor lower
bearing, or the splines, both being well greased.

As a precaution I have ground out the inside of the motor housing using
my Dremmel so that the fit is now more agricultural and less prone to
seizure. I will also reassemble it with Corrosion Block anti corrosion
grease instead of plain water proof grease once the trunk fibreglass
repair is complete. Hopefully such a nightmare will not happen again.
Maybe a contributary factor is that since modifying the bow thruster to
run in grease with sealed bearings, it has not been necessary to remove
it so frequently to get rid of the mayonnaise. The last removal was
almost three years ago. (See next post).

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Built 2003 Location Mediterranean


On 18/07/2012 08:17, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

Good luck with it. As you can imagine, the oil in ours was like
mayonnaise.
It still worked well and sounded fine but it was probably on a short
fuse.
We don't know why it started to leak on our way from New Caledonia but it
seems logical that the seal was somehow damaged when we went to the fuel
dock. Up until then, it had been bone dry.

Hope all goes well. We will be interested to hear how it went.

Regards,

Ann and Bob
Nowornot SM#33

On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 5:46 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

I was joking when I said lift the foredeck of course! I was just
imagining the car jack trying to lift it up as it generated pressure. I
hope to start work on the thruster next Saturday when I am back in
Cyprus.

As I have filled my thruster with grease instead of oil, it would be
possible to do all the servicing without disconnecting from the motor,
but I know that if I don't get it apart now and re-grease the splines,
then I probably never will. Thanks for the reminder on the neoprene
seal. I will have a good look at that too.

On my first SM I built a rubber dam around the entry area to the inside
of the boat and fitted drain tubes that connected to the anchor locker
drain pipe. This reduced considerably the amount of water ending up
under the floor adjacent to the forward heads.

When the thruster arrangement was re-designed following my sinking, the
later boats have a watertight compartment for the thruster that drains
into the chain locker pipe. End of problem.

I will post my findings when I have dismantled the thruster to see how
the grease worked out. Audibly, it seems fine after almost three years
of use using grease.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 09:20, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

I don't know what you have envisaged about the process that was used in
Yalikivak but we DID NOT remove the foredeck. They removed the bow
thruster
motor to give room to move at the top of the bow thruster (motor was
dismantled) and the whole thing was supported under the boat push
against
the action of the jack. The bow thruster was in the up position and
they
jacked the top section upwards, hence the need to remove the motor. We
had
the boat for 5 years before we managed to get it fixed. We had tried
everything including the drop method with the only result being
consternation among other people in the boat yard.

We have a rubber seal as well as the foam ones. It is similar to the
seals
used in irrigation systems and it has the "open" side down to stop
inflow
of water. Ours had become so bad that we had to put a bulge pump in the
bilge outside the forward head. We have since travelled from Turkey to
Brisbane in Australia and had no water come in until the last leg from
New
Caledonia. It appears that the seal has suffered some damage. Dare say
we
will find out during our next haul out.

Regards,

Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 4:29 PM, Ian Shepherd<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**


Hi Bo& Ann,
thanks for the info. I will try Bill's drop suggestion first before
trying to lift the foredeck! I presume by seal you mean the foam seals
that go around the shaft? There is a correct way to fit them as I
believe that one side is harder than the other. Can you please remind
me
of the correct way round? I would assume that the hard side is glued
to
the top and bottom of the hole and the soft side faces down and up? Or
is it the other way round?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 00:32, Bob Parry wrote:
We had the same problem on our 1990 Super Maramu. It was finally
fixed
by
an Englishman and his Turkish assistant in Yalikavak. They removed
the
motor to give room at the top and used a hydraulic car jack. The jack
was
inside the boat and the Turkish assistant supported the bottom
outside
the
boat. It took a bit of effort but it worked. Whoever serviced it
before
we
bought the boat had put a seal in upside down and the steel rim had
corroded and was holding the fibreglass? tube in a vice-like grip.

Good luck with it.
Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33 in Brisbane

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:38 AM, sv_crusader<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**

I am having difficulty removing my bow thruster to service it. It
seems
well and truly stuck when I try to pull it out of the boat. I have
sprayed
the tube/motor housing connection with Corrosion Block and other
products
in the hope that it will free up in a few days, but I suspect the
shaft
splines may be corroded despite greasing them the last time it was
assembled.

Has anyone discovered a way of freeing up the unit without doing any
damage? The boat is on the hard (at your last haul out spot Bill&
Judy).
Ian Shepherd SM2000 414 Crusader Built 2003 Med


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



------------------------------------

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(No subject)

nezih nezih
 


Re: [Amel] SM2000 Bow Thruster Removal

bobparry1947
 

Hi Ian,

We wondered how you were getting on. The bow thruster is certainly the most
frustrating piece of equipment. The anti-torque plate was on our boat when
we bought it in 2004 but had not been fitted (our bow thruster is from
1990). That tended to indicate that the bow thruster had not been serviced
for a while. It was fitted when we finally had the bow thruster serviced
and re-installed.

We found the drop method to be quite traumatic and decided to quit before
we did damage. We might try it again when (if) the need arises but we would
not persevere.

We found that there was no corrosion of the splines and our only problem
was corrosion of the motor base making it grip the tube.

We have followed the discussion of the seals with interest. The Turkish
mechanic replaced our seals with identical ones that he bought locally. We
sailed from Turkey to Australia without a drop of water entering until New
Caledonia. That included beating for a week into 15-20+ knots on our
passage from Panama to Galapagos. It will be interesting to see what has
happened to the seal to cause the problem.

As a point of interest, we unpin our bow thruster only when we are using it.

Kind regards,

Ann and Bob Parry

Nowornot, SM#33
On Wed, Jul 25, 2012 at 10:35 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk>wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

it did not go well. In fact it took one and a half days to remove the
bow thruster despite being soaked in Corrosion Block and other lubes for
almost a week before we tried to remove it. Here is the saga and a sure
way to get it out next time.

First we tried the drop method mentioned on this site. The only success
we had with this technique was to splinter the trunk fibreglass and
remove the skin off my hands!

Then we tied one end of a rope to the thruster just above the gearbox
and tied the other end to a 6 foot steel square sectioned tube. One end
of the tube tucked under the forward hull support trestle. Downward
pressure and several persuasive beatings with a wooden block did move it
about 3/16th of an inch but no further. Just enough in fact so that the
securing pins would not go back in, leaving the boat unusable. No
turning back now. More solvent, more beatings but no more movement. The
end of the day came and I retired to bed to lick my wounds and curse
this bow thruster even more than I have in the past.

Next morning, thinking that the splines on the drive shaft must have
corroded, I decided to dismantle the gearbox so that we could withdraw
the tube downwards and the motor and shaft upwards. Having removed the
prop shaft and major planet gear wheel, the drive shaft then dropped
down an inch, so obviously it was not the splines causing the trouble
but the fibre tube stuck to the inside of the motor housing despite
being well greased as were the splines when I last serviced the unit.

It was now clear that we had to twist the motor relative to the shaft.
To do this, we removed the ant-torque plate from the underside of the
motor and repositioned it 90 degrees anticlockwise so that the two
prongs faced aft into the cabin. (You will have to move the bolt that
does not hold the plate to the motor one step anticlockwise too so that
it aligns with the hole in the plate). - For those who do not have this
plate, then you are out of luck. It was added to the design after my
sinking to stop the bow thruster tube failing. Amel rightly made
modification kits for all SM's fitted with the larger motor, and if you
don't have one, then I would thoroughly recommend getting one. For two
reasons now.

We found a 3 foot tube that fitted over the anti-torque plate prongs and
tried to twist the motor against the tube. After a huge amount of effort
and and extension bar, we moved it a little then sprayed more lube in
though the locking pin holes. Gradually it freed up some more, but the
thruster still refused to pull free despite the leverage of the 6 foot
bar beneath. After many futile attempts I got the mechanic to twist the
motor whilst I put all of my weight on the bar below and eventually we
got the bow thruster out. This method will work, providing you have the
means to twist the motor.

Examination of the tube revealed no pitting and there was very little
rust on the inside of the motor housing. I believe that it was just made
too tight. It always was very difficult to locate the tube in the fully
home position in the motor housing. There was no rust on the motor lower
bearing, or the splines, both being well greased.

As a precaution I have ground out the inside of the motor housing using
my Dremmel so that the fit is now more agricultural and less prone to
seizure. I will also reassemble it with Corrosion Block anti corrosion
grease instead of plain water proof grease once the trunk fibreglass
repair is complete. Hopefully such a nightmare will not happen again.
Maybe a contributary factor is that since modifying the bow thruster to
run in grease with sealed bearings, it has not been necessary to remove
it so frequently to get rid of the mayonnaise. The last removal was
almost three years ago. (See next post).

Ian Shepherd SM2000 #414 Built 2003 Location Mediterranean


On 18/07/2012 08:17, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

Good luck with it. As you can imagine, the oil in ours was like
mayonnaise.
It still worked well and sounded fine but it was probably on a short
fuse.
We don't know why it started to leak on our way from New Caledonia but it
seems logical that the seal was somehow damaged when we went to the fuel
dock. Up until then, it had been bone dry.

Hope all goes well. We will be interested to hear how it went.

Regards,

Ann and Bob
Nowornot SM#33

On Wed, Jul 18, 2012 at 5:46 PM, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**


Hi Bob,

I was joking when I said lift the foredeck of course! I was just
imagining the car jack trying to lift it up as it generated pressure. I
hope to start work on the thruster next Saturday when I am back in
Cyprus.

As I have filled my thruster with grease instead of oil, it would be
possible to do all the servicing without disconnecting from the motor,
but I know that if I don't get it apart now and re-grease the splines,
then I probably never will. Thanks for the reminder on the neoprene
seal. I will have a good look at that too.

On my first SM I built a rubber dam around the entry area to the inside
of the boat and fitted drain tubes that connected to the anchor locker
drain pipe. This reduced considerably the amount of water ending up
under the floor adjacent to the forward heads.

When the thruster arrangement was re-designed following my sinking, the
later boats have a watertight compartment for the thruster that drains
into the chain locker pipe. End of problem.

I will post my findings when I have dismantled the thruster to see how
the grease worked out. Audibly, it seems fine after almost three years
of use using grease.

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 09:20, Bob Parry wrote:
Hi Ian,

I don't know what you have envisaged about the process that was used in
Yalikivak but we DID NOT remove the foredeck. They removed the bow
thruster
motor to give room to move at the top of the bow thruster (motor was
dismantled) and the whole thing was supported under the boat push
against
the action of the jack. The bow thruster was in the up position and
they
jacked the top section upwards, hence the need to remove the motor. We
had
the boat for 5 years before we managed to get it fixed. We had tried
everything including the drop method with the only result being
consternation among other people in the boat yard.

We have a rubber seal as well as the foam ones. It is similar to the
seals
used in irrigation systems and it has the "open" side down to stop
inflow
of water. Ours had become so bad that we had to put a bulge pump in the
bilge outside the forward head. We have since travelled from Turkey to
Brisbane in Australia and had no water come in until the last leg from
New
Caledonia. It appears that the seal has suffered some damage. Dare say
we
will find out during our next haul out.

Regards,

Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 4:29 PM, Ian Shepherd<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**


Hi Bo& Ann,
thanks for the info. I will try Bill's drop suggestion first before
trying to lift the foredeck! I presume by seal you mean the foam seals
that go around the shaft? There is a correct way to fit them as I
believe that one side is harder than the other. Can you please remind
me
of the correct way round? I would assume that the hard side is glued
to
the top and bottom of the hole and the soft side faces down and up? Or
is it the other way round?

Regards

Ian SM 414 Crusader Built 2003


On 17/07/2012 00:32, Bob Parry wrote:
We had the same problem on our 1990 Super Maramu. It was finally
fixed
by
an Englishman and his Turkish assistant in Yalikavak. They removed
the
motor to give room at the top and used a hydraulic car jack. The jack
was
inside the boat and the Turkish assistant supported the bottom
outside
the
boat. It took a bit of effort but it worked. Whoever serviced it
before
we
bought the boat had put a seal in upside down and the steel rim had
corroded and was holding the fibreglass? tube in a vice-like grip.

Good luck with it.
Ann and Bob Parry
Nowornot SM#33 in Brisbane

On Tue, Jul 17, 2012 at 6:38 AM, sv_crusader<
sv_freespirit@yahoo.co.uk
wrote:

**

I am having difficulty removing my bow thruster to service it. It
seems
well and truly stuck when I try to pull it out of the boat. I have
sprayed
the tube/motor housing connection with Corrosion Block and other
products
in the hope that it will free up in a few days, but I suspect the
shaft
splines may be corroded despite greasing them the last time it was
assembled.

Has anyone discovered a way of freeing up the unit without doing any
damage? The boat is on the hard (at your last haul out spot Bill&
Judy).
Ian Shepherd SM2000 414 Crusader Built 2003 Med


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: MARAMU BEST SOLAR PANELS POSITION

jjjk12s <jjjk12s@...>
 

I should add that we swivel our panel vertically out of the way outside the rail not inside. If the ladder is on the same side it can still swing out of the way but not quite vertical. It can be swung inside as well of course. There is enough friction in the clamps that no other means of securing the panels is used. I don't find shading a big problem but it depends how much power you want, ie trickle charge, top up other power source (our situation) or maximum possible.

The price of panels has come down a lot. I put a system on my house 2 years ago and now the same panels cost a lot less.

John #91 Maramu

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "jjjk12s" <jjjk12s@...> wrote:

Andy,

I have one solar panel mounted on the starboard rail. It swivels vertically out of the way otherwise the angle can be adjusted to the sun. It is easy to route the wires and a simple system. I like it. It would be possible to do the other side too but then the ladder is on that side and it would not be possible to put the panel vertical, not a big problem. Doing it this way there is hardly any expense of mounting so if you decided later to add a stern arch mounting not much money has been spent. Another location could be the top of the dodger but we like using that area. The number of panels depends upon what you want to achieve.

Regards

John

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Andy" <allezaubon@> wrote:

dear all ,especially Maramu owners, we are debating the pro's and con's of various positions for mounting solar panels on our Maramu -the two favorites are horizontally over our soft Bimini or on port and starboard aft pushpits / rails / stanchions - how many solar panels ? We have been thinking ~200W to 400W. 32 - 36 cells - Are the number of cells critical , or as there are so many other factors such as shading, this point is over emphasized ?? Looking forward to your knowlegable feedback. Thanks in advance , Andy


(No subject)

nezih nezih
 


Re: [Amel] MARAMU BEST SOLAR PANELS POSITION

Dave_Benjamin
 

Andy,

We currently have 2 135w panels mounted on the rails in similar fashion to Ian. We've found that shading is a major factor for us and plan to install a pole on the transom to elevate the panels to a spot where they are mostly out of the shade. We will create an adjustable mount. If finances allow, we'll add a wind gen as well.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Ian Shepherd <sv_freespirit@...> wrote:

Hi Andy,

I have used two BP Solar 120W 24V panels on my Super Maramu(s) for the
past 11 years. I don't know if the ladder is mounted differently on the
Maramu, but its location causes no problem on the SM. Both panels are
attached to the rails with three West Marine rail clamps and swivel
inwards to the vertical position when mooring. They are adjusted via a
rope passing through a small jammer on the inside of the panel, Shock
cord is connected from the outside of the panel to the toe rail via a
snap shackle so that it can be removed easily to deploy the ladder.

Together with a mizzen top mounted wind generator I have left the boat
for months with the fridge on without needing to connect to shore power.
In the summer I can even keep one deep freeze running too. When sailing
I can sail during daylight hours with no battery discharge all day with
the computer, fridge, freezer, AIS, autopilot and entertainment system
on providing I have about 14 knots apparent or more.

I am not sure that entirely agree with what Bill says. With the cost of
diesel being what it is in Europe, the complete lack of maintenance plus
the very much reduced generator running time and thus reduced
maintenance, wear and tear, I believe this is a cost effective way to
go. I am contemplating fitting a third panel on the back stay cross
bracket as most times one of the rail mounted panels is in the shadow of
the mizzen sail. Also, shore power is becoming increasingly expensive
over here.

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader East Med

On 26/07/2012 08:08, Andy wrote:

dear all ,especially Maramu owners, we are debating the pro's and
con's of various positions for mounting solar panels on our Maramu
-the two favorites are horizontally over our soft Bimini or on port
and starboard aft pushpits / rails / stanchions - how many solar
panels ? We have been thinking ~200W to 400W. 32 - 36 cells - Are the
number of cells critical , or as there are so many other factors such
as shading, this point is over emphasized ?? Looking forward to your
knowlegable feedback. Thanks in advance , Andy



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohnholl@...>
 

The Email address for Martin is desaladoratyahoo .es as I see that Yahoo cut it short in my message. John, SM319

From: Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe
Sent: Friday, July 27, 2012 2:43 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H


Kilkea II,

The capacitor on BeBe's 160l Dessalator Low Pressure pump is rated at 12.5 microfarads (&#956;F or MFD). The voltage should be 460 to 500 volts. You will need a pigtail from the capacitor of about 6" to 8". If you cannot get one that attaches like the original (nut threaded to the end of the cap), you can wire-tie the cap to the motor housing.

Be sure to attach the wires to the same terminals on the motor as the original cap. There is no polarity of the capacitor wires, but if you wire it to the wrong terminals, it may cause the generator to stall.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Turkey

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "Anne and John Hollamby" <annejohnholl@...> wrote:

I do not know owing to the strange habit of either Amel or Dessalador of painting the capacitors so it is impossible to see what size they are.
I suggest that you Email Martin de Jong who is their agent in Spain and ask him. He is incredibly helpful and prompt in replying about any problem relating to their watermakers. desalador@... I do know that the capacitors on the high pressure motor are 30mfd each and 7cms x 4.5cms as a techie replaced them with ones 14 cms long and these made the genset stall. Luckily I had kept the old ones!

Good starts, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM 319, Sicily

From: kilkea_2
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:54 PM
To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H


Hello we are in need of a capacitor/condensor but do not have the specs and apparently it is important to have the right one. If anyone know the specs of the capacitor would you please let us know.
Kilkea II #466










[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] MARAMU BEST SOLAR PANELS POSITION

Ian Shepherd
 

I should have also mentioned that my 12 house batteries lasted 7 years
before they died, which I attribute to the fact that they were
discharged 4-7% each night then fully charged every day by the solar panels.

Ian SM 414 Crusader

On 26/07/2012 08:08, Andy wrote:

dear all ,especially Maramu owners, we are debating the pro's and
con's of various positions for mounting solar panels on our Maramu
-the two favorites are horizontally over our soft Bimini or on port
and starboard aft pushpits / rails / stanchions - how many solar
panels ? We have been thinking ~200W to 400W. 32 - 36 cells - Are the
number of cells critical , or as there are so many other factors such
as shading, this point is over emphasized ?? Looking forward to your
knowlegable feedback. Thanks in advance , Andy


Re: [Amel] MARAMU BEST SOLAR PANELS POSITION

Ian Shepherd
 

Hi Andy,

I have used two BP Solar 120W 24V panels on my Super Maramu(s) for the
past 11 years. I don't know if the ladder is mounted differently on the
Maramu, but its location causes no problem on the SM. Both panels are
attached to the rails with three West Marine rail clamps and swivel
inwards to the vertical position when mooring. They are adjusted via a
rope passing through a small jammer on the inside of the panel, Shock
cord is connected from the outside of the panel to the toe rail via a
snap shackle so that it can be removed easily to deploy the ladder.

Together with a mizzen top mounted wind generator I have left the boat
for months with the fridge on without needing to connect to shore power.
In the summer I can even keep one deep freeze running too. When sailing
I can sail during daylight hours with no battery discharge all day with
the computer, fridge, freezer, AIS, autopilot and entertainment system
on providing I have about 14 knots apparent or more.

I am not sure that entirely agree with what Bill says. With the cost of
diesel being what it is in Europe, the complete lack of maintenance plus
the very much reduced generator running time and thus reduced
maintenance, wear and tear, I believe this is a cost effective way to
go. I am contemplating fitting a third panel on the back stay cross
bracket as most times one of the rail mounted panels is in the shadow of
the mizzen sail. Also, shore power is becoming increasingly expensive
over here.

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader East Med

On 26/07/2012 08:08, Andy wrote:

dear all ,especially Maramu owners, we are debating the pro's and
con's of various positions for mounting solar panels on our Maramu
-the two favorites are horizontally over our soft Bimini or on port
and starboard aft pushpits / rails / stanchions - how many solar
panels ? We have been thinking ~200W to 400W. 32 - 36 cells - Are the
number of cells critical , or as there are so many other factors such
as shading, this point is over emphasized ?? Looking forward to your
knowlegable feedback. Thanks in advance , Andy


Re: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Kilkea II,

The capacitor on BeBe's 160l Dessalator Low Pressure pump is rated at 12.5 microfarads (&#956;F or MFD). The voltage should be 460 to 500 volts. You will need a pigtail from the capacitor of about 6" to 8". If you cannot get one that attaches like the original (nut threaded to the end of the cap), you can wire-tie the cap to the motor housing.

Be sure to attach the wires to the same terminals on the motor as the original cap. There is no polarity of the capacitor wires, but if you wire it to the wrong terminals, it may cause the generator to stall.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Turkey

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Anne and John Hollamby" <annejohnholl@...> wrote:

I do not know owing to the strange habit of either Amel or Dessalador of painting the capacitors so it is impossible to see what size they are.
I suggest that you Email Martin de Jong who is their agent in Spain and ask him. He is incredibly helpful and prompt in replying about any problem relating to their watermakers. desalador@... I do know that the capacitors on the high pressure motor are 30mfd each and 7cms x 4.5cms as a techie replaced them with ones 14 cms long and these made the genset stall. Luckily I had kept the old ones!

Good starts, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM 319, Sicily

From: kilkea_2
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:54 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H


Hello we are in need of a capacitor/condensor but do not have the specs and apparently it is important to have the right one. If anyone know the specs of the capacitor would you please let us know.
Kilkea II #466





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Maramu best generator location

jjjk12s <jjjk12s@...>
 

Bob,

I have brackets on the tubular supports for the mizzen so the 4 KVA gen set sits over the back of the engine. Advantages and disadvantages between that and the locker. The watermaker has 240V motors on a shelf tucked in on the bulkhead forward of the engine. Pressure vessels are on the starboard side of engine and controls in the walkway to the aft cabin. Sorry no pictures yet, will try to get some.

Regards

John Maramu #91

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Bob Sarff" <bsarff@...> wrote:

I am preparing to install a generator/watermaker and would appreciate any input on the best location on a Maramu. my preference would be the engine room if it will fit. second choice is the port storage locker. What have other Maramu owners done? Do any of you have pictures youy can send or post.

Thanks for your assistance.

Bob
SV Chara


Re: MARAMU BEST SOLAR PANELS POSITION

jjjk12s <jjjk12s@...>
 

Andy,

I have one solar panel mounted on the starboard rail. It swivels vertically out of the way otherwise the angle can be adjusted to the sun. It is easy to route the wires and a simple system. I like it. It would be possible to do the other side too but then the ladder is on that side and it would not be possible to put the panel vertical, not a big problem. Doing it this way there is hardly any expense of mounting so if you decided later to add a stern arch mounting not much money has been spent. Another location could be the top of the dodger but we like using that area. The number of panels depends upon what you want to achieve.

Regards

John

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Andy" <allezaubon@...> wrote:

dear all ,especially Maramu owners, we are debating the pro's and con's of various positions for mounting solar panels on our Maramu -the two favorites are horizontally over our soft Bimini or on port and starboard aft pushpits / rails / stanchions - how many solar panels ? We have been thinking ~200W to 400W. 32 - 36 cells - Are the number of cells critical , or as there are so many other factors such as shading, this point is over emphasized ?? Looking forward to your knowlegable feedback. Thanks in advance , Andy


Re: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohnholl@...>
 

I do not know owing to the strange habit of either Amel or Dessalador of painting the capacitors so it is impossible to see what size they are.
I suggest that you Email Martin de Jong who is their agent in Spain and ask him. He is incredibly helpful and prompt in replying about any problem relating to their watermakers. desalador@yahoo.es I do know that the capacitors on the high pressure motor are 30mfd each and 7cms x 4.5cms as a techie replaced them with ones 14 cms long and these made the genset stall. Luckily I had kept the old ones!

Good starts, Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM 319, Sicily

From: kilkea_2
Sent: Thursday, July 26, 2012 1:54 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] low pressure water maker pump for a 160 L/H


Hello we are in need of a capacitor/condensor but do not have the specs and apparently it is important to have the right one. If anyone know the specs of the capacitor would you please let us know.
Kilkea II #466