Date   

Re: [Amel] GOIOT Hatches - Repairing, Parts & Re-Lens

amelforme
 

Where are you and the boat located?



All the best,

Joel F. Potter





Joel F. Potter - Cruising Yacht Specialist, LLC

Amel's Sole Associate for the Americas

Mailing Address: 401 East Las Olas Boulevard #130-126

Fort Lauderdale, Florida 33301

Phone: (954) 462-5869 Cell: (954) 812-2485

Email: jfpottercys@att.net

www.yachtworld.com/jfpottercys



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Robert
Sent: Monday, February 18, 2013 2:36 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] GOIOT Hatches - Repairing, Parts & Re-Lens





Hello,

Our boat is a 82' Maramu, the hatches are almost impossible to see through
(light yes, clear anything no).

Ordered new handles and some new rod stops from https://www.hatchmasters.com
- looks like they also carry new 'replacement' versions but BOY they aren't
cheap.

Wasn't sure if the consensus was to replace the entire hatch with a new one,
or if people can simply replace the lenses with fairly little fuss.

Looking for any advice or insight into the costs, time, frustration (if any)
and viability of both options.

My wife and I are trying to spend as LITTLE as possible and do most of the
work ourselves, so any advice is greatly appreciated.

-Jer


GOIOT Hatches - Repairing, Parts & Re-Lens

mr_hermanns
 

Hello,

Our boat is a 82' Maramu, the hatches are almost impossible to see through (light yes, clear anything no).

Ordered new handles and some new rod stops from https://www.hatchmasters.com - looks like they also carry new 'replacement' versions but BOY they aren't cheap.

Wasn't sure if the consensus was to replace the entire hatch with a new one, or if people can simply replace the lenses with fairly little fuss.

Looking for any advice or insight into the costs, time, frustration (if any) and viability of both options.

My wife and I are trying to spend as LITTLE as possible and do most of the work ourselves, so any advice is greatly appreciated.

-Jer


Re: The importance of your transmission oil cooler

Dave_Benjamin
 

Trevor,

Sorry to hear about this turn of events. Let me know if you need any assistance importing parts. We do a lot of business in Mexico so we've got the resources to help. Good luck getting things sorted. I wish I had a mechanic to recommend in Acapulco but they are all further north.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@...> wrote:

To all members
Recently while crossing the Tehuantepec Bay a distance of 230 miles we had as anticipated light winds and lots of motoring. All fluids and filters were checked and topped off.
<snip>
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty

Seafever of Cuan
Super Maramu no 425
Acapulco
Mexico


Re: [Amel] The importance of your transmission oil cooler

karkauai
 

Hi Trevor Jim, et al.
When I head west I'll have to make a decision about Mexico. My insurance won't let me sail there without paying a premium (like Venezuela and Haiti) so I guess there is significant risk over and above the rest of the Caribbean. I wondered about your cursing Mexico for 2 1/2 years, Jim. I guess that means you've found it worth staying and exploring further? Have you found it safe? Any pearls you or others would like to share?
Muchas Gracias
Kent
SM 243
Kristy
On Feb 17, 2013, at 3:08 PM, ldesalvo@bigplanet.com wrote:

Trevor, Linda and I just read your email you sent us today but
accidentally deleted it before we were finished. Please if you have
it in your sent file send it again to us at ldesalvoatbigplanet.com.
We are so looking forward to getting together with you. We have been
cursing mexico for the last 2 ½ years.
Jim and Linda
s/v lieblling, sm#207

---- Original Message ----
From: seafeverofcuan@yahoo.com
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] The importance of your transmission oil cooler
Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2013 00:19:45 -0000

To all members
Recently while crossing the Tehuantepec Bay a distance of 230 miles
we had as anticipated light winds and lots of motoring. All fluids
and filters were checked and topped off.
20 miles South of Acapulco motoring at 2300RPM at 0200hrs the engine
surged a couple of times and stopped.
During long runs like that we regularly check the engine room
temperatures with a laser thermometer and nothing had previously
seemed amiss. The transmission unit now was 84C it is normally
around 50 to 55C and the ATF fluid was gone and replaced with
emulsified sea water, a grey colour from what little oil or grease
there was left in the bearings etc.
The transmission had seized and after sailing for four hours to allow
everything to cool down, to it's credit the transmission engaged
enough ahead to allow us to motor into Acapulco gently at 1500RPM
against the headwinds. It would not engage astern as the clutch was
seized.
The transmission is destroyed due to a pin hole leak in the oil
cooler, we had the cooler professionally cleaned in August last year
and I checked it myself when I returned to the boat in October to
ensure the Bowman rubber end caps and clips were in good condition.
It is a painful lesson, the engine has 3000 hours and runs like a
dream, clearly that cooler now has to regularly inspected and or
changed as part of my maintenance program.
I hope this email will save someone else the costs and hassle we are
now incurring.
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty

Seafever of Cuan
Super Maramu no 425
Acapulco
Mexico




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] The importance of your transmission oil cooler

ldesalvo@...
 

Trevor, Linda and I just read your email you sent us today but
accidentally deleted it before we were finished. Please if you have
it in your sent file send it again to us at ldesalvoatbigplanet.com.
We are so looking forward to getting together with you. We have been
cursing mexico for the last 2 ½ years.
Jim and Linda
s/v lieblling, sm#207

---- Original Message ----
From: seafeverofcuan@yahoo.com
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] The importance of your transmission oil cooler
Date: Sun, 17 Feb 2013 00:19:45 -0000

To all members
Recently while crossing the Tehuantepec Bay a distance of 230 miles
we had as anticipated light winds and lots of motoring. All fluids
and filters were checked and topped off.
20 miles South of Acapulco motoring at 2300RPM at 0200hrs the engine
surged a couple of times and stopped.
During long runs like that we regularly check the engine room
temperatures with a laser thermometer and nothing had previously
seemed amiss. The transmission unit now was 84C it is normally
around 50 to 55C and the ATF fluid was gone and replaced with
emulsified sea water, a grey colour from what little oil or grease
there was left in the bearings etc.
The transmission had seized and after sailing for four hours to allow
everything to cool down, to it's credit the transmission engaged
enough ahead to allow us to motor into Acapulco gently at 1500RPM
against the headwinds. It would not engage astern as the clutch was
seized.
The transmission is destroyed due to a pin hole leak in the oil
cooler, we had the cooler professionally cleaned in August last year
and I checked it myself when I returned to the boat in October to
ensure the Bowman rubber end caps and clips were in good condition.
It is a painful lesson, the engine has 3000 hours and runs like a
dream, clearly that cooler now has to regularly inspected and or
changed as part of my maintenance program.
I hope this email will save someone else the costs and hassle we are
now incurring.
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty

Seafever of Cuan
Super Maramu no 425
Acapulco
Mexico




Re: [Amel] The importance of your transmission oil cooler

ldesalvo@...
 

Trevor,
I am so sorry to hear about your transmission problem. You never
know when something will break. How will you get it replaced down
here in Mexico? We are in Zihuatqnejo for the next three weeks, only
about 112 NM North West of your location. We were in Acapulco last
year for five nights. Three on anchor and two nights in La Marina.
If you will be coming up this way we would like to meet with you and
your crew.
Our direct email address is ldesalvoatbigplanet.com
Hope to hear from you.
Jim and Linda
s/v Liebling
SM #207


Re: [Amel] Re: Onan Exhaust Temp Sensor

karkauai
 

Thank you all. I've got it. And was able to download the parts catalogue.
You guys make things easy!
Kent
On Feb 16, 2013, at 8:00 PM, "captain_cucumber_head" <mcerdos@gmail.com> wrote:

I just sent you the entire parts catalog with exploded diagrams. Hope this helps.

Mark

Cream Puff

SM2K #275

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" wrote:

Hi, everyone.
I just discovered a sensor that is broken on the exhaust hose of my Onan generator. I have looked at the parts manual and it isn't listed there. I took some pics of the part/number, but I can't read all of the numbers...several pics, all a little blurry.
Can anyone tell me that it is for sure a temp sensor and what the part number is?
Thanks, and happy sailing.
Kent
KRISTY
SM 243
Currently Brunswick, GA

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel] The importance of your transmission oil cooler

seafeverofcuan <seafeverofcuan@...>
 

Hi Dennis,
the only thing that I can think of and intend to do is, when installing a new transmission unit is to also have a temperature gauge fitted. In this case I am very happy that it wasn't due to neglect but just pure bad luck.
If you check your transmission fluid on a regular basis any ingress of salt water will turn the ATF fluid into a kind of strawberry frappe and you will know that you have a problem. You can bypass the cooler using the hydraulic hoses and the transmission will get you home without being destroyed. We got caught out on a thirty plus hour run and wouldn't normally have checked the ATF until setting out again.
regards,
Trevor

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Woods <woods.dennis@...> wrote:

Trevor, thanks for that, am away from my boat right now. Is there a simple method of checking the cooler to prevent this ?
Dennis Woods ICC
IL Flauto Magico sm 408

Sent from my iPad

On 17 Feb 2013, at 00:19, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@...> wrote:

To all members
Recently while crossing the Tehuantepec Bay a distance of 230 miles we had as anticipated light winds and lots of motoring. All fluids and filters were checked and topped off.
20 miles South of Acapulco motoring at 2300RPM at 0200hrs the engine surged a couple of times and stopped.
During long runs like that we regularly check the engine room temperatures with a laser thermometer and nothing had previously seemed amiss. The transmission unit now was 84C it is normally around 50 to 55C and the ATF fluid was gone and replaced with emulsified sea water, a grey colour from what little oil or grease there was left in the bearings etc.
The transmission had seized and after sailing for four hours to allow everything to cool down, to it's credit the transmission engaged enough ahead to allow us to motor into Acapulco gently at 1500RPM against the headwinds. It would not engage astern as the clutch was seized.
The transmission is destroyed due to a pin hole leak in the oil cooler, we had the cooler professionally cleaned in August last year and I checked it myself when I returned to the boat in October to ensure the Bowman rubber end caps and clips were in good condition.
It is a painful lesson, the engine has 3000 hours and runs like a dream, clearly that cooler now has to regularly inspected and or changed as part of my maintenance program.
I hope this email will save someone else the costs and hassle we are now incurring.
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty

Seafever of Cuan
Super Maramu no 425
Acapulco
Mexico




Re: Onan Exhaust Temp Sensor

Mark Erdos
 

I am not able to upload the catalog to the group but the part you need is on page #50

please see if you are able to upload the file as it is very detailed and useful

Mark
Cream Puff
SM2k #275

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "captain_cucumber_head" <mcerdos@...> wrote:

I just sent you the entire parts catalog with exploded diagrams. Hope this helps.

Mark

Cream Puff

SM2K #275

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" <karkauai@> wrote:

Hi, everyone.
I just discovered a sensor that is broken on the exhaust hose of my Onan generator. I have looked at the parts manual and it isn't listed there. I took some pics of the part/number, but I can't read all of the numbers...several pics, all a little blurry.
Can anyone tell me that it is for sure a temp sensor and what the part number is?
Thanks, and happy sailing.
Kent
KRISTY
SM 243
Currently Brunswick, GA


Re: [Amel] The importance of your transmission oil cooler

Dennis woods
 

Trevor, thanks for that, am away from my boat right now. Is there a simple method of checking the cooler to prevent this ?
Dennis Woods ICC
IL Flauto Magico sm 408
On 17 Feb 2013, at 00:19, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@yahoo.com> wrote:

To all members
Recently while crossing the Tehuantepec Bay a distance of 230 miles we had as anticipated light winds and lots of motoring. All fluids and filters were checked and topped off.
20 miles South of Acapulco motoring at 2300RPM at 0200hrs the engine surged a couple of times and stopped.
During long runs like that we regularly check the engine room temperatures with a laser thermometer and nothing had previously seemed amiss. The transmission unit now was 84C it is normally around 50 to 55C and the ATF fluid was gone and replaced with emulsified sea water, a grey colour from what little oil or grease there was left in the bearings etc.
The transmission had seized and after sailing for four hours to allow everything to cool down, to it's credit the transmission engaged enough ahead to allow us to motor into Acapulco gently at 1500RPM against the headwinds. It would not engage astern as the clutch was seized.
The transmission is destroyed due to a pin hole leak in the oil cooler, we had the cooler professionally cleaned in August last year and I checked it myself when I returned to the boat in October to ensure the Bowman rubber end caps and clips were in good condition.
It is a painful lesson, the engine has 3000 hours and runs like a dream, clearly that cooler now has to regularly inspected and or changed as part of my maintenance program.
I hope this email will save someone else the costs and hassle we are now incurring.
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty

Seafever of Cuan
Super Maramu no 425
Acapulco
Mexico


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Onan Exhaust Temp Sensor

Mark Erdos
 

I just sent you the entire parts catalog with exploded diagrams. Hope this helps.

Mark

Cream Puff

SM2K #275

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, everyone.
I just discovered a sensor that is broken on the exhaust hose of my Onan generator. I have looked at the parts manual and it isn't listed there. I took some pics of the part/number, but I can't read all of the numbers...several pics, all a little blurry.
Can anyone tell me that it is for sure a temp sensor and what the part number is?
Thanks, and happy sailing.
Kent
KRISTY
SM 243
Currently Brunswick, GA


The importance of your transmission oil cooler

seafeverofcuan <seafeverofcuan@...>
 

To all members
Recently while crossing the Tehuantepec Bay a distance of 230 miles we had as anticipated light winds and lots of motoring. All fluids and filters were checked and topped off.
20 miles South of Acapulco motoring at 2300RPM at 0200hrs the engine surged a couple of times and stopped.
During long runs like that we regularly check the engine room temperatures with a laser thermometer and nothing had previously seemed amiss. The transmission unit now was 84C it is normally around 50 to 55C and the ATF fluid was gone and replaced with emulsified sea water, a grey colour from what little oil or grease there was left in the bearings etc.
The transmission had seized and after sailing for four hours to allow everything to cool down, to it's credit the transmission engaged enough ahead to allow us to motor into Acapulco gently at 1500RPM against the headwinds. It would not engage astern as the clutch was seized.
The transmission is destroyed due to a pin hole leak in the oil cooler, we had the cooler professionally cleaned in August last year and I checked it myself when I returned to the boat in October to ensure the Bowman rubber end caps and clips were in good condition.
It is a painful lesson, the engine has 3000 hours and runs like a dream, clearly that cooler now has to regularly inspected and or changed as part of my maintenance program.
I hope this email will save someone else the costs and hassle we are now incurring.
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty

Seafever of Cuan
Super Maramu no 425
Acapulco
Mexico


Re: Onan Exhaust Temp Sensor

seafeverofcuan <seafeverofcuan@...>
 

Hi Kent,
my generator is a 2003 Onan 7MDKAV-2317 the sensor part number marked in yellow reads,
L230
402-927
0251

I presume it has to be a temp sensor, but better to have that confirmed by one of the site gurus that we all rely so heavily on.
I hope this is some help to you.
Regards,
Trevor Lusty

Seafever of Cuan
supermaramu no 425
Acapulco
Mexico

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:

Hi, everyone.
I just discovered a sensor that is broken on the exhaust hose of my Onan generator. I have looked at the parts manual and it isn't listed there. I took some pics of the part/number, but I can't read all of the numbers...several pics, all a little blurry.
Can anyone tell me that it is for sure a temp sensor and what the part number is?
Thanks, and happy sailing.
Kent
KRISTY
SM 243
Currently Brunswick, GA


Re: Onan Exhaust Temp Sensor

karkauai
 

Forgot to mention that I posted a couple of pics under new photo album Kristy SM243


Onan Exhaust Temp Sensor

karkauai
 

Hi, everyone.
I just discovered a sensor that is broken on the exhaust hose of my Onan generator. I have looked at the parts manual and it isn't listed there. I took some pics of the part/number, but I can't read all of the numbers...several pics, all a little blurry.
Can anyone tell me that it is for sure a temp sensor and what the part number is?
Thanks, and happy sailing.
Kent
KRISTY
SM 243
Currently Brunswick, GA


(No subject)

Jose_Luis Isasi
 


Re: Hydranet sails

Dave_Benjamin
 

We have a variety of fibers we can specify with load path sails and I wouldn't necessarily go with carbon/technora for a Super Maramu. Vectran is a possibility as well as a few others. We went with carbon/technora on the cat due to the loads which are much higher that what we see on a mono-hull.

In general, the advantages of a well constructed load path sail are:

Highly efficient construction - Strength where you need it
Durability
Exceptional stretch resistance
Economical compared to Hydranet and other radial sail

We have a 3 Year warranty on our MXL Vacu-Fix sails with worldwide support.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, svperegrinus wrote:

Thanks.

So, the client on the catamaran had positive feedback over about two years of use. What would you say the benefits of these carbon/technora sails might be on a Super Maramu vs. other cloth materials?


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

That was a few years ago when I wrote that post. Customer sold the boat last year but feedback was quite positive. That sail will be good for quite some time.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, svperegrinus wrote:

Hello,

And what has been your experience with the carbon/technora sails?

Best,



--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

Please note that Dimension Polyant manufactures two types of Hydranet cloth. One is a crosscut and the other is radial.

The crosscut has not held up well so not too many sailmakers will recommend it.

The radial cloth is excellent, however quite expensive.

We are building sails for a Catana catamaran right now using carbon/technora load path membrane which is more economical.

International demand for Hydranet is so low that Dimension Polyant now only manufactures when they have an order.


Re: Euros mainsheet track

Dave_Benjamin
 

Ullar,

The Harken low beam track should work as it has some flexibility. I would check the Harken documentation available on their website and review the installation instructions.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "ullaroo" wrote:

Hi Dave,

Thanks for information. The track on Euros is situated in aft end of the
cockpit and is tilted slightly forward. If we can fix the new track on
the old one the tilt will be automatically right. That is a bonus.
However, the track is also curved. Can I buy a straight track and bend
it myself?

Here is the picture of my mainsheet track.
c/1817213682/view>

I really missed the convenience of towed mainsheet car last summer. It
wasn't for constant tweaking like on sports boat but just to get main
right easily.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

Ullar,

It was a combination of factors. The original track did not appear to
be through bolted. I suspect there is a strip of steel that was
basically embedded, and then holes drilled and tapped to accept the
screws for the original Goiot track. There was no sign of any problem
with the track. After consulting with a few riggers who had seen similar
installations, we decided to mount the new track on top of the existing.

Here is a link to a photo of the track right after it was installed.
We used Lanocote on the machine screws to prevent dissimilar metal
corrosion. That's the orange colored goop you see in the photo around
the screws.
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/105731786/amel_track.JPG

The beauty of this approach is we were able to use off the shelf
Harken hardware that is both robust and readily available.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "ullaroo" wrote:

Hi Dave,

That sounds interesting. Why did you keep the original track below
the new one? Was Goiot track difficult to remove or was it something
else that brought you to that solution?

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

Ullar,

We have an older Amel also, a 1979 Maramu. We fitted a Harken Big
Boat track to our boat. The original Goiot track was substantial enough
that we could drill and tap mounting holes for the Harken track.


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Hydranet sails

svperegrinus <no_reply@...>
 

Thanks.

So, the client on the catamaran had positive feedback over about two years of use. What would you say the benefits of these carbon/technora sails might be on a Super Maramu vs. other cloth materials?

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

That was a few years ago when I wrote that post. Customer sold the boat last year but feedback was quite positive. That sail will be good for quite some time.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, svperegrinus wrote:

Hello,

And what has been your experience with the carbon/technora sails?

Best,



--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

Please note that Dimension Polyant manufactures two types of Hydranet cloth. One is a crosscut and the other is radial.

The crosscut has not held up well so not too many sailmakers will recommend it.

The radial cloth is excellent, however quite expensive.

We are building sails for a Catana catamaran right now using carbon/technora load path membrane which is more economical.

International demand for Hydranet is so low that Dimension Polyant now only manufactures when they have an order.


Re: Euros mainsheet track

ullaroo
 

Hi Dave,

Thanks for information. The track on Euros is situated in aft end of the
cockpit and is tilted slightly forward. If we can fix the new track on
the old one the tilt will be automatically right. That is a bonus.
However, the track is also curved. Can I buy a straight track and bend
it myself?

Here is the picture of my mainsheet track.
<http://groups.yahoo.com/group/amelyachtowners/photos/album/909546897/pi\;
c/1817213682/view>

I really missed the convenience of towed mainsheet car last summer. It
wasn't for constant tweaking like on sports boat but just to get main
right easily.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

Ullar,

It was a combination of factors. The original track did not appear to
be through bolted. I suspect there is a strip of steel that was
basically embedded, and then holes drilled and tapped to accept the
screws for the original Goiot track. There was no sign of any problem
with the track. After consulting with a few riggers who had seen similar
installations, we decided to mount the new track on top of the existing.

Here is a link to a photo of the track right after it was installed.
We used Lanocote on the machine screws to prevent dissimilar metal
corrosion. That's the orange colored goop you see in the photo around
the screws.
https://dl.dropbox.com/u/105731786/amel_track.JPG

The beauty of this approach is we were able to use off the shelf
Harken hardware that is both robust and readily available.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "ullaroo" wrote:

Hi Dave,

That sounds interesting. Why did you keep the original track below
the new one? Was Goiot track difficult to remove or was it something
else that brought you to that solution?

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Dave_Benjamin" wrote:

Ullar,

We have an older Amel also, a 1979 Maramu. We fitted a Harken Big
Boat track to our boat. The original Goiot track was substantial enough
that we could drill and tap mounting holes for the Harken track.