Date   

Re: [Amel] Nanni

murray k. seidel <mseidel@...>
 

Dear Maria- I doubt most sailors in the U.S. have even heard of "Nanni".
Stick to a known manufacturer with an excellent reputation, a reputation
for rugged performance , and for being more bullet proof than the average
sailboat diesel. If possible, I would always try to get a Yanmar, and 75 hp.
Is enough for the SM53. I suspect it would also be a lot easier to mount a
new Yanmar in your SM's engine bed. Murray Seidel sm349.



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Maria Geiger
Sent: Tuesday, April 16, 2013 1:33 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] Nanni





Hello everybody,

We are thinking to buy a new motor for our Super Maramu does any one has a
Nanni?
What would be your experience?

Than you ,

Maria
Pitugolf



No virus found in this message.
Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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Nanni

Maria Geiger
 

Hello everybody,

We are thinking to buy a new motor for our Super Maramu does any one has a Nanni?
What would be your experience?

Than you ,

Maria
Pitugolf


Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

Armin <n4796p@...>
 

Dear all,

we had too recogniced a abrassion on the rubber gas pipe of the stove at our boat during an atlantic crossing, where we did not lock the cardanic hinge.
SAV had no spare parts. The answered, that we can exchance the complete gas pipe from tank to the stove.
On the market seemed no spare part exist for the rubber pipe with theright connections.
At the end I found, that hydraulic systems have the right connectors. Therefore I bought an rubber gas pipe withe the right dimensions, cut off the connectors and let a mechanic for agricultural engines fit the right hydraulic connectors using a metalic press fitting (as original).

The work was done 1 year ago and everything is ok.

This means the key is to ask somebody who is working with hydraulik systems. He will help.

Armin
SY ASHIA, SM2k, #359

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Rink de Haan <rinkdehaan@...> wrote:

Dear all,

Thanks for the information, comments and suggestions.
I'll be working on this issue the first week of May and will try to
document the process.

Best regards,

Rink
SM2K #330 razor's Edge




Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

Rink De Haan
 

Dear all,

Thanks for the information, comments and suggestions.
I'll be working on this issue the first week of May and will try to
document the process.

Best regards,

Rink
SM2K #330 razor's Edge


Re: [Amel] onan problem

Kimberly Cerillo <kcvabeach@...>
 

Are both lights steadily on? Have you checked fault codes?



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of alexgennai
Sent: Monday, April 15, 2013 8:35 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel] onan problem





I have an Onan genset MDKAV
anyone could you tell me what does it mean when there are the green and
yellow lights both on and the genset doesn't run????????

thanks
alessandro lucetta blu
GRAND CRU
antigua


onan problem

alexgennai <agennai@...>
 

I have an Onan genset MDKAV
anyone could you tell me what does it mean when there are the green and yellow lights both on and the genset doesn't run????????

thanks
alessandro lucetta blu
GRAND CRU
antigua


[Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

jjjk12s <jjjk12s@...>
 

Rink and others,

There are different ways to connect a gas hose onto a copper pipe. It sounds like Rink has a compression fitting rather than a hose crimped directlty onto copper pipe. It also sounds like he has a compression fitting with an olive (compession ring) rather than a flare...re his original question about how to remove the compression ring. If possible try to do a repair that is compliant with regulations otherwise consider it temporary. Also it is obviously important to be very safe with gas.

I agree that a good nose is no substitue for regulations but neither unfortunately can they be ignored. For example, I had to replace the gas installation on my Maramu to get a gas certificate. Without a certificate a boat can't be registered or sold here. The copper gas pipe had to be changed to one which was plastic coated. The compression joints are flared, which I guess is more standard these days than olives, though regulations vary from country to country.

John Maramu #91

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS <simms@...> wrote:

Well said Mike and Chris I echo your last sentence.
 
"Health and Safety Regulations have made people expect machines to look after them - Sailing teaches you to look after yourself - thank God."
Yvonne has a good nose and good ears too, vital to pick up problems before they become disasters. Not much point in calling for a tradesman to fix his work from 1000 miles out at sea.
Danny and Yvonne
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui
New Zealand


From: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, 14 April 2013 9:04 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

 
Hi Rink, and All

A cautionary Tale

   Please exercise great care with the modern "pressure bonded" cooker to copper pipe connections.
   Before setting out on our planned circumnavigation we replaced the old cooker in our Santorin. The new Taylors  came with precrimped pipes from the cooker to the copper pipe end with its connection. We took off the old cooker pipe, threw away the old hose, took off the connection(and for some unknown reason - BBQ?) kept it. 
   Some  5 months later, after an Atlantic crossing and 2/3 through a Pacific crossing, my wife smelt gas whilst cooking breakfast. All off and investigate.
  The official "corgi" rubber/steel braided standard pipe had slid free from its supposedly pressure crimped connection and gas was pouring into the boat.
  All hatches wide open and divert the downwash from the balooner through the cabin floorboards up etc etc..
  Later, I inspected the failed connector, because it is hydraulically crimped the tang that the pipe fits on is smooth not like the old ones which had serrated rings.It is perfect for domestic use but several days of gimblaling, which we only did whilst cooking, had worked the pipe off the tang. (And yes I did have the loop that was supposed to prevent that)
  Off with the official pipe end and back on with the old one - cut off the (useless) crimps push the pipe onto the serrated rings, cut back the braid so that the clips compress the pipe, and 3 small jubilee clips. No worries since then - 13 years ago. And yes - we do inspect regularly.
  Please remember, Gas qualified technicians (Corgi) deal almost exclusively with fixed installations - even if they are leisure qualified - that means mostly caravans and BBQ's.
   This was the most dangerous incidentin over 40,000 sea miles and 15 years on the boat.
   I trust jubilee clips that I can check and tighten and a visible rubber section that I can inspect - I do not trust some anonymous automatic machine. (Now a bit of a rant) Health and Safety Regulations have made people expect machines to look after them - Sailing teaches you to look after yourself - thank God.

Mike & Chris, (her with the sensitive nose!!)
SN027
Akwaaba

From: Rink de Haan <mailto:rinkdehaan%40gmail.com>

To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2013 2:24 PM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement


 
Hi Trevor,
Thanks for your reply. I'll check the info. I am also looking for some hands on experience to share. I put some photo's of the bimini in the Razor's Edge photo folder. Just in case you want to use it.
Cheers,
Rink
Razor's Edge
SM2k #330

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@> wrote:


Hi Rink,
It may help to check out www.socal.co.uk they have all parts for Eno cookers. Click on toolbox where you will find a wide variety of hoses and fittings for gas bottles.
I hope this is of some help to you.
On a separate subject, you did a great job with the canopy/bimini on Razors Edge, we are currently trying to do something similar at the moment.
On retrospect is there anything that you would now change?
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Mexico


--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "Rink de Haan" <rinkdehaan@> wrote:

I want to replace my rubber gas pipes from the bottles to the copper pipe and from the ENO stove to the copper pipe. As there are compression fittings being used I assume there will be an old compression ring left on the copper pipe. Has anyone experience with replacing the rubber gas pipes and removing the compression rings?
I have to do it myself since there are no certified companies in the marina where I am (Turkey).

Rink de Haan
SM2K Razor's Edge #330







Re: [Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Well said Mike and Chris I echo your last sentence.
 
"Health and Safety Regulations have made people expect machines to look after them - Sailing teaches you to look after yourself - thank God."
Yvonne has a good nose and good ears too, vital to pick up problems before they become disasters. Not much point in calling for a tradesman to fix his work from 1000 miles out at sea.
Danny and Yvonne
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
Mangonui
New Zealand


From: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@yahoo.com>
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Sunday, 14 April 2013 9:04 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

 
Hi Rink, and All

A cautionary Tale

   Please exercise great care with the modern "pressure bonded" cooker to copper pipe connections.
   Before setting out on our planned circumnavigation we replaced the old cooker in our Santorin. The new Taylors  came with precrimped pipes from the cooker to the copper pipe end with its connection. We took off the old cooker pipe, threw away the old hose, took off the connection(and for some unknown reason - BBQ?) kept it. 
   Some  5 months later, after an Atlantic crossing and 2/3 through a Pacific crossing, my wife smelt gas whilst cooking breakfast. All off and investigate.
  The official "corgi" rubber/steel braided standard pipe had slid free from its supposedly pressure crimped connection and gas was pouring into the boat.
  All hatches wide open and divert the downwash from the balooner through the cabin floorboards up etc etc..
  Later, I inspected the failed connector, because it is hydraulically crimped the tang that the pipe fits on is smooth not like the old ones which had serrated rings.It is perfect for domestic use but several days of gimblaling, which we only did whilst cooking, had worked the pipe off the tang. (And yes I did have the loop that was supposed to prevent that)
  Off with the official pipe end and back on with the old one - cut off the (useless) crimps push the pipe onto the serrated rings, cut back the braid so that the clips compress the pipe, and 3 small jubilee clips. No worries since then - 13 years ago. And yes - we do inspect regularly.
  Please remember, Gas qualified technicians (Corgi) deal almost exclusively with fixed installations - even if they are leisure qualified - that means mostly caravans and BBQ's.
   This was the most dangerous incidentin over 40,000 sea miles and 15 years on the boat.
   I trust jubilee clips that I can check and tighten and a visible rubber section that I can inspect - I do not trust some anonymous automatic machine. (Now a bit of a rant) Health and Safety Regulations have made people expect machines to look after them - Sailing teaches you to look after yourself - thank God.

Mike & Chris, (her with the sensitive nose!!)
SN027
Akwaaba

From: Rink de Haan <mailto:rinkdehaan%40gmail.com>

To: mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2013 2:24 PM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement


 
Hi Trevor,
Thanks for your reply. I'll check the info. I am also looking for some hands on experience to share. I put some photo's of the bimini in the Razor's Edge photo folder. Just in case you want to use it.
Cheers,
Rink
Razor's Edge
SM2k #330

--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@...> wrote:


Hi Rink,
It may help to check out www.socal.co.uk they have all parts for Eno cookers. Click on toolbox where you will find a wide variety of hoses and fittings for gas bottles.
I hope this is of some help to you.
On a separate subject, you did a great job with the canopy/bimini on Razors Edge, we are currently trying to do something similar at the moment.
On retrospect is there anything that you would now change?
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Mexico


--- In mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com, "Rink de Haan" <rinkdehaan@> wrote:

I want to replace my rubber gas pipes from the bottles to the copper pipe and from the ENO stove to the copper pipe. As there are compression fittings being used I assume there will be an old compression ring left on the copper pipe. Has anyone experience with replacing the rubber gas pipes and removing the compression rings?
I have to do it myself since there are no certified companies in the marina where I am (Turkey).

Rink de Haan
SM2K Razor's Edge #330
[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

jjjk12s <jjjk12s@...>
 

Rink,

I am not an expert (others may have different advice as gas is obviously an important issue) but I think you have two choices: cut the copper pipe shorter to remove the nut and compression ring, or if not enough pipe to do this, re-use the nut and ring and just replace the hose with one with identical threads and bore. The important thing is to test afterwards for leaks with soapy bubbly water. Maybe once in a suitable location have the system inspected by a gas technician.

John

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Rink de Haan" <rinkdehaan@...> wrote:

Hi Trevor,
Thanks for your reply. I'll check the info. I am also looking for some hands on experience to share. I put some photo's of the bimini in the Razor's Edge photo folder. Just in case you want to use it.
Cheers,
Rink
Razor's Edge
SM2k #330

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@> wrote:


Hi Rink,
It may help to check out www.socal.co.uk they have all parts for Eno cookers. Click on toolbox where you will find a wide variety of hoses and fittings for gas bottles.
I hope this is of some help to you.
On a separate subject, you did a great job with the canopy/bimini on Razors Edge, we are currently trying to do something similar at the moment.
On retrospect is there anything that you would now change?
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Mexico


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Rink de Haan" <rinkdehaan@> wrote:

I want to replace my rubber gas pipes from the bottles to the copper pipe and from the ENO stove to the copper pipe. As there are compression fittings being used I assume there will be an old compression ring left on the copper pipe. Has anyone experience with replacing the rubber gas pipes and removing the compression rings?
I have to do it myself since there are no certified companies in the marina where I am (Turkey).

Rink de Haan
SM2K Razor's Edge #330


Re: [Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
 

Hi Rink, and All

A cautionary Tale

   Please exercise great care with the modern "pressure bonded" cooker to copper pipe connections.
   Before setting out on our planned circumnavigation we replaced the old cooker in our Santorin. The new Taylors  came with precrimped pipes from the cooker to the copper pipe end with its connection. We took off the old cooker pipe, threw away the old hose, took off the connection(and for some unknown reason - BBQ?) kept it. 
   Some  5 months later, after an Atlantic crossing and 2/3 through a Pacific crossing, my wife smelt gas whilst cooking breakfast. All off and investigate.
  The official "corgi" rubber/steel braided standard pipe had slid free from its supposedly pressure crimped connection and gas was pouring into the boat.
  All hatches wide open and divert the downwash from the balooner through the cabin floorboards up etc etc.
  Later, I inspected the failed connector, because it is hydraulically crimped the tang that the pipe fits on is smooth not like the old ones which had serrated rings.It is perfect for domestic use but several days of gimblaling, which we only did whilst cooking, had worked the pipe off the tang. (And yes I did have the loop that was supposed to prevent that)
  Off with the official pipe end and back on with the old one - cut off the (useless) crimps push the pipe onto the serrated rings, cut back the braid so that the clips compress the pipe, and 3 small jubilee clips. No worries since then - 13 years ago. And yes - we do inspect regularly.
  Please remember, Gas qualified technicians (Corgi) deal almost exclusively with fixed installations - even if they are leisure qualified - that means mostly caravans and BBQ's.
   This was the most dangerous incidentin over 40,000 sea miles and 15 years on the boat.
   I trust jubilee clips that I can check and tighten and a visible rubber section that I can inspect - I do not trust some anonymous automatic machine. (Now a bit of a rant) Health and Safety Regulations have made people expect machines to look after them - Sailing teaches you to look after yourself - thank God.

Mike & Chris, (her with the sensitive nose!!)
SN027
Akwaaba




From: Rink de Haan <rinkdehaan@gmail.com>

To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, April 14, 2013 2:24 PM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement



 
Hi Trevor,
Thanks for your reply. I'll check the info. I am also looking for some hands on experience to share. I put some photo's of the bimini in the Razor's Edge photo folder. Just in case you want to use it.
Cheers,
Rink
Razor's Edge
SM2k #330

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@...> wrote:


Hi Rink,
It may help to check out www.socal.co.uk they have all parts for Eno cookers. Click on toolbox where you will find a wide variety of hoses and fittings for gas bottles.
I hope this is of some help to you.
On a separate subject, you did a great job with the canopy/bimini on Razors Edge, we are currently trying to do something similar at the moment.
On retrospect is there anything that you would now change?
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Mexico


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Rink de Haan" <rinkdehaan@> wrote:

I want to replace my rubber gas pipes from the bottles to the copper pipe and from the ENO stove to the copper pipe. As there are compression fittings being used I assume there will be an old compression ring left on the copper pipe. Has anyone experience with replacing the rubber gas pipes and removing the compression rings?
I have to do it myself since there are no certified companies in the marina where I am (Turkey).

Rink de Haan
SM2K Razor's Edge #330



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

Rink De Haan
 

Hi Trevor,
Thanks for your reply. I'll check the info. I am also looking for some hands on experience to share. I put some photo's of the bimini in the Razor's Edge photo folder. Just in case you want to use it.
Cheers,
Rink
Razor's Edge
SM2k #330

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "seafeverofcuan" <seafeverofcuan@...> wrote:


Hi Rink,
It may help to check out www.socal.co.uk they have all parts for Eno cookers. Click on toolbox where you will find a wide variety of hoses and fittings for gas bottles.
I hope this is of some help to you.
On a separate subject, you did a great job with the canopy/bimini on Razors Edge, we are currently trying to do something similar at the moment.
On retrospect is there anything that you would now change?
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Mexico


--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Rink de Haan" <rinkdehaan@> wrote:

I want to replace my rubber gas pipes from the bottles to the copper pipe and from the ENO stove to the copper pipe. As there are compression fittings being used I assume there will be an old compression ring left on the copper pipe. Has anyone experience with replacing the rubber gas pipes and removing the compression rings?
I have to do it myself since there are no certified companies in the marina where I am (Turkey).

Rink de Haan
SM2K Razor's Edge #330


Re: Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

seafeverofcuan <seafeverofcuan@...>
 

Hi Rink,
It may help to check out www.socal.co.uk they have all parts for Eno cookers. Click on toolbox where you will find a wide variety of hoses and fittings for gas bottles.
I hope this is of some help to you.
On a separate subject, you did a great job with the canopy/bimini on Razors Edge, we are currently trying to do something similar at the moment.
On retrospect is there anything that you would now change?
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Mexico

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Rink de Haan" <rinkdehaan@...> wrote:

I want to replace my rubber gas pipes from the bottles to the copper pipe and from the ENO stove to the copper pipe. As there are compression fittings being used I assume there will be an old compression ring left on the copper pipe. Has anyone experience with replacing the rubber gas pipes and removing the compression rings?
I have to do it myself since there are no certified companies in the marina where I am (Turkey).

Rink de Haan
SM2K Razor's Edge #330


Re: Propellor Shaft Bushing and Rotary Shaft Seals

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Bill,
Good idea (getting quote from SKF for custom bushing) - will pursue.
Craig


Gas pipe (rubber) replacement

Rink De Haan
 

I want to replace my rubber gas pipes from the bottles to the copper pipe and from the ENO stove to the copper pipe. As there are compression fittings being used I assume there will be an old compression ring left on the copper pipe. Has anyone experience with replacing the rubber gas pipes and removing the compression rings?
I have to do it myself since there are no certified companies in the marina where I am (Turkey).

Rink de Haan
SM2K Razor's Edge #330


Re: Propellor Shaft Bushing and Rotary Shaft Seals

Judy and Bill aboard SV BeBe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Craig,

Interesting. I have a question: Why didn't you take him up on his offer when he said, "We can offer you a custom wear sleeve if needed." Or at least ask for a quote?

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "sv Sangaris" <sangaris@...> wrote:

As we've all experienced, the bronze "wearing-out bushing" (as Amel refers it) gets, well, worn out and grooved from the lip seals. Then water leaks into the oil and we see the tell-tale "chocolate milk" colored oil that says it's time to haul out and replace the seals (cheap) and the "wearing-out bushing" (typically dear in price if supplied by Amel.)
I've had two thoughts on this: switch to a harder bushing of stainless steel and/or try a new (to me) lip seal design by SKF called the Wave Seal. It has the lip in a sinusoidal pattern that spreads the wearing area on the bushing. (SKF is "the world leader in bearing technology.")
I ran this by SKF's engineering department who were most responsive. Here's what their take was on the issue:
"Craig,
My educated guess is that the seals are not an issue in this application. The problem is with the Bronze bushing that is being used as a sealing surface. Bronze is generally quite soft and might not have the required hardness of Rockwell C 30 or higher. You have a few options to solve this issue:
• You can put SKF speedi-sleeve gold on the shaft (P/N 99830). You will probably have to install multiple sleeves as you have 3 seals next to each other.
• You can replace the bronze bushing with a hardened wear sleeve for better abrasion resistance. We can offer you a custom wear sleeve if needed.
• You can plate your bushing with a harder material (Chrome, ceramic, etc) to make it wear resistant.
Essentially, the harder the shaft is, the less grooving it will see. I also suggest you to make sure that you grease pack the area between the seals to make sure that the seals not in contact with the oil are well lubricated. A lack of lubrication can cause the seal and surface to wear quicker. Finally I would arrange the seals with 2 facing the water and one facing the oil as long as there is no pressure difference.
Best regards, Jaydeep Laljani, Application Engineer, SKF USA

I wrote back and said:
"Many thanks for your analysis. Frankly, I have wondered why the manufacturer used Bronze in the first place and not stainless - they actually call it a "wearing-out bushing" (but then they do charge a lot for replacements :-).
Next month I'm returning to the boat, which is in Turkey, and I can easily have a local shop turn a new bushing in 316 Stainless (the same material as the shaft and propeller, so no electrolysis issues.) I think that would solve the problem without going to sleeves or plating.
As for the orientation of the seals, I like your suggestion of two facing the water and will do that the next time I change the seals. After all, we're really trying to keep the water out more than keeping the oil in. And, yes, indeed, I always pack the seals with a good water-proof grease and that helps, I'm sure. "

Jaydeep replied with:
"I think you might not get as much life as you want with 316 SS as it is still not up to the required hardness. If you want to go Stainless I recommend 17-4 Stainless steel which is harder. If you are going with the 316 SS I would recommend you to passivate it to improve corrosion resistance. "

So that's the story which I thought might be of interest to the group. I hauled last year and only haul every three years, plus the new seals I put on then only have 300 hours and are not yet leaking so I'll report back in 2015 when I haul again and install a new 17-4 Stainless Steel "Not Wearing-Out Bushing" with two seals facing out!

Cheers, Craig Briggs
s/v SANGARIS, 1992 Santorin #68, Didim Turkey


Propellor Shaft Bushing and Rotary Shaft Seals

Craig Briggs
 

As we've all experienced, the bronze "wearing-out bushing" (as Amel refers it) gets, well, worn out and grooved from the lip seals. Then water leaks into the oil and we see the tell-tale "chocolate milk" colored oil that says it's time to haul out and replace the seals (cheap) and the "wearing-out bushing" (typically dear in price if supplied by Amel.)
I've had two thoughts on this: switch to a harder bushing of stainless steel and/or try a new (to me) lip seal design by SKF called the Wave Seal. It has the lip in a sinusoidal pattern that spreads the wearing area on the bushing. (SKF is "the world leader in bearing technology.")
I ran this by SKF's engineering department who were most responsive. Here's what their take was on the issue:
"Craig,
My educated guess is that the seals are not an issue in this application. The problem is with the Bronze bushing that is being used as a sealing surface. Bronze is generally quite soft and might not have the required hardness of Rockwell C 30 or higher. You have a few options to solve this issue:
• You can put SKF speedi-sleeve gold on the shaft (P/N 99830). You will probably have to install multiple sleeves as you have 3 seals next to each other.
• You can replace the bronze bushing with a hardened wear sleeve for better abrasion resistance. We can offer you a custom wear sleeve if needed.
• You can plate your bushing with a harder material (Chrome, ceramic, etc) to make it wear resistant.
Essentially, the harder the shaft is, the less grooving it will see. I also suggest you to make sure that you grease pack the area between the seals to make sure that the seals not in contact with the oil are well lubricated. A lack of lubrication can cause the seal and surface to wear quicker. Finally I would arrange the seals with 2 facing the water and one facing the oil as long as there is no pressure difference.
Best regards, Jaydeep Laljani, Application Engineer, SKF USA

I wrote back and said:
"Many thanks for your analysis. Frankly, I have wondered why the manufacturer used Bronze in the first place and not stainless - they actually call it a "wearing-out bushing" (but then they do charge a lot for replacements :-).
Next month I'm returning to the boat, which is in Turkey, and I can easily have a local shop turn a new bushing in 316 Stainless (the same material as the shaft and propeller, so no electrolysis issues.) I think that would solve the problem without going to sleeves or plating.
As for the orientation of the seals, I like your suggestion of two facing the water and will do that the next time I change the seals. After all, we're really trying to keep the water out more than keeping the oil in. And, yes, indeed, I always pack the seals with a good water-proof grease and that helps, I'm sure. "

Jaydeep replied with:
"I think you might not get as much life as you want with 316 SS as it is still not up to the required hardness. If you want to go Stainless I recommend 17-4 Stainless steel which is harder. If you are going with the 316 SS I would recommend you to passivate it to improve corrosion resistance. "

So that's the story which I thought might be of interest to the group. I hauled last year and only haul every three years, plus the new seals I put on then only have 300 hours and are not yet leaking so I'll report back in 2015 when I haul again and install a new 17-4 Stainless Steel "Not Wearing-Out Bushing" with two seals facing out!

Cheers, Craig Briggs
s/v SANGARIS, 1992 Santorin #68, Didim Turkey


Re: [Amel] Re: Isolation Transformer

karkauai
 

Thanks, Craig.  I have Calder's book, will look at Casey's.  I find it a huge leap from reading about it and doing it...will look on SSU to see what you have there.
Hi to Katherine
Kent




________________________________
From: sv Sangaris <sangaris@aol.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2013 9:49 AM
Subject: [Amel] Re: Isolation Transformer



 


Hi Kent,
Don't know any boat electrical courses, but I'll suggest it to Seven Seas U for a future offering, maybe by Nigel Calder.
Do look at both Nigel's book and Don Casey's - good additions for your on-board library and good treatment of isolation transformers, inter alia.
Cheers,
Craig
--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Kent" <karkauai@...> wrote:
.. Does anyone have a recommendation for a good marine electrical course?


(No subject)

Miles Bidwell <mbidwell@...>
 

Eric,



I just replaced the corroded transmission cooler on the Hurst transmission
on my Volvo Penta. It is a (not cheap) stainless duplicate of the cast
aluminum original. I got this from Foley Engines in Worcester, MA. 1 800
233 6539. They seem to have a lot of things like this. They are on the
internet under Foleyengines.com. Good hunting.



Miles

SM 216 Ladybug (on the hard in Newport, RI)


Re: [Amel] WC replacing

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Hi Kent the backing plates were not used on the earlier Melch they had a nut washers behind

Regards

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Apr 11, 2013, at 7:37, Kent Robertson <karkauai@yahoo.com> wrote:

On SM 243 there is a permanent backing plate with threaded holes for the mounting bolts.
Kent
SM243
Kristy
Currently Brunswick, GA, USA

________________________________
From: Richard03801 <richard03801@yahoo.com>
To: "amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thursday, April 11, 2013 7:32 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel] WC replacing



Hi all, when we've done this job we put 4" "inspection ports" in the floor so we could access the nuts. When we put it back together we used nylock nuts. This was done on our Maramu.

By the way when you change out the hose leading to the tank a heat gun makes the job go much easier.

Regards

Richard Piller

Cell 603 767 5330

On Apr 11, 2013, at 1:37, "ornellab" <ornella.battaglini@libero.it> wrote:

Hi all,
I need to remove the WC from the floor of my Santorin to replace it with an identical new one. My doubt is this: do the screws holding the WC have any slab or locknut under the floor, so that I could put the new ones without any problem? Or must I disassemble the toilet's floor?
Thnk you for your help.
Fair winds
Ornella
Santorin N° 122 Earendil

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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


[Amel] Re: SSB/ SAT PHONE

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

As promised, full step by step pictures of how and where we installed the ICOM 710 & AT130 Tuner (plus some other equipment at the Nav Station)on Island Pearl II now up on the site under Photos - title "Island Pearl II"

Fair winds
Colin Streeter
Island Pearl II, 2001 SM2K #332 - Now for sale in Brisbane Australia

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "coatsken" <goldendaze@...> wrote:

Golden Daze, Maramu 192 crossed the Atlantic twice with both.
We ended up using the satphone only. We used provider uuplus for
our email, which allows you to control what is sent to you and also
compacts the messages and we could get all email and weather in less than a minute. SailDocs is inexpensive and allows a text moving forecast based on your expected coordinates. Maps from various sources. All through email which cuts your time online.
Be sure to get the Iridium, as Globalstar still has no mid ocean coverage. Various weather routers will also deliver forcasts by
email or voice. We used Chris Parker and the money was well spent.

Ken & Judy,
Golden Daze
Chagaramaus Trinidad