Date   

Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

Hi Gary
Thanks for your input

/Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila. SM 232



Skickat från min iPad

15 nov 2013 kl. 18:47 skrev "amelliahona" <no_reply@...>:

 

 Just one additional note.  I completely agree will Bill's description and will add the following.  On my Amel SM 2000  SN 335, 160 l/hr Dessalator water maker, the high pressure valve on the control board will occasionally seep a little salt water.  Left unattended, this seep, yields salt crystals below the knob.  This valve has a small packing or "gland" that surrounds the valve shaft along with a "packing nut" to adjust the pressure of the packing around the valve shaft.  This can be adjusted (assuming your system is the same) by removing the valve knob (unscrew the knob retaining screw and simply pull the knob off the shaft), then clean all the salt up by irrigating the area using fresh water.  Next SLIGHTLY, VERY SLIGHTLY, torque the packing nut.  It will require, in my experience less than 15 degrees of rotation.  Replace everything and operate the system.  If the seep continues, repeat the process incrementally until the seep ceases.  This doesn't mitigate the possibility that you need a new valve, but it is cheap and easy and should be the first step. 


Sincerely, 


Gary S. Silver

Amel SM 2000  Hull # 335

s/v Liahon

On the hard in Antigua



---In amelyachtowners@..., <kanalmamman@...> wrote:

Thanks Bill and Ian!
Will follow your advice

/Ann-Sofie

Skickat från min iPad

15 nov 2013 kl. 08:50 skrev "Ian & Judy Jenkins" <ianjudyjenkins@...>:

 

Hi Ann- Sophie,
                             We have had both problems on Pen Azen. A new tap can be bought from the Desalator agent in the UK --I will send on his details. We use this tap to check on the quality of water and after a while the washer on the tap perishes and it drips. We haven't found a way to replace the washer.
  The drip from the pressure knob is indeed salt and it will corrode the knob. If you detach the knob ( undo the small nut in its centre and it pulls off ) you will find a nut behind it. If you gently tighten that nut it presses on a rubber washer that acts as a seal and the seal will work once more.
   Are you about to cross the pond ?
  Fair winds,
Ian and Judy,  Pen Azen, SM 302, Ragusa, Sicily


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: yahoogroups@...
Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2013 02:09:48 +0000
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998



Ann-Sofie

I am fairly certain that the salt under the knob is from a slight leak from the pressure regulator, when the system is off...from the looks of accumulation of salt, I believe it is leaking one drop at a time. I do not think it is leaking when you are making water. The fact that you have a small leak here is not important, but you should look at this valve from the back side to see if the valve is OK. On my 160l in #387 you can see the watermaker control unit from the back by removing a piece of plywood in the cockpit lazarette, then the back cover of the Dessalator control unit. It might be easier to remove yours from the front...I am not sure. 

If the pressure regulator (the valve that the pressure control knob is on) is leaking on the back side while making water, you need to replace it soon. If not, the small leak that you have on the front, under the knob, is not significant and could probably continue without a problem for years.

I hope this helps you.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey


On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 2:11 PM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

I had to put the photos on our blog
http://sailinglife.se/2013/11/14/desalinator-d501998-watermaker/
 
Don't answer on the blog, place your answer here on the forum instead. More easy to follow then.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila SM #232
still at the Canary Islands..... 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <kanalmamman@...> wrote:

Sorry I was to fast to click on "send"......
 
I am Ann-Sofie on Lady Annila SM232
 
But I have to solv the photo thing because I can't up load to the album. I will come back with an address where you can watch the  pictures.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y LadyAnnila
SM 232
present at the Canary Islands


---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

OK, I thought that kanalmamman looked familiar...I checked my email for kanalmamman"at"hotmail.com and found that it belongs to 
Jonas Svanberg and Ann-Sofie S/Y Lady Annila an Amel Super Maramu,#232 and the last I heard, they were in Spain.

Jonas, if you are still in Spain, there are 5 distributors of Dessalator in Spain. Go to http://www.dessalator.com/ and click on Agents for a list.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387





On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 
Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.
 
What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )







Re: Desalinator D50 from 1998

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

 Just one additional note.  I completely agree will Bill's description and will add the following.  On my Amel SM 2000  SN 335, 160 l/hr Dessalator water maker, the high pressure valve on the control board will occasionally seep a little salt water.  Left unattended, this seep, yields salt crystals below the knob.  This valve has a small packing or "gland" that surrounds the valve shaft along with a "packing nut" to adjust the pressure of the packing around the valve shaft.  This can be adjusted (assuming your system is the same) by removing the valve knob (unscrew the knob retaining screw and simply pull the knob off the shaft), then clean all the salt up by irrigating the area using fresh water.  Next SLIGHTLY, VERY SLIGHTLY, torque the packing nut.  It will require, in my experience less than 15 degrees of rotation.  Replace everything and operate the system.  If the seep continues, repeat the process incrementally until the seep ceases.  This doesn't mitigate the possibility that you need a new valve, but it is cheap and easy and should be the first step. 


Sincerely, 


Gary S. Silver

Amel SM 2000  Hull # 335

s/v Liahon

On the hard in Antigua



---In amelyachtowners@..., <kanalmamman@...> wrote:

Thanks Bill and Ian!
Will follow your advice

/Ann-Sofie

Skickat från min iPad

15 nov 2013 kl. 08:50 skrev "Ian & Judy Jenkins" <ianjudyjenkins@...>:

 

Hi Ann- Sophie,
                             We have had both problems on Pen Azen. A new tap can be bought from the Desalator agent in the UK --I will send on his details. We use this tap to check on the quality of water and after a while the washer on the tap perishes and it drips. We haven't found a way to replace the washer.
  The drip from the pressure knob is indeed salt and it will corrode the knob. If you detach the knob ( undo the small nut in its centre and it pulls off ) you will find a nut behind it. If you gently tighten that nut it presses on a rubber washer that acts as a seal and the seal will work once more.
   Are you about to cross the pond ?
  Fair winds,
Ian and Judy,  Pen Azen, SM 302, Ragusa, Sicily


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: yahoogroups@...
Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2013 02:09:48 +0000
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998



Ann-Sofie

I am fairly certain that the salt under the knob is from a slight leak from the pressure regulator, when the system is off...from the looks of accumulation of salt, I believe it is leaking one drop at a time. I do not think it is leaking when you are making water. The fact that you have a small leak here is not important, but you should look at this valve from the back side to see if the valve is OK. On my 160l in #387 you can see the watermaker control unit from the back by removing a piece of plywood in the cockpit lazarette, then the back cover of the Dessalator control unit. It might be easier to remove yours from the front...I am not sure. 

If the pressure regulator (the valve that the pressure control knob is on) is leaking on the back side while making water, you need to replace it soon. If not, the small leak that you have on the front, under the knob, is not significant and could probably continue without a problem for years.

I hope this helps you.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey


On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 2:11 PM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

I had to put the photos on our blog
http://sailinglife.se/2013/11/14/desalinator-d501998-watermaker/
 
Don't answer on the blog, place your answer here on the forum instead. More easy to follow then.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila SM #232
still at the Canary Islands..... 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <kanalmamman@...> wrote:

Sorry I was to fast to click on "send"......
 
I am Ann-Sofie on Lady Annila SM232
 
But I have to solv the photo thing because I can't up load to the album. I will come back with an address where you can watch the  pictures.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y LadyAnnila
SM 232
present at the Canary Islands


---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

OK, I thought that kanalmamman looked familiar...I checked my email for kanalmamman"at"hotmail.com and found that it belongs to 
Jonas Svanberg and Ann-Sofie S/Y Lady Annila an Amel Super Maramu,#232 and the last I heard, they were in Spain.

Jonas, if you are still in Spain, there are 5 distributors of Dessalator in Spain. Go to http://www.dessalator.com/ and click on Agents for a list.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387





On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 
Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.
 
What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )







Re: [Amel] Batteries

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Hi have you had the batteries load tested?  
When you say the boat is in use, what is the major method of charge the motor or gen set. 
The alternators on the motor will most likely not top off the charge. (Note the number of over 50% discharges have a lot to do with battery life as does the quality of water used to refill them) 
The gen set by way of a smart charger will top off the batteries then "float" charge. (Given you are in HK it is also important you don't over heat the battery bank. Most new smart chargers have a temp sensor that sits on top along side the batteries. 
Go luck keeps up to date.

Regards
Richard Piller 
Fairbanks Yacht Group llc
Support and Sales in the Northeaster US
Cell 603 767 5330

On Nov 15, 2013, at 5:22, <crwggb@...> wrote:

 

I have Trojan Lead acid batteries on my SM SULA. the first set I owned lasted 7 years which by all account is pretty good. The boat was kept predominantly in Northern Europe and was was plugged into shore power throughout the winter whilst ashore.

Sula is now based in HK and got a new set of batteries (Trojans again) when she arrived. She is now in commission 12 months of the year being used regularly and rarely gets plugged into shore power. It is obviously very hot in HK for most of the year. the batteries have crashed after only 2 1/2 years. I was somewhat disappointed with this short life until I read the SM owners manual posted here recently, which stated that 1 1/2 years would be the life expectancy!

 

I was wondering what other folks experience has been with their batteries. Sula's have always been meticulously maintained, topped up and left fully charged when leaving the boat after use.

Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong


Re: [Amel] Batteries

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

My Trojan 27-TMX batteries are 6 years old and have actualy 66% of there total capacity (400 Ah ->280Ah)
This needs to equalize the batteries (at 31V see documentation) after this capacity increased from 80Ah to 280Ah
JL Mertz
on CottonBay


0Le 15/11/2013 11:22, crwggb@... a écrit :

 

I have Trojan Lead acid batteries on my SM SULA. the first set I owned lasted 7 years which by all account is pretty good. The boat was kept predominantly in Northern Europe and was was plugged into shore power throughout the winter whilst ashore.

Sula is now based in HK and got a new set of batteries (Trojans again) when she arrived. She is now in commission 12 months of the year being used regularly and rarely gets plugged into shore power. It is obviously very hot in HK for most of the year. the batteries have crashed after only 2 1/2 years. I was somewhat disappointed with this short life until I read the SM owners manual posted here recently, which stated that 1 1/2 years would be the life expectancy!

 

I was wondering what other folks experience has been with their batteries. Sula's have always been meticulously maintained, topped up and left fully charged when leaving the boat after use.

Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong



Re: [Amel] Batteries

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

It depends on so many variables that you will get a wide range of answers, but the range that I hear from active cruisers is 2 to 4 years. Those mostly plugged into shore power can go for ever.

That said, are all of your batteries dead? Did you have them tested? When they were tested, did the test include CCA? Was the person testing the batteries conflicted (a seller of new batteries)?

Sometimes 1 or 2 batteries in the battery bank will fail or short and make the entire bank appear faulty. Since you are in Hong Kong, you might consider buying a digital battery tester with printer. I like this one, and I am betting it is made in China: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Solar-BA327-Digital-Battery-And-System-Tester-With-Integrated-Printer-/331052762325?pt=Battery_Chargers&hash=item4d144844d5

Our experience on our slow circumnavigation has been 4 years life, except that the 13 that we bought 2 years ago have been the worst, with 1 battery failing in less than a year, and 2 more failing recently.

Hope this helps.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387


On Fri, Nov 15, 2013 at 10:22 AM, <crwggb@...> wrote:
 

I have Trojan Lead acid batteries on my SM SULA. the first set I owned lasted 7 years which by all account is pretty good. The boat was kept predominantly in Northern Europe and was was plugged into shore power throughout the winter whilst ashore.

Sula is now based in HK and got a new set of batteries (Trojans again) when she arrived. She is now in commission 12 months of the year being used regularly and rarely gets plugged into shore power. It is obviously very hot in HK for most of the year. the batteries have crashed after only 2 1/2 years. I was somewhat disappointed with this short life until I read the SM owners manual posted here recently, which stated that 1 1/2 years would be the life expectancy!

 

I was wondering what other folks experience has been with their batteries. Sula's have always been meticulously maintained, topped up and left fully charged when leaving the boat after use.

Grah am Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong



Batteries

Graham Boyd
 

I have Trojan Lead acid batteries on my SM SULA. the first set I owned lasted 7 years which by all account is pretty good. The boat was kept predominantly in Northern Europe and was was plugged into shore power throughout the winter whilst ashore.

Sula is now based in HK and got a new set of batteries (Trojans again) when she arrived. She is now in commission 12 months of the year being used regularly and rarely gets plugged into shore power. It is obviously very hot in HK for most of the year. the batteries have crashed after only 2 1/2 years. I was somewhat disappointed with this short life until I read the SM owners manual posted here recently, which stated that 1 1/2 years would be the life expectancy!

 

I was wondering what other folks experience has been with their batteries. Sula's have always been meticulously maintained, topped up and left fully charged when leaving the boat after use.

Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong


Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

Thanks Bill and Ian!
Will follow your advice

/Ann-Sofie

Skickat från min iPad

15 nov 2013 kl. 08:50 skrev "Ian & Judy Jenkins" <ianjudyjenkins@...>:

 

Hi Ann- Sophie,
                             We have had both problems on Pen Azen. A new tap can be bought from the Desalator agent in the UK --I will send on his details. We use this tap to check on the quality of water and after a while the washer on the tap perishes and it drips. We haven't found a way to replace the washer.
  The drip from the pressure knob is indeed salt and it will corrode the knob. If you detach the knob ( undo the small nut in its centre and it pulls off ) you will find a nut behind it. If you gently tighten that nut it presses on a rubber washer that acts as a seal and the seal will work once more.
   Are you about to cross the pond ?
  Fair winds,
Ian and Judy,  Pen Azen, SM 302, Ragusa, Sicily


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: yahoogroups@...
Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2013 02:09:48 +0000
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998



Ann-Sofie

I am fairly certain that the salt under the knob is from a slight leak from the pressure regulator, when the system is off...from the looks of accumulation of salt, I believe it is leaking one drop at a time. I do not think it is leaking when you are making water. The fact that you have a small leak here is not important, but you should look at this valve from the back side to see if the valve is OK. On my 160l in #387 you can see the watermaker control unit from the back by removing a piece of plywood in the cockpit lazarette, then the back cover of the Dessalator control unit. It might be easier to remove yours from the front...I am not sure. 

If the pressure regulator (the valve that the pressure control knob is on) is leaking on the back side while making water, you need to replace it soon. If not, the small leak that you have on the front, under the knob, is not significant and could probably continue without a problem for years.

I hope this helps you.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey


On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 2:11 PM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

I had to put the photos on our blog
http://sailinglife.se/2013/11/14/desalinator-d501998-watermaker/
 
Don't answer on the blog, place your answer here on the forum instead. More easy to follow then.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila SM #232
still at the Canary Islands..... 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <kanalmamman@...> wrote:

Sorry I was to fast to click on "send"......
 
I am Ann-Sofie on Lady Annila SM232
 
But I have to solv the photo thing because I can't up load to the album. I will come back with an address where you can watch the  pictures.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y LadyAnnila
SM 232
present at the Canary Islands


---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

OK, I thought that kanalmamman looked familiar...I checked my email for kanalmamman"at"hotmail.com and found that it belongs to 
Jonas Svanberg and Ann-Sofie S/Y Lady Annila an Amel Super Maramu,#232 and the last I heard, they were in Spain.

Jonas, if you are still in Spain, there are 5 distributors of Dessalator in Spain. Go to http://www.dessalator.com/ and click on Agents for a list.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387





On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 
Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.
 
What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )







Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Ann- Sophie,
                             We have had both problems on Pen Azen. A new tap can be bought from the Desalator agent in the UK --I will send on his details. We use this tap to check on the quality of water and after a while the washer on the tap perishes and it drips. We haven't found a way to replace the washer.
  The drip from the pressure knob is indeed salt and it will corrode the knob. If you detach the knob ( undo the small nut in its centre and it pulls off ) you will find a nut behind it. If you gently tighten that nut it presses on a rubber washer that acts as a seal and the seal will work once more.
   Are you about to cross the pond ?
  Fair winds,
Ian and Judy,  Pen Azen, SM 302, Ragusa, Sicily


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: yahoogroups@...
Date: Fri, 15 Nov 2013 02:09:48 +0000
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998



Ann-Sofie

I am fairly certain that the salt under the knob is from a slight leak from the pressure regulator, when the system is off...from the looks of accumulation of salt, I believe it is leaking one drop at a time. I do not think it is leaking when you are making water. The fact that you have a small leak here is not important, but you should look at this valve from the back side to see if the valve is OK. On my 160l in #387 you can see the watermaker control unit from the back by removing a piece of plywood in the cockpit lazarette, then the back cover of the Dessalator control unit. It might be easier to remove yours from the front...I am not sure. 

If the pressure regulator (the valve that the pressure control knob is on) is leaking on the back side while making water, you need to replace it soon. If not, the small leak that you have on the front, under the knob, is not significant and could probably continue without a problem for years.

I hope this helps you.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey


On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 2:11 PM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

I had to put the photos on our blog
http://sailinglife.se/2013/11/14/desalinator-d501998-watermaker/
 
Don't answer on the blog, place your answer here on the forum instead. More easy to follow then.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila SM #232
still at the Canary Islands..... 


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote:

Sorry I was to fast to click on "send"......
 
I am Ann-Sofie on Lady Annila SM232
 
But I have to solv the photo thing because I can't up load to the album. I will come back with an address where you can watch the  pictures.
 
/Ann-Sofie
S/Y LadyAnnila
SM 232
present at the Canary Islands


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote:

OK, I thought that kanalmamman looked familiar...I checked my email for kanalmamman"at"hotmail.com and found that it belongs to 
Jonas Svanberg and Ann-Sofie S/Y Lady Annila an Amel Super Maramu,#232 and the last I heard, they were in Spain.

Jonas, if you are still in Spain, there are 5 distributors of Dessalator in Spain. Go to http://www.dessalator.com/ and click on Agents for a list.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387





On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 
Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.
 
What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )







Re: [Amel] RE: Desalinator D50 from 1998

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Ann-Sofie

I am fairly certain that the salt under the knob is from a slight leak from the pressure regulator, when the system is off...from the looks of accumulation of salt, I believe it is leaking one drop at a time. I do not think it is leaking when you are making water. The fact that you have a small leak here is not important, but you should look at this valve from the back side to see if the valve is OK. On my 160l in #387 you can see the watermaker control unit from the back by removing a piece of plywood in the cockpit lazarette, then the back cover of the Dessalator control unit. It might be easier to remove yours from the front...I am not sure. 

If the pressure regulator (the valve that the pressure control knob is on) is leaking on the back side while making water, you need to replace it soon. If not, the small leak that you have on the front, under the knob, is not significant and could probably continue without a problem for years.

I hope this helps you.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey


On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 2:11 PM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

I had to put the photos on our blog

http://sailinglife.se/2013/11/14/desalinator-d501998-watermaker/

 

Don't answer on the blog, place your answer here on the forum instead. More easy to follow then.

 

/Ann-Sofie

S/Y Lady Annila SM #232

still at the Canary Islands..... 



---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote:

Sorry I was to fast to click on "send"......

 

I am Ann-Sofie on Lady Annila SM232

 

But I have to solv the photo thing because I can't up load to the album. I will come back with an address where you can watch the  pictures.

 

/Ann-Sofie

S/Y LadyAnnila

SM 232

present at the Canary Islands



---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote:

OK, I thought that kanalmamman looked familiar...I checked my email for kanalmamman"at"hotmail.com and found that it belongs to 
Jonas Svanberg and Ann-Sofie S/Y Lady Annila an Amel Super Maramu,#232 and the last I heard, they were in Spain.

Jonas, if you are still in Spain, there are 5 distributors of Dessalator in Spain. Go to http://www.dessalator.com/ and click on Agents for a list.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387





On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.

 

What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )





Re: [Amel] Desalinator D50 from 1998

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

Read the other messages in the same thread. There is a urlmtomour blog where you can see the pictures.

Right now that articel is the newesr, so just try www.sailinglife.se

Regards
Ann-Sofie. 
S/Y Lady Annila. SM nr 232

Skickat från min iPad

14 nov 2013 kl. 16:41 skrev "Kent Robertson" <karkauai@...>:

 




From: "kanalmamman@..." <kanalmamman@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 6:50 AM
Subject: [Amel] Desalinator D50 from 1998

 
Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.
 
What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )

I can't find that Album, kanalmamman.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy


Re: [Amel] Desalinator D50 from 1998

karkauai
 




From: "kanalmamman@..."
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Thursday, November 14, 2013 6:50 AM
Subject: [Amel] Desalinator D50 from 1998

 
Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.
 
What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )

I can't find that Album, kanalmamman.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy


Fw: [Amel] Watermaking, Dessalator

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohnholl@...>
 

Because the search facility on this revised site is so difficult I set out below a message that I posted on 28 June 2012.  Martin de Jong speaks perfect English and no doubt Spanish and French. He is incredibly knowledgeable and helpful. His phone no is 0034 96571988.
 
              Anne and John, Bali Hai, SM 319 for sale in Malta   annejohnholl@...
 

Sent: Thursday, June 28, 2012 12:26 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel] Watermaking
 
Hello Jose,
The best place for advice is Martin de Jong who is Mr Dessalator in Spain (desalador@...). The second bit of my advice is that so far as I know all watermakers are based on high pressure pumps made by the US company called Catpumps.Their European Agent is at  cpi@... and they will send you a list of a local agents and I feel sure that there will be one in the Azores because the locals including the hotels will have big R.O. installations. My catpump needed servicing and the agents for yacht water makers were of no help but cpi gave me the details of the man here in Malta who does hotels and he did it for me.   However start with Martin and do get a salinity meter so that you do not pump salt water into your tank as even if you are not offshore salt water will destroy your appliances pdq. I do not know your hull no but unless you have a latish SM2K
the so called salinity monitor is non existent. A replacement board with a working monitor can be bought for about $500.
 
                          Enjoy Horta,  Anne and John,  Bali Hai,  SM2K 319   Malta
 
From: Jose
Sent: Wednesday, June 27, 2012 9:31 PM
Subject: [Amel] Watermaking
 
 

Background
Ipanema's desalination had been pickled and dormant since I bought her almost 4 years ago. In preparation for our transatlantic passage I had bought a new set of membranes assuming that the ones on board should have certainly been useless. However, after hearing from one of our members, I decided to see if they worked once we put the boat in the water. The boat had been all winter and spring on land at Plymouth's Brewer's Marina being repaired from a substantial, but only cosmetic, damage caused by a loose boat that laid against Impanema during a late October storm while it awaited haul out. So we could only test the system 2 weeks departure while we provisioned the boat at Constitution Marina (Boston). Initially, when I started the desalination, the current drawn by the motor was so excessive that the generator's breaker would stop after a few seconds. Recommended by a tech from Cay electronics, I started it with shore power and IT WORKED making the 35 Gal/hour with the pressure gauge on the middle of the green. Because of the poor quality of water in Boston harbor I only let it run for a few minutes and tasted the water: It was good! Then, we ran the generator and it worked again: we could finally leave last Friday June 21, 2012.
Since I was still a little worried about the desalination, we decided to conserve water and loaded the boat with fresh water, just in case. Well, when I tested the system again, this time 50 miles east of the cape code, the desalination motor started and it made water for about 30 minutes. Then the system stopped and the motor was very hot with the smell of electrical burn. It meant the end of showers for the end of the trip, and a drop in the morale of the crew including me.
Today, Monday June 25, I tried again and … as the motor started the generator began to labor and for the first 2 minutes I thought it was the end of our water making but … miraculously, the generator accelerated and the pump began to purr. I left her without increasing the pressure and monitored its temperature that rached about 65 C. 20 minutes later I increased the high pressure slowly until the flow reached 20 gph and the pressure was still on the orange. One hour later the high pressure motor temperature was still 65 C. We ran it for another hour at 25 gph with only 1 C increase in motor temperature.

The questions are: 1) what happened ? 2) is 65 C too much (It feels hot to touch but does not burn)? 3) is there anything that I should do while underway and after I reach the Azores? 5) any tech at the Azores that can check the system and service it?
Thanks in advance

Jose Gabriel Venegas and crew
Ipanema SM 2K, crossing the atlantic, currently at N40 13 W 60 40.


Re: Desalinator D50 from 1998

kanalmamman@...
 

I had to put the photos on our blog

http://sailinglife.se/2013/11/14/desalinator-d501998-watermaker/

 

Don't answer on the blog, place your answer here on the forum instead. More easy to follow then.

 

/Ann-Sofie

S/Y Lady Annila SM #232

still at the Canary Islands..... 

---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote:

OK, I thought that kanalmamman looked familiar...I checked my email for kanalmamman"at"hotmail.com and found that it belongs to 
Jonas Svanberg and Ann-Sofie S/Y Lady Annila an Amel Super Maramu,#232 and the last I heard, they were in Spain.

Jonas, if you are still in Spain, there are 5 distributors of Dessalator in Spain. Go to http://www.dessalator.com/ and click on Agents for a list.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387





On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.

 

What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )




Re: Desalinator D50 from 1998

kanalmamman@...
 

Sorry I was to fast to click on "send"......

 

I am Ann-Sofie on Lady Annila SM232

 

But I have to solv the photo thing because I can't up load to the album. I will come back with an address where you can watch the  pictures.

 

/Ann-Sofie

S/Y LadyAnnila

SM 232

present at the Canary Islands

On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.

 

What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )




Re: [Amel] Desalinator D50 from 1998

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

OK, I thought that kanalmamman looked familiar...I checked my email for kanalmamman"at"hotmail.com and found that it belongs to 
Jonas Svanberg and Ann-Sofie S/Y Lady Annila an Amel Super Maramu,#232 and the last I heard, they were in Spain.

Jonas, if you are still in Spain, there are 5 distributors of Dessalator in Spain. Go to http://www.dessalator.com/ and click on Agents for a list.

Hope this helps,

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387





On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 12:43 PM, Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...> wrote:
First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.

 

What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )




Re: [Amel] Desalinator D50 from 1998

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

First, I do not know who you are. 

Second, I do not know your boat model or hull number, nor do I know your current location. 

Third, I paged through all of the photo albums and could not find an album named Desalinator D50 1998. I did look at the album we set up for Dessalator and found no photo there. If you could copy and paste a hyperlink in your message, it will save those trying to help you some time.

We all try to help each other, but we all need to help the helpers by trying to give accurate and complete information.

Now that I have all of that off of my chest, let me see if I can help you.
  1. Dessalator has a fairly good website in 5 languages at http://www.dessalator.com/. If you have not already checked their website, you should do so.
  2. You can ask Dessalator any question directly by clicking on the contact tab on their website, or you might try this link to that page: http://www.dessalator.fr/en/contact/?PHPSESSID=but1skluq01a7aautbg541f2j7
  3. I think you may be referring to salt under the pressure regulator knob. If so, the pressure regulator is probably leaking...this may be a problem, or not...
How the water maker works and the role of the pressure regulator:
The Reverse Osmosis salt water membrane looks like a very thick pipe; as water passes through from the outside of the membrane to the hollow inside, it loses most of the disolved solids (salt).

The pressure regulator causes the increase in pressure in the water at the outside of the membrane by closing off some of the outlet of salt water. The more you close off the outlet, the higher the pressure gets going to the outside of the membrane. Water passes through the membrane from the outside to the inside shedding about 99% of the dissolved solids...these dissolved solids wash off of the outside of the membrane inside pressure tube with other water and it all passes through that pressure regulator. 

Simply stated, the pressure regulator is much like a water tap. When it is wide open, water flows through unobstructed and no significant pressure builds up in the membrane pressure tube. When you start closing the pressure regulator, the flow of the water is restricted and pressure builds on the outside of the membrane forcing water through the membrane (Reverse Osmosis). 

Always turn the pressure regulator completely anti-clockwise when you finish making water, and always  increase and decrease the pressure slowly.

I am not familiar with the D50, but I have seen a Dessalator pressure regulator assembly made out of dissimilar metals which eventually corroded enough to leak on the pressure side. If you have pickled your watermaker each year since 1998, the pickling solution is caustic enough to have deteriorated that pressure regulator valve enough to create a leak.

I would remove the panel from the front or look at the panel from the rear...(again, I do not know what boat you have, but suspect it is a Super Maramu). With the system running and making water, look for leaks.

You can buy parts from Dessalator and repair it yourself, or you can use their website to locate one of their reps.

BTW, I have had a very slight leak at the pressure regulator for 3 or 4 years. When it dries, only the salt is evident.

Hope this helps you and that you will be making water soon.

Bill
BeBe, SM2k, #387
Currently Fethiye, Turkey










On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 11:50 AM, <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
 

Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.

 

What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )



Desalinator D50 from 1998

kanalmamman@...
 

Look at the pictures in the Album Desalinator D50 1998.

 

What can that pile of salt-looking thing be that appears under the nob that we use for managing the preassure on the watermaker.

(The pipe you can see to the left, or almost see, is our not-permanent solution for the tap where we test the water quality. It works, it is not nice but better than a tap dripping while we try to get a new one. )


Re: [Amel] RE: Dessalinator model D50 50 l/h

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Alan, 

I bought the 24V timer and a 24V solenoid water valve on eBay. Both were shipped from China to Turkey at no additional cost...most of the China eBay sellers ship worldwide via China Post at no additional cost to the buyer (included in the sale price). If the invoice cost is low, the item will fly through Customs in the US and Turkey...do not know about other places. The timer looks exactly like the one in the link posted by Derick.

Bill
BeBe


On Thu, Nov 14, 2013 at 5:30 AM, <divanz620@...> wrote:
 

Thanks Bill....that's great, where did you get the 24V solenoid valve needed to go inline ???

 

Cheers

Alan

SV Elyse SM437 in Opua, New Zealand 



---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote:



On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 6:20 PM, <derickgates@...> wrote:
 

 Gary,

 

Thanks for the great explanation of a simple timed fresh water flush system for the Dessalator membranes.  In sending for the timer using your link, I note that it refers to a 24 Volt AC timer.  Can I safely assume that you meant to refer to a 24 Volt DC timer?  Here is the corresponding 24 Volt DC link that I found:

 

http://prostores1.carrierzone.com/servlet/super-feed_com/-strse-30/DT-dsh-06-fdsh--24-VOLT-DC/Detail

 

Same price, same functionality, I believe.

 

Derick Gates

Amel SM #400

s/v Brava

Currently on the hard at Bailey's Boatyard in Antigua

As of January 4th, 2013, Sapphire Beach Marina, St. Thomas USVI

 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote:

H Jonas:

Regarding the timer flush system that I hooked up: I purchased one of these

http://prostores1.carrierzone.com/servlet/super-feed_com/-strse-96/DT-dsh-05-fdsh--24-Volt-AC/Detail

I hope that link will post. If not, just google "24 volt fish feeder timer" or something like that and you will come across some 24 volt 7 day timers. The one mentioned above was about $35.00 US. This one was rated at 16 amps and had an internal battery backup. Since I wasn't exactly sure of the current draw of the fresh water pump on my boat I hooked the output of the timer to a 28 volt relay that was rated at a much higher amperage. I don't have the specification of the relay, but it was about $15.00 US at the local chandlery and its contacts were rated at 50 amps or something li ke that. So the timer controls the relay, that regulates power to the fresh water pump. At any rate, in the area behind the 24 volt breaker panel is a terminal block with a cover for 24 volt power. I wired the timer to this source, I then cut the wire from the breaker for the fresh water pump and wired it through the contacts of the relay. The control coil of the relay is controlled by 24 volt power from the control contacts of the timer (ganged relays). (I will try and post a schematic of this wiring in the Dessalator photos folder). The timer has a switch for "On" or "Timer" mode. When aboard the boat, we place that switch in the ON position and the fresh water pump operates as normal with the pressure switch on the pump functioning as usual. When we leave the boat, we make sure the water tank is full, switch the flush valve on the water maker low pressure pump to the flush position, and set the timer to the TIMER mode. We program the timer to flush for 5 minutes every other or every third day. 5 minutes of flush every third day will use about 500 to 700 liters of fresh water in 6 months. Your results may vary and you should actually time and measure how much flush water will pass through your system by collecting and measuring how much water comes out the thru hull fitting on the port side of the hull. At the programmed time, the timer contacts close sending 24 volts to the relay coil. This causes the relay coil to actuate and the relay contacts close, sending 24 volt power to the fresh water pump, The pump actuates for 5 minutes, sending fresh water thru the water maker system (flushes the low pressure pump, the series of filters, the high pressure pump, the membranes and the plumbing of the control panel). It has worked for 5 years without fail. I have a small portable solar panel that I leave out when off the boat to trickle charge the batteries and this has always kept up with the energy needs of the brief run cycles of the pump.

My only concern was having to leave the main 24 volt power switches on the battery bank in the on position when I leave the boat. I do make sure that every other breaker on the boat is turned off, including (1) the breakers in the engine room, (2) forward cabin, (3) beneath the nav station, (4) in the hanging locker by the nav station, and (5) above the overhead of the quarter berth, (6) all the 24 volt panel breakers except the bilge pump and fresh water pump. A potential failure mode would be if the timer or ganged-relay failed in the "on" position. In that case the pump would actuate until the water tanks were empty and them might continue to run until pump failure or battery depletion. I have toyed with installing some sort of "run-on" sensor that would time out the system and turn it off if the pump ran too long. I just haven't gotten around to that yet.

To flush with the water maker on or off is an interesting discus sion. I have always flushed with the water maker off except when I am flushing the entire sea-chest/manifold system when leaving the boat. In that case I put the hose from shore water source in to the sea-chest and turn the water maker on. I have yet to find a source of water strong enough to keep up with the water maker's need for water. I have to cycle the water maker on and off to prevent it from sucking air from the sea chest. I can see why flushing with the system running would give more through-put of flush water and thus do a more thorough flush, but having the high pressure pump cavitate with air is supposedly damaging to that pump. Perhaps you can keep up with the feed water needs of the lower capacity water maker using shore water to flush but I cannot.

Nice chatting with you Jonas. I will post an alert when I post the schematic of the timer modification in the photo's section.

Sincerely,

Gary Silver
Amel SM #335
s/v Liahona
Sint Maartin Dutch West Indies


--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ann-Sofie Svanberg wrote:
>
>
> Gary,
> thank you for a fact oriented and short answer. I totally share your opinion regarding how to deal with the WM and was not aware of the Sodium meta-bisulfite. Have not used it and will probably not do it either. I am really interested in your automatic rinsing solution, could you please send some additional info regarding this, it will be most appreciated.
> I think I have solved the major question regarding the rinsing, in the Amel manual for this boat it says that the Dessalator unit should be tunred off but in the official info from Dessalator it says that it should be on but without pressure(the D50 has no automatic rinsing function). Doing the rinsing with the unit on gave a much better quality of the produced water than having it off. We now produce water with approx. 250 PTS level(using a Com 100) which I think is ok.
>
> Once again, thank you for a fast and very good answer!
>
> All the best from a cloudy but warm island of Brac, Croatia
>
> Jonas (Svanberg)
> S/Y Lady Annila
> SM # 232
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>



Re: Dessalinator model D50 50 l/h

Alan Leslie
 

Thanks Bill....that's great, where did you get the 24V solenoid valve needed to go inline ???

 

Cheers

Alan

SV Elyse SM437 in Opua, New Zealand 

On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 6:20 PM, <derickgates@...> wrote:
 

 Gary,

 

Thanks for the great explanation of a simple timed fresh water flush system for the Dessalator membranes.  In sending for the timer using your link, I note that it refers to a 24 Volt AC timer.  Can I safely assume that you meant to refer to a 24 Volt DC timer?  Here is the corresponding 24 Volt DC link that I found:

 

http://prostores1.carrierzone.com/servlet/super-feed_com/-strse-30/DT-dsh-06-fdsh--24-VOLT-DC/Detail

 

Same price, same functionality, I believe.

 

Derick Gates

Amel SM #400

s/v Brava

Currently on the hard at Bailey's Boatyard in Antigua

As of January 4th, 2013, Sapphire Beach Marina, St. Thomas USVI

 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote:

H Jonas:

Regarding the timer flush system that I hooked up: I purchased one of these

http://prostores1.carrierzone.com/servlet/super-feed_com/-strse-96/DT-dsh-05-fdsh--24-Volt-AC/Detail

I hope that link will post. If not, just google "24 volt fish feeder timer" or something like that and you will come across some 24 volt 7 day timers. The one mentioned above was about $35.00 US. This one was rated at 16 amps and had an internal battery backup. Since I wasn't exactly sure of the current draw of the fresh water pump on my boat I hooked the output of the timer to a 28 volt relay that was rated at a much higher amperage. I don't have the specification of the relay, but it was about $15.00 US at the local chandlery and its contacts were rated at 50 amps or something li ke that. So the timer controls the relay, that regulates power to the fresh water pump. At any rate, in the area behind the 24 volt breaker panel is a terminal block with a cover for 24 volt power. I wired the timer to this source, I then cut the wire from the breaker for the fresh water pump and wired it through the contacts of the relay. The control coil of the relay is controlled by 24 volt power from the control contacts of the timer (ganged relays). (I will try and post a schematic of this wiring in the Dessalator photos folder). The timer has a switch for "On" or "Timer" mode. When aboard the boat, we place that switch in the ON position and the fresh water pump operates as normal with the pressure switch on the pump functioning as usual. When we leave the boat, we make sure the water tank is full, switch the flush valve on the water maker low pressure pump to the flush position, and set the timer to the TIMER mode. We program the timer to flush for 5 minutes every other or every third day. 5 minutes of flush every third day will use about 500 to 700 liters of fresh water in 6 months. Your results may vary and you should actually time and measure how much flush water will pass through your system by collecting and measuring how much water comes out the thru hull fitting on the port side of the hull. At the programmed time, the timer contacts close sending 24 volts to the relay coil. This causes the relay coil to actuate and the relay contacts close, sending 24 volt power to the fresh water pump, The pump actuates for 5 minutes, sending fresh water thru the water maker system (flushes the low pressure pump, the series of filters, the high pressure pump, the membranes and the plumbing of the control panel). It has worked for 5 years without fail. I have a small portable solar panel that I leave out when off the boat to trickle charge the batteries and this has always kept up with the energy needs of the brief run cycles of the pump.

My only concern was having to leave the main 24 volt power switches on the battery bank in the on position when I leave the boat. I do make sure that every other breaker on the boat is turned off, including (1) the breakers in the engine room, (2) forward cabin, (3) beneath the nav station, (4) in the hanging locker by the nav station, and (5) above the overhead of the quarter berth, (6) all the 24 volt panel breakers except the bilge pump and fresh water pump. A potential failure mode would be if the timer or ganged-relay failed in the "on" position. In that case the pump would actuate until the water tanks were empty and them might continue to run until pump failure or battery depletion. I have toyed with installing some sort of "run-on" sensor that would time out the system and turn it off if the pump ran too long. I just haven't gotten around to that yet.

To flush with the water maker on or off is an interesting discus sion. I have always flushed with the water maker off except when I am flushing the entire sea-chest/manifold system when leaving the boat. In that case I put the hose from shore water source in to the sea-chest and turn the water maker on. I have yet to find a source of water strong enough to keep up with the water maker's need for water. I have to cycle the water maker on and off to prevent it from sucking air from the sea chest. I can see why flushing with the system running would give more through-put of flush water and thus do a more thorough flush, but having the high pressure pump cavitate with air is supposedly damaging to that pump. Perhaps you can keep up with the feed water needs of the lower capacity water maker using shore water to flush but I cannot.

Nice chatting with you Jonas. I will post an alert when I post the schematic of the timer modification in the photo's section.

Sincerely,

Gary Silver
Amel SM #335
s/v Liahona
Sint Maartin Dutch West Indies


--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...> wrote:
>
>
> Gary,
> thank you for a fact oriented and short answer. I totally share your opinion regarding how to deal with the WM and was not aware of the Sodium meta-bisulfite. Have not used it and will probably not do it either. I am really interested in your automatic rinsing solution, could you please send some additional info regarding this, it will be most appreciated.
> I think I have solved the major question regarding the rinsing, in the Amel manual for this boat it says that the Dessalator unit should be tunred off but in the official info from Dessalator it says that it should be on but without pressure(the D50 has no automatic rinsing function). Doing the rinsing with the unit on gave a much better quality of the produced water than having it off. We now produce water with approx. 250 PTS level(using a Com 100) which I think is ok.
>
> Once again, thank you for a fast and very good answer!
>
> All the best from a cloudy but warm island of Brac, Croatia
>
> Jonas (Svanberg)
> S/Y Lady Annila
> SM # 232
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>


Re: [Amel] Re: Dessalinator model D50 50 l/h

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 


On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 6:20 PM, <derickgates@...> wrote:
 

 Gary,

 

Thanks for the great explanation of a simple timed fresh water flush system for the Dessalator membranes.  In sending for the timer using your link, I note that it refers to a 24 Volt AC timer.  Can I safely assume that you meant to refer to a 24 Volt DC timer?  Here is the corresponding 24 Volt DC link that I found:

 

http://prostores1.carrierzone.com/servlet/super-feed_com/-strse-30/DT-dsh-06-fdsh--24-VOLT-DC/Detail

 

Same price, same functionality, I believe.

 

Derick Gates

Amel SM #400

s/v Brava

Currently on the hard at Bailey's Boatyard in Antigua

As of January 4th, 2013, Sapphire Beach Marina, St. Thomas USVI

 



---In amelyachtowners@..., <no_reply@...> wrote:

H Jonas:

Regarding the timer flush system that I hooked up: I purchased one of these

http://prostores1.carrierzone.com/servlet/super-feed_com/-strse-96/DT-dsh-05-fdsh--24-Volt-AC/Detail

I hope that link will post. If not, just google "24 volt fish feeder timer" or something like that and you will come across some 24 volt 7 day timers. The one mentioned above was about $35.00 US. This one was rated at 16 amps and had an internal battery backup. Since I wasn't exactly sure of the current draw of the fresh water pump on my boat I hooked the output of the timer to a 28 volt relay that was rated at a much higher amperage. I don't have the specification of the relay, but it was about $15.00 US at the local chandlery and its contacts were rated at 50 amps or something li ke that. So the timer controls the relay, that regulates power to the fresh water pump. At any rate, in the area behind the 24 volt breaker panel is a terminal block with a cover for 24 volt power. I wired the timer to this source, I then cut the wire from the breaker for the fresh water pump and wired it through the contacts of the relay. The control coil of the relay is controlled by 24 volt power from the control contacts of the timer (ganged relays). (I will try and post a schematic of this wiring in the Dessalator photos folder). The timer has a switch for "On" or "Timer" mode. When aboard the boat, we place that switch in the ON position and the fresh water pump operates as normal with the pressure switch on the pump functioning as usual. When we leave the boat, we make sure the water tank is full, switch the flush valve on the water maker low pressure pump to the flush position, and set the timer to the TIMER mode. We program the timer to flush for 5 minutes every other or every third day. 5 minutes of flush every third day will use about 500 to 700 liters of fresh water in 6 months. Your results may vary and you should actually time and measure how much flush water will pass through your system by collecting and measuring how much water comes out the thru hull fitting on the port side of the hull. At the programmed time, the timer contacts close sending 24 volts to the relay coil. This causes the relay coil to actuate and the relay contacts close, sending 24 volt power to the fresh water pump, The pump actuates for 5 minutes, sending fresh water thru the water maker system (flushes the low pressure pump, the series of filters, the high pressure pump, the membranes and the plumbing of the control panel). It has worked for 5 years without fail. I have a small portable solar panel that I leave out when off the boat to trickle charge the batteries and this has always kept up with the energy needs of the brief run cycles of the pump.

My only concern was having to leave the main 24 volt power switches on the battery bank in the on position when I leave the boat. I do make sure that every other breaker on the boat is turned off, including (1) the breakers in the engine room, (2) forward cabin, (3) beneath the nav station, (4) in the hanging locker by the nav station, and (5) above the overhead of the quarter berth, (6) all the 24 volt panel breakers except the bilge pump and fresh water pump. A potential failure mode would be if the timer or ganged-relay failed in the "on" position. In that case the pump would actuate until the water tanks were empty and them might continue to run until pump failure or battery depletion. I have toyed with installing some sort of "run-on" sensor that would time out the system and turn it off if the pump ran too long. I just haven't gotten around to that yet.

To flush with the water maker on or off is an interesting discus sion. I have always flushed with the water maker off except when I am flushing the entire sea-chest/manifold system when leaving the boat. In that case I put the hose from shore water source in to the sea-chest and turn the water maker on. I have yet to find a source of water strong enough to keep up with the water maker's need for water. I have to cycle the water maker on and off to prevent it from sucking air from the sea chest. I can see why flushing with the system running would give more through-put of flush water and thus do a more thorough flush, but having the high pressure pump cavitate with air is supposedly damaging to that pump. Perhaps you can keep up with the feed water needs of the lower capacity water maker using shore water to flush but I cannot.

Nice chatting with you Jonas. I will post an alert when I post the schematic of the timer modification in the photo's section.

Sincerely,

Gary Silver
Amel SM #335
s/v Liahona
Sint Maartin Dutch West Indies


--- In amelyachtowners@..., Ann-Sofie Svanberg wrote:
>
>
> Gary,
> thank you for a fact oriented and short answer. I totally share your opinion regarding how to deal with the WM and was not aware of the Sodium meta-bisulfite. Have not used it and will probably not do it either. I am really interested in your automatic rinsing solution, could you please send some additional info regarding this, it will be most appreciated.
> I think I have solved the major question regarding the rinsing, in the Amel manual for this boat it says that the Dessalator unit should be tunred off but in the official info from Dessalator it says that it should be on but without pressure(the D50 has no automatic rinsing function). Doing the rinsing with the unit on gave a much better quality of the produced water than having it off. We now produce water with approx. 250 PTS level(using a Com 100) which I think is ok.
>
> Once again, thank you for a fast and very good answer!
>
> All the best from a cloudy but warm island of Brac, Croatia
>
> Jonas (Svanberg)
> S/Y Lady Annila
> SM # 232
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
>