Date   

Re: [Amel] RE: Anchor size Maramu 46

Ric Gottschalk <ric@...>
 

I also placed a Rochna #33/73 lbs. and it fits well. What I also did was make a 2nd bow roller to port for originally a 66 lbs Bruce and now the original 46 lb CQR. I have a Santorin 46' SN 24. Now in Annapolis. The 2nd rode is chain & 3/4 nylon that is removed from the locker & the lofran windlass works well. 
I can not bring myself to installing another hawsepipe. I use flexible modeling clay to cap off the windlass hawsepipe. 
Cheers,

Ric Gottschalk
Kitchen Magic Refacers, Inc
Office 410-923-5800
Fax 410-923-5802

On Jan 2, 2014, at 12:05 PM, "Bob Sarff" <bob.sarff@...> wrote:

 

I originally had a 45 lb CQR on our Maramu  but upgraded to a Rocna 33 (73 lb) before leaving for Mexico.  Itw fit OK but hit the pullpit so I had an extension welded to the existing roller so it would fit better.  

Bob
SV Chara


On Sun, Dec 29, 2013 at 5:34 AM, <j.lochhead@...> wrote:
 

Thanks all for the advice.  John that is exactly the info I was after. Basically what size new generation anchor will fit.  I am not a fantastic sleeper at the moment when on anchor so anything to help when we move aboard will be worth it. Our "plan" is also to head up to the barrier reef, although not sure how far up this next year.  We are in perth at the moment and will be driving from perth to Brisbane in February.


Thanks again.




Re: [Amel] RE: Anchor size Maramu 46

Bob Sarff <bob.sarff@...>
 

I originally had a 45 lb CQR on our Maramu  but upgraded to a Rocna 33 (73 lb) before leaving for Mexico.  Itw fit OK but hit the pullpit so I had an extension welded to the existing roller so it would fit better.  

Bob
SV Chara


On Sun, Dec 29, 2013 at 5:34 AM, <j.lochhead@...> wrote:
 

Thanks all for the advice.  John that is exactly the info I was after. Basically what size new generation anchor will fit.  I am not a fantastic sleeper at the moment when on anchor so anything to help when we move aboard will be worth it. Our "plan" is also to head up to the barrier reef, although not sure how far up this next year.  We are in perth at the moment and will be driving from perth to Brisbane in February.


Thanks again.




Re: Just testing

Jose_Luis Isasi
 

Hi Danny, your account seems to be fine in the register. No bouncing, etc.
Regards
JL
Group Moderator


Amel Kirk in the UK

David Carter <lylecarter1165@...>
 

Hello Amel Owners,

I joined your group hoping to find someone who owns an Amel Kirk in the UK. I am just about to go to the Caribbean to inspect one that I make an offer on but am doing so without actually having see an Amel Kirk in person. I am hoping to find someone here in the UK who owns one who would be happy to let me take a look round to get a feeling of what I am letting myself in for.

Many thanks,

David


Just testing

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi all, once again a drought of Amel emails. Nothing in Spam either.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl


Re: 1993 Santorin for sale

ericmeury@...
 

Am i mistaken?  Didn't you just purchase this Santorin? We just bought ours this past summer and love it!!..Why the swtich?


Re: [Amel] Flopper Stoppers

karkauai
 

I was looking at a similar website that suggested a triangle 36" on each side for a 45 footer.  That would make it more like a 4 foot triangle for our SM's?  Anybody have specific experience building their own?
Kent
SM 243 Kristy
Brunswick GA USA


From: Dennis Johns
To: "amelyachtowners@..."
Sent: Tuesday, December 31, 2013 2:53 PM
Subject: [Amel] Flopper Stoppers

 
Sorry for this late addition.  My experience with flopper stoppers has been positive for all the reasons previously noted.  Because stoppers should be specific to your boat (size/quantity), I followed this mariner's instructions and made my own: http://offshore-sailor.com/boat-gear/27-flopper-stopper-you-can-make-yourself.html.  They work well and stow flat.  I made two, one each to hang off the ends of the main and mizzen booms (a bit easier to deploy than spin poles -I think).  Prototypes were made out of plywood to make sure I had made them the right size (just guessing, I made them as large as possible to fit in a bow deck hold).  After several tests at anchor in the California Channel Islands (certainly one of the better places to test) indicating they were an appropriate size, I remade them out of Starboard and they worked even better as they were not buoyant like the plywood ones.  I also modified the original design adding additional weights so they dive faster.  Caveat: they do not totally prevent rocking but they do prevent the accentuated rocking cycle that can develop that makes sleeping a challenge.  I used them often in the South Pacific in anchorages that other boats avoided because of their reputation of exposure to the swell.

Dennis Johns
s/v Libertad
Yacht Haven Marina
Phuket, Thailand





Flopper Stoppers

sbmesasailor
 

Sorry for this late addition.  My experience with flopper stoppers has been positive for all the reasons previously noted.  Because stoppers should be specific to your boat (size/quantity), I followed this mariner's instructions and made my own: http://offshore-sailor.com/boat-gear/27-flopper-stopper-you-can-make-yourself.html.  They work well and stow flat.  I made two, one each to hang off the ends of the main and mizzen booms (a bit easier to deploy than spin poles -I think).  Prototypes were made out of plywood to make sure I had made them the right size (just guessing, I made them as large as possible to fit in a bow deck hold).  After several tests at anchor in the California Channel Islands (certainly one of the better places to test) indicating they were an appropriate size, I remade them out of Starboard and they worked even better as they were not buoyant like the plywood ones.  I also modified the original design adding additional weights so they dive faster.  Caveat: they do not totally prevent rocking but they do prevent the accentuated rocking cycle that can develop that makes sleeping a challenge.  I used them often in the South Pacific in anchorages that other boats avoided because of their reputation of exposure to the swell.

Dennis Johns
s/v Libertad
Yacht Haven Marina
Phuket, Thailand



Happy New Year!

Stephanie DiBelardino <stephiedib@...>
 

As we close the year on 2013, and open a new journal for 2014, both Ezio and I send you our warmest best wishes for a New Year filled with Health, Happiness, and Good Fortune!

Ezio & Stephanie
And our fur-babies: Gigi, Bimba & Pippo


Re: New to group

Dave_Benjamin
 

Any well cared for Amel will be a great choice. But why wait until your son is older? By the time they are junior high school age, they can be more resistant to change and are more influenced by what their friends think. 


Re: [Amel] RE: New to group

John Edmondson <jjjk12s@...>
 

Welcome Jason,
 
You asked about sailing Amels with kids. We have an older Maramu which we sail with 2 kids, 9 and 7 years and we all love the boat. We live ashore but sail a fair bit and have just finished a 3 month trip taking the kids out of school for a term. We also had both sets of grandparents on board for 10 days each. We didn't have a problem with space but the cockpit on a Maramu is a bit small with visitors, perfect with just the family. We had enough room on deck though for toys such as a 3.1m RIB with 15hp on the foredeck, 8ft walkerbay sailing/rowing dinghy on the back deck, kayak, and paddleboard. Even room in the lockers for lots more toys like SCUBA gear, games, lots of books for homeschooling, enough food for about a year (far more than we needed), lots of bedding for visitors etc.
 
Our plan is to cruise further next year. Plan A at the moment is to sail from our home in Australia up through Micronesia to Japan then Hawaii, USA then back across the Pacific.
 
As pointed out the Amels are not really designed for families but they do make very good family boats for a few reasons, namely - safe in bad weather, safe deep cockpit, sensible companionway steps, clear flat decks, solid lifelines, very good motion compared to lighter boats, aft cabin for privacy, lots of storage etc.... The only drawback is only 2 cabins. If more cabins were really important my personal choice of boat would be something like a Privilege 435, although I did ask for a Gunboat 62 for Xmas ;).
 
We have also sailed from Greece to England when the kids were 3 and 1 in a Southerly 115, a great boat for children in Europe where the draft enabled us to transit canals. We have met many cruising families and they are on all sorts of boats but some are just hard work with kids. Before we had children we had an S and S 39, great sailing for a couple but that would be a nightmare with kids - curved decks, ropes, tracks and winches everywhere, mainsheet track in the cockpit, high companionway steps to fall down, dungeon like aft cabin.
 
My purchace decision was influenced by where I want to sail. I would be a bit nervous in a cat in the open ocean in over 40 knots and I think the Amels are way better quality, more robust and better value than a family sized catamaran and streets ahead of a standard production boat in build quality, fuel capacity, storage and comfort in rough conditions. These advantages to me outweigh the disadvantage of only 2 cabins.
 
If your budget is limited, a very good thing is that the Amels have always been good, so even the older ones are great. Check the history of the founder Henri Amel and his philosophy. My boat was built in 1981. I woundn't buy a boat of that age made by any other brand. The Maramu has great saloon berths for visitors but the Super Maramu has a berth in the passage to the aft cabin, so if you have one child he could sleep there when you have visitors, leaving the fore cabin for them.
 
Regarding what to look out for, nothing serious but some things that may need fixing - headlining, especially on pre 1997 boats and general maintenance as these boats tend to be sailed far and wide. The boats are known for very good design and fibreglass work, examples are solid, non-cored hulls with very strong hull to deck joint, good chainplates that don't leak, very strong and well supported rudders etc. History is important to know if you can, and these boats are a bit different, which is why the advice of seeking Amel specialist brokers is good. Good luck with your plans.
John, Maramu, Popeye


On Tuesday, 31 December 2013 1:03 AM, "jason.ellis@..." wrote:


Hey everyone!  Thanks for the warm welcome.  The good news is that I'm more or less on the same page as everyone else around here.  As usual, look like "must haves" and budget will determine much of what we buy.

Are there any younger folks on here?  I'd be interested in any specifics for living aboard an Amel with a kid in tow.

Much thanks!

Jason





Re: [Amel] Mast repaint in Turkey

Patrick McAneny
 


I would not paint just in spots, for it will be spotty, it would look like hell. If you are going to do anything, do it right and paint the entire mast or paint nothing. I prepped my mast and spreaders sanding down corrosion and primed those spots and then lightly sanded the entire mast. To this point I probably had about 16 hours invested. There is no need to prime the entire mast. Then after wiping down the entire mast with an awlgrip cleaner , my wife and I applied two coats of awlgrip using the roll and tip method, Diane rolled and I tipped. It took about 4 hours to do all the paint work. Total time invested was probably 25 hours, cost probably $ 400.00 and you could not tell that the mast was not sprayed. About three years ago I painted my topsides ,roll and tip again  they look like they were sprayed, great shine and easy to clean. It took probably 60 hrs. of prep to eliminate every imperfection , I wanted it to look like a new boat and it does. I was surprised, each coat of paint only took about 11/2 hours to apply , total 3 maybe 4 hrs. to paint the entire boat.Total cost probably $800.00.I may do my mizzen mast this spring. Dirt does not stick on awlgrip as it does on gelcoat. Hope this helps. Pat #123

-----Original Message-----
From: alainfeuillet <alainfeuillet@...>
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Dec 30, 2013 11:34 am
Subject: [Amel] Mast repaint in Turkey

 
My masts are down for rigging change after 23 years of good and reliable services... Doing that, I face very normally some surface corrosion at each contact point with inox, and a minimum has to be done. Also the whole surface is white powder and sooner or later needs repaint.
I have the option 1 to repaint locally (spreadeers, attach points , head and foot) or option 2 to repaint the totality . The proposed work is: for all corroded area to sand , passivate with oxalic acid, coat with two primer, plus in these area and all over the masts, sand and coat with two primer layers and three Awlgrip polyurethane two components layers.
The best quotation (Ores Marine) I got is 1700€ plus one week for option 1 and 4000€ plus three weeks option2.
Technically the guys seems to know their job and capable
I roughly consider that additional charges from the Marmaris Yacht Marina to "rent" working surface and allow the work is equivalent to remove again later the masts and repaint in a less "greedy" environment eg Kilada(Greece) or Gruissan (France).or even Tunisia.
Any remarks, experience, advice or recommendations, regarding technic and prices, from the group?
Thanks in advance and happy new year!


Mast repaint in Turkey

alainfeuillet@...
 

My masts are down for rigging change after 23 years of good and reliable services... Doing that, I face very normally some surface corrosion at each contact point with inox, and a minimum has to be done. Also the whole surface is white powder and sooner or later needs repaint.

I have the option 1 to repaint locally (spreadeers, attach points , head and foot) or option 2 to repaint the totality . The proposed work is: for all corroded area to sand , passivate with oxalic acid, coat with two primer, plus in these area and all over the masts, sand and coat with two primer layers and three Awlgrip polyurethane two components layers.

The best quotation (Ores Marine) I got is 1700€ plus one week for option 1 and 4000€ plus three weeks option2.

Technically the guys seems to know their job and capable

I roughly consider that additional charges from the Marmaris Yacht Marina to "rent" working surface and allow the work is equivalent to remove again later the masts and repaint in a less "greedy" environment eg Kilada(Greece) or Gruissan (France).or even Tunisia.

Any remarks, experience, advice or recommendations, regarding technic and prices, from the group?

Thanks in advance and happy new year!


Re: New to group

jason.ellis@...
 

Hey everyone!  Thanks for the warm welcome.  The good news is that I'm more or less on the same page as everyone else around here.  As usual, look like "must haves" and budget will determine much of what we buy.


Are there any younger folks on here?  I'd be interested in any specifics for living aboard an Amel with a kid in tow.


Much thanks!


Jason


Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

Patrick McAneny
 




-----Original Message-----
From: Patrick Mcaneny
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Dec 30, 2013 9:34 am
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

 
Craig, I hope someone that uses the mat writes , I would like to know how much it reduces the stern slap, before I invest in one. Many may not be bothered by the slapping, it seems my wife loses little sleep from the slapping, I on the other hand lose hours of sleep quite often if the slapping is constant. There has been slaps that sound like a stick of dynamite going off along with the vibration. Moving up to the v-berth is one solution if it gets bad.  Thanks, Pat #123


-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris <sangaris@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Mon, Dec 30, 2013 9:04 am
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

 
Hi Pat,
Nope - haven't tried the mat, but would be interested.  Btw, that's another advantage of rocker stoppers vs stern anchoring in that always facing the wind and waves minimizes the stern slap.  The worst stern slap seems always in marinas where you can't swing - another reason to avoid them.
Cheers,
Craig SN#68 "Sangaris"


Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

Patrick McAneny
 

Craig, I hope someone that uses the mat writes , I would like to know how much it reduces the stern slap, before I invest in one. Many may not be bothered by the slapping, it seems my wife loses little sleep from the slapping, I on the other hand lose hours of sleep quite often if the slapping is constant. There has been slaps that sound like a stick of dynamite going off along with the vibration. Moving up to the v-berth is one solution if it gets bad.  Thanks, Pat #123


-----Original Message-----
From: sangaris
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Mon, Dec 30, 2013 9:04 am
Subject: Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

 
Hi Pat,
Nope - haven't tried the mat, but would be interested.  Btw, that's another advantage of rocker stoppers vs stern anchoring in that always facing the wind and waves minimizes the stern slap.  The worst stern slap seems always in marinas where you can't swing - another reason to avoid them.
Cheers,
Craig SN#68 "Sangaris"


Re: [Amel] RE: Flopper Stoppers

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Pat,

Nope - haven't tried the mat, but would be interested.  Btw, that's another advantage of rocker stoppers vs stern anchoring in that always facing the wind and waves minimizes the stern slap.  The worst stern slap seems always in marinas where you can't swing - another reason to avoid them.

Cheers,

Craig SN#68 "Sangaris"


Re: [Amel] storm sails

Patrick McAneny
 

Eric,Bill, Danny,Kent, Thanks for your input. I had been thinking about installing an inner forestay w/furler, But now I am thinking maybe just going with a 110% or a bit smaller may be of more use, more of the time and small enough to furl and still have shape. Its good to hear other's experiences and opinions , it helps in the decision making. Thanks Again, Pat SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: Kent Robertson
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Dec 29, 2013 7:57 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel] storm sails

 
Hi Pat.  I think u need two sails, a 150 for lite air and a. 110 Yankee w a high cut clew for typical trades of. 20+ kts .
A 110 won't be enuf for lite air, and a 150 won't have any shape when you get in 20g maybe  + kt winds and furl.  
Kent
SM 24Kristy


On Dec 29, 2013, at 5:43 PM, Patrick Mcaneny <sailw32@...> wrote:

 
Eric , How is your 110% in light air ? I need to buy a new genoa, if you were buying a new sail would you go with a 110 again? I have been toying with installing an inner forestay/furler , but I would rather not if I can get by without it. Thanks for getting back to me .Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailorman <kimberlite@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sun, Dec 29, 2013 5:22 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel] storm sails

 
Pat,
I carry an ATN Gale Ail. I have never use it.
When the wind get to 50 knots + I use just a little jib and mizzen.  My headsail is a 110 % 10 oz Yankee cut
made by Doyle it is very heavy. The only problem with the headsail in heavy weather is that I  can not move the Genoa car any further forward as the track is not long enough.
 
If I had a 54 I would carry a storm staysail on the inner forestay.
 
When that is too much sail for the wind conditions I just either heave to, or preferably set the drogue.
The Jordan series drogue is te only wat to go in hurricane force wins.
Fair Winds
Eric
Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite
 
 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of sailw32@...
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 11:08 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel] storm sails
 
 
Eric, Reading your accounts of the conditions you have encountered on several of your trips, I want to ask you or anyone else with some very heavy weather sailing experience, what if any storm sails you carry. I know you carry a drogue, but I am interested in sails ,as I have no storm sails and am preparing my boat to cruise and seeking opinions.  Thanks, Pat #123


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Re: [Amel] storm sails

Ian Park
 

Eric
Hoping I never share your experience in a hurricane, can I ask about attaching the Jordan Drogue. We have inherited one with our Santorin 'Ocean Hobo' and I made the assumption I would attach the strop to the aft cleats. It sounds that you made a different arrangement. Are there any details about where and how you made strengthened attachment points on an Amel. I have an additional consideration having a Hydrovane on the transom to clear.
hope, like my liferaft, never to use it, but sound preparation has to be the best insurance.

Ian and Linda SN 96 Ocean Hobo


Re: [Amel] storm sails

Peter Forbes
 

Eric,

What an absolutely epic story - congratulations and thank you for sharing it with us. We here in England are currently being battered by storm force winds but I am thankful to be hunkered down at home with the remains if the Turkey and Christmas pudding.

Peter Forbes
Amel 54 #035 Carango.
Moored in Goçek, Turkey

07836 209730

On 29 Dec 2013, at 22:47, Sailorman <kimberlite@...> wrote:

 

Pat,

Here is the article about us in a 36 hour hurricane.

 

http://www.oceannavigator.com/March-April-2011/Prepare-for-survival-conditions/

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite

 

 

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of Patrick Mcaneny
Sent: Sunday, December 29, 2013 5:33 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel] storm sails

 

 

 

Bill, I remember reading about that storm on your blog a couple years ago. I remember  you were in it a couple of days. So have you ever used your ATN ?Were you just running with bare poles, any drogue? Thanks, Pat

 

-----Original Message-----
From: Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Sun, Dec 29, 2013 2:48 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel] storm sails

 

Pat,

 

We had an ATN storm sail...the one that clips on around the furled Genoa. 

 

We were in a small Cyclone in the Bay of Bengal and found that all we wanted to do was run with the storm. Additionally the conditions were too dangerous to rig the ATN storm sail.

 

Bill 

BeBe #387

 

On Sun, Dec 29, 2013 at 10:59 AM, Richard03801 <richard03801@...> wrote:

 

Hi Pat for off shore we generally fly an 11oz Dacron Caribbean blaster as a head sail when we've been out in heavy weather or the trades it works well it is a 110 high clue. We can shorten up and back wind it when hoving to. The main and mizzen are 10 oz and have worked well in all conditions shorting as needed.  

SM 209 FOR SALE IN NEWPORT 

Regards 

Richard Piller

 

Cell 603 767 5330


On Dec 29, 2013, at 11:07, <sailw32@...> wrote:

 

Eric, Reading your accounts of the conditions you have encountered on several of your trips, I want to ask you or anyone else with some very heavy weather sailing experience, what if any storm sails you carry. I know you carry a drogue, but I am interested in sails ,as I have no storm sails and am preparing my boat to cruise and seeking opinions.  Thanks, Pat #123