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Re: Purchasing an Amel

n33077@...
 

Sam,
I just bought my Amel Sharki last April. Take your time searching. Based on your budget, I tend to agree that the Sharki or Maramu might be best for your budget, but this depends on your sailing and plans.   Also be cognizant of future maintenance, duties, taxes, slip fees, and other costs involved.  Things tend to get expensive quickly when you get bigger. You've already reached out to the most knowledgeable folks so you'll be in good hands.

The group is helpful and has tons of information. I joined about two years before I bought my bought. I read continuously, monitoring common problems and keeping in mind what I should be looking out for as I searched for my boat. 

Other than that, if you have specific questions, just ask.

Bon chance....

Aras Grinius
S/V FIASCO
Sharki #163


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Purchasing an Amel

Chris Flack
 

Hello Hans,

Our boat is Hemera but used to be called Hemera of Dartmouth.

We came home to Australia in January after sailing her down from Cesme where Riza put us in touch with the owners who wanted to sell.

Riza installed a new solar arch and has done other works for us.

We plan on going back next July for 3 months

Riza has also been looking after her while we are away and believe he had her on Skopea Marina when all other Amels were there.

Cheers
Chris

Sent from my android device.


-----Original Message-----
From: "'hanspeter.baettig@...' hanspeter.baettig@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Wed, 03 Dec 2014 7:42 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Purchasing an Amel

 

Hi Chris
Can I ask you your boat name?
I stay also in Göcek during sommer time at Skopie Marina and for wintering in Yacht Classic Marina in Fethiye. Service done by Riza

Hanspeter
SM #16 Tamango 2

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 02.12.2014 um 22:11 schrieb "Chris Flack chris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Sorry - I am Chris Flack in Melbourne Australia. I have Amel Super Maramu No 031 currently located in Gocek Turkey

 

 

On 03-12-2014 08:07, Ann-Sofie Svanberg kanalmamman@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

 

And you are??
 
One bad thing with this forum is that you have to write your name and preferrably boat name, model and number.  Nothing adds automaticly.
It is so nice to know how is doing the posting.
 
Cheers
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM #232 from 1998
Present in Chaguaramas

Skickat från min iPad

2 dec 2014 kl. 16:56 skrev "Chris Flack chris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

 

I was advised to purchase the biggest boat i could afford by some American cruisers we met in Gocek Turkey - it was very sound advice. We bought a 1991 Super Maramu for 140,000 euro in pretty good condition and love her to death and can't wait to get back over there to see where she takes us.

I've sailed on a lot of production boats and have to admit the Amel has its quirks but then you say WOW!! how did they think of doing it THAT way?? :)

 

Cheers

 

 

On 03-12-2014 04:08, dave_benjamin@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Your budget is suited for a Maramu or Sharki. Both are great boats. I used to own one of the first Maramu's made, hull #29. In some respects, I like the idea of the old Maramu with conventional rig for high latitude work. There's less to go wrong (no thruster, no C-Drive, minimal electrical requirements, no in-mast furling motors, etc. etc.) Even if you can do your own work, a 150K SM is a major project boat, most likely a salvaged boat. If you can find a Mango, that's a good way to go as well, particularly the older ones as I mentioned previously that are simpler.

 
The people I know who have sailed extensively in polar regions tend to favor very simple boats. I personally have no experience in the high latitudes although I have been stuck sailing with ice on the decks, which I have vowed not to repeat. Ice is best confined to a cocktail glass. 
 
 
 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Purchasing an Amel

hanspeter baettig
 

Hi Chris
Can I ask you your boat name?
I stay also in Göcek during sommer time at Skopie Marina and for wintering in Yacht Classic Marina in Fethiye. Service done by Riza

Hanspeter
SM #16 Tamango 2

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 02.12.2014 um 22:11 schrieb "Chris Flack chris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Sorry - I am Chris Flack in Melbourne Australia. I have Amel Super Maramu No 031 currently located in Gocek Turkey

 

 

On 03-12-2014 08:07, Ann-Sofie Svanberg kanalmamman@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

 

And you are??
 
One bad thing with this forum is that you have to write your name and preferrably boat name, model and number.  Nothing adds automaticly.
It is so nice to know how is doing the posting.
 
Cheers
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM #232 from 1998
Present in Chaguaramas

Skickat från min iPad

2 dec 2014 kl. 16:56 skrev "Chris Flack chris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

 

I was advised to purchase the biggest boat i could afford by some American cruisers we met in Gocek Turkey - it was very sound advice. We bought a 1991 Super Maramu for 140,000 euro in pretty good condition and love her to death and can't wait to get back over there to see where she takes us.

I've sailed on a lot of production boats and have to admit the Amel has its quirks but then you say WOW!! how did they think of doing it THAT way?? :)

 

Cheers

 

 

On 03-12-2014 04:08, dave_benjamin@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Your budget is suited for a Maramu or Sharki. Both are great boats. I used to own one of the first Maramu's made, hull #29. In some respects, I like the idea of the old Maramu with conventional rig for high latitude work. There's less to go wrong (no thruster, no C-Drive, minimal electrical requirements, no in-mast furling motors, etc. etc.) Even if you can do your own work, a 150K SM is a major project boat, most likely a salvaged boat. If you can find a Mango, that's a good way to go as well, particularly the older ones as I mentioned previously that are simpler.

 
The people I know who have sailed extensively in polar regions tend to favor very simple boats. I personally have no experience in the high latitudes although I have been stuck sailing with ice on the decks, which I have vowed not to repeat. Ice is best confined to a cocktail glass. 
 
 
 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Purchasing an Amel

Chris Flack
 

Sorry - I am Chris Flack in Melbourne Australia. I have Amel Super Maramu No 031 currently located in Gocek Turkey

 

 

On 03-12-2014 08:07, Ann-Sofie Svanberg kanalmamman@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

 

And you are??
 
One bad thing with this forum is that you have to write your name and preferrably boat name, model and number.  Nothing adds automaticly.
It is so nice to know how is doing the posting.
 
Cheers
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM #232 from 1998
Present in Chaguaramas

Skickat från min iPad

2 dec 2014 kl. 16:56 skrev "Chris Flack chris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

 

I was advised to purchase the biggest boat i could afford by some American cruisers we met in Gocek Turkey - it was very sound advice. We bought a 1991 Super Maramu for 140,000 euro in pretty good condition and love her to death and can't wait to get back over there to see where she takes us.

I've sailed on a lot of production boats and have to admit the Amel has its quirks but then you say WOW!! how did they think of doing it THAT way?? :)

 

Cheers

 

 

On 03-12-2014 04:08, dave_benjamin@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Your budget is suited for a Maramu or Sharki. Both are great boats. I used to own one of the first Maramu's made, hull #29. In some respects, I like the idea of the old Maramu with conventional rig for high latitude work. There's less to go wrong (no thruster, no C-Drive, minimal electrical requirements, no in-mast furling motors, etc. etc.) Even if you can do your own work, a 150K SM is a major project boat, most likely a salvaged boat. If you can find a Mango, that's a good way to go as well, particularly the older ones as I mentioned previously that are simpler.

 
The people I know who have sailed extensively in polar regions tend to favor very simple boats. I personally have no experience in the high latitudes although I have been stuck sailing with ice on the decks, which I have vowed not to repeat. Ice is best confined to a cocktail glass. 
 
 
 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Purchasing an Amel

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

And you are??

One bad thing with this forum is that you have to write your name and preferrably boat name, model and number.  Nothing adds automaticly.
It is so nice to know how is doing the posting.

Cheers
Ann-Sofie
S/Y Lady Annila, SM #232 from 1998
Present in Chaguaramas

Skickat från min iPad

2 dec 2014 kl. 16:56 skrev "Chris Flack chris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

I was advised to purchase the biggest boat i could afford by some American cruisers we met in Gocek Turkey - it was very sound advice. We bought a 1991 Super Maramu for 140,000 euro in pretty good condition and love her to death and can't wait to get back over there to see where she takes us.

I've sailed on a lot of production boats and have to admit the Amel has its quirks but then you say WOW!! how did they think of doing it THAT way?? :)

 

Cheers

 

 

On 03-12-2014 04:08, dave_benjamin@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Your budget is suited for a Maramu or Sharki. Both are great boats. I used to own one of the first Maramu's made, hull #29. In some respects, I like the idea of the old Maramu with conventional rig for high latitude work. There's less to go wrong (no thruster, no C-Drive, minimal electrical requirements, no in-mast furling motors, etc. etc.) Even if you can do your own work, a 150K SM is a major project boat, most likely a salvaged boat. If you can find a Mango, that's a good way to go as well, particularly the older ones as I mentioned previously that are simpler.

 
The people I know who have sailed extensively in polar regions tend to favor very simple boats. I personally have no experience in the high latitudes although I have been stuck sailing with ice on the decks, which I have vowed not to repeat. Ice is best confined to a cocktail glass. 
 
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Purchasing an Amel

Chris Flack
 

I was advised to purchase the biggest boat i could afford by some American cruisers we met in Gocek Turkey - it was very sound advice. We bought a 1991 Super Maramu for 140,000 euro in pretty good condition and love her to death and can't wait to get back over there to see where she takes us.

I've sailed on a lot of production boats and have to admit the Amel has its quirks but then you say WOW!! how did they think of doing it THAT way?? :)

 

Cheers

 

 

On 03-12-2014 04:08, dave_benjamin@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Your budget is suited for a Maramu or Sharki. Both are great boats. I used to own one of the first Maramu's made, hull #29. In some respects, I like the idea of the old Maramu with conventional rig for high latitude work. There's less to go wrong (no thruster, no C-Drive, minimal electrical requirements, no in-mast furling motors, etc. etc.) Even if you can do your own work, a 150K SM is a major project boat, most likely a salvaged boat. If you can find a Mango, that's a good way to go as well, particularly the older ones as I mentioned previously that are simpler.

 
The people I know who have sailed extensively in polar regions tend to favor very simple boats. I personally have no experience in the high latitudes although I have been stuck sailing with ice on the decks, which I have vowed not to repeat. Ice is best confined to a cocktail glass. 
 
 


Re: Main Sail Roller Battens

Dave_Benjamin
 

Jose,

I'd suggest you start with the mizzen. It's a small inexpensive sail and if it is irreparably damaged, you can keep sailing. 

You could also consider having a prototype made out of some relatively inexpensive Dacron. If the plan is to perfect the concept and then build a sail for the long term, your prototype should be under $1000 not including the battens. When I do prototyping, I usually just run those projects at my cost plus 10% to cover administrative expenses. I'm not volunteering for this one since you're not local to us.

Those Flattens look interesting. Those might not add that much thickness to the roll if installed perpendicular to the mast. Another way to design a sail like this would be to set the pockets parallel to the foot. 


Re: Purchasing an Amel

Dave_Benjamin
 

Your budget is suited for a Maramu or Sharki. Both are great boats. I used to own one of the first Maramu's made, hull #29. In some respects, I like the idea of the old Maramu with conventional rig for high latitude work. There's less to go wrong (no thruster, no C-Drive, minimal electrical requirements, no in-mast furling motors, etc. etc.) Even if you can do your own work, a 150K SM is a major project boat, most likely a salvaged boat. If you can find a Mango, that's a good way to go as well, particularly the older ones as I mentioned previously that are simpler.

The people I know who have sailed extensively in polar regions tend to favor very simple boats. I personally have no experience in the high latitudes although I have been stuck sailing with ice on the decks, which I have vowed not to repeat. Ice is best confined to a cocktail glass. 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Purchasing an Amel

Mark Erdos
 

Hi Sam,

 

Welcome to the group. We too found ourselves in the same situation and once we decided on Amel had to face the reality of a higher budget.  We shopped for almost 3 years before making a purchase.

I will offer my 2 cents worth:

I think what you are trying to find is going to prove very difficult in the price range you specify. I would advise you to try to find an Amel that is as close to original as possible. If systems were replaced you will find yourself with issues you did not expect. One of the key learning’s of Amel is things are a certain way for a reason. Sometimes the reason is not apparent until you change something.  And, then you have an “ah ha” moment. Amel’s are different from other boats in many aspects. Unfortunately, a boat that is original is going to cost you more than you think. It’s painful but worth it. If you are seeking just a solid hull, you will miss all the added benefits that an Amel owner experiences. You will also find this group to be the most helpful if you have a start point on an issue you are trying to resolve. Obviously, the hull is a critical aspect, but I would purchase a boat needing to be repowered, needing a new generator, and needing a watermaker before I purchased a “molested” or “mutilated” Amel. Again, just my 2 cents, hope it helps.

 

Mark

SM2K#275

www.creampuff.us 


On Tue, Dec 2, 2014 at 9:59 AM, sqfrederick@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello all! I'm new to the group as a hopeful Amel owner. A buddy and I are looking for a used Amel to sail to Patagonia, S. Pacific, Asia and pretty much everywhere else it can go! We are still very early in our search and I had never heard of Amel until a few weeks ago! I am now completely sold on the brand!


We were originally hoping to have a boat this spring, but looking at the Amel Mango and SM have pushed our budget up a bit, so hopefully by the end of next summer... 


I just wanted to check in and say hello and see if anyone has any advice for places to look for a good deal on a used boat. I would prefer a SM, but am very open to Mangos as well. I have already met with Michel Charpentier, and have been in touch with Joel Potter in Florida. They are keeping an eye out, but it seems like such a tight knit community that one of you may have a good lead!

Our budget is a bit tight, so we are looking for a good deal. Ideally, we'd like to find a boat with a solid hull, engine, generator and water maker for around US$150,000. I am a marine engineer, so if she needs some work, overhauls, etc, that is not a problem. We'd rather find a boat with good bones that needs some love than have to work a few more years to afford something in perfect condition! 


If any of you have any advice of things to pay particular attention to when looking at potential boats, that would be greatly appreciated too! I've only had the chance to go aboard one SM at the dock so far, and they seem very solid, and I love the access, but I'm sure you all know some good tips and tricks to keep an eye out for!


Thank you all for your time and I look forward to running into some of you out there in the next few years!

Sam



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Purchasing an Amel

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

Welcome aboard. Tough to find a SM in reasonable condition at $150000. 
We wish the best. We are all here to help each other. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing To All
Capt Richard 
RP Yacht Brokerage
Newport RI 
We list sell and service fine yachts including Amel's
Cell 603 767 5330

On Dec 2, 2014, at 09:59, sqfrederick@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello all! I'm new to the group as a hopeful Amel owner. A buddy and I are looking for a used Amel to sail to Patagonia, S. Pacific, Asia and pretty much everywhere else it can go! We are still very early in our search and I had never heard of Amel until a few weeks ago! I am now completely sold on the brand!


We were originally hoping to have a boat this spring, but looking at the Amel Mango and SM have pushed our budget up a bit, so hopefully by the end of next summer... 


I just wanted to check in and say hello and see if anyone has any advice for places to look for a good deal on a used boat. I would prefer a SM, but am very open to Mangos as well. I have already met with Michel Charpentier, and have been in touch with Joel Potter in Florida. They are keeping an eye out, but it seems like such a tight knit community that one of you may have a good lead!

Our budget is a bit tight, so we are looking for a good deal. Ideally, we'd like to find a boat with a solid hull, engine, generator and water maker for around US$150,000. I am a marine engineer, so if she needs some work, overhauls, etc, that is not a problem. We'd rather find a boat with good bones that needs some love than have to work a few more years to afford something in perfect condition! 


If any of you have any advice of things to pay particular attention to when looking at potential boats, that would be greatly appreciated too! I've only had the chance to go aboard one SM at the dock so far, and they seem very solid, and I love the access, but I'm sure you all know some good tips and tricks to keep an eye out for!


Thank you all for your time and I look forward to running into some of you out there in the next few years!

Sam


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Purchasing an Amel

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Welcome aboard Sam.

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera SM007


On 2 Dec 2014, at 15:59, sqfrederick@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello all! I'm new to the group as a hopeful Amel owner. A buddy and I are looking for a used Amel to sail to Patagonia, S. Pacific, Asia and pretty much everywhere else it can go! We are still very early in our search and I had never heard of Amel until a few weeks ago! I am now completely sold on the brand!


We were originally hoping to have a boat this spring, but looking at the Amel Mango and SM have pushed our budget up a bit, so hopefully by the end of next summer... 


I just wanted to check in and say hello and see if anyone has any advice for places to look for a good deal on a used boat. I would prefer a SM, but am very open to Mangos as well. I have already met with Michel Charpentier, and have been in touch with Joel Potter in Florida. They are keeping an eye out, but it seems like such a tight knit community that one of you may have a good lead!

Our budget is a bit tight, so we are looking for a good deal. Ideally, we'd like to find a boat with a solid hull, engine, generator and water maker for around US$150,000. I am a marine engineer, so if she needs some work, overhauls, etc, that is not a problem. We'd rather find a boat with good bones that needs some love than have to work a few more years to afford something in perfect condition! 


If any of you have any advice of things to pay particular attention to when looking at potential boats, that would be greatly appreciated too! I've only had the chance to go aboard one SM at the dock so far, and they seem very solid, and I love the access, but I'm sure you all know some good tips and tricks to keep an eye out for!


Thank you all for your time and I look forward to running into some of you out there in the next few years!

Sam


Re: Main mast profile

rossienio@...
 

Hello Craig you perfectly understand my post.  The mast is "almost" straight with the high shrouds,backstay and headstay loose. It seems that the upper shrouds (or spreaders) pull back the mast......Regards. Enio


Purchasing an Amel

sqfrederick@...
 

Hello all! I'm new to the group as a hopeful Amel owner. A buddy and I are looking for a used Amel to sail to Patagonia, S. Pacific, Asia and pretty much everywhere else it can go! We are still very early in our search and I had never heard of Amel until a few weeks ago! I am now completely sold on the brand!


We were originally hoping to have a boat this spring, but looking at the Amel Mango and SM have pushed our budget up a bit, so hopefully by the end of next summer... 


I just wanted to check in and say hello and see if anyone has any advice for places to look for a good deal on a used boat. I would prefer a SM, but am very open to Mangos as well. I have already met with Michel Charpentier, and have been in touch with Joel Potter in Florida. They are keeping an eye out, but it seems like such a tight knit community that one of you may have a good lead!

Our budget is a bit tight, so we are looking for a good deal. Ideally, we'd like to find a boat with a solid hull, engine, generator and water maker for around US$150,000. I am a marine engineer, so if she needs some work, overhauls, etc, that is not a problem. We'd rather find a boat with good bones that needs some love than have to work a few more years to afford something in perfect condition! 


If any of you have any advice of things to pay particular attention to when looking at potential boats, that would be greatly appreciated too! I've only had the chance to go aboard one SM at the dock so far, and they seem very solid, and I love the access, but I'm sure you all know some good tips and tricks to keep an eye out for!


Thank you all for your time and I look forward to running into some of you out there in the next few years!

Sam


Re: Main mast profile

Craig Briggs
 

Hello Rossienio,
After all that work it must be frustrating to have the same problem.  Let me be sure I understand your post. The mast is straight with the shrouds loose.  Then when your tighten the cap shrouds (or uppers) and the intermediates the mast is bending between the lower spreaders and the top, with the upper spreaders being aft of what would be a straight vertical line, that is, it has an inverse or negative bend, which we definitely want to get rid of.

I assume you tensioned the headstay and backstay first to about 15 to 20% of their breaking strength (really, really tight). Then you should be able to remove the negative bend by slacking the aft lowers while tightening the forward lowers and by tensioning the backstay.  You may want to experiment by really slacking the aft lowers and see if you can induce some positive bend by tightening the forward lowers and the backstay - if you can then you can re-adjust to get it straight. 

By the way, there are a lot of good tuning guides on the internet - here's one from Selden Masts that you may want to look at: www dot riggingandsails dot com slash pdf slash selden dash tuning dot pdf. : http://www.riggingandsails.com/pdf/selden-tuning.pdf    Our rig is discussed on pg 39 and 40.

Sorry, but I have no more suggestions - perhaps others will.
Best regards,
Craig Briggs - SN#68 Sangaris


Re: Main mast profile

rossienio@...
 

Good morning to Craig and everyone. I did all the works set by Craig. The main mast is perfectly vertical and almost straight. With the shrouds lens. But, when I hold the upper shrouds return the inverse bend at high spreders. This may depend on wath? Have I to leave it????


Nomad- sails

Eric Freedman
 

Hi Nomad,

I heard from North sails SXM that they made sails for you . I would like to discuss them backchannel.

Gavin at FKG asked to look at Kimberlites head foil. Are you having a problem?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite SM 376

 

Kimberlite@...

 


Re: Main Sail Roller Battens

Jose Venegas
 

I hope this will end the already long discussion and explain the reasoning behind my willingness to try something different from vertical battens on my SM.

My experience as a mechanical engineer is only 40 years but I have always evaluated critically every modification I have made to my boats.  In principle, I see the vertical battens as a bad design waiting for disasters like those experienced by Michael.   I do understand that sail makers are by definition conservative and thus Dave’s skepticism.  Sails have been around for thousands of years and worked well with minimal changes.  Adding new features always brings the risk for failures and, if I made sails for a living, I would also be skeptical and conservative.


However I am not sure these roller-battens have been used in the manner we plan to do it. I can see how the roller battens, installed as full battens and perpendicular to the mast as shown in the website, can have problems.  Using them like that in addition to making wider the folded sail, they exacerbate the problem brought up by Dave : as the sail is furled, each turn will make incremental motions of the inner part of the stainless batten relative to the outer part.  The more turns the more this happen and the greater the force the tip of the inner half of the batten will do against the batten cover.

By putting the roller battens perpendicular to the leach it makes them shorter than if they were placed horizontal or vertical,  and thus they will have less turns and make the furled sail less wide.  In addition, when placed perpendicular to the leach with a length such that only 40% of them extends over the leach, the sail damage when battens are too short will be prevented. More important, the widening of the furled sail will be reduced because the battens will roll in a corkscrew shape.  I am also expecting that they may reduce the likelihood of the leach folding on itself and jamming the sail when it is furled with little wind.

In any case I am willing to take the chance, knowing that if I am wrong it is for reasons that I am still not aware of.  So far Dave’s skepticisms has been very helpful  to identify key potential problems and for formulating solutions. Unless he or any other person identifies additional problems with the roller-batten idea I will proceed with the project, keep an eye on the battens, and will keep you posted on my progress or failure.


Jose


Mainsail battens

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohnholl@...>
 

Hello Craig,
It was interesting to find that when I specified vertical battens for a new mainsail on my Oyster in the late nineties the sailmaker, Doyles in New Zealand, told me that when they laid my old mainsail on top of the new one with vertical battens, they found the new one was 7% bigger. It was very good and there were no problems
So far as I know the purchaser of that boat in 2000 found it good for many years when he circumnavigated over a number of years.
Similarly the new mainsail I had made by Lee Sails in Hong Kong has been excellent although I should add that I ordered it through a Maltese sailmaker who also fitted the new sails when they came and he made some small adjustments  at my request.
 
                                Best wishes,   Anne and John, Bali Hai,  SM 319,  for sale in Malta  


Re: Main Sail Roller Battens

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Jose,
Just another data point for your experiment is that the fellows that developed the Flattens I posted about last week said they are installed at Luff-90 - perpendicular to the Luff, not the Leach. That way when they roll up they actually make the sail roll tighter - like the measuring tape analogy you used wherein the tape rolls up on itself, not crosswise to its natural cupped shape.  Anyway, will follow with great interest - sounds like a good idea, notwithstanding our resident sailmaker's doubts. Keep us posted.
Cheers,
Craig