Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Attn Jeff Spirit

JEFFREY KRAUS
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine Coolant Leak

Eric Freedman
 

Did you check the seals on the water pump on the front of the engine and around the drive shaft of the pump?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of pepinoamel
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 9:33 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine Coolant Leak

 

 

Last year I had my heat exchanger serviced by a professional mechanic and since then the engine coolant leaks slowly from the reservoir.  This also happens while I'm stationary in the marina at a slow rate of about 5mm for the month.  There's no water in the engine oil and no external leaks that I can find.  Could the coolant leak out into the heat exchanger or the hot water heater?

 

I have the 100 HP Yanmar engine.

 

Has anyone had this problem?  Any suggestions?

 

Gerhard Hoffmann

SM381

Pepino, Greece

 


Attn Jeff Spirit

Eric Freedman
 

Jeff,

If it is something you need immediately then you will be getting a whopping bill from FedEx as there is customs, duty , and brokers involved. If you can wait send it to me in St Maarten and it will come in duty free and I will bring it home with me March 31. Leaving Ny March 18.

Ps I also have your engine alarm here.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, February 27, 2015 9:25 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] contacting amel for parts

 

 

Jeff,

I should have told you to send an email, but you were asking how to dial a number.

When you send an email for parts, I find it best to carefully list the part, remembering the language difference and to include a photo of that part...be sure to label the photo with the same description that you use in the email.  Include your model and hull number. Within about 3 working days you should receive a reply requesting a credit card for payment. If you have not heard anything in 4 working days, send a "FOLLOW-UP" email.

Amel has always shipped me via FedEx with the part arriving within a week. There will be no VAT if shipped outside the EU, but VAT will be added, if inside.

If you need something urgently, tell them in your first email and include the credit card. If Amel has the part, you should be able to receive it within a week, anywhere in the world.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
sent from my tablet

On Feb 27, 2015 7:35 AM, "jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for the help everyone.

I was able to leave a message thru the phone number provided on the Amel site. It turns out that I was dialing the right number, it was just busy every time I called.

I received an email response as I requested, and was directed to contact Maud Touillet or Thierry Billard at sav@...,, and to request my parts from them. 

I sent them an email this morning explaining the what the parts were, so I'll see how it goes from here.It seems like an easy enough way to go about acquiring parts, as long as it's not crisis mode. If that were the case, I guess the direct line given in their email response was 33 (0) 546 55 00 75. For a call from the US, I assume a prefix number to dial before that number would be 011.

Assuming that my needed parts (small size wise) were available, What is the expected amount of time and the preferred means of shipping? My parts could fit in a large envelope.

Jeff 54 #14&nbsp ;

----- Original Message -----
From: "sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Thursday, February 26, 2015 11:33 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] contacting amel for parts
To: amelyachtowners@...

> Jeff,
>
> Depending where you are calling from you call 011 (from the USA)
>
> Then 33 France country code then 546 La Rochelle city code and
> then the local number 551731. Do not dial the 0 between the 33
> and the 546.
>
>
>
> Calling from out of the country sometimes you have to dial +
> instead of 011. To dial a + you hold down the o button.
>
> Fair Winds
>
> Eric
>
> Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376
>
>
>
>
>
> From: amelyachtowners@...
> [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
> Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2015 11:28 AM> To: amelyachtowners@...
> Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] contacting amel for parts
>
>
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
> I am trying to contact Amel to order a few parts, something I
> haven't done before.
>
> The number I see to use is 330546551731, and I was told that to
> dial direct, I needed to preface the call by dialing 011. Seems
> like a hell of a lot of numbers, however I haven't had to dial
> France before.
>
> If anyone would be kind enough to let me know if that is the
> number, or if there is another one to use, I would be greatly
> appreciative of that information.
>
> I tried emailing and never received a response. It would seem
> that emailing would be a much more efficient means to order
> parts. The email I used was provided on the Amel website.
>
> I have actually dialed the number sequence I li sted above, and
> never get through, it always sounds busy. The operator says she
> is connecting my call, so I assume that the number is correct.
>
> Thanks
>
> Jeff 54 #14
>
>
>
>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Maramu blisters

bob Sarff <bob.sarff@...>
 

Thanks Dave.  I'm just concerned that they will continue to grow and someday when I sell there will be large price deduction because of them.  I think it's a matter of pay now or pay later.

I appreciate all the comments I've received back from follow Amel owners.

Bob


On Feb 28, 2015, at 2:43 PM, dave_benjamin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Blister repairs are a huge revenue generator for boatyards, and they love to get people worked up about it and convince them to do a peel and complete new bottom. On some of the Amels I have seen there are some very shallow blisters that are not causing any harm. I would not be swayed by boatyard salespeople. If someone is concerned, pay a survey for an hour of his time to offer a professional opinion. I've yet to see a blister sink a boat. 


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

I was recently discussing this issue with some knowledgeable people, and their take on it was unless they were large enough to be a structural issue, paint them and forget them.  Their argument (as best I can relate it anyway) was this: H2O is drawn into voids in the laminate by a chemical process (I assume osmosis).  When there is sufficient H2O in the void to react with the catalyst, then the H2O molecules are no longer attracted and the process is stabilized.  Therefore the blisters stop growing.  As long as the blisters don't get too big, don't worry about it.  If you have the time and money, fix it.  If you're short on either, and the blisters are not a structural problem, "paint 'em and forget 'em". 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Diving Compressors?

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Thank you to all who provided comments about on board dive compressors. Your feedback was really helpful and is now a good source of information for us all on this site which can be added to for reference purposes.

Alexandre your comments were specifically useful in terms of the maintenance upkeep side of these as we are still a couple years away from going cruising, and hence will now wait a little longer before purchasing one of these. Similarly in 2012 we purchased the latest model 100 duo watermaker and, in hindsight, it could have been preferable for maintenance reasons when the boat is standing to wait till six or so months before before long term cruising. 

Colin & Lauren Streeter
Island Pearl II, SM #332
Mackay, Australia

On Tue, Feb 24, 2015 at 1:03 AM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Good morning Collin,

My Amel (SM2K #289) comes with the Bauer Junior compressor and the 2 small space for tank.
Note: the space is only for small tank. Will not accommodate the common 80 CF aluminum tank.
So I store my 4 tanks next to the life raft (in the life raft compartment). They fit beautifully stored vertically as they should.

I purchased my Amel 2 years ago and never used the compressor, but I just had it serviced (I should say overall at a cost of $2200).
Is it worth having it? I think it will depends from person to person.
1) it requires regular maintenance. At least need to run for an hour every month.
2) the use is not very simple. Before to start it, you need to open then close the 3 valves, then while using it, also open & close the 3 valves every 10 minutes, etc. Even though they have safety valves, it is recommended to be near it when you use it.
3) cartridge/canister will only last 8 hour (about 16 tank) and cost $49 each. They also have a fairly small shelf life (1.5 year) so can not stock them.
My estimations is that on maintenance only, it cost about $5 to fill up a tank with the compressor (not including the purchase cost).

So, in my opinion, if you are going to sail in a fairly touristic area (Bahamas, Caribbean, europe, etc.) then it is easier to just bring your tanks to a dive shop and pay $10 to refill and keep lots of precious space.

But, if you are going to travel to remote areas and/or want to do a lots of diving then it is worth it.

Hope that helps…
Have a great day!
Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
in maintenance in Fort Lauderdale

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 2/22/15, Colin Streeter colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Diving Compressors?
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Sunday, February 22, 2015, 7:47 AM




 









Many thanks Peter and
Andrew for your early input so far. Looking forward to
also hearing from others out there who already have a dive
compressor installed on their vessel in terms of how
well it works and if it is worth losing all that valuable
space in the port cockpit locker?

Also has
anyone come up with a better aftermarket dive compressor
which could possibly fit in the large engine room? See the
link to the S/V Delos boat tour video  - http://svdelos.blogspot.com.au/p/blog-page_7933.html
-  who have a TV soap opera type following of blog fans
around the globe watching their videos as they travel the
world on an SM2000. Never noticed Brian on this forum yet,
however he appears to be a pretty savvy skipper who
researches everything pretty meticulously too so do hope to
see him contribute to this forum too some day. Watching this
video they have mounted a compressor in the engine bay and
it fills tanks up in 20mins. Anyone else done so and what
brand/model did you put in? 
Colin StreeterIsland
Pearl II, SM#332
PS
Note that S/V Delos fitted 600w solar panels and barely have
to run their generator anymore despite normally having a
large crew on board.



On Sun, Feb 22, 2015 at
10:00 PM, Peter Forbes ppsforbes@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:















 









Colin,
I asked
Amel Mediterranean for a quote for Diving compressor retro
fit in my Amel 54 and the quote was €4600 + tax (currently
20% I think) and  a down time of one day.
I did not pursue this due cost so I
never got to ask the type etc.
i hope that helps.
Peter

Peter
Forbes0044 7836 209730ppsforbes@...
 Sailing KetchAmel 54 #035Gouvia
Marina - CORFU, Greece


On
22 Feb 2015, at 10:11, colin.d.streeter@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:

We do not have the Amel fitted Dive compressor
on Island Pearl II and are interested to get information
from other Amel owners about these? 
Does Amel fit a particular brand? Where is it
fitted? Is it effective? How long does it take to refill a
10l dive tank? Would like to see some pictures posted on
this forum of the Amel installed equipment if possible? Is
there an after market brand and model which fits the Super
Maramu and where to purchase this?
Lastly does any Super Maramu owner have one in
good condition and not use, or need it, and want to sell it
to creat more space on board their boat? How
much??
Apology for so many questions but we suspect that we
are not the only person interested in find this out, so it
will be a useful conversation to store on this site for
future reference of others.
Fair Winds
Colin &
Lauren StreeterIsland
Pearl II, 2001 SM#332Mackay, Australia
























--
Colin
Streeter0411 016
445











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--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Maramu blisters

Dave_Benjamin
 

Blister repairs are a huge revenue generator for boatyards, and they love to get people worked up about it and convince them to do a peel and complete new bottom. On some of the Amels I have seen there are some very shallow blisters that are not causing any harm. I would not be swayed by boatyard salespeople. If someone is concerned, pay a survey for an hour of his time to offer a professional opinion. I've yet to see a blister sink a boat. 

---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailor63109@...> wrote :

I was recently discussing this issue with some knowledgeable people, and their take on it was unless they were large enough to be a structural issue, paint them and forget them.  Their argument (as best I can relate it anyway) was this: H2O is drawn into voids in the laminate by a chemical process (I assume osmosis).  When there is sufficient H2O in the void to react with the catalyst, then the H2O molecules are no longer attracted and the process is stabilized.  Therefore the blisters stop growing.  As long as the blisters don't get too big, don't worry about it.  If you have the time and money, fix it.  If you're short on either, and the blisters are not a structural problem, "paint 'em and forget 'em". 


New to the Group

Michael Ladd
 

Hello All

Greetings from the great white north where the outside temp yesterday was -39c and the wind chill was down into the -50s.

My wife and I live in Northern Ontario Canada and our dream is to purchase a sailboat and do some, well a lot of blue water sailing when we retire approx 10 yrs from now. It may seem a little premature to be on this forum at this point but we realize that this will be a huge undertaking for us and there will be a lot of research involved to get us up and running. I have been looking at different boats and reviews for the last several months now and keep coming back to the Amel. It doesn't hurt to be following the Delos blogs and video's as well to help promote the Amel's.

I have been lurking on this group for a little while now trying to get a feel for these boats. From what I can gather the Amel was designed and built for exactly what we want a blue water boat with an emphasis on safety. They were solidly built with relatively few problems such as blistering and delamination with the exception perhaps of the 1985 year with gel coat problems,which seemed to plague most of the french boats of the day. Most of what I see on these blogs are general maintenance and repair issues that are to be expected.

 We  are particularly interested in a couple of boats here and I will be looking for some guidance from the group along the way so we can make the right decision the first time. The boats we have in mind are the Maramu or Santorin as they are just under 50' and from the sounds of things being under 50' can make a considerable dollar advantage when acquiring a slip or when it comes to maintenance and repair costs, although I would expect we would be at anchor most of the time. The other boat is either a Mango or Super Maramu although I think the SM may be out of our price range.The advantage of these bigger boats that I see are a few more systems on board for the long haul and more room and storage. Does this outweigh the cost savings of the smaller boat after all this will be our house for several years, the groups thoughts and experience's on these matters would be appreciated. For those of you that need a dollar cost on this to be effective in your response, is for us to spend 100 to 150 thousand for a boat and then put another 50 to 100 thousand into it.The reason for a fixer upper is so we can learn systems along the way.

The Plan at this point (and again any guidance in this is appreciated) is as our sailing experience is limited is to buy a small sailboat such as a Catalina 22 or something along the lines that is trailerable (again keep costs down) and spend as much time as possible learning to sail and all the ins and outs of sailing. When the time comes for retirement we were thinking that we could possibly crew on some of these repositioning jobs out there and get some offshore experience and then purchase our Amel (I think I have already decided on a make and I don't know if that is good or not) and then set of to sea. For those of you that may be shaking your heads at us and saying we have no clue as to what we're getting ourselves into and we may not like the sailing life and we may tuck and run at the first sign of bad weather. All I have to say is that where we live now is not much different from what life would be like on a sailboat, we live remote and have to think ahead and be prepared for emergencies and weather. 

Any and all feedback is greatly appreciated.

Happy Sailing


Michael Ladd


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Maramu blisters

bob Sarff <bob.sarff@...>
 

Thanks!


On Feb 28, 2015, at 11:27 AM, Yahoo! Mail sammie.whammie@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Pie or square but you still need to deal with them even if a few at a time. Open them up with a ice pick and let them drain then fill, sand, seal with what ever you want ( epoxy ) next time you re coat with barrier and then ant- fouling paint.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

At Feb 27, 2015, 5:15:02 PM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners]amelyachtowners@...'> wrote:

I was recently discussing this issue with some knowledgeable people, and their take on it was unless they were large enough to be a structural issue, paint them and forget them. Their argument (as best I can relate it anyway) was this: H2O is drawn into voids in the laminate by a chemical process (I assume osmosis). When there is sufficient H2O in the void to react with the catalyst, then the H2O molecules are no longer attracted and the process is stabilized. Therefore the blisters stop growing. As long as the blisters don't get too big, don't worry about it. If you have the time and money, fix it. If you're short on either, and the blisters are not a structural problem, "paint 'em and forget 'em".


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Maramu blisters

bob Sarff <bob.sarff@...>
 

Thanks for your feedback.  For the time being ill take a wait and watch action.  I think they have gotten larger Diane I purchases her 7 years ago.  I'm afraid that I will continue to worry about them until they are fixed.  I plan on returning to NZ next season and will look again then.

Bob
S/V Chara


On Feb 28, 2015, at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I was recently discussing this issue with some knowledgeable people, and their take on it was unless they were large enough to be a structural issue, paint them and forget them.  Their argument (as best I can relate it anyway) was this: H2O is drawn into voids in the laminate by a chemical process (I assume osmosis).  When there is sufficient H2O in the void to react with the catalyst, then the H2O molecules are no longer attracted and the process is stabilized.  Therefore the blisters stop growing.  As long as the blisters don't get too big, don't worry about it.  If you have the time and money, fix it.  If you're short on either, and the blisters are not a structural problem, "paint 'em and forget 'em". 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Maramu blisters

Stephen Hancock
 

Pie or square but you still need to deal with them even if a few at a time. Open them up with a ice pick and let them drain then fill, sand, seal with what ever you want ( epoxy ) next time you re coat with barrier and then ant- fouling paint.


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

At Feb 27, 2015, 5:15:02 PM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners]<'amelyachtowners@...'> wrote:

I was recently discussing this issue with some knowledgeable people, and their take on it was unless they were large enough to be a structural issue, paint them and forget them. Their argument (as best I can relate it anyway) was this: H2O is drawn into voids in the laminate by a chemical process (I assume osmosis). When there is sufficient H2O in the void to react with the catalyst, then the H2O molecules are no longer attracted and the process is stabilized. Therefore the blisters stop growing. As long as the blisters don't get too big, don't worry about it. If you have the time and money, fix it. If you're short on either, and the blisters are not a structural problem, "paint 'em and forget 'em".


Re: Maramu blisters

Duane Siegfri
 

I was recently discussing this issue with some knowledgeable people, and their take on it was unless they were large enough to be a structural issue, paint them and forget them.  Their argument (as best I can relate it anyway) was this: H2O is drawn into voids in the laminate by a chemical process (I assume osmosis).  When there is sufficient H2O in the void to react with the catalyst, then the H2O molecules are no longer attracted and the process is stabilized.  Therefore the blisters stop growing.  As long as the blisters don't get too big, don't worry about it.  If you have the time and money, fix it.  If you're short on either, and the blisters are not a structural problem, "paint 'em and forget 'em". 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Maramu blisters

bob Sarff <bob.sarff@...>
 

Thanks Ian for you reply.  Much appreciated. 

Bob
 S/V Chara


On Feb 27, 2015, at 10:46 PM, Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bob,    Sorry, can't help you there. I understand that the problem was with the gelcoat rather than the fibreglass. If that's right, then once the gelcoat has been replaced or dried out sufficiently to take the necessary coats of epoxy the problem should not reoccur. I am no expert in these matters but from my general understanding blisters are a problem that can be effectively fixed  for the long term these days.
  Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Corfu


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 11:55:31 +1300
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Maramu blisters



Thanks Ian.  It amazes me how much useful info is available on this site.  Do you happen to know what the resin problem was.  Will I continue to have problems with incurred resin even after the fix?

Thanks for your help.  

Bob


On Feb 25, 2015, at 11:10 PM, Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Dennis,      I think you will find that it was a 1985 problem--the main manufacturers of gelcoat widely used in Europe at the time produced a bad batch that year . It almost put Jeanneau out of business and from memory they recovered the Franc equivalent of about £20m. in damages in the subsequent litigation-- a huge sum in those days

  Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Corfu


To: amelyachtowners@...
From: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Wed, 25 Feb 2015 08:33:38 +1300
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Maramu blisters



Thanks Dennis.  I was a bit surprised at the cost estimate.  I may be doing it myself... I work cheap.

Bob


On Feb 25, 2015, at 8:24 AM, Dennis Johns sbmesasailor@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I had considerable blistering on Libertad when purchased but fortunately it turned out to be only in the antifoul as the last coat was incompatible with the previous one or the prep work was poorly executed.  I have been following this site for about ten years and in all that time I have not heard of widespread blistering on the Maramu, so I think I can safely say that blistering is not a common/major problem.

Sorry, can't comment on the repair process or the cost but my gut says 25K nzd seems a bit steep.  Perhaps NZL isn't the place for economical repairs it was five years ago.

Dennis Johns
Maramu #121
Barcelona, Spain








Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine Smoke

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Gerhard,

I am guessing, but I think that there are two possibilities:

Most likely 1 - 3:
#1 is that the new nozzles are out of specification. I am guessing that your mechanic changed injector nozzles. My experience on the same engine is that nozzles last about 1000 hours. Have the nozzles tested.

#2 is that the valves need adjustment.

#3 have you checked your AutoProp? If is has ANY fouling or growth, the AutoProp fouling is causing it to "bite" too deep into the water.

It is probably NOT the pump because smoking is caused by excess fuel.

The Yanmar turbo will smoke a little and will leave a diesel smudge on the hull.

How long have you owned this boat?

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
sent from my tablet

On Feb 27, 2015 8:38 AM, "pepinoamel" <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Last year I had the engine injectors replaced by a professional mechanic.  Since then my engine smokes more and leaves a black streak on the white hull.  The injector pump was not checked.  The turbo was serviced at the same time.  The mechanic thinks it's the fuel since in the EU we now have compulsory bio-diesel.


Has anyone had similar experience after changing the injectors?


Gerhard Hoffmann

SM381, Pepino

Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine Coolant Leak

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Gerhard,

Have you replaced the water heater? If not it is 14 years old and probably is where your leak is.

But, to answer your question, yes coolant could escape the closed system at the Yanmar heat exchanger, and at the water heater.

Why don't you try this.

Remove both hoses from the water heater. This will be difficult because I believe Amel uses an adheisive. You may have to cut them, but there is probably enough hose that this will not be a problem. Connect the two hose ends together using a piece of pipe. If the loss of coolant stops, replace the water heater.

If it does not, I suspect that your professional mechanic did not replace the O rings and gaskets on the heat exchanger because they are a little difficult to get. You, or a mechanic will need to disassemble the heat exchanger again. Get new O rings and gaskets before you start.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
sent from my tablet

On Feb 27, 2015 8:33 AM, "pepinoamel" <no_reply@...> wrote:
 

Last year I had my heat exchanger serviced by a professional mechanic and since then the engine coolant leaks slowly from the reservoir.  This also happens while I'm stationary in the marina at a slow rate of about 5mm for the month.  There's no water in the engine oil and no external leaks that I can find.  Could the coolant leak out into the heat exchanger or the hot water heater?


I have the 100 HP Yanmar engine.


Has anyone had this problem?  Any suggestions?


Gerhard Hoffmann

SM381

Pepino, Greece



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine Coolant Leak

karkauai
 

Gerhard,
I had the opposite problem and found my overflow tank filling up whether running the engine or sitting at the dock.  It was a leak in the water heater heat exchanger.  When I figured that out, I left the boat for a couple of weeks with the fresh water pump off (unpressurized).  There was some leakage from the heat exchanger into the fresh water system.  That's a problem that could cause health issues.
I suspect that your problem is in the engine heat exchanger, but make sure you aren't getting antifreeze in your water tanks.
Kent
SM243
Kristy


On Feb 27, 2015, at 9:32 AM, pepinoamel <no_reply@...> wrote:

 

Last year I had my heat exchanger serviced by a professional mechanic and since then the engine coolant leaks slowly from the reservoir.  This also happens while I'm stationary in the marina at a slow rate of about 5mm for the month.  There's no water in the engine oil and no external leaks that I can find.  Could the coolant leak out into the heat exchanger or the hot water heater?


I have the 100 HP Yanmar engine.


Has anyone had this problem?  Any suggestions?


Gerhard Hoffmann

SM381

Pepino, Greece



Re: Engine Coolant Leak

seafeverofcuan@...
 

Dear Gerhard,
                   It looks as if engine water heating element inside your calorifer has got pin holes.
When the water warms up inside the calorifer it has to expand, the pressure increases inside and it pushes the coolant back through your engine and out through the plastic reservoir.
The calorifer on the older boats sensibly have an anode to stop internal corrosion.
Unfortunately the later models do not and if this is a correct diagnosis then you will have to replace the calorifer.
Regards,
Trevor Lusty
Sea fever of cuan
SM425 Redline
For Sale 
Mexico



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine Coolant Leak

JEFFREY KRAUS
 


Engine Smoke

pepinoamel <no_reply@...>
 

Last year I had the engine injectors replaced by a professional mechanic.  Since then my engine smokes more and leaves a black streak on the white hull.  The injector pump was not checked.  The turbo was serviced at the same time.  The mechanic thinks it's the fuel since in the EU we now have compulsory bio-diesel.


Has anyone had similar experience after changing the injectors?


Gerhard Hoffmann

SM381, Pepino

Greece


Engine Coolant Leak

pepinoamel <no_reply@...>
 

Last year I had my heat exchanger serviced by a professional mechanic and since then the engine coolant leaks slowly from the reservoir.  This also happens while I'm stationary in the marina at a slow rate of about 5mm for the month.  There's no water in the engine oil and no external leaks that I can find.  Could the coolant leak out into the heat exchanger or the hot water heater?


I have the 100 HP Yanmar engine.


Has anyone had this problem?  Any suggestions?


Gerhard Hoffmann

SM381

Pepino, Greece



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] contacting amel for parts

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Jeff,

I should have told you to send an email, but you were asking how to dial a number.

When you send an email for parts, I find it best to carefully list the part, remembering the language difference and to include a photo of that part...be sure to label the photo with the same description that you use in the email.  Include your model and hull number. Within about 3 working days you should receive a reply requesting a credit card for payment. If you have not heard anything in 4 working days, send a "FOLLOW-UP" email.

Amel has always shipped me via FedEx with the part arriving within a week. There will be no VAT if shipped outside the EU, but VAT will be added, if inside.

If you need something urgently, tell them in your first email and include the credit card. If Amel has the part, you should be able to receive it within a week, anywhere in the world.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
sent from my tablet

On Feb 27, 2015 7:35 AM, "jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thanks for the help everyone.

I was able to leave a message thru the phone number provided on the Amel site. It turns out that I was dialing the right number, it was just busy every time I called.
I received an email response as I requested, and was directed to contact Maud Touillet or Thierry Billard at sav@...,, and to request my parts from them. 
I sent them an email this morning explaining the what the parts were, so I'll see how it goes from here.It seems like an easy enough way to go about acquiring parts, as long as it's not crisis mode. If that were the case, I guess the direct line given in their email response was 33 (0) 546 55 00 75. For a call from the US, I assume a prefix number to dial before that number would be 011.
Assuming that my needed parts (small size wise) were available, What is the expected amount of time and the preferred means of shipping? My parts could fit in a large envelope.
Jeff 54 #14&nbsp ;

----- Original Message -----
From: "sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]"
Date: Thursday, February 26, 2015 11:33 pm
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] contacting amel for parts
To: amelyachtowners@...

> Jeff,
>
> Depending where you are calling from you call 011 (from the USA)
>
> Then 33 France country code then 546 La Rochelle city code and
> then the local number 551731. Do not dial the 0 between the 33
> and the 546.
>
>
>
> Calling from out of the country sometimes you have to dial +
> instead of 011. To dial a + you hold down the o button.
>
> Fair Winds
>
> Eric
>
> Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376
>
>
>
>
>
> From: amelyachtowners@...
> [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
> Sent: Thursday, February 26, 2015 11:28 AM> To: amelyachtowners@...
> Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] contacting amel for parts
>
>
>
>
>
> Hello,
>
> I am trying to contact Amel to order a few parts, something I
> haven't done before.
>
> The number I see to use is 330546551731, and I was told that to
> dial direct, I needed to preface the call by dialing 011. Seems
> like a hell of a lot of numbers, however I haven't had to dial
> France before.
>
> If anyone would be kind enough to let me know if that is the
> number, or if there is another one to use, I would be greatly
> appreciative of that information.
>
> I tried emailing and never received a response. It would seem
> that emailing would be a much more efficient means to order
> parts. The email I used was provided on the Amel website.
>
> I have actually dialed the number sequence I li sted above, and
> never get through, it always sounds busy. The operator says she
> is connecting my call, so I assume that the number is correct.
>
> Thanks
>
> Jeff 54 #14
>
>
>
>