Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Window Hatch Locks

karkauai
 

Thanks Richard.  Did you find that scratching was an issue? Is that what you would use?
Kent


On Mar 10, 2015, at 7:59 AM, Richard Piller richard03801@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi we have used Lexsan on a number of windscreen replacement projects on Amel's. You need to take great care about scratches and what you use to clean it. The price is a bit higher and so is the performance and it does not tend to crack or deteriorate in the sun. Drilling sawing and working the edges was not an issue. Hope this helps.  

Regards
Capt Richard Piller

On Mar 10, 2015, at 07:46, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Interesting, Paul.  Thanks for bringing that for discussion.

Does anyone have experience with Lexan for this application?  I've heard that it scratches too easily, but the hard coating a la eye glasses may be the difference.

Kent


On Mar 10, 2015, at 3:27 AM, osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I think you should use Polycarbonate plastic (traded under the name Lexan or Markrolon. It’s less brittle and have better impact strength than. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) more known as Plexiglas

See below text from Wikipedia

Polycarbonate is a durable material. Although it has high impact-resistance, it has low scratch-resistance and so a hard coating is applied to polycarbonate eyewear lenses and polycarbonate exterior automotive components. The characteristics of polycarbonate are quite like those of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, acrylic), but polycarbonate is stronger and usable over a greater temperature range. Polycarbonate is highly transparent to visible light, with better light transmission than many kinds of glass.

Polycarbonate has a glass transition temperature of about 147 °C (297 °F),[6] so it softens gradually above this point and flows above about 155 °C (311 °F).[1] Tools must be held at high temperatures, generally above 80 °C (176 °F) to make strain- and stress-free products. Low molecular mass grades are easier to mold than higher grades, but their strength is lower as a result. The toughest grades have the highest molecular mass, but are much more difficult to process.

Unlike most thermoplastics, polycarbonate can undergo large plastic deformations without cracking or breaking. As a result, it can be processed and formed at room temperature using sheet metal techniques, such as bending on a brake. Even for sharp angle bends with a tight radius, heating may not be necessary. This makes it valuable in prototyping applications where transparent or electrically non-conductive parts are needed, which cannot be made from sheet metal. Note that PMMA/Plexiglas, which is similar in appearance to polycarbonate, is brittle and cannot be bent at room temperature.

 It's more info on both Lexan and Plexiglas on Wikipedia,

 I worked once in Lexan and it was not that easy for a not so handy man, it melted when sawing and the cut was not that tidy, but for a handy man it should be doable.


Regards

Paul on S/Y Kerpa


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM Washboard Removal

karkauai
 

Hi Ian.
Someone posted here a couple (few?) years ago about doing just that. I can't find it right now, but I know it's there somewhere.
Kent
SM243
Kristy


On Mar 10, 2015, at 6:12 AM, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

My companionway washboard had become grubby due to rubber deposits from
the bottom seal so I decided to sand it down not realizing that the
outer surface was a wafer thin teak veneer. The inevitable happened and
I sanded through to the marine ply underneath. Teak veneer is not
available in Cyprus so my best interim option will be to paint the
washboard pending being able to resurface the panel.

Has anyone removed the washboard without removing the dodger, and if so,
how? There are 4 screws on the outside of the frame. If these are
removed, will the out frame come out without damaging the gelcoat? If
anyone has successfully done this, I would be grateful for any information.

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader (2003) Larnaca Cyprus


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Internal filter in the fuel tank

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Eric,

Interesting. The inspection plates on BeBe 387 have some sort of rubber like gaskets. No silicone was added and the gaskets are in good shape.

I am curious about your description of getting to the screen. I assume all of your access was from the outside of the tank where the cutoff valve is located. Am I correct and is it possible to give a little more description? For instance, what part did you use the tappet on and was there more than one part?

Bill
BeBe 387

On Tue, Mar 10, 2015 at 12:36 AM, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

After crossing the Atlantic, sailing all around the Caribbean ,and then sailing home to NY. My engine stopped working in NY Harbor of all places.

I waited and it started again after a while. This went on for about 40 miles and 10 miles from my home. Finally no fuel was coming out of the fuel line.

 

I decided there was a clog inside the tank. I removed the rubber fuel hose and put the bell of the air horn on the end of the hose and pressed the button.. I eventually heard the fuel gurgling in the tank. When I got to my marina I removed the inspection plates and pumped the tank dry. Lo and behold the silicone sealant that was used to seal the inspection plates had degraded and clogged the tanks INTERNAL FILTER.

 

Here is the interesting part, Behind the shut off valve at the bottom  of the tank, inside the tank is a plastic mesh screen-.

To get to this screen, I had to use a very thin wrench which we used to call a tappet wrench to remove the fittings.

 

I spoke with the company that makes Loctite about what sealant to use on the inspection plates. They suggested a sealant that is used on racing motorcycle transmissions.

This sealant keeps fluids in but allows the assembly and disassembly of transmissions over and over again. I have been using it for over 10 years – it is in a grey tube.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2015 7:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: RACOR or Vetus dual fuel filter

 

 

Paul,

We use 10 micron.....I don't know if it makes much difference, we try to keep the fuel going into the tank as clean as possible.

 

Yes the Baja filter does slow down refuelling a bit...but you could be a LOT more slowed down if you didn't use it !

Don't worry about the queue...they can wait ... the cleanliness of your fuel is more important than their timetable !

Getting water and/or debris in your fuel tank is more than a headache...it can be a nightmare...

EVERY precaution you can take to avoid it is worthwhile  IMHO

 

Good luck !

 

Alan

SV Elyse SM437



---In amelyachtowners@..., <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote :

Thank you all 

I will go for the Racor filter Water separator, are you using 10 or 30 micron filter?

The Baja filter I'w heard of, but does it not prolong the filling time quiet a lot? I'm in no hurry we plan to cruise with no time constrain, but the one in the ques might be impatient

Paul S/Y Kerpa

 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Window Hatch Locks

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Hi we have used Lexsan on a number of windscreen replacement projects on Amel's. You need to take great care about scratches and what you use to clean it. The price is a bit higher and so is the performance and it does not tend to crack or deteriorate in the sun. Drilling sawing and working the edges was not an issue. Hope this helps.  

Regards
Capt Richard Piller

On Mar 10, 2015, at 07:46, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Interesting, Paul.  Thanks for bringing that for discussion.

Does anyone have experience with Lexan for this application?  I've heard that it scratches too easily, but the hard coating a la eye glasses may be the difference.

Kent


On Mar 10, 2015, at 3:27 AM, osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I think you should use Polycarbonate plastic (traded under the name Lexan or Markrolon. It’s less brittle and have better impact strength than. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) more known as Plexiglas

See below text from Wikipedia

Polycarbonate is a durable material. Although it has high impact-resistance, it has low scratch-resistance and so a hard coating is applied to polycarbonate eyewear lenses and polycarbonate exterior automotive components. The characteristics of polycarbonate are quite like those of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, acrylic), but polycarbonate is stronger and usable over a greater temperature range. Polycarbonate is highly transparent to visible light, with better light transmission than many kinds of glass.

Polycarbonate has a glass transition temperature of about 147 °C (297 °F),[6] so it softens gradually above this point and flows above about 155 °C (311 °F).[1] Tools must be held at high temperatures, generally above 80 °C (176 °F) to make strain- and stress-free products. Low molecular mass grades are easier to mold than higher grades, but their strength is lower as a result. The toughest grades have the highest molecular mass, but are much more difficult to process.

Unlike most thermoplastics, polycarbonate can undergo large plastic deformations without cracking or breaking. As a result, it can be processed and formed at room temperature using sheet metal techniques, such as bending on a brake. Even for sharp angle bends with a tight radius, heating may not be necessary. This makes it valuable in prototyping applications where transparent or electrically non-conductive parts are needed, which cannot be made from sheet metal. Note that PMMA/Plexiglas, which is similar in appearance to polycarbonate, is brittle and cannot be bent at room temperature.

 It's more info on both Lexan and Plexiglas on Wikipedia,

 I worked once in Lexan and it was not that easy for a not so handy man, it melted when sawing and the cut was not that tidy, but for a handy man it should be doable.


Regards

Paul on S/Y Kerpa


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Window Hatch Locks

karkauai
 

Interesting, Paul.  Thanks for bringing that for discussion.

Does anyone have experience with Lexan for this application?  I've heard that it scratches too easily, but the hard coating a la eye glasses may be the difference.

Kent


On Mar 10, 2015, at 3:27 AM, osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I think you should use Polycarbonate plastic (traded under the name Lexan or Markrolon. It’s less brittle and have better impact strength than. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) more known as Plexiglas

See below text from Wikipedia

Polycarbonate is a durable material. Although it has high impact-resistance, it has low scratch-resistance and so a hard coating is applied to polycarbonate eyewear lenses and polycarbonate exterior automotive components. The characteristics of polycarbonate are quite like those of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, acrylic), but polycarbonate is stronger and usable over a greater temperature range. Polycarbonate is highly transparent to visible light, with better light transmission than many kinds of glass.

Polycarbonate has a glass transition temperature of about 147 °C (297 °F),[6] so it softens gradually above this point and flows above about 155 °C (311 °F).[1] Tools must be held at high temperatures, generally above 80 °C (176 °F) to make strain- and stress-free products. Low molecular mass grades are easier to mold than higher grades, but their strength is lower as a result. The toughest grades have the highest molecular mass, but are much more difficult to process.

Unlike most thermoplastics, polycarbonate can undergo large plastic deformations without cracking or breaking. As a result, it can be processed and formed at room temperature using sheet metal techniques, such as bending on a brake. Even for sharp angle bends with a tight radius, heating may not be necessary. This makes it valuable in prototyping applications where transparent or electrically non-conductive parts are needed, which cannot be made from sheet metal. Note that PMMA/Plexiglas, which is similar in appearance to polycarbonate, is brittle and cannot be bent at room temperature.

 It's more info on both Lexan and Plexiglas on Wikipedia,

 I worked once in Lexan and it was not that easy for a not so handy man, it melted when sawing and the cut was not that tidy, but for a handy man it should be doable.


Regards

Paul on S/Y Kerpa


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Internal filter in the fuel tank

karkauai
 

Hmmm.  I was told by someone? that there was no internal filter in our tanks.  That seems like a real problem waiting to happen.

Did you replace it or remove it?
Kent


On Mar 10, 2015, at 1:36 AM, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

After crossing the Atlantic, sailing all around the Caribbean ,and then sailing home to NY. My engine stopped working in NY Harbor of all places.

I waited and it started again after a while. This went on for about 40 miles and 10 miles from my home. Finally no fuel was coming out of the fuel line.

 

I decided there was a clog inside the tank. I removed the rubber fuel hose and put the bell of the air horn on the end of the hose and pressed the button.. I eventually heard the fuel gurgling in the tank. When I got to my marina I removed the inspection plates and pumped the tank dry. Lo and behold the silicone sealant that was used to seal the inspection plates had degraded and clogged the tanks INTERNAL FILTER.

 

Here is the interesting part, Behind the shut off valve at the bottom  of the tank, inside the tank is a plastic mesh screen-.

To get to this screen, I had to use a very thin wrench which we used to call a tappet wrench to remove the fittings.

 

I spoke with the company that makes Loctite about what sealant to use on the inspection plates. They suggested a sealant that is used on racing motorcycle transmissions.

This sealant keeps fluids in but allows the assembly and disassembly of transmissions over and over again. I have been using it for over 10 years – it is in a grey tube.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2015 7:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: RACOR or Vetus dual fuel filter

 

 

Paul,

We use 10 micron.....I don't know if it makes much difference, we try to keep the fuel going into the tank as clean as possible.

 

Yes the Baja filter does slow down refuelling a bit...but you could be a LOT more slowed down if you didn't use it !

Don't worry about the queue...they can wait ... the cleanliness of your fuel is more important than their timetable !

Getting water and/or debris in your fuel tank is more than a headache...it can be a nightmare...

EVERY precaution you can take to avoid it is worthwhile  IMHO

 

Good luck !

 

Alan

SV Elyse SM437



---In amelyachtowners@..., <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote :

Thank you all 

I will go for the Racor filter Water separator, are you using 10 or 30 micron filter?

The Baja filter I'w heard of, but does it not prolong the filling time quiet a lot? I'm in no hurry we plan to cruise with no time constrain, but the one in the ques might be impatient

Paul S/Y Kerpa

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] New hatch lenses

karkauai
 

Great, thanks Eric.  Do you happen to remember the name of the sealant?
Kent


On Mar 9, 2015, at 10:38 PM, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,

I replaced all the lenses on my last boat.

I spoke with the manufacturer and they gave me specific instructions.

It is easy to cut the Plexiglas and sand the edges smooth.

 

The trick they told me ,and it works, is to prime the frame and the edge of the lens with Xylene. It is hazardous stuff and is difficult to get. Xylene makes the frame and lens edge sticky and the sealant sticks to it very well.

 

I also called the GE silicone sealant division and spoke to an engineer that said that they had a special sealant just for that application. Being that it is also difficult to get he was kind enough to send me a free “engineering” sample.

He said not to use regular marine caulking.

 

I bedded the lenses using a lot of masking tape to prevent overspill, I also left the paper on the lenses until they were installed.

 

The installation was perfect and lasted as far as I know over 16 years to date.

 

 

I liked the xylene so much that every time I bedded something to the deck I used the xylene. I even bedded all 9 new S/S ports with it and the genoa tracks.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2015 7:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Window Hatch Locks

 

 

Thanks Steve,

Man, that's a lot for a window.  Has anyone replaced a lens him/herself?

Kent


On Mar 9, 2015, at 6:54 PM, Steve Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,

 

We used S &S Metal and Plastics in Jacksonville a few months ago to duplicate our stbd salon window. They have a big shop with high tech equipment, and can duplicate most anything in your choice of material. The salon window is a complicated piece of work with beveled edges, and they did a perfect job. The minimum charge is $250.00, so you might want to take more than one to be replaced. My long salon window would have been $216, but I paid the minimum. It took about a week for them to make my salon window. You will just need to get the plexiglass out of the frame to take to them. 

 

Good luck on getting your c-drive back together and back in the water. 

 

Steve Davis

S/V Aloha SM 72

Currently in St Augustine, FL

 




On Mar 9, 2015, at 5:20 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,

I think it is the same as the windshield which is 10mm ( 3/8").

This may be the time to have an expert do the job.

Be sure to pick a tinted plexiglass.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
sent from my tablet

On Mar 9, 2015 4:10 PM, "karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,
I want to replace a cracked hatch lens and need to know the thickness of the lenses. The one in need is above the forward head and measures 38cm X 51.5 cm. the folks at hatch masters won't sell me the lens.

I understand that "cast" acrylic (plexiglass) is the preferred material???

If I can get the right material, I'll cut it myself using the old one as a template.
Anyone have any words of wisdom about this job?
As usual thanks for the help.
Kent
sM 243
Kristy


SM Washboard Removal

Ian Shepherd
 

My companionway washboard had become grubby due to rubber deposits from the bottom seal so I decided to sand it down not realizing that the outer surface was a wafer thin teak veneer. The inevitable happened and I sanded through to the marine ply underneath. Teak veneer is not available in Cyprus so my best interim option will be to paint the washboard pending being able to resurface the panel.

Has anyone removed the washboard without removing the dodger, and if so, how? There are 4 screws on the outside of the frame. If these are removed, will the out frame come out without damaging the gelcoat? If anyone has successfully done this, I would be grateful for any information.

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 Crusader (2003) Larnaca Cyprus


Re: RACOR or Vetus dual fuel filter

rossirossix4
 

We've had good luck with the Mr. Funnel filter, we use the largest one with 2 filters in the bowl.  The flow rate is good and it allows you to reasonably fill your Amel tank at the fuel dock at 12 gpm.  The Mr. Funnel, West Marine, and Racor RFF are the same and all made by Shurhold.  You can test it periodically by filling about 1/4 full with water and confirming that none passes, with more water, say 1/2 there is enough pressure to push the water through.  Can also use it for a contaminated outboard tank but take precautions with gasoline!  Racor says it filters down to 50 microns  http://www.parker.com/literature/Racor/Racor_Fuel_Filtration_-_Fuel_Filter_Funnels_-_7568.pdf

Bob
SV KAIMI SM 429


Re: Keel bolt bonding strap

jjjk12s@...
 

I was thinking of a little anode hanging on a wire and fastened to the bolt on at the top where the wires are. It would be quite interesting to do it just to see if it gets eaten away at all. Fortunately I don't have any electrics in my bilge like an electrical switch or submerged bilge pump that may be a source of stray current. 

I've attached an anode on the prop retaining bolt and that works well and is obviously doing something. The shaft is only attached to the engine and no other bonding (the stuffing box is bonded but the stuffing would prevent continuity) and being a Perkins that's isolated earth. Bonding is definitely a mysterious black art.

John Maramu #91 1981 Popeye


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Equivalent Perkins engine to Volvo TDM 22

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Hello Joe and Chris,

You guys are a wealth of information... I will continue my research but the Montego and Maestro club looks like a great start point.

Cheers,


Jean-Pierre Germain
SY Eleuthera, SM007


On 10 Mar 2015, at 02:27, Chris Smither yachtakwaaba@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Greetings
This engine is theoretically supported by Volvo. After Caterpillar took over Perkins, Volvo where committed to hold spares for the small engines for 10 years.
D. B. marine  near Maidenhead UK where most helpfull.
If you would like the M 50 users handbook, workshop manual, and Perkins power training Course Notes email me.
yachtakwaaba (at) yahoo.com.
Cheers
Chris Smither


On 10 Mar 2015, at 07:22, joemac4sail@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

This engine was first sold as the non-turbo Perkins Prima 2.0L Diesel and installed in Austin Rover Montego's, Maestro's and LDF Sherpa Vans, back in the 80's and early 90's. It was one of the first lightweight diesel suitable for the average family car.  Check out ebay or Amazon for the owners workshop manual, they sell for about €12. A good source of information and where to get parts is the Montego and Meastro Club in the UK. Also these engines were popular for retro-fitting into Landrovers again due to their weight to power ratio and fuel economy. eg of some of the non Marine purchases, coolant pump €20, Full set of Gaskets €50, Things like the Filters are generic and most manufacturers sell them at a fraction of Marine prices Rimmer brothers UK €3 for an oil filter.The Boat Diesel web site had a discussion on Perkins a few years ago and supply the filter part numbers.The Perkins Prima M50, 60 and 80, were also popular for use and fitting, in canal barges in the UK, so another place to check.


Regards Joe        



Posted by: Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (7)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Keel bolt bonding strap

Andrew & Kate Lamb
 

I think an anode would need to be installed low down to be effective and would likely be harder to change than the copper strap in the first place, which probably brings the argument full circle I think. Difficult one I suspect a stainless steel strap is probably ok but …

 

Andrew

 

Ronpische

SM2k 472

Canet en Roussillion, France

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, March 10, 2015 8:24 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Keel bolt bonding strap

 

 

I suppose technically the best to protect the strap would be a small zinc anode on it as the bilge water is not in the same water body as the rudder anode (unless you have a very big problem!). I would guess the copper is acting in a sacrificial way.

 

John, Maramu #91 Popeye

 

 

 


Re: Novel fuel pre filter.--and auxilliary fuel tanks.

Paul Osterberg
 

Thank you for you advice.
I have on my list in the near future to add an extra day tank and thought of using the life raft locker for that too for peace of mind and extra fuel capacity.  with a Baja filter and a day tank I think I will have good solution. 
I have also had problem on an earlier boat with the sealant for the tank inspection hatch contaminating the fuel with small "droplets" blocking the fuel line, very annoying. I have been a little afraid to open the hatch on my "new" Amel now I feel more confident and will look for the sealant you mentioned, Do you have the name of The loctite sealant? 
Does anyone else experience and advice installing an extra day-tank in the life raft locker or elsewhere on an SM?
Paul S/Y Kerpa
 


Re: Window Hatch Locks

Paul Osterberg
 

I think you should use Polycarbonate plastic (traded under the name Lexan or Markrolon. It’s less brittle and have better impact strength than. Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) more known as Plexiglas

See below text from Wikipedia

Polycarbonate is a durable material. Although it has high impact-resistance, it has low scratch-resistance and so a hard coating is applied to polycarbonate eyewear lenses and polycarbonate exterior automotive components. The characteristics of polycarbonate are quite like those of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA, acrylic), but polycarbonate is stronger and usable over a greater temperature range. Polycarbonate is highly transparent to visible light, with better light transmission than many kinds of glass.

Polycarbonate has a glass transition temperature of about 147 °C (297 °F),[6] so it softens gradually above this point and flows above about 155 °C (311 °F).[1] Tools must be held at high temperatures, generally above 80 °C (176 °F) to make strain- and stress-free products. Low molecular mass grades are easier to mold than higher grades, but their strength is lower as a result. The toughest grades have the highest molecular mass, but are much more difficult to process.

Unlike most thermoplastics, polycarbonate can undergo large plastic deformations without cracking or breaking. As a result, it can be processed and formed at room temperature using sheet metal techniques, such as bending on a brake. Even for sharp angle bends with a tight radius, heating may not be necessary. This makes it valuable in prototyping applications where transparent or electrically non-conductive parts are needed, which cannot be made from sheet metal. Note that PMMA/Plexiglas, which is similar in appearance to polycarbonate, is brittle and cannot be bent at room temperature.

 It's more info on both Lexan and Plexiglas on Wikipedia,

 I worked once in Lexan and it was not that easy for a not so handy man, it melted when sawing and the cut was not that tidy, but for a handy man it should be doable.


Regards

Paul on S/Y Kerpa


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Keel bolt bonding strap

jjjk12s@...
 

I suppose technically the best to protect the strap would be a small zinc anode on it as the bilge water is not in the same water body as the rudder anode (unless you have a very big problem!). I would guess the copper is acting in a sacrificial way.

John, Maramu #91 Popeye




Internal filter in the fuel tank

Eric Freedman
 

After crossing the Atlantic, sailing all around the Caribbean ,and then sailing home to NY. My engine stopped working in NY Harbor of all places.

I waited and it started again after a while. This went on for about 40 miles and 10 miles from my home. Finally no fuel was coming out of the fuel line.

 

I decided there was a clog inside the tank. I removed the rubber fuel hose and put the bell of the air horn on the end of the hose and pressed the button.. I eventually heard the fuel gurgling in the tank. When I got to my marina I removed the inspection plates and pumped the tank dry. Lo and behold the silicone sealant that was used to seal the inspection plates had degraded and clogged the tanks INTERNAL FILTER.

 

Here is the interesting part, Behind the shut off valve at the bottom  of the tank, inside the tank is a plastic mesh screen-.

To get to this screen, I had to use a very thin wrench which we used to call a tappet wrench to remove the fittings.

 

I spoke with the company that makes Loctite about what sealant to use on the inspection plates. They suggested a sealant that is used on racing motorcycle transmissions.

This sealant keeps fluids in but allows the assembly and disassembly of transmissions over and over again. I have been using it for over 10 years – it is in a grey tube.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2015 7:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: RACOR or Vetus dual fuel filter

 

 

Paul,

We use 10 micron.....I don't know if it makes much difference, we try to keep the fuel going into the tank as clean as possible.

 

Yes the Baja filter does slow down refuelling a bit...but you could be a LOT more slowed down if you didn't use it !

Don't worry about the queue...they can wait ... the cleanliness of your fuel is more important than their timetable !

Getting water and/or debris in your fuel tank is more than a headache...it can be a nightmare...

EVERY precaution you can take to avoid it is worthwhile  IMHO

 

Good luck !

 

Alan

SV Elyse SM437



---In amelyachtowners@..., <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote :

Thank you all 

I will go for the Racor filter Water separator, are you using 10 or 30 micron filter?

The Baja filter I'w heard of, but does it not prolong the filling time quiet a lot? I'm in no hurry we plan to cruise with no time constrain, but the one in the ques might be impatient

Paul S/Y Kerpa

 


Novel fuel pre filter.--and auxilliary fuel tanks.

Eric Freedman
 

Paul,

At the suggestion of Ian and Judy Jenkins Pen Azen, I had Kimberlite built with a special pre –fuel filter.

At my fill pipe there is a “y” valve. When the valve is turned the fuel is runs through a 1 ¼ inch inlet  hi volume electric fuel pump then through a huge  a huge Racor filter-5 inch diameter and 11 inches long. This is just the filter cartridge size, like you see on fuel pumps at truck stops. From there it goes into my main tank.

 

I have always used 2 micron filters in my dual racor filters and have never had a problem. I keep a few 10 and 30 micron filters in case I happen to have a fuel problem, but they have never been used.

 

 

You read about a lot of boats getting into a storm and breaking loose all the crud that has built up on the sides of the tank. Since our boats take the fuel off the bottom of the tank all the crud usually winds up in the filter before there is a problem at sea.

 

I also do not believe in using biocide in my fuel tank as I believe  it kills the algae in the tank and causes it to drop to the bottom of the tank.

 

At the recommendation of the Factory rep of Yanmar USA I use a product called Howells Fuel treatment. it dissolves the algae, keeps the fuel clean, reduces the soot very dramatically on the hull and guarantees 5% better fuel economy.  It is used in fuel depots to store fuel heating oil. It has to be bought by the case.

 

I never bother filling my tanks on arrival in a port and just add some more Howells. Never had a problem.

 

I also have added 2- 37 gallon fuel tanks into the port life raft locker- they were fabricate to fit and are aluminum. When I need the fuel I just use a fuel transfer pump and send the fuel into the main tank through the filter system. I intentionally did not plumb them into the main tank . If I have a problem with the main fuel tank I still have 74 gallons of good fuel.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2015 7:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: RACOR or Vetus dual fuel filter

 

 

Paul,

We use 10 micron.....I don't know if it makes much difference, we try to keep the fuel going into the tank as clean as possible.

 

Yes the Baja filter does slow down refuelling a bit...but you could be a LOT more slowed down if you didn't use it !

Don't worry about the queue...they can wait ... the cleanliness of your fuel is more important than their timetable !

Getting water and/or debris in your fuel tank is more than a headache...it can be a nightmare...

EVERY precaution you can take to avoid it is worthwhile  IMHO

 

Good luck !

 

Alan

SV Elyse SM437



---In amelyachtowners@..., <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote :

Thank you all 

I will go for the Racor filter Water separator, are you using 10 or 30 micron filter?

The Baja filter I'w heard of, but does it not prolong the filling time quiet a lot? I'm in no hurry we plan to cruise with no time constrain, but the one in the ques might be impatient

Paul S/Y Kerpa

 


Re: Mango Genoa Furler Top Swivel

svcharisma
 

I've gotten the swivel pressed apart and uploaded more photos.  the steel bearings and collars are very rusted and cannot be rejuvenated.

I need to decide to rebuild and "americanize" the assembly, or maybe order a super maramu swivel if it will fit.  any insights would be welcomed.

the miracle is that this failed a mile from the marina, not in the middle of the Pacific.


New hatch lenses

Eric Freedman
 

Kent,

I replaced all the lenses on my last boat.

I spoke with the manufacturer and they gave me specific instructions.

It is easy to cut the Plexiglas and sand the edges smooth.

 

The trick they told me ,and it works, is to prime the frame and the edge of the lens with Xylene. It is hazardous stuff and is difficult to get. Xylene makes the frame and lens edge sticky and the sealant sticks to it very well.

 

I also called the GE silicone sealant division and spoke to an engineer that said that they had a special sealant just for that application. Being that it is also difficult to get he was kind enough to send me a free “engineering” sample.

He said not to use regular marine caulking.

 

I bedded the lenses using a lot of masking tape to prevent overspill, I also left the paper on the lenses until they were installed.

 

The installation was perfect and lasted as far as I know over 16 years to date.

 

 

I liked the xylene so much that every time I bedded something to the deck I used the xylene. I even bedded all 9 new S/S ports with it and the genoa tracks.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, March 09, 2015 7:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Window Hatch Locks

 

 

Thanks Steve,

Man, that's a lot for a window.  Has anyone replaced a lens him/herself?

Kent


On Mar 9, 2015, at 6:54 PM, Steve Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,

 

We used S &S Metal and Plastics in Jacksonville a few months ago to duplicate our stbd salon window. They have a big shop with high tech equipment, and can duplicate most anything in your choice of material. The salon window is a complicated piece of work with beveled edges, and they did a perfect job. The minimum charge is $250.00, so you might want to take more than one to be replaced. My long salon window would have been $216, but I paid the minimum. It took about a week for them to make my salon window. You will just need to get the plexiglass out of the frame to take to them. 

 

Good luck on getting your c-drive back together and back in the water. 

 

Steve Davis

S/V Aloha SM 72

Currently in St Augustine, FL

 




On Mar 9, 2015, at 5:20 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,

I think it is the same as the windshield which is 10mm ( 3/8").

This may be the time to have an expert do the job.

Be sure to pick a tinted plexiglass.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
sent from my tablet

On Mar 9, 2015 4:10 PM, "karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,
I want to replace a cracked hatch lens and need to know the thickness of the lenses. The one in need is above the forward head and measures 38cm X 51.5 cm. the folks at hatch masters won't sell me the lens.

I understand that "cast" acrylic (plexiglass) is the preferred material???

If I can get the right material, I'll cut it myself using the old one as a template.
Anyone have any words of wisdom about this job?
As usual thanks for the help.
Kent
sM 243
Kristy


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Equivalent Perkins engine to Volvo TDM 22

Chris Smither <yachtakwaaba@...>
 

Greetings
This engine is theoretically supported by Volvo. After Caterpillar took over Perkins, Volvo where committed to hold spares for the small engines for 10 years.
D. B. marine  near Maidenhead UK where most helpfull.
If you would like the M 50 users handbook, workshop manual, and Perkins power training Course Notes email me.
yachtakwaaba (at) yahoo.com.
Cheers
Chris Smither


On 10 Mar 2015, at 07:22, joemac4sail@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

This engine was first sold as the non-turbo Perkins Prima 2.0L Diesel and installed in Austin Rover Montego's, Maestro's and LDF Sherpa Vans, back in the 80's and early 90's. It was one of the first lightweight diesel suitable for the average family car.  Check out ebay or Amazon for the owners workshop manual, they sell for about €12. A good source of information and where to get parts is the Montego and Meastro Club in the UK. Also these engines were popular for retro-fitting into Landrovers again due to their weight to power ratio and fuel economy. eg of some of the non Marine purchases, coolant pump €20, Full set of Gaskets €50, Things like the Filters are generic and most manufacturers sell them at a fraction of Marine prices Rimmer brothers UK €3 for an oil filter.The Boat Diesel web site had a discussion on Perkins a few years ago and supply the filter part numbers.The Perkins Prima M50, 60 and 80, were also popular for use and fitting, in canal barges in the UK, so another place to check.


Regards Joe