Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 'White deck' texture

Ben "Santorin LO"
 

Thanks Joe, the area is very small (about 10 x 5cm) and I believe your idea could work, however, I observed that there are about 3 different patterns to follow i.e the 'drops shaped' fixtures, the diagonal lines of original fixing and the width ones, which makes this very difficult to match to the rest of the surface
.




From: "joemac4sail@... [amelyachtowners]" To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Monday, November 2, 2015 5:55 PM
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: 'White deck' texture

 
How big is the repair. Would a waxed silicone mould of an undamaged part of the deck hold uncured gelcoat allowing you to get the look you want. Might be worth trying as an experiment. Regards Joe.



Re: 'White deck' texture

joseph mc donnell
 

How big is the repair. Would a waxed silicone mould of an undamaged part of the deck hold uncured gelcoat allowing you to get the look you want. Might be worth trying as an experiment. Regards Joe.


Re: Pole takedown

Bob Fritz
 

This is my procedure for setting and retrieving the long pole on the SM.
1. Set the short pole on the mast and attach the long pole and hook it on the rail.
2. Attach the fore guy, (blue line), the after guy, (red line), the down haul, (yellow line), and the pole lift. If from the factory, the lines are marked at the cleat point. I hope I have the colors correct.
3. Run the genoa sheet through the sheave on the end of the pole.
4. Deploy the pole by hauling rapidly on the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, use gravity to help by hauling when the boat rolls to the same side as the pole.
5. Unfurl the jib and sheet home.
6. Reverse the procedure for removing the pole. Furl the jib first and proceed from there.
7. Lower the pole to the level of the stanchion.
8. Maintain control of the pole by having a crew take up on the after guy as you ease the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, bring in the pole when the boat rolls to the pole side. Be sure the assisting crew is far enough aft that they will not be hit by the pole if control is lost. A bumper or cushion on the stanchion or rail will prevent damage should things go bad. I have never yet had a problem with the pole hitting the water although it could happen if the pole is lowered too much.


Re: Anchors for a Santorin

joseph mc donnell
 

Thanks Christoph for raising the subject of anchors. After a summer in Croatia, I was disapointed with our CQR, particularly when trying to set it in sea grass. That along with the deep anchoring, has pushed us to look at changing our main anchor. If any Santorin owner has changed to one of the newer brands Rocna, Bugel, Mason, Bruce or Delta, which worked and at what weight. Also was there a need to alter the bow roller to accommodate the new anchor and was there a need to up grade the chain from 8mm to 10mm.
Regards. Joe


'White deck' texture

Ben "Santorin LO"
 

Hi, does anyone knows how to get the same original anti slide design on the white part of the deck following repair? Hading a patch just under the mast following cracking due to tool falling - it is repaired, but flat rather then like the original design - any idea how to get this right please? (Amel Santorin).

Brads


(No subject)

Christoph Kasper <christoph.kasper@...>
 

Santorin owners 
what sort of anchor do you use? what experience did you make with rocna vs. cobra?  what size of chain is the best?
do anyone of you have the original amel owners manual?
thanks a lot for your comments
Christoph


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pole takedown

Mark Erdos
 

Furl the sail.

Slowly ease the blue rope while keeping the red rope taut (moving the pole aft)

When the outer end of the pole is within reach of the boat hook place the boat hook on the red rope at the attachment point and push out.

Release the blue rope and pull on the red rope while pushing out with the boat hook (at the outer end of the pole)

Lock the pole to the rail and detach the colored ropes and jib sheet.



I do not see how the pole hit your hull. The top line (white) should prevent the pole from going that low. We adopted the method above because the pole crashed into the rail once. No damage was done but I was awakened by the speed that the pole slammed back.



Hope this helps.





With best regards,



Mark



Skipper

Sailing Yacht: Cream Puff



www.creampuff.us



From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2015 9:56 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pole takedown





Thanks Kent and Mark.



Kent, I find that the angle where I can maintain control of the blue line goes down as the wind speed increases. Around 20 knots apparent, there is little control after about 10 degrees aft of perpendicular. Is this consistent with your experience? I try easing the sheet but at that wind speed, there is still lots of pressure on the sail and therefore on the sheet at the shiv. In fact, the pole starts to move forward.



Mark, how exactly do you use the boat hook?



I have had two episodes of drama. Once in the middle of the night I lowered the pole, started a takedown and it crashed loudly on the hull. Needless to say, the shock to the sleeping crew was not appreciated. Second time, I raised the pole and it crashed against a shroud. Most recently, I have started bending two halyards to the rail just abeam the dodger, raising the pole, and then gradually releasing the blue line. With this method, the pole hits the halyards and stops less abruptly and with less potential for damage. But I keep thinking there must be a better way.



Thanks gents. Much appreciated.







[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Gelcoat repair

Mark Erdos
 

We have used a product called MagicEzy. It is an Australian product that is very easy to use. It doesn’t require any mixing. I am very happy with the results.



The color CREAM is just about an exact match to the cabin top of the SM2K.



Here is the site: <http://www.magicezy.com> www.magicezy.com



It is available from Defender and Amazon in the USA





With best regards,



Mark



Super Maramu 2000

Hull #275

www.creampuff.us

Currently cruising: St Augustine FL



From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 31, 2015 7:35 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Gelcoat repair





I contacted Amel directly with this question. The answer, unfortunately, was no. The color is simply the "factory" color. There was no other information they could provide. This was for a SM. So if you have a different model, there may be a different answer.



If you really want it to look good, hire a paint professional to match the color. Or do it yourself and use trial and error. Just try color matching with gel coat without the cure until you find the color that matches.

Best,



Jason

Pao San

SM #88





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Surveyor(s) east coast US

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Russ,

If you cannot get a surveyor that knows Amels, you should find an owner that knows Amels well, or hire Joel Potter att.net> to look your boat over and give yo plenty of advice. I would rather have someone who knows Amels than a really good surveyor that does not. 

I know too many Amel owners that had a good highly recommended surveyor, that would never hire that kind of person again for a pre-purchase review of an Amel.

Bill
BeBe 387
Lanzarote, Canary Islands

On Sat, Oct 31, 2015 at 6:31 PM, seafeverofcuan@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Russ,

       Now that you have a lot of recommendations it will pay dividends to ensure that you select one who has actually surveyed an Amel. If you check the history of this site you will find postings referring to surveyors not understanding some of the Amel systems, how to switch on the bow thruster for example and reporting that it didn't work.
It would also be worth contacting Olivier privately for a  possible recommendation
of someone in your area.
Good luck with your search.
Regards,
Trevor

Seafever of Cuan
SM425 Redline 2004
Mexico
For sale
$295k 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pole takedown

karkauai
 

It sounds like you are taking the pole down with the sail still out?  " at that wind speed, there is still lots of pressure on the sail and therefore on the sheet at the shiv."  I don't see how you could do that under any circumstances, but just in case, fuel the sail completely first.  Or in the case of the ballooner, bring it down before you take the pole down.
Where are you leading the blue line after it leaves the pole? It should go through a block well foreword at the bottom of the stanchion by the bow locker.  If your block is farther back, you would lose control at a much lesser angle.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy


On Nov 1, 2015, at 9:55 PM, francesringley@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks Kent and Mark. 

Kent, I find that the angle where I can maintain control of the blue line goes down as the wind speed increases. Around 20 knots apparent, there is little control after about 10 degrees aft of perpendicular. Is this consistent with your experience? I try easing the sheet but at that wind speed, there is still lots of pressure on the sail and therefore on the sheet at the shiv. In fact, the pole starts to move forward.

Mark, how exactly do you use the boat hook? 

I have had two episodes of drama. Once in the middle of the night I lowered the pole, started a takedown and it crashed loudly on the hull. Needless to say, the shock to the sleeping crew was not appreciated. Second time, I raised the pole and it crashed against a shroud. Most recently, I have started bending two halyards to the rail just abeam the dodger, raising the pole, and then gradually releasing the blue line. With this method, the pole hits the halyards and stops less abruptly and with less potential for damage. But I keep thinking there must be a better way.

Thanks gents. Much appreciated. 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pole takedown

Alan Leslie
 

Same deal as Kent.... lower the topping lift a bit, but not too much...we have black tape on the white line to know where to go to, so if it hits anything it hits the rail...its a lot easier with two people...I've done it on my own and it was a bit hairy !
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pole takedown

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Do you furl the sail first. I use the se method as Kent. 
Danny
Sm 299
Ocean pearl


Sent from Samsung Mobile


-------- Original message --------
From: "francesringley@... [amelyachtowners]"
Date:02/11/2015 15:55 (GMT+12:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pole takedown

 

Thanks Kent and Mark. 

Kent, I find that the angle where I can maintain control of the blue line goes down as the wind speed increases. Around 20 knots apparent, there is little control after about 10 degrees aft of perpendicular. Is this consistent with your experience? I try easing the sheet but at that wind speed, there is still lots of pressure on the sail and therefore on the sheet at the shiv. In fact, the pole starts to move forward.

Mark, how exactly do you use the boat hook? 

I have had two episodes of drama. Once in the middle of the night I lowered the pole, started a takedown and it crashed loudly on the hull. Needless to say, the shock to the sleeping crew was not appreciated. Second time, I raised the pole and it crashed against a shroud. Most recently, I have started bending two halyards to the rail just abeam the dodger, raising the pole, and then gradually releasing the blue line. With this method, the pole hits the halyards and stops less abruptly and with less potential for damage. But I keep thinking there must be a better way.

Thanks gents. Much appreciated. 


Re: Pole takedown

Ian Park
 

I have not used my twin headsails extensively and have only once been caught out leaving it a bit late in a rising wind.
I always furl the sails completely as the first step - I have never attempted to remove a pole with the sail still set.
I always lower the pole until the end is just below the height of the guardrail. So far I have managed to control it with the blue line, but if in doubt I put a fender on the guardrail as a cushion. This works for me but I admit that I have not had to try this in a heavy rolling sea where the pole end could catch in a wave top.
I believe there have been earlier posts on deploying poles, and there is a good description in the SM handbook of the whole process of setting and retrieving the twin headsails which I downloaded from the web-site.

Ian 'Ocean Hobo' SN 96


Re: Pole takedown

francesringley@...
 

Thanks Kent and Mark. 

Kent, I find that the angle where I can maintain control of the blue line goes down as the wind speed increases. Around 20 knots apparent, there is little control after about 10 degrees aft of perpendicular. Is this consistent with your experience? I try easing the sheet but at that wind speed, there is still lots of pressure on the sail and therefore on the sheet at the shiv. In fact, the pole starts to move forward.

Mark, how exactly do you use the boat hook? 

I have had two episodes of drama. Once in the middle of the night I lowered the pole, started a takedown and it crashed loudly on the hull. Needless to say, the shock to the sleeping crew was not appreciated. Second time, I raised the pole and it crashed against a shroud. Most recently, I have started bending two halyards to the rail just abeam the dodger, raising the pole, and then gradually releasing the blue line. With this method, the pole hits the halyards and stops less abruptly and with less potential for damage. But I keep thinking there must be a better way.

Thanks gents. Much appreciated. 


Re: Gelcoat repair

sailor63109@...
 

Here's a good YouTube video instruction on color matching gel coat.

There's A Hole In My Boat~ Gelcoat Color matching Part 2

 

Duane
Wanderer SM477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Pole takedown

Mark Erdos
 

We use a boat hook to prevent the pole from crashing into the boat.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Super Maramu 2000

Hull #275

www.creampuff.us

Currently cruising:  St Augustine FL

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, November 01, 2015 6:49 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Pole takedown

 

 

Hi Ian,

Yes, the pole can come back vigorously.  After it's at 45degrees aft of straight out, you have no control of it with the forward stay (the blue line).

 

I often single-hand, and I first lower the topping lift until the end of the pole is a little below waist height.  Then I stand about 4-5 feet behind the pole and ease the fore stay, ready to catch the pole as soon I can reach it.  That way I can start slowing it down before it gets moving so fast.  When I get control, I walk it back and hook it in the rail.

 

With two people, same thing, but I lower it to only chest or abdominal height (I think there's less chance of the boat rolling and catching the tip of the pole in the water), and have the second crew ready by the dodger.  I still slow it down from a few feet behind the pole as I ease the blue line.

 

Hope that helps.

Kent

SM 243

Kristy


On Nov 1, 2015, at 5:17 AM, francesringley@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Looking for advice on how to takedown the poles, especially in 15+ knot winds. I am not yet ready to fly the ballooner so I use the pole when sailing wing-on-wing. However, on a couple of occasions during takedown, the pole has rapidly and dangerously sprung aftward. I usually first ensure that the pole is perpendicular, the foreguy is tight and then begin to ease pressure by releasing the jib sheet. But I am still experiencing challenges. Any guidance for next?

 

Ian Townsend

SM153

Loca Lola II


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Pole takedown

karkauai
 

Hi Ian,
Yes, the pole can come back vigorously.  After it's at 45degrees aft of straight out, you have no control of it with the forward stay (the blue line).

I often single-hand, and I first lower the topping lift until the end of the pole is a little below waist height.  Then I stand about 4-5 feet behind the pole and ease the fore stay, ready to catch the pole as soon I can reach it.  That way I can start slowing it down before it gets moving so fast.  When I get control, I walk it back and hook it in the rail.

With two people, same thing, but I lower it to only chest or abdominal height (I think there's less chance of the boat rolling and catching the tip of the pole in the water), and have the second crew ready by the dodger.  I still slow it down from a few feet behind the pole as I ease the blue line.

Hope that helps.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy


On Nov 1, 2015, at 5:17 AM, francesringley@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Looking for advice on how to takedown the poles, especially in 15+ knot winds. I am not yet ready to fly the ballooner so I use the pole when sailing wing-on-wing. However, on a couple of occasions during takedown, the pole has rapidly and dangerously sprung aftward. I usually first ensure that the pole is perpendicular, the foreguy is tight and then begin to ease pressure by releasing the jib sheet. But I am still experiencing challenges. Any guidance for next?


Ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II


Pole takedown

francesringley@...
 

Looking for advice on how to takedown the poles, especially in 15+ knot winds. I am not yet ready to fly the ballooner so I use the pole when sailing wing-on-wing. However, on a couple of occasions during takedown, the pole has rapidly and dangerously sprung aftward. I usually first ensure that the pole is perpendicular, the foreguy is tight and then begin to ease pressure by releasing the jib sheet. But I am still experiencing challenges. Any guidance for next?

Ian Townsend
SM153
Loca Lola II


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gelcoat repair

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Hi Gang,

I too need both the side deck and the top deck colors to repair some small nicks and dings.

Does anyone have a color reference?

Kind regards,

Jean-Pierre Germain,
SY Eleuthera, Amel Super Maramu 007



On 1 Nov 2015, at 00:35, jwdernehl@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I contacted Amel directly with this question.  The answer, unfortunately, was no. The color is simply the "factory" color. There was no other information they could provide. This was for a SM.  So if you have a different model, there may be a different answer. 


If you really want it to look good, hire a paint professional to match the color. Or do it yourself and use trial and error. Just try color matching with gel coat without the cure until you find the color that matches. 
Best,

Jason
Pao San
SM #88




Re: Gelcoat repair

jwdernehl@...
 

I contacted Amel directly with this question.  The answer, unfortunately, was no. The color is simply the "factory" color. There was no other information they could provide. This was for a SM.  So if you have a different model, there may be a different answer. 

If you really want it to look good, hire a paint professional to match the color. Or do it yourself and use trial and error. Just try color matching with gel coat without the cure until you find the color that matches. 
Best,

Jason
Pao San
SM #88