Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main sail line tender

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 3:21 PM, Donato Valente ing.d.valente@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Goodmorning,

Unfortunately my partner in Portorico has to change the gears on the
electric line tender on the boom of our SM 2000 (year 2004).
He is having the assistance of a local 'technician' but unsuccesfully.
The gears are completely gone and need to dismantle the whole line
tender since it seems blocked (rust, salt etc).
How to start to free the vertical shaft ? starting from the cap on
top, or freeing the bottom gears first.
I apologize for my very poor description.
Any suggestions ?
Is there any drawing on the net ?
Many thanks for your help

Donato
SM 486 Ocean Bird in Fajardo Puertorico

--
___/)_____/)____/)_____

Ing. Donato Valente
mobile:+39 392 5390810
Skype ID: donato.valente



New file uploaded to amelyachtowners

amelyachtowners@...
 

Hello,


This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the amelyachtowners
group.


File : /Outhaul Service.pdf
Uploaded by : svbebe <yahoogroups@svbebe.com>
Description : SM Outhaul by Gary Silver...edited by Bill Rouse


You can access this file at the URL:
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Regards,


svbebe <yahoogroups@svbebe.com>


Re: Main sail line tender

seafeverofcuan@...
 

Donato,
           Go into the Files section and look under Amelliahona Outhaul Gearbox written by Gary Silver and possibly Bill Rouse of Bebe.
You will get very clear instructions how to proceed.
Also, it would be much better to have the new seals, gears and bearings before you start.
Regards,
Trevor
Seafever of Cuan
2004 SM 425 Redline
For Sale 
$295,000


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Jamie,

BeBe SM #387 does not have an isolation transformer and does not have a breaker before the breaker on the side of the 220VAC electrical panel. That is a GFC breaker rated at 32 amps.

I am not an electrical engineer, so I test electrical devices by touching them to see how hot are charged they are. This has served me well, but I have lost a few brain cells doing this...maybe I'll buy a Fluke one of these days.

Good luck on your project, and don't use the touch-test to test for a load...that only works for us IEs.

Bill
Bebe 387

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 3:06 PM, Andrew Lamb andrew.lamb@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Yes just after I posted my message I looked on some of the US calculators and these as you say seem more conservative. I am not at my boat at the moment but I will certainly take a look at the Amel drawings the next time I am there.

 

Andrew

 

Ronpische

SM2k 472

Canet en Roussillion, France

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:59 PM


To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

 

 

Thanks Andrew, I checked the European wire manufacturers out there and they all seem to indicate that 4mm2 wire is good for up to 32A single phase, so I think you are correct on adequacy in design. I think the US NEC is just more conservative, hence my concern.

 

I will retain my 32A breaker, but I still would like to find out why my Amel factory electrical schematics indicate a 16 amp 230V circuit breaker. It seems you have a 32A breaker, as do I.

 

What shore power inlet breaker rating is shown on your Amel drawings?

 

Thanks,

Jamie

 

 

On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 9:46 AM, "Andrew Lamb andrew.lamb@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

We have a total run of somewhere between 15-20 meters (internal cabling + shore power cable)  of twin and earth 4mm2 cross section double insulated cable from the shore power to the 32A circuit breaker in the engine room, then onto the 7.5KW rated isolation transformer. All the online and offline calculators/calculations that I have done seem to suggest that this is adequate.

 

Andrew

 

Ronpische

SM2k 472

Canet en Roussillion, France

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:23 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

 

 

Bill, thanks for the feedback. Trust me, I am not trying to question what Amel did, as I am sure they have been installing safe and effective electrical systems in their boats. And I also agree that I do not want to "de-Amel" my boat. I like it essentially the way it is.

 

But I do have some concerns that my Amel 54 may not be configured as Amel intended, and what I have is definitely not safe. I was hoping to see what others have in their shore power systems to see if I have the right setup. Right now I have a single 32A/230V Hubbel shore power inlet coupled to a 32A/230V circuit breaker in the lazarette feeding my shore power line to the automatic transfer switch in the engine room. The Amel electrical schematics I have indicate there should be a 16A/230V breaker for the 50Hz feeder and also a 32A breaker for a 120V/60Hz feeder with a step-up transformer. I do not have the 16A breaker or the transformer. I am concerned about the possibility that someone may connect my shore power inlet to a 230V or 240V connection (which is what you have to do of course whether in Europe or the US) but then try to run everything in the boat. That would overload my 4mm2 wiring.

 

I certainly am not immune to making mistakes, but I do think I am looking at this correctly. I am an electrical engineer, so right or wrong I have based my shore power assessments on US National Electrical Code rules. Your approach to determining wire size based on voltage and voltage drop also can be used, but is only really appropriate for DC wiring and not higher voltage AC systems (whether they are 120V or 230V), where voltage drop is not a concern in a house or boat. Voltage drop is only important if you are looking at DC circuits (where we are dealing with 12 or 24 volts).

 

Respectfully, I must also point out a few issues with your numbers. 4mm2, commonly available in Europe, is a cross-sectional measurement of the wire and not the diameter or circumference. It is the equivalent of a US Wire Gauge Size 11 per the conversion tables. I can see how you might have equated it to a 6 AWG. Since 11 gauge wire is not commonly available in the US, you would have to use 12 gauge wire to be safe.

 

Current through the wire is the issue and not voltage or frequency. 12 gauge wire (or 4mm2) on any AC circuit (less than 600 volts) is good for up to a 20A breaker and a maximum of 16 amps of continuous current at either 120V or 230V. If you connect a European 230V (or US 240V) power source to a 32A breaker (as I have), the breaker would allow a huge current (up to about 30 amps before tripping) to pass through my 4mm2 wire. In order to handle that much current, I would need to replace the wiring with 6mm2 wire (or 10 AWG in the US). i do not want to do that, as I agree with you that Amel clearly planned for 4mm2 wiring on the 230V/50Hz shore power feeder, and hence the rationale for a 16A circuit breaker. Also I think you are correct that the vast majority of power systems available throughout Europe are indeed 16A rather than 32A.

 

Those are the reasons why I think the circuit breaker I have is wrong and I should degrade it to 16 amps at 230V. Of course, that would limit my power capacity, but I think that is what Amel would have installed. What size shore power connector and circuit breaker do you have?

 

Thanks,

Jamie Wendell

s/v Phantom Amel 54

 

 

On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:59 AM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Jaimie,

 

I think that you are incorrect on required wire size. How did you calculate that it is wrong? Based on: Wire Circular mils =2 x ρ x I x L / (%Allowable Voltage drop of source voltage) 

 

4mm = 6 gauge...and 6 gauge is adequate for 230VAC 50htz for 200+ foot length at 3%Allowable Voltage drop.

 

Is it possible that you have made a mistake? Or, is it possible that your calculations of wire size are based on 110VAC common to the USA?

Also, I would assume that if Amel installed a 16 amp breaker in the lazarette that they would have used 16 amps for a reason...maybe because the vast majority of the 230VAC 50htz shore power connection in Europe and around the world happen to be 16 amp. There are some marinas with a 32 amp option, but not many. So, it is highly likely that the 16 amp breaker was intentional. We happen to be plugged into 230VAC 50htz 32 amp shore power now, but in this new marina, the 32 amp plug that we are using is the only one on our pontoon...30 other boats are plugged into 16 amps.

 

A word of advice to you. The last person you should doubt in terms of Amel systems design is Amel. And the last thing that you want to do with an Amel is to Un-Amel your Amel.

 

Also, I sent you a private message.

 

Bill

BeBe #387

 

 

 

On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 4:24 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

That definitely helps. So in your case all shore power feeds through the Mass GI 3.5, presumably protected by a 16A circuit breaker in the lazarette? Is that the size breaker you have?

 

I have a 32A breaker in the lazarette, which is too large for the 4mm2 wire Amel installed, and it would not safely protect that size isolation transformer.

 

I plan to change that to a 16A breaker and use a similarly- sized isolation transformer like yours (I am using the Victron 3.6 unit). I just want to be sure that the breaker doesn't trip all the time if AC loads exceed the 16 amps permitted.

 

Thanks,

Jamie Wendell

s/v Phantom Amel 54

 

 

On Tuesday, November 17, 2015 8:29 AM, "Wolfg ang Weber webercardio@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

For your Information. 

This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards, 
Edwin van der Kroon"

 

Any comment ?  Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE  Amel 54 # 162

 

 

 

 

 



Main sail line tender

Donato Valente
 

Goodmorning,

Unfortunately my partner in Portorico has to change the gears on the
electric line tender on the boom of our SM 2000 (year 2004).
He is having the assistance of a local 'technician' but unsuccesfully.
The gears are completely gone and need to dismantle the whole line
tender since it seems blocked (rust, salt etc).
How to start to free the vertical shaft ? starting from the cap on
top, or freeing the bottom gears first.
I apologize for my very poor description.
Any suggestions ?
Is there any drawing on the net ?
Many thanks for your help

Donato
SM 486 Ocean Bird in Fajardo Puertorico




--
___/)_____/)____/)_____

Ing. Donato Valente
mobile:+39 392 5390810
Skype ID: donato.valente


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

Andrew & Kate Lamb
 

Yes just after I posted my message I looked on some of the US calculators and these as you say seem more conservative. I am not at my boat at the moment but I will certainly take a look at the Amel drawings the next time I am there.

Andrew

Ronpische
SM2k 472
Canet en Roussillion, France



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:59 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration


Thanks Andrew, I checked the European wire manufacturers out there and they all seem to indicate that 4mm2 wire is good for up to 32A single phase, so I think you are correct on adequacy in design. I think the US NEC is just more conservative, hence my concern.

I will retain my 32A breaker, but I still would like to find out why my Amel factory electrical schematics indicate a 16 amp 230V circuit breaker. It seems you have a 32A breaker, as do I.

What shore power inlet breaker rating is shown on your Amel drawings?

Thanks,
Jamie


On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 9:46 AM, "Andrew Lamb andrew.lamb@telemed.co.uk<mailto:andrew.lamb@telemed.co.uk> [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:


We have a total run of somewhere between 15-20 meters (internal cabling + shore power cable) of twin and earth 4mm2 cross section double insulated cable from the shore power to the 32A circuit breaker in the engine room, then onto the 7.5KW rated isolation transformer. All the online and offline calculators/calculations that I have done seem to suggest that this is adequate.

Andrew

Ronpische
SM2k 472
Canet en Roussillion, France



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:23 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration


Bill, thanks for the feedback. Trust me, I am not trying to question what Amel did, as I am sure they have been installing safe and effective electrical systems in their boats. And I also agree that I do not want to "de-Amel" my boat. I like it essentially the way it is.[*:) happy]

But I do have some concerns that my Amel 54 may not be configured as Amel intended, and what I have is definitely not safe. I was hoping to see what others have in their shore power systems to see if I have the right setup. Right now I have a single 32A/230V Hubbel shore power inlet coupled to a 32A/230V circuit breaker in the lazarette feeding my shore power line to the automatic transfer switch in the engine room. The Amel electrical schematics I have indicate there should be a 16A/230V breaker for the 50Hz feeder and also a 32A breaker for a 120V/60Hz feeder with a step-up transformer. I do not have the 16A breaker or the transformer. I am concerned about the possibility that someone may connect my shore power inlet to a 230V or 240V connection (which is what you have to do of course whether in Europe or the US) but then try to run everything in the boat. That would overload my 4mm2 wiring.

I certainly am not immune to making mistakes, but I do think I am looking at this correctly.[*:) happy] I am an electrical engineer, so right or wrong I have based my shore power assessments on US National Electrical Code rules. Your approach to determining wire size based on voltage and voltage drop also can be used, but is only really appropriate for DC wiring and not higher voltage AC systems (whether they are 120V or 230V), where voltage drop is not a concern in a house or boat. Voltage drop is only important if you are looking at DC circuits (where we are dealing with 12 or 24 volts).

Respectfully, I must also point out a few issues with your numbers. 4mm2, commonly available in Europe, is a cross-sectional measurement of the wire and not the diameter or circumference. It is the equivalent of a US Wire Gauge Size 11 per the conversion tables. I can see how you might have equated it to a 6 AWG. Since 11 gauge wire is not commonly available in the US, you would have to use 12 gauge wire to be safe.

Current through the wire is the issue and not voltage or frequency. 12 gauge wire (or 4mm2) on any AC circuit (less than 600 volts) is good for up to a 20A breaker and a maximum of 16 amps of continuous current at either 120V or 230V. If you connect a European 230V (or US 240V) power source to a 32A breaker (as I have), the breaker would allow a huge current (up to about 30 amps before tripping) to pass through my 4mm2 wire. In order to handle that much current, I would need to replace the wiring with 6mm2 wire (or 10 AWG in the US). i do not want to do that, as I agree with you that Amel clearly planned for 4mm2 wiring on the 230V/50Hz shore power feeder, and hence the rationale for a 16A circuit breaker. Also I think you are correct that the vast majority of power systems available throughout Europe are indeed 16A rather than 32A.

Those are the reasons why I think the circuit breaker I have is wrong and I should degrade it to 16 amps at 230V. Of course, that would limit my power capacity, but I think that is what Amel would have installed. What size shore power connector and circuit breaker do you have?

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54


On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:59 AM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@svbebe.com<mailto:yahoogroups@svbebe.com> [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:


Jaimie,

I think that you are incorrect on required wire size. How did you calculate that it is wrong? Based on: Wire Circular mils =2 x ρ x I x L / (%Allowable Voltage drop of source voltage)

4mm = 6 gauge...and 6 gauge is adequate for 230VAC 50htz for 200+ foot length at 3%Allowable Voltage drop.

Is it possible that you have made a mistake? Or, is it possible that your calculations of wire size are based on 110VAC common to the USA?

Also, I would assume that if Amel installed a 16 amp breaker in the lazarette that they would have used 16 amps for a reason...maybe because the vast majority of the 230VAC 50htz shore power connection in Europe and around the world happen to be 16 amp. There are some marinas with a 32 amp option, but not many. So, it is highly likely that the 16 amp breaker was intentional. We happen to be plugged into 230VAC 50htz 32 amp shore power now, but in this new marina, the 32 amp plug that we are using is the only one on our pontoon...30 other boats are plugged into 16 amps.

A word of advice to you. The last person you should doubt in terms of Amel systems design is Amel. And the last thing that you want to do with an Amel is to Un-Amel your Amel.

Also, I sent you a private message.

Bill
BeBe #387



On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 4:24 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@yahoo.com<mailto:ms42phantom54@yahoo.com> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:

That definitely helps. So in your case all shore power feeds through the Mass GI 3.5, presumably protected by a 16A circuit breaker in the lazarette? Is that the size breaker you have?

I have a 32A breaker in the lazarette, which is too large for the 4mm2 wire Amel installed, and it would not safely protect that size isolation transformer.

I plan to change that to a 16A breaker and use a similarly- sized isolation transformer like yours (I am using the Victron 3.6 unit). I just want to be sure that the breaker doesn't trip all the time if AC loads exceed the 16 amps permitted.

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54


On Tuesday, November 17, 2015 8:29 AM, "Wolfg ang Weber webercardio@yahoo.com<mailto:webercardio@yahoo.com> [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com<mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>> wrote:


For your Information.
This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards,
Edwin van der Kroon"

Any comment ? Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE Amel 54 # 162


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salt water in the bilge

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Aras,  
              On our Supermaramu we found water in the bilge by the forward head. I assumed that this was from the bow thruster seals as it had a slightly salty taste. However, they were dry. I was puzzled for a while until I realised that shower water was trickling between the the upright edge of the shower tray where it overlapped the shower lining. 
 We slackened off the screws holding the tray in place and inserted mastic, re tightened the screws and have had no further problems.
 The reason the water had tasted slightly salty I put down to the fact that on a couple of occasions in the past 15 years we have had a slight weep from the bow thruster seals when I have delayed changing them and despite cleaning out the bilge a slight residue of salt had remained.

Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Preveza


On 18 Nov 2015, at 10:42, n33077@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Interesting thoughts.  I had the same happened to me when coming back from Rhode Island.  I too thought it was from the chain locker.  During the passage I checked the bow thruster.  Everything appeared dry.  I replaced the seals earlier this spring.  I checked the top of thruster and saw no water / moisture in and around the area,

The head was also replaced and no water was noticed overflowing during the starboard tack.

I did sample the water and it was definitely saltwater, so it was bot not from the water tank.

This is the first time it ever happened.   Outside of replacing the seals again, what else can be done?

Aaras.
Sharki #163


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

James Wendell <ms42phantom54@...>
 

Thanks Andrew, I checked the European wire manufacturers out there and they all seem to indicate that 4mm2 wire is good for up to 32A single phase, so I think you are correct on adequacy in design. I think the US NEC is just more conservative, hence my concern.

I will retain my 32A breaker, but I still would like to find out why my Amel factory electrical schematics indicate a 16 amp 230V circuit breaker. It seems you have a 32A breaker, as do I.

What shore power inlet breaker rating is shown on your Amel drawings?

Thanks,
Jamie



On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 9:46 AM, "Andrew Lamb andrew.lamb@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
We have a total run of somewhere between 15-20 meters (internal cabling + shore power cable)  of twin and earth 4mm2 cross section double insulated cable from the shore power to the 32A circuit breaker in the engine room, then onto the 7.5KW rated isolation transformer. All the online and offline calculators/calculations that I have done seem to suggest that this is adequate.
 
Andrew
 
Ronpische
SM2k 472
Canet en Roussillion, France
 
 
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:23 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration
 
 
Bill, thanks for the feedback. Trust me, I am not trying to question what Amel did, as I am sure they have been installing safe and effective electrical systems in their boats. And I also agree that I do not want to "de-Amel" my boat. I like it essentially the way it is.
 
But I do have some concerns that my Amel 54 may not be configured as Amel intended, and what I have is definitely not safe. I was hoping to see what others have in their shore power systems to see if I have the right setup. Right now I have a single 32A/230V Hubbel shore power inlet coupled to a 32A/230V circuit breaker in the lazarette feeding my shore power line to the automatic transfer switch in the engine room. The Amel electrical schematics I have indicate there should be a 16A/230V breaker for the 50Hz feeder and also a 32A breaker for a 120V/60Hz feeder with a step-up transformer. I do not have the 16A breaker or the transformer. I am concerned about the possibility that someone may connect my shore power inlet to a 230V or 240V connection (which is what you have to do of course whether in Europe or the US) but then try to run everything in the boat. That would overload my 4mm2 wiring.
 
I certainly am not immune to making mistakes, but I do think I am looking at this correctly. I am an electrical engineer, so right or wrong I have based my shore power assessments on US National Electrical Code rules. Your approach to determining wire size based on voltage and voltage drop also can be used, but is only really appropriate for DC wiring and not higher voltage AC systems (whether they are 120V or 230V), where voltage drop is not a concern in a house or boat. Voltage drop is only important if you are looking at DC circuits (where we are dealing with 12 or 24 volts).
 
Respectfully, I must also point out a few issues with your numbers. 4mm2, commonly available in Europe, is a cross-sectional measurement of the wire and not the diameter or circumference. It is the equivalent of a US Wire Gauge Size 11 per the conversion tables. I can see how you might have equated it to a 6 AWG. Since 11 gauge wire is not commonly available in the US, you would have to use 12 gauge wire to be safe.
 
Current through the wire is the issue and not voltage or frequency. 12 gauge wire (or 4mm2) on any AC circuit (less than 600 volts) is good for up to a 20A breaker and a maximum of 16 amps of continuous current at either 120V or 230V. If you connect a European 230V (or US 240V) power source to a 32A breaker (as I have), the breaker would allow a huge current (up to about 30 amps before tripping) to pass through my 4mm2 wire. In order to handle that much current, I would need to replace the wiring with 6mm2 wire (or 10 AWG in the US). i do not want to do that, as I agree with you that Amel clearly planned for 4mm2 wiring on the 230V/50Hz shore power feeder, and hence the rationale for a 16A circuit breaker. Also I think you are correct that the vast majority of power systems available throughout Europe are indeed 16A rather than 32A.
 
Those are the reasons why I think the circuit breaker I have is wrong and I should degrade it to 16 amps at 230V. Of course, that would limit my power capacity, but I think that is what Amel would have installed. What size shore power connector and circuit breaker do you have?
 
Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54
 
 
On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:59 AM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
 
Jaimie,
 
I think that you are incorrect on required wire size. How did you calculate that it is wrong? Based on: Wire Circular mils =2 x ρ x I x L / (%Allowable Voltage drop of source voltage) 
 
4mm = 6 gauge...and 6 gauge is adequate for 230VAC 50htz for 200+ foot length at 3%Allowable Voltage drop.
 
Is it possible that you have made a mistake? Or, is it possible that your calculations of wire size are based on 110VAC common to the USA?

Also, I would assume that if Amel installed a 16 amp breaker in the lazarette that they would have used 16 amps for a reason...maybe because the vast majority of the 230VAC 50htz shore power connection in Europe and around the world happen to be 16 amp. There are some marinas with a 32 amp option, but not many. So, it is highly likely that the 16 amp breaker was intentional. We happen to be plugged into 230VAC 50htz 32 amp shore power now, but in this new marina, the 32 amp plug that we are using is the only one on our pontoon...30 other boats are plugged into 16 amps.
 
A word of advice to you. The last person you should doubt in terms of Amel systems design is Amel. And the last thing that you want to do with an Amel is to Un-Amel your Amel.
 
Also, I sent you a private message.
 
Bill
BeBe #387
 
 
 
On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 4:24 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
That definitely helps. So in your case all shore power feeds through the Mass GI 3.5, presumably protected by a 16A circuit breaker in the lazarette? Is that the size breaker you have?
 
I have a 32A breaker in the lazarette, which is too large for the 4mm2 wire Amel installed, and it would not safely protect that size isolation transformer.
 
I plan to change that to a 16A breaker and use a similarly- sized isolation transformer like yours (I am using the Victron 3.6 unit). I just want to be sure that the breaker doesn't trip all the time if AC loads exceed the 16 amps permitted.
 
Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54
 
 
On Tuesday, November 17, 2015 8:29 AM, "Wolfg ang Weber webercardio@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
 
For your Information. 
This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards, 
Edwin van der Kroon"
 
Any comment ?  Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE  Amel 54 # 162
 
 
 
 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

Andrew & Kate Lamb
 

We have a total run of somewhere between 15-20 meters (internal cabling + shore power cable)  of twin and earth 4mm2 cross section double insulated cable from the shore power to the 32A circuit breaker in the engine room, then onto the 7.5KW rated isolation transformer. All the online and offline calculators/calculations that I have done seem to suggest that this is adequate.

 

Andrew

 

Ronpische

SM2k 472

Canet en Roussillion, France

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:23 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

 

 

Bill, thanks for the feedback. Trust me, I am not trying to question what Amel did, as I am sure they have been installing safe and effective electrical systems in their boats. And I also agree that I do not want to "de-Amel" my boat. I like it essentially the way it is.

 

But I do have some concerns that my Amel 54 may not be configured as Amel intended, and what I have is definitely not safe. I was hoping to see what others have in their shore power systems to see if I have the right setup. Right now I have a single 32A/230V Hubbel shore power inlet coupled to a 32A/230V circuit breaker in the lazarette feeding my shore power line to the automatic transfer switch in the engine room. The Amel electrical schematics I have indicate there should be a 16A/230V breaker for the 50Hz feeder and also a 32A breaker for a 120V/60Hz feeder with a step-up transformer. I do not have the 16A breaker or the transformer. I am concerned about the possibility that someone may connect my shore power inlet to a 230V or 240V connection (which is what you have to do of course whether in Europe or the US) but then try to run everything in the boat. That would overload my 4mm2 wiring.

 

I certainly am not immune to making mistakes, but I do think I am looking at this correctly. I am an electrical engineer, so right or wrong I have based my shore power assessments on US National Electrical Code rules. Your approach to determining wire size based on voltage and voltage drop also can be used, but is only really appropriate for DC wiring and not higher voltage AC systems (whether they are 120V or 230V), where voltage drop is not a concern in a house or boat. Voltage drop is only important if you are looking at DC circuits (where we are dealing with 12 or 24 volts).

 

Respectfully, I must also point out a few issues with your numbers. 4mm2, commonly available in Europe, is a cross-sectional measurement of the wire and not the diameter or circumference. It is the equivalent of a US Wire Gauge Size 11 per the conversion tables. I can see how you might have equated it to a 6 AWG. Since 11 gauge wire is not commonly available in the US, you would have to use 12 gauge wire to be safe.

 

Current through the wire is the issue and not voltage or frequency. 12 gauge wire (or 4mm2) on any AC circuit (less than 600 volts) is good for up to a 20A breaker and a maximum of 16 amps of continuous current at either 120V or 230V. If you connect a European 230V (or US 240V) power source to a 32A breaker (as I have), the breaker would allow a huge current (up to about 30 amps before tripping) to pass through my 4mm2 wire. In order to handle that much current, I would need to replace the wiring with 6mm2 wire (or 10 AWG in the US). i do not want to do that, as I agree with you that Amel clearly planned for 4mm2 wiring on the 230V/50Hz shore power feeder, and hence the rationale for a 16A circuit breaker. Also I think you are correct that the vast majority of power systems available throughout Europe are indeed 16A rather than 32A.

 

Those are the reasons why I think the circuit breaker I have is wrong and I should degrade it to 16 amps at 230V. Of course, that would limit my power capacity, but I think that is what Amel would have installed. What size shore power connector and circuit breaker do you have?

 

Thanks,

Jamie Wendell

s/v Phantom Amel 54

 

 

On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:59 AM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Jaimie,

 

I think that you are incorrect on required wire size. How did you calculate that it is wrong? Based on: Wire Circular mils =2 x ρ x I x L / (%Allowable Voltage drop of source voltage) 

 

4mm = 6 gauge...and 6 gauge is adequate for 230VAC 50htz for 200+ foot length at 3%Allowable Voltage drop.

 

Is it possible that you have made a mistake? Or, is it possible that your calculations of wire size are based on 110VAC common to the USA?

Also, I would assume that if Amel installed a 16 amp breaker in the lazarette that they would have used 16 amps for a reason...maybe because the vast majority of the 230VAC 50htz shore power connection in Europe and around the world happen to be 16 amp. There are some marinas with a 32 amp option, but not many. So, it is highly likely that the 16 amp breaker was intentional. We happen to be plugged into 230VAC 50htz 32 amp shore power now, but in this new marina, the 32 amp plug that we are using is the only one on our pontoon...30 other boats are plugged into 16 amps.

 

A word of advice to you. The last person you should doubt in terms of Amel systems design is Amel. And the last thing that you want to do with an Amel is to Un-Amel your Amel.

 

Also, I sent you a private message.

 

Bill

BeBe #387

 

 

 

On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 4:24 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

That definitely helps. So in your case all shore power feeds through the Mass GI 3.5, presumably protected by a 16A circuit breaker in the lazarette? Is that the size breaker you have?

 

I have a 32A breaker in the lazarette, which is too large for the 4mm2 wire Amel installed, and it would not safely protect that size isolation transformer.

 

I plan to change that to a 16A breaker and use a similarly- sized isolation transformer like yours (I am using the Victron 3.6 unit). I just want to be sure that the breaker doesn't trip all the time if AC loads exceed the 16 amps permitted.

 

Thanks,

Jamie Wendell

s/v Phantom Amel 54

 

 

On Tuesday, November 17, 2015 8:29 AM, "Wolfg ang Weber webercardio@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

For your Information. 

This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards, 
Edwin van der Kroon"

 

Any comment ?  Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE  Amel 54 # 162

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

James Wendell <ms42phantom54@...>
 

Bill, thanks for the feedback. Trust me, I am not trying to question what Amel did, as I am sure they have been installing safe and effective electrical systems in their boats. And I also agree that I do not want to "de-Amel" my boat. I like it essentially the way it is.

But I do have some concerns that my Amel 54 may not be configured as Amel intended, and what I have is definitely not safe. I was hoping to see what others have in their shore power systems to see if I have the right setup. Right now I have a single 32A/230V Hubbel shore power inlet coupled to a 32A/230V circuit breaker in the lazarette feeding my shore power line to the automatic transfer switch in the engine room. The Amel electrical schematics I have indicate there should be a 16A/230V breaker for the 50Hz feeder and also a 32A breaker for a 120V/60Hz feeder with a step-up transformer. I do not have the 16A breaker or the transformer. I am concerned about the possibility that someone may connect my shore power inlet to a 230V or 240V connection (which is what you have to do of course whether in Europe or the US) but then try to run everything in the boat. That would overload my 4mm2 wiring.

I certainly am not immune to making mistakes, but I do think I am looking at this correctly. I am an electrical engineer, so right or wrong I have based my shore power assessments on US National Electrical Code rules. Your approach to determining wire size based on voltage and voltage drop also can be used, but is only really appropriate for DC wiring and not higher voltage AC systems (whether they are 120V or 230V), where voltage drop is not a concern in a house or boat. Voltage drop is only important if you are looking at DC circuits (where we are dealing with 12 or 24 volts).

Respectfully, I must also point out a few issues with your numbers. 4mm2, commonly available in Europe, is a cross-sectional measurement of the wire and not the diameter or circumference. It is the equivalent of a US Wire Gauge Size 11 per the conversion tables. I can see how you might have equated it to a 6 AWG. Since 11 gauge wire is not commonly available in the US, you would have to use 12 gauge wire to be safe.

Current through the wire is the issue and not voltage or frequency. 12 gauge wire (or 4mm2) on any AC circuit (less than 600 volts) is good for up to a 20A breaker and a maximum of 16 amps of continuous current at either 120V or 230V. If you connect a European 230V (or US 240V) power source to a 32A breaker (as I have), the breaker would allow a huge current (up to about 30 amps before tripping) to pass through my 4mm2 wire. In order to handle that much current, I would need to replace the wiring with 6mm2 wire (or 10 AWG in the US). i do not want to do that, as I agree with you that Amel clearly planned for 4mm2 wiring on the 230V/50Hz shore power feeder, and hence the rationale for a 16A circuit breaker. Also I think you are correct that the vast majority of power systems available throughout Europe are indeed 16A rather than 32A.

Those are the reasons why I think the circuit breaker I have is wrong and I should degrade it to 16 amps at 230V. Of course, that would limit my power capacity, but I think that is what Amel would have installed. What size shore power connector and circuit breaker do you have?

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54



On Wednesday, November 18, 2015 3:59 AM, "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Jaimie,

I think that you are incorrect on required wire size. How did you calculate that it is wrong? Based on: Wire Circular mils =2 x ρ x I x L / (%Allowable Voltage drop of source voltage) 

4mm = 6 gauge...and 6 gauge is adequate for 230VAC 50htz for 200+ foot length at 3%Allowable Voltage drop.

Is it possible that you have made a mistake? Or, is it possible that your calculations of wire size are based on 110VAC common to the USA?

Also, I would assume that if Amel installed a 16 amp breaker in the lazarette that they would have used 16 amps for a reason...maybe because the vast majority of the 230VAC 50htz shore power connection in Europe and around the world happen to be 16 amp. There are some marinas with a 32 amp option, but not many. So, it is highly likely that the 16 amp breaker was intentional. We happen to be plugged into 230VAC 50htz 32 amp shore power now, but in this new marina, the 32 amp plug that we are using is the only one on our pontoon...30 other boats are plugged into 16 amps.

A word of advice to you. The last person you should doubt in terms of Amel systems design is Amel. And the last thing that you want to do with an Amel is to Un-Amel your Amel.

Also, I sent you a private message.

Bill
BeBe #387



On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 4:24 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
That definitely helps. So in your case all shore power feeds through the Mass GI 3.5, presumably protected by a 16A circuit breaker in the lazarette? Is that the size breaker you have?

I have a 32A breaker in the lazarette, which is too large for the 4mm2 wire Amel installed, and it would not safely protect that size isolation transformer.

I plan to change that to a 16A breaker and use a similarly- sized isolation transformer like yours (I am using the Victron 3.6 unit). I just want to be sure that the breaker doesn't trip all the time if AC loads exceed the 16 amps permitted.

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54



On Tuesday, November 17, 2015 8:29 AM, "Wolfg ang Weber webercardio@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
For your Information. 
This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards, 
Edwin van der Kroon"
 
Any comment ?  Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE  Amel 54 # 162








Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salt water in the bilge

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Aaras,

Does your Sharki bow thruster have a locking pin to mechanically lock the bow thruster in the up position? If it does the locking of the bow thruster should squeeze the foam seal and stop water egress, unless the seals need replacement.

One other slight thing is that for many years and until very recently Amel supplied 1 natural foam donut seal for the bow thruster tube inside the boat and 2 neoprene foam donuts for outside. I believe, but cannot confirm, that if you used the natural foam outside, you may get water egress, while neoprene should not allow it. Today if you order from Amel France you will get 3 neoprene seals. Amel Caribe still has some of the sets with 1 foam seal. 

So, my suggestion to you and everyone else is: 
Be sure that you understand the difference in these foam donut seals. It is very difficult to tell the difference, but not impossible, if you have a supply of spares...separate them and group them in sets of 2:1 (neoprene:natural foam) and use them correctly. If you cannot tell the difference in your spares, order a supply of the neoprene from Amel.

If you have a locking pin, I have found that using it will eliminate water egress.

Best,

Bill
BeBe #387

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 11:00 AM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

New seals can leak....due to maladjustment of the raising lowering positions...consult Gary Silver's post about this.

It has to be RIGHT 
It is a pain in the ass to adjust, but when you change the seals you may need to adjust the up and down positions to get everything working right
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salt water in the bilge

Alan Leslie
 

New seals can leak....due to maladjustment of the raising lowering positions...consult Gary Silver's post about this.
It has to be RIGHT 
It is a pain in the ass to adjust, but when you change the seals you may need to adjust the up and down positions to get everything working right
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salt water in the bilge

n33077@...
 

Interesting thoughts.  I had the same happened to me when coming back from Rhode Island.  I too thought it was from the chain locker.  During the passage I checked the bow thruster.  Everything appeared dry.  I replaced the seals earlier this spring.  I checked the top of thruster and saw no water / moisture in and around the area,

The head was also replaced and no water was noticed overflowing during the starboard tack.

I did sample the water and it was definitely saltwater, so it was bot not from the water tank.

This is the first time it ever happened.   Outside of replacing the seals again, what else can be done?

Aaras.
Sharki #163


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Jaimie,

I think that you are incorrect on required wire size. How did you calculate that it is wrong? Based on: Wire Circular mils =2 x ρ x I x L / (%Allowable Voltage drop of source voltage) 

4mm = 6 gauge...and 6 gauge is adequate for 230VAC 50htz for 200+ foot length at 3%Allowable Voltage drop.

Is it possible that you have made a mistake? Or, is it possible that your calculations of wire size are based on 110VAC common to the USA?

Also, I would assume that if Amel installed a 16 amp breaker in the lazarette that they would have used 16 amps for a reason...maybe because the vast majority of the 230VAC 50htz shore power connection in Europe and around the world happen to be 16 amp. There are some marinas with a 32 amp option, but not many. So, it is highly likely that the 16 amp breaker was intentional. We happen to be plugged into 230VAC 50htz 32 amp shore power now, but in this new marina, the 32 amp plug that we are using is the only one on our pontoon...30 other boats are plugged into 16 amps.

A word of advice to you. The last person you should doubt in terms of Amel systems design is Amel. And the last thing that you want to do with an Amel is to Un-Amel your Amel.

Also, I sent you a private message.

Bill
BeBe #387



On Tue, Nov 17, 2015 at 4:24 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

That definitely helps. So in your case all shore power feeds through the Mass GI 3.5, presumably protected by a 16A circuit breaker in the lazarette? Is that the size breaker you have?

I have a 32A breaker in the lazarette, which is too large for the 4mm2 wire Amel installed, and it would not safely protect that size isolation transformer.

I plan to change that to a 16A breaker and use a similarly- sized isolation transformer like yours (I am using the Victron 3.6 unit). I just want to be sure that the breaker doesn't trip all the time if AC loads exceed the 16 amps permitted.

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54



On Tuesday, November 17, 2015 8:29 AM, "Wolfg ang Weber webercardio@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
For your Information. 
This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards, 
Edwin van der Kroon"
 
Any comment ?  Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE  Amel 54 # 162






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salt water in the bilge

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

From our experience, even for an expert who uses only Amel original parts and who has replaced hundreds of Amel bow thruster seals for more than 25 years, it is possible that fresh seals leak.  It happened to us.

Another seal replacement a little short later and the leak was fixed.

Cheerio,


Peregrinus
At anchor, Palos de La Frontera, Odiel river


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

Alan Leslie
 

If you install a 16A breaker and the loads exceed 16A then the breaker will trip.
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

James Wendell <ms42phantom54@...>
 

That definitely helps. So in your case all shore power feeds through the Mass GI 3.5, presumably protected by a 16A circuit breaker in the lazarette? Is that the size breaker you have?

I have a 32A breaker in the lazarette, which is too large for the 4mm2 wire Amel installed, and it would not safely protect that size isolation transformer.

I plan to change that to a 16A breaker and use a similarly-sized isolation transformer like yours (I am using the Victron 3.6 unit). I just want to be sure that the breaker doesn't trip all the time if AC loads exceed the 16 amps permitted.

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54



On Tuesday, November 17, 2015 8:29 AM, "Wolfgang Weber webercardio@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
For your Information. 
This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5
http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards, 
Edwin van der Kroon"
 
Any comment ?  Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE  Amel 54 # 162





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Shore Power Configuration

Wolfgang Weber <webercardio@...>
 

For your Information. 
This is the answer from Mastervolt concerning the Installation of charger/inverter on Amel 54

"The AC is not connected to the DC terminals inside, the DC is floating to the housing.
however, the AC input is not galphanic isolated from the shore, for this you need a isolation transformer, and create your own ships ground in your boat.
the combi Ultra has an option to switch on a ground relay, this means the neutral in AC output will be connected to the ground in inverter mode automatically. in charger mode (this means there is a AC input like a shore connection, then this relay will be deactivated, because theoretical, the hot and neutral line can be swapped, and you don't want the hot line to be connected to the ground.
our high frequency isolation transformer is 88000355 mass GI 3,5
http://www.mastervolt.com/products/mass-gi/mass-gi-35-kva-16a-lightweight/

hope this helps,

best regards, 
Edwin van der Kroon"
 
Any comment ?  Wolfgang Weber SY ELISE  Amel 54 # 162



Re: Wiring diagram for propshaft alternator Maramu 1988

j.lochhead@...
 

Hi,

I could not find a wiring diagram for this in the files section, but can probably help you.  I am however heading away from internet now but can be reached by email though sat phone.

Please send me an email to j_lochhead      @      hotmail.com

Thanks

James
Mahiti
Maramu 147


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Salt water in the bilge

tango708@...
 

Absolutely... I was thinking bow thruster but typed c- drive👍