Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Marine Electronics - Autopilot

Roy Duddy <RDuddy@...>
 

Jay,

I had a Robertson control head installed and continued to utilize the original chain driven unit. it works perfectly.

Roy
Sharki #123
Unwineding

On Nov 18, 2015, at 5:28 PM, J Wagam jwagam@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Bill,

Let me be more specific. I am wondering where owners mounted the linear drive or if they perhaps found a way to use the existing gear when upgrading. Right now, the autopilot motor is attached to a chain behind the console. It is controlled manually. I actually wouldn't mind finding a way to leave it as a backup.

Plenty of space for all the other items you listed.

Regards
Jay

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 2:33 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I do not understand your question.

There will be several components to the Raymarine pilot system:
Control head
Course computer
Rotary drive or Linear drive
Rudder reference
Compass

Then there will be other instruments such as depth, wind, chartplotter, radar, etc.

What specifically do you mean when you say, "best way to connect the Raymarine Evolution autopilot?"

Bill
BeBe 387

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 7:10 PM, jwagam@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello All,

This is my first post here. I am closing on a 1986 Amel Mango and need to replace the electronics. I am planning on buying the new Raymarine eS system and replacing the existing chain driven autopilot. Does anybody have any thoughts on the best way to connect the Raymarine Evolution autopilot?

Thank You
Jay Wagamon











Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

Tony Robinson <tonywrobinson51@...>
 

When the common rail sensor was eventually diagnosed as the problem on my  54, I showed the old one to a couple of engineer friends. The metal on the end of the thread had turned blue. Apparently this indicates it had been subjected to extreme heat. Whether the lightening was to blame I'm not sure - but there as a strike about a hundred yards away. And I could smell and see smoke coming from the top of a church tower about 200 yards away. It was a crazy night.....

Tony.



From: "seafeverofcuan@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2015 8:31 AM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

 
Jamie,
         Following Tony Robinson's posting re. electrical storm. Is there any way that you can establish if your boat could have been hit by lightening after you left it?
I was sailing up the coast of Brazil in 2009 with four another Amels, there was a 54 called Togwin owned by a very knowledgeable  Frenchman.
Togwin suddenly lost all engine power during an Electrical storm and she was taken in tow by the rest of the group for 350 miles.
The owner well known to the factory, had a new Amel 64 on order and the factory sent out a Volvo technician from France to the Amazon basin.
The man arrived with every conceivable solid state part, meters, etc. and as others have posted, he methodically replaced each sensor until he got the engine to run.
I am not sure exactly who defined that the problem was due to lightening striking the stainless steel rails on the aft coach roof.
Regards,
Trevor

Seafever of Cuan
2004 SM 425 Redline
Mexico
For Sale
$ 295,000





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

seafeverofcuan@...
 

Jamie,
         Following Tony Robinson's posting re. electrical storm. Is there any way that you can establish if your boat could have been hit by lightening after you left it?
I was sailing up the coast of Brazil in 2009 with four another Amels, there was a 54 called Togwin owned by a very knowledgeable  Frenchman.
Togwin suddenly lost all engine power during an Electrical storm and she was taken in tow by the rest of the group for 350 miles.
The owner well known to the factory, had a new Amel 64 on order and the factory sent out a Volvo technician from France to the Amazon basin.
The man arrived with every conceivable solid state part, meters, etc. and as others have posted, he methodically replaced each sensor until he got the engine to run.
I am not sure exactly who defined that the problem was due to lightening striking the stainless steel rails on the aft coach roof.
Regards,
Trevor

Seafever of Cuan
2004 SM 425 Redline
Mexico
For Sale
$ 295,000



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

Tony Robinson <tonywrobinson51@...>
 

I got caught in a bad electrical storm last year. The engine cut out while I was motoring into the wind when the anchor dragged - in the early hours of the morning of course. It then refused to start. Anyway the local Volvo agent in Corfu came out the next day with all the diagnostic tools including a plug in fault reader. Nothing showed up on the screen, but the engine still wouldn't start. He checked the obvious things first - fuel, filters etc. but still no go. Then he said it was most likely the flywheel sensor and replaced that. It made no difference. He then went off to another D3, and took off all the sensors, including the ECU, and started replacing the sensors on my engine, one by one. It turned out to be the sensor on the common rail.

This is apparently a common fault. Volvo themselves replaced the original common rail sensor with a newer version in the last year or so. I suppose I got lucky in that my engineer had access to another fully operational D3. But all his computers,  meters and pressure gauges were useless in the event and it was only by methodically changing each one that he eventually found the problem.

I still think your issue will eventually be traced to a faulty sensor. Good luck anyway.

Tony.



From: "James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 11:35 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

 
Tony, how did you figure out that the sensor had failed? When my Volvo guy connected the VODIA tool to the engine and cranked it, it showed about 240 bar of pressure. He also disconnected it (at my insistence) and then checked it with his meter. He told me it showed the correct readings.

There were no error codes on my display or the diagnostics tool.

I could just go ahead and replace it, but it costs about $450. If I have low compression I might be wasting more money.

What did you see on your engine?

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54



On Thursday, November 19, 2015 3:30 PM, "Tony Robinson tonywrobinson51@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
I agree....that's what the problem was on my Volvo D3 - a failed sensor on the end of the common rail. And it also took forever to diagnose.....

Tony Robinson - Catriona R


From: "Jeff Wingfield ki4jde@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2015 7:54 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

 
James:

It still sounds to me as a failed sensor for the common rail. 

Jeff
LAST TANGO




On Nov 15, 2015, at 10:06, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
 
Mark, thanks for the suggestions. As you can see this is a perplexing problem and I still do not know the culprit, but I have systematically ruled out many things. We isolated the fuel system by providing an independent day tank, eliminating the boat fuel tank and filters. I am not sure what else external to the engine could be studied. The battery is fine and the ECM is getting good voltage. As you know we replaced the ECM and then returned it.

The Volvo Tech did nothing except sit in the cockpit and watch the Seven Seas mechanic do a couple of tests. I am going to ask for a quote on doing a compression check test. Getting the injectors out does take some time as I have already done that once, and the mounting parts would have to be replaced again. Those parts alone are several hundred dollars. When you figure the labor a compression check will likely cost about $500 to $600. I have already spent nearly $4,000 replacing fuel pumps, high-pressure lines, and servicing the injectors. Maybe the added expense is worth the knowledge, and I concur that a compression check is in order.
Also, we have not cranked the engine with the fuel line to the injectors loosened. That is very risky at the high pressures generated, but we do know that fuel is returning from the injectors? Why do you think WD40 alone would not be enough to cause the engine to cough? If the engine has sufficient compression it should at least try to fire. Continuous spraying into the air intake while cranking did not do anything, and we tried it a couple times.
Jamie



On Saturday, November 14, 2015 9:28 PM, "'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
I have to agree with Bill regarding the fact: What if the issue is external to the engine. Personally I would like to know for certain if the engine is shot, or not.

As for the compression check. I cannot believe the Volvo Tech did not perform this. It is not hard to do and requires only mildly expensive equipment that any good mechanic would regularly carry in their tools. The compression check test each cylinder by removing the injector, attaching the gauge and cranking the engine for about 15 secs per cylinder. It should take less than an hour to test all cylinders. For a problem such as yours it would be very insightful to know if compression, or lack of it, is the issue. If the results confirm you thoughts, you may well be better replacing the engine. But what if you have good compression? If could mean you are on the wrong path of diagnosis. I have read this thread since the first post and have thought this is more likely a fuel problem. Also, you shouldn’t need a Volvo mechanic to do a compression check. Any capable diesel mechanic can do this test.

I asked these questions before but did not see a response. Has the engine been cranked with the fuel line to the injectors loosened and fuel observed leaking out of the end? Are you absolutely certain you have fuel entering the cylinders? I do not think WD40 alone would be enough to cause the engine to cough.

With best regards,

Mark

Super Maramu 2000

Hull #275

www.creampuff.us

Currently cruising: St Augustine, FL

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2015 2:22 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

James,

My take away from all of your posts is that the mechanics and other experts that you have hired have done nothing except throw parts at your engine hoping that the part dejour will solve the problem.

Also, it seems to me that most of the diagnoses that you have written about has come from you and not the people you hired to diagnose the engine non-starting problem.

If you are replacing the engine because you have had a series of people do nothing toward identifying the problem, you could be making another mistake. What if the problem is external of your engine?

I would raise all sorts of hell with Volvo Penta and demand that they identify someone who can give you a diagnoses and a recommended solution. I would also insist on some sort of compensation for parts replaced in error. I am not sure that I would get anywhere with these things, but I would work at it very hard.

If you are not going to do this, do you plan to buy and install a Volvo? And, if you are going to change that engine to Yanmar, you may be looking at all sorts of other issues...the house 24VDC alternator, motor mounts, Vetus coupling, etc.

Just my two cents worth.

One last comment: That boat does not appear to have been maintained properly...probably not neglect, but likely some things were not completely understood by the owner...like the barnacle and marine growth...possibly there was an engine overheating issue...a proper compression test would give you a strong indication of damage. That boat spent a lot of time in Curacao where the barnacles breed like few other places. Gary left most things up to mechanics in marinas rather than being hands-on...and you know the quality of mechanics in marinas...I think you have met some recently.

Bill

BeBe #387

On Sat, Nov 14, 2015 at 6:07 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Kent, I certainly appreciate the input, and I have to agree with you in principle. The engine seems to have expired prematurely, but that 10,000 hours is only realistic if properly maintained. But I have no other explanation, as we have tried almost every possible "solution" to no avail. Many folks have tested, diagnosed, and assessed the engine. I have listened to the engine spin and everyone (including myself) feels that it spins too easily. Spraying WD40 into the air intake should have at least allowed the engine to "cough" or "kick." It did not, and this is not the first time we have tried to inject "fuel" directly into the combustion chambers. I do not know how to explain that except with low compression in at least 2 or more cylinders. Plus, the suction at the intake during cranking seems quite weak.

We have not tried a compression check at this point, since that in itself is a fairly involved process. If we discover anything other than adequate compression, then I am faced with further engine tear down. Even if the compression is good, what then? We have tried almost everything else we could try. The technician did not actually volunteer the possibility that fuel starvation could have caused the problem, but when I explained to him that the engine stopped and failed to restart during sea trial (filters were solid black with contamination), he concluded that lack of fuel "lubrication" could have at least contributed to engine failure. He could not positively identify the problem without further investigation.

At this point I am becoming more and more convinced that there is internal engine damage. Again, I feel that chasing the problem will be quite costly unless I undertake that expedition on my own. I am most weary of fighting with this engine, as it has not run for the last 4 months, and I have already replaced a bunch of parts that have not allowed it to start.

If you do get an opinion from your contacts, I would sure welcome additional inputs.

Thanks, and I do agree with your opinion on Yanmars.............

Jamie Wendell

On Saturday, November 14, 2015 11:56 AM, "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

He "thinks"??? Has he actually checked compression? I'm skeptical. I wrote to Danny Ramos but he didn't reply, sorry.

If it really is a low compression problem, how does he's explain that fuel starvation caused the problem? Does he explain what he thinks is the problem? Bad rings? Bad valves?

I would guess that engine should be good for 10000 hrs. I'd contact Danny Ramos at Marine Mechanical in Fajardo, PR before I bought a new engine.

If you're set on re powering, look at a new Yanmar. Much easier to work on, get parts, etc.

Kent

SM 243

Kristy



On Nov 14, 2015, at 11:35 AM, ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I want to thank everyone for the great advice and suggestions regarding my Amel 54 (Phantom) engine "no-start" issue. Since no one has been able to pinpoint the problem, I just had a Volvo Penta factory technician out to survey the situation. He thinks the compression is low on the engine, as it would not fire even as we sprayed WD40 into the intake. Although he had no specific rationale as to the possible cause of this conclusion, he did suggest that earlier fuel-starvation could have caused the problem, stressing the importance of maintaining a clean fuel supply at all times.

I have decided to replace the engine. That will restart the clock with zero hours and a 5-year warranty. The alternative would be to start tearing down the engine to determine the problem. Even if we do find something (blown head gasket, stuck valves, scored cylinders, etc.), chasing this "rebuild" tactic would be a very expensive and time-consuming operation - and it will still be a 9-year-old engine with 2500 hours. Although hugely expensive, a new engine is the only rational option. I do not want to continue chasing "ghosts."

Thanks again for the support.

Jamie Wendell

s/v Phantom

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]










Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

Wolfgang Weber <webercardio@...>
 

The volvo is a very common engine https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volvo_D5_engine
Why not ask someone who works for cars ?
We have the VW -Marine TDI 140 Hp on our Amel 54. For special services I would not hesitate to
ask someone from a car department.
By the way, did someone use the OBD2 scanner for this motor on the boat ?
Wolgang Weber SY ELISE Amel 54 # 162


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

James Wendell <ms42phantom54@...>
 

Tony, how did you figure out that the sensor had failed? When my Volvo guy connected the VODIA tool to the engine and cranked it, it showed about 240 bar of pressure. He also disconnected it (at my insistence) and then checked it with his meter. He told me it showed the correct readings.

There were no error codes on my display or the diagnostics tool.

I could just go ahead and replace it, but it costs about $450. If I have low compression I might be wasting more money.

What did you see on your engine?

Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
s/v Phantom Amel 54



On Thursday, November 19, 2015 3:30 PM, "Tony Robinson tonywrobinson51@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
I agree....that's what the problem was on my Volvo D3 - a failed sensor on the end of the common rail. And it also took forever to diagnose.....

Tony Robinson - Catriona R


From: "Jeff Wingfield ki4jde@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2015 7:54 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

 
James:

It still sounds to me as a failed sensor for the common rail. 

Jeff
LAST TANGO




On Nov 15, 2015, at 10:06, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
 
Mark, thanks for the suggestions. As you can see this is a perplexing problem and I still do not know the culprit, but I have systematically ruled out many things. We isolated the fuel system by providing an independent day tank, eliminating the boat fuel tank and filters. I am not sure what else external to the engine could be studied. The battery is fine and the ECM is getting good voltage. As you know we replaced the ECM and then returned it.

The Volvo Tech did nothing except sit in the cockpit and watch the Seven Seas mechanic do a couple of tests. I am going to ask for a quote on doing a compression check test. Getting the injectors out does take some time as I have already done that once, and the mounting parts would have to be replaced again. Those parts alone are several hundred dollars. When you figure the labor a compression check will likely cost about $500 to $600. I have already spent nearly $4,000 replacing fuel pumps, high-pressure lines, and servicing the injectors. Maybe the added expense is worth the knowledge, and I concur that a compression check is in order.
Also, we have not cranked the engine with the fuel line to the injectors loosened. That is very risky at the high pressures generated, but we do know that fuel is returning from the injectors? Why do you think WD40 alone would not be enough to cause the engine to cough? If the engine has sufficient compression it should at least try to fire. Continuous spraying into the air intake while cranking did not do anything, and we tried it a couple times.
Jamie



On Saturday, November 14, 2015 9:28 PM, "'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
I have to agree with Bill regarding the fact: What if the issue is external to the engine. Personally I would like to know for certain if the engine is shot, or not.

As for the compression check. I cannot believe the Volvo Tech did not perform this. It is not hard to do and requires only mildly expensive equipment that any good mechanic would regularly carry in their tools. The compression check test each cylinder by removing the injector, attaching the gauge and cranking the engine for about 15 secs per cylinder. It should take less than an hour to test all cylinders. For a problem such as yours it would be very insightful to know if compression, or lack of it, is the issue. If the results confirm you thoughts, you may well be better replacing the engine. But what if you have good compression? If could mean you are on the wrong path of diagnosis. I have read this thread since the first post and have thought this is more likely a fuel problem. Also, you shouldn’t need a Volvo mechanic to do a compression check. Any capable diesel mechanic can do this test.

I asked these questions before but did not see a response. Has the engine been cranked with the fuel line to the injectors loosened and fuel observed leaking out of the end? Are you absolutely certain you have fuel entering the cylinders? I do not think WD40 alone would be enough to cause the engine to cough.

With best regards,

Mark

Super Maramu 2000

Hull #275

www.creampuff.us

Currently cruising: St Augustine, FL

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2015 2:22 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

James,

My take away from all of your posts is that the mechanics and other experts that you have hired have done nothing except throw parts at your engine hoping that the part dejour will solve the problem.

Also, it seems to me that most of the diagnoses that you have written about has come from you and not the people you hired to diagnose the engine non-starting problem.

If you are replacing the engine because you have had a series of people do nothing toward identifying the problem, you could be making another mistake. What if the problem is external of your engine?

I would raise all sorts of hell with Volvo Penta and demand that they identify someone who can give you a diagnoses and a recommended solution. I would also insist on some sort of compensation for parts replaced in error. I am not sure that I would get anywhere with these things, but I would work at it very hard.

If you are not going to do this, do you plan to buy and install a Volvo? And, if you are going to change that engine to Yanmar, you may be looking at all sorts of other issues...the house 24VDC alternator, motor mounts, Vetus coupling, etc.

Just my two cents worth.

One last comment: That boat does not appear to have been maintained properly...probably not neglect, but likely some things were not completely understood by the owner...like the barnacle and marine growth...possibly there was an engine overheating issue...a proper compression test would give you a strong indication of damage. That boat spent a lot of time in Curacao where the barnacles breed like few other places. Gary left most things up to mechanics in marinas rather than being hands-on...and you know the quality of mechanics in marinas...I think you have met some recently.

Bill

BeBe #387

On Sat, Nov 14, 2015 at 6:07 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Kent, I certainly appreciate the input, and I have to agree with you in principle. The engine seems to have expired prematurely, but that 10,000 hours is only realistic if properly maintained. But I have no other explanation, as we have tried almost every possible "solution" to no avail. Many folks have tested, diagnosed, and assessed the engine. I have listened to the engine spin and everyone (including myself) feels that it spins too easily. Spraying WD40 into the air intake should have at least allowed the engine to "cough" or "kick." It did not, and this is not the first time we have tried to inject "fuel" directly into the combustion chambers. I do not know how to explain that except with low compression in at least 2 or more cylinders. Plus, the suction at the intake during cranking seems quite weak.

We have not tried a compression check at this point, since that in itself is a fairly involved process. If we discover anything other than adequate compression, then I am faced with further engine tear down. Even if the compression is good, what then? We have tried almost everything else we could try. The technician did not actually volunteer the possibility that fuel starvation could have caused the problem, but when I explained to him that the engine stopped and failed to restart during sea trial (filters were solid black with contamination), he concluded that lack of fuel "lubrication" could have at least contributed to engine failure. He could not positively identify the problem without further investigation.

At this point I am becoming more and more convinced that there is internal engine damage. Again, I feel that chasing the problem will be quite costly unless I undertake that expedition on my own. I am most weary of fighting with this engine, as it has not run for the last 4 months, and I have already replaced a bunch of parts that have not allowed it to start.

If you do get an opinion from your contacts, I would sure welcome additional inputs.

Thanks, and I do agree with your opinion on Yanmars.............

Jamie Wendell

On Saturday, November 14, 2015 11:56 AM, "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

He "thinks"??? Has he actually checked compression? I'm skeptical. I wrote to Danny Ramos but he didn't reply, sorry.

If it really is a low compression problem, how does he's explain that fuel starvation caused the problem? Does he explain what he thinks is the problem? Bad rings? Bad valves?

I would guess that engine should be good for 10000 hrs. I'd contact Danny Ramos at Marine Mechanical in Fajardo, PR before I bought a new engine.

If you're set on re powering, look at a new Yanmar. Much easier to work on, get parts, etc.

Kent

SM 243

Kristy



On Nov 14, 2015, at 11:35 AM, ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I want to thank everyone for the great advice and suggestions regarding my Amel 54 (Phantom) engine "no-start" issue. Since no one has been able to pinpoint the problem, I just had a Volvo Penta factory technician out to survey the situation. He thinks the compression is low on the engine, as it would not fire even as we sprayed WD40 into the intake. Although he had no specific rationale as to the possible cause of this conclusion, he did suggest that earlier fuel-starvation could have caused the problem, stressing the importance of maintaining a clean fuel supply at all times.

I have decided to replace the engine. That will restart the clock with zero hours and a 5-year warranty. The alternative would be to start tearing down the engine to determine the problem. Even if we do find something (blown head gasket, stuck valves, scored cylinders, etc.), chasing this "rebuild" tactic would be a very expensive and time-consuming operation - and it will still be a 9-year-old engine with 2500 hours. Although hugely expensive, a new engine is the only rational option. I do not want to continue chasing "ghosts."

Thanks again for the support.

Jamie Wendell

s/v Phantom

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]








Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

Tony Robinson <tonywrobinson51@...>
 

I agree....that's what the problem was on my Volvo D3 - a failed sensor on the end of the common rail. And it also took forever to diagnose.....

Tony Robinson - Catriona R



From: "Jeff Wingfield ki4jde@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sunday, November 15, 2015 7:54 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

 
James:

It still sounds to me as a failed sensor for the common rail. 

Jeff
LAST TANGO




On Nov 15, 2015, at 10:06, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
 
Mark, thanks for the suggestions. As you can see this is a perplexing problem and I still do not know the culprit, but I have systematically ruled out many things. We isolated the fuel system by providing an independent day tank, eliminating the boat fuel tank and filters. I am not sure what else external to the engine could be studied. The battery is fine and the ECM is getting good voltage. As you know we replaced the ECM and then returned it.

The Volvo Tech did nothing except sit in the cockpit and watch the Seven Seas mechanic do a couple of tests. I am going to ask for a quote on doing a compression check test. Getting the injectors out does take some time as I have already done that once, and the mounting parts would have to be replaced again. Those parts alone are several hundred dollars. When you figure the labor a compression check will likely cost about $500 to $600. I have already spent nearly $4,000 replacing fuel pumps, high-pressure lines, and servicing the injectors. Maybe the added expense is worth the knowledge, and I concur that a compression check is in order.
Also, we have not cranked the engine with the fuel line to the injectors loosened. That is very risky at the high pressures generated, but we do know that fuel is returning from the injectors? Why do you think WD40 alone would not be enough to cause the engine to cough? If the engine has sufficient compression it should at least try to fire. Continuous spraying into the air intake while cranking did not do anything, and we tried it a couple times.
Jamie



On Saturday, November 14, 2015 9:28 PM, "'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
I have to agree with Bill regarding the fact: What if the issue is external to the engine. Personally I would like to know for certain if the engine is shot, or not.

As for the compression check. I cannot believe the Volvo Tech did not perform this. It is not hard to do and requires only mildly expensive equipment that any good mechanic would regularly carry in their tools. The compression check test each cylinder by removing the injector, attaching the gauge and cranking the engine for about 15 secs per cylinder. It should take less than an hour to test all cylinders. For a problem such as yours it would be very insightful to know if compression, or lack of it, is the issue. If the results confirm you thoughts, you may well be better replacing the engine. But what if you have good compression? If could mean you are on the wrong path of diagnosis. I have read this thread since the first post and have thought this is more likely a fuel problem. Also, you shouldn’t need a Volvo mechanic to do a compression check. Any capable diesel mechanic can do this test.

I asked these questions before but did not see a response. Has the engine been cranked with the fuel line to the injectors loosened and fuel observed leaking out of the end? Are you absolutely certain you have fuel entering the cylinders? I do not think WD40 alone would be enough to cause the engine to cough.

With best regards,

Mark

Super Maramu 2000

Hull #275

www.creampuff.us

Currently cruising: St Augustine, FL

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, November 14, 2015 2:22 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Engine Problems Amel 54

James,

My take away from all of your posts is that the mechanics and other experts that you have hired have done nothing except throw parts at your engine hoping that the part dejour will solve the problem.

Also, it seems to me that most of the diagnoses that you have written about has come from you and not the people you hired to diagnose the engine non-starting problem.

If you are replacing the engine because you have had a series of people do nothing toward identifying the problem, you could be making another mistake. What if the problem is external of your engine?

I would raise all sorts of hell with Volvo Penta and demand that they identify someone who can give you a diagnoses and a recommended solution. I would also insist on some sort of compensation for parts replaced in error. I am not sure that I would get anywhere with these things, but I would work at it very hard.

If you are not going to do this, do you plan to buy and install a Volvo? And, if you are going to change that engine to Yanmar, you may be looking at all sorts of other issues...the house 24VDC alternator, motor mounts, Vetus coupling, etc.

Just my two cents worth.

One last comment: That boat does not appear to have been maintained properly...probably not neglect, but likely some things were not completely understood by the owner...like the barnacle and marine growth...possibly there was an engine overheating issue...a proper compression test would give you a strong indication of damage. That boat spent a lot of time in Curacao where the barnacles breed like few other places. Gary left most things up to mechanics in marinas rather than being hands-on...and you know the quality of mechanics in marinas...I think you have met some recently.

Bill

BeBe #387

On Sat, Nov 14, 2015 at 6:07 PM, James Wendell ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Kent, I certainly appreciate the input, and I have to agree with you in principle. The engine seems to have expired prematurely, but that 10,000 hours is only realistic if properly maintained. But I have no other explanation, as we have tried almost every possible "solution" to no avail. Many folks have tested, diagnosed, and assessed the engine. I have listened to the engine spin and everyone (including myself) feels that it spins too easily. Spraying WD40 into the air intake should have at least allowed the engine to "cough" or "kick." It did not, and this is not the first time we have tried to inject "fuel" directly into the combustion chambers. I do not know how to explain that except with low compression in at least 2 or more cylinders. Plus, the suction at the intake during cranking seems quite weak.

We have not tried a compression check at this point, since that in itself is a fairly involved process. If we discover anything other than adequate compression, then I am faced with further engine tear down. Even if the compression is good, what then? We have tried almost everything else we could try. The technician did not actually volunteer the possibility that fuel starvation could have caused the problem, but when I explained to him that the engine stopped and failed to restart during sea trial (filters were solid black with contamination), he concluded that lack of fuel "lubrication" could have at least contributed to engine failure. He could not positively identify the problem without further investigation.

At this point I am becoming more and more convinced that there is internal engine damage. Again, I feel that chasing the problem will be quite costly unless I undertake that expedition on my own. I am most weary of fighting with this engine, as it has not run for the last 4 months, and I have already replaced a bunch of parts that have not allowed it to start.

If you do get an opinion from your contacts, I would sure welcome additional inputs.

Thanks, and I do agree with your opinion on Yanmars.............

Jamie Wendell

On Saturday, November 14, 2015 11:56 AM, "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

He "thinks"??? Has he actually checked compression? I'm skeptical. I wrote to Danny Ramos but he didn't reply, sorry.

If it really is a low compression problem, how does he's explain that fuel starvation caused the problem? Does he explain what he thinks is the problem? Bad rings? Bad valves?

I would guess that engine should be good for 10000 hrs. I'd contact Danny Ramos at Marine Mechanical in Fajardo, PR before I bought a new engine.

If you're set on re powering, look at a new Yanmar. Much easier to work on, get parts, etc.

Kent

SM 243

Kristy



On Nov 14, 2015, at 11:35 AM, ms42phantom54@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I want to thank everyone for the great advice and suggestions regarding my Amel 54 (Phantom) engine "no-start" issue. Since no one has been able to pinpoint the problem, I just had a Volvo Penta factory technician out to survey the situation. He thinks the compression is low on the engine, as it would not fire even as we sprayed WD40 into the intake. Although he had no specific rationale as to the possible cause of this conclusion, he did suggest that earlier fuel-starvation could have caused the problem, stressing the importance of maintaining a clean fuel supply at all times.

I have decided to replace the engine. That will restart the clock with zero hours and a 5-year warranty. The alternative would be to start tearing down the engine to determine the problem. Even if we do find something (blown head gasket, stuck valves, scored cylinders, etc.), chasing this "rebuild" tactic would be a very expensive and time-consuming operation - and it will still be a 9-year-old engine with 2500 hours. Although hugely expensive, a new engine is the only rational option. I do not want to continue chasing "ghosts."

Thanks again for the support.

Jamie Wendell

s/v Phantom

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] NMEA Paddlewheel - wiring diagram

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Leo,

I sent you a copy of page 124 of the B&G user manual which shows how to wire a paddlewheel. If you have the Tinley paddlewheel emulator, it is wired the same.

Bill

On Thu, Nov 19, 2015 at 12:51 PM, leopold.hauer@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello,

does anyone have a wire diagramm that shows how to connect a NMEA Paddle wheel (Tinley marine electronics) with the B+G instruments?

I would like to know how to join which cable to which color.

Mail to  leopold.hauer(at)yahoo.com

Thanks for your help!

Leo

SM 69 Yin Yang



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Marine Electronics - Autopilot

Patrick McAneny
 

Jay, I would definitely keep your rotary drive , as well as adding the linear drive , two is better than one when it comes to autopilots. Having added a linear drive to my SM ,I can say that trying to install the drive as Amel did from the factory , would be very difficult. I spent time looking at a factory install and took photos and measurements on another SM , then compared them to my boat. I realized I would need to cut out glassed in stringers , cut the tabbing and remove the seat/bed from the starboard aft stateroom . Then fabricate a new quadrant , while trying to calculate the angles and positions for both quadrant and drive unit , to allow exactly the right limits for the push and pull of the drive. I was not comfortable cutting out stringers and to have a unprofessional  finish/appearance . I build houses and do a lot of fabrication and problem solving , but I felt uncomfortable tackling the install. I was about to give up and put the L drive on Ebay . I came up with another way to install the L-drive , the install was pretty straight forward ,relatively easy and has worked fine now for over 8000 miles. I installed the unit under the port side of the bed in the storage area. You can see photos of my install in the photo section under Shenanigans. I did not have to fabricate a new  quadrant , just extend the existing one. If you have any questions feel free to contact me.
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigans
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: J Wagam jwagam@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Wed, Nov 18, 2015 5:28 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Marine Electronics - Autopilot

 
Hi Bill,

Let me be more specific. I am wondering where owners mounted the linear drive or if they perhaps found a way to use the existing gear when upgrading. Right now, the autopilot motor is attached to a chain behind the console. It is controlled manually. I actually wouldn't mind finding a way to leave it as a backup.

Plenty of space for all the other items you listed.

Regards
Jay

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 2:33 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
I do not understand your question.

There will be several components to the Raymarine pilot system:
Control head
Course computer
Rotary drive or Linear drive
Rudder reference
Compass

Then there will be other instruments such as depth, wind, chartplotter, radar, etc.

What specifically do you mean when you say, "best way to connect the Raymarine Evolution autopilot?"

Bill
BeBe 387

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 7:10 PM, jwagam@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Hello All,

This is my first post here. I am closing on a 1986 Amel Mango and need to replace the electronics. I am planning on buying the new Raymarine eS system and replacing the existing chain driven autopilot. Does anybody have any thoughts on the best way to connect the Raymarine Evolution autopilot?

Thank You
Jay Wagamon





Re: NMEA Paddlewheel - wiring diagram

seafeverofcuan@...
 

Leo,
      The wheels on Seafever which is hull 425 built 2004 are Airmar. You will find all relevant wiring diagrams on the Airmar website site.
Tinley should be able to advise you of what make your actual wheel is, if the manufacturers name isn't already stamped on it.
Regards,
Trevor

Seafever of Cuan
SM 425 
Mexico
For sale
$295,000


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Pole takedown

Peter Killen
 

Ian,

Many thanks for your response.

Regards,

Peter

SM2K 433 Pure Magic

On 19 Nov 2015, at 12:41, Ian Shepherd sv_freespirit@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

No Peter you are not wrong. The inwards pressure on the pole can be considerable and the focal point of this pressure is six feet above the step. When the weld on my same side lower spreader failed whilst using only the port side pole, the mast crumpled around the pole attachment point.

Significantly when I accepted the boat back from Amel after repairs, the Amel representative sailing with me said that in strong winds it would be a good idea to rig poles on both sides to lessen the side thrust on the mast.

I remember someone pointing out to me before I owned an Amel that the pole design was not a good idea due to the loads being so high up the mast. I believe that Amel learnt from my mishap and did away with the concept on the 54 by attaching the poles at the foot of the mast.

Ian Shepherd SM2K Crusader (2003) Larnaca Cyprus


On 03/11/2015 17:32, peter killen peterkillen@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 

I have always swung both poles out whether or not I use the two, since I seem to remember, during training, that Olivier had stated that too much pressure on one side of the mast was a bad idea.  Am I wrong in this?


Peter
Pure Magic 433
On 3 Nov 2015, at 03:38, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

All good techniques. The key is that someone needs to be prepared to "catch" the pole when the blue line is eased. I like to lower the pole about 1-2 feet before easing the blue line, so that when the pole comes toward the boat it is about 6" to 1' above the rail, then we lower it and hook it to the rail on the inside of the rail. I usually ease the blue line, while Judy pulls on the sheet and red line and is prepared to catch. I also help with the catching with one hand. I have done this alone...you should practice this while at anchor with crew members.

Getting the long pole to swing out while someone is pulling on the blue line takes practice. If there is some roll to the boat, use the roll to your advantage...and always make sure that the swivel block on the bitter end of the long pole is horizontal...if not, you will have a difficult time getting it to swing out.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 5:11 PM, Bob Fritz U sailboatdelivery@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

This is my procedure for setting and retrieving the long pole on the SM.
1. Set the short pole on the mast and attach the long pole and hook it on the rail.
2. Attach the fore guy, (blue line), the after guy, (red line), the down haul, (yellow line), and the pole lift. If from the factory, the lines are marked at the cleat point. I hope I have the colors correct.
3. Run the genoa sheet through the sheave on the end of the pole.
4. Deploy the pole by hauling rapidly on the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, use gravity to help by hauling when the boat rolls to the same side as the pole.
5. Unfurl the jib and sheet home.
6. Reverse the procedure for removing the pole. Furl the jib first and proceed from there.
7. Lower the pole to the level of the stanchion.
8. Maintain control of the pole by having a crew take up on the after guy as you ease the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, bring in the pole when the boat rolls to the pole side. Be sure the assisting crew is far enough aft that they will not be hit by the pole if control is lost. A bumper or cushion on the stanchion or rail will prevent damage should things go bad. I have never yet had a problem with the pole hitting the water although it could happen if the pole is lowered too much.








NMEA Paddlewheel - wiring diagram

Leopold Hauer
 

Hello,

does anyone have a wire diagramm that shows how to connect a NMEA Paddle wheel (Tinley marine electronics) with the B+G instruments?

I would like to know how to join which cable to which color.

Mail to  leopold.hauer(at)yahoo.com

Thanks for your help!

Leo

SM 69 Yin Yang


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main sail line tender

Stephen Davis
 

No problem. Have a great sail. 

Steve
Aloha SM72
Culebra, Puerto Rico

On Nov 19, 2015, at 08:04, Donato Valente ing.d.valente@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thank you Steve. 
I have the gearbox spare on board
We are sailing today because of our strict timetable. 
Will solve the problem in Miami, since the locals in Fajardo were not able to free the gearbox from the shaft. 
Thanks for your help. 
Donato 

SM Ocean Bird #468
Leaving Puertorico today


Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 19 nov 2015, alle ore 11:17, flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> ha scritto:

 

Hello Donato,


I just remembered that I have a new Leroy Somer gearbox I purchased from Emek Marine as a spare last year. If you need the gearbox to repair your boat, I'd be happy tp sell it to you, and I will just purchase another spare for myself. It was $1400.00 US from Emek Marine when I purchased it last year. 

We are a few miles away in Culebra with our SM, and you could probably ride the $5.00 ferry from Fajardo to here this afternoon to pick it up, or I can look for a way to ship it from here. They have very few services on Culebra, and I suspect shipping is not a great option, but I'd be willing to check into it. We are also planning to be in Fajardo on December 1st, but I would guess you may need the part sooner. 

Let me know if you are interested soon, as we are planning to sail over to Vieques on Saturday. 

Regards,
Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72

Flyboyscd at gmail dot com


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main sail line tender

amelforme
 

Thanks for responding Donato. I remember standing on the deck of SM 53 #479 at La Rochelle and holding back a tear as that was the last one built before the molds were retired. Just wanted to make sure my memory was correct, something I am afraid I must do more often these days!



All The Best, Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell







From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Thursday, November 19, 2015 4:00 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main sail line tender





Thanks Joel, you are right.

Sorry for the mistake.

All the best

Donato



SM #468 Ocean Bird now in Fajardo

Inviato da iPad


Il giorno 18 nov 2015, alle ore 21:30, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@att.net <mailto:jfpottercys@att.net> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> > ha scritto:



Hello Donato. Please tell me that you own SM 53 # 468 and not #486.

Thanks in advance.

All The best. Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 10:21 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main sail line tender

Goodmorning,

Unfortunately my partner in Portorico has to change the gears on the
electric line tender on the boom of our SM 2000 (year 2004).
He is having the assistance of a local 'technician' but unsuccesfully.
The gears are completely gone and need to dismantle the whole line
tender since it seems blocked (rust, salt etc).
How to start to free the vertical shaft ? starting from the cap on
top, or freeing the bottom gears first.
I apologize for my very poor description.
Any suggestions ?
Is there any drawing on the net ?
Many thanks for your help

Donato
SM 486 Ocean Bird in Fajardo Puertorico

--
___/)_____/)____/)_____

Ing. Donato Valente
mobile:+39 392 5390810
Skype ID: donato.valente

[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Pole takedown

Ian Shepherd
 

No Peter you are not wrong. The inwards pressure on the pole can be considerable and the focal point of this pressure is six feet above the step. When the weld on my same side lower spreader failed whilst using only the port side pole, the mast crumpled around the pole attachment point.

Significantly when I accepted the boat back from Amel after repairs, the Amel representative sailing with me said that in strong winds it would be a good idea to rig poles on both sides to lessen the side thrust on the mast.

I remember someone pointing out to me before I owned an Amel that the pole design was not a good idea due to the loads being so high up the mast. I believe that Amel learnt from my mishap and did away with the concept on the 54 by attaching the poles at the foot of the mast.
Ian Shepherd SM2K Crusader (2003) Larnaca Cyprus


On 03/11/2015 17:32, peter killen peterkillen@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

I have always swung both poles out whether or not I use the two, since I seem to remember, during training, that Olivier had stated that too much pressure on one side of the mast was a bad idea. Am I wrong in this?


Peter
Pure Magic 433
On 3 Nov 2015, at 03:38, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


All good techniques. The key is that someone needs to be prepared to "catch" the pole when the blue line is eased. I like to lower the pole about 1-2 feet before easing the blue line, so that when the pole comes toward the boat it is about 6" to 1' above the rail, then we lower it and hook it to the rail on the inside of the rail. I usually ease the blue line, while Judy pulls on the sheet and red line and is prepared to catch. I also help with the catching with one hand. I have done this alone...you should practice this while at anchor with crew members.

Getting the long pole to swing out while someone is pulling on the blue line takes practice. If there is some roll to the boat, use the roll to your advantage...and always make sure that the swivel block on the bitter end of the long pole is horizontal...if not, you will have a difficult time getting it to swing out.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Mon, Nov 2, 2015 at 5:11 PM, Bob Fritz U sailboatdelivery@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

This is my procedure for setting and retrieving the long pole on the SM.
1. Set the short pole on the mast and attach the long pole and hook it on the rail.
2. Attach the fore guy, (blue line), the after guy, (red line), the down haul, (yellow line), and the pole lift. If from the factory, the lines are marked at the cleat point. I hope I have the colors correct.
3. Run the genoa sheet through the sheave on the end of the pole.
4. Deploy the pole by hauling rapidly on the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, use gravity to help by hauling when the boat rolls to the same side as the pole.
5. Unfurl the jib and sheet home.
6. Reverse the procedure for removing the pole. Furl the jib first and proceed from there.
7. Lower the pole to the level of the stanchion.
8. Maintain control of the pole by having a crew take up on the after guy as you ease the fore guy. If the boat is rolling, bring in the pole when the boat rolls to the pole side. Be sure the assisting crew is far enough aft that they will not be hit by the pole if control is lost. A bumper or cushion on the stanchion or rail will prevent damage should things go bad. I have never yet had a problem with the pole hitting the water although it could happen if the pole is lowered too much.






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] DOLPHIN carger 24 volt 100 A

Ian Shepherd
 

Giovanni,

does the charger work for a short period then shut down? The cooling fans on the Reya chargers do tend to fail regularly. I replace them with 24V computer fans using self tapping screws from the outside of the casing which is far less fiddly than the original nuts, washers and bolts.

I am also going to fit 24V regulators in the feed to the fan as I believe that when the charger voltage rises to 28.2V, it may be over stressing the fan motor.

Good luck.
Ian Shepherd SM2K Crusader (2003) Larnaca Cyprus


On 13/11/2015 11:23, gtesta23@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 

 Hi to all ,

my Dolphin carger 24 volt 100 A (2003) has RED signal _electronic controller carger out of service.

So, as I'm in Thailand, I think that it  is very difficult to service it with new electronic parts.

I'm planning to replace it with a new one, good to charge also my AGM batteries.

Any experinces or suggestions about ?

all the best

Giovanni TESTA

sv EUTIKIA SM 428

Krabi_Thailand

 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Main sail line tender

Donato Valente
 

Thank you Steve. 
I have the gearbox spare on board
We are sailing today because of our strict timetable. 
Will solve the problem in Miami, since the locals in Fajardo were not able to free the gearbox from the shaft. 
Thanks for your help. 
Donato 

SM Ocean Bird #468
Leaving Puertorico today


Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 19 nov 2015, alle ore 11:17, flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> ha scritto:

 

Hello Donato,


I just remembered that I have a new Leroy Somer gearbox I purchased from Emek Marine as a spare last year. If you need the gearbox to repair your boat, I'd be happy tp sell it to you, and I will just purchase another spare for myself. It was $1400.00 US from Emek Marine when I purchased it last year. 

We are a few miles away in Culebra with our SM, and you could probably ride the $5.00 ferry from Fajardo to here this afternoon to pick it up, or I can look for a way to ship it from here. They have very few services on Culebra, and I suspect shipping is not a great option, but I'd be willing to check into it. We are also planning to be in Fajardo on December 1st, but I would guess you may need the part sooner. 

Let me know if you are interested soon, as we are planning to sail over to Vieques on Saturday. 

Regards,
Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72

Flyboyscd at gmail dot com


Re: Marine Electronics - Autopilot

mkbiz@...
 

Hi Jay,

I did the same on my Maramu, though I use a B&G control unit. I assume the Mango is not so much different from it.
I installed a Raymarine Lineardrive Type 2 under the aft cabin bunk. I got a stainless steel arm welded to one of the two sides of the existing "handles" where the steering cables are attached.
I had to drill a hole into both the side of the bunk and the compartment with the rudder shaft to connect the "arm" to the drive piston.

Don't have a photo of the complete installation here, only can show you what happened when the piston got loose and broke an additional hole into the sid of the bunk ;)

http://www.sioned.de/sail/piston.jpg

I kept the original autopilot as a backup.


Re: Main sail line tender

Stephen Davis
 

Hello Donato,

I just remembered that I have a new Leroy Somer gearbox I purchased from Emek Marine as a spare last year. If you need the gearbox to repair your boat, I'd be happy tp sell it to you, and I will just purchase another spare for myself. It was $1400.00 US from Emek Marine when I purchased it last year. 

We are a few miles away in Culebra with our SM, and you could probably ride the $5.00 ferry from Fajardo to here this afternoon to pick it up, or I can look for a way to ship it from here. They have very few services on Culebra, and I suspect shipping is not a great option, but I'd be willing to check into it. We are also planning to be in Fajardo on December 1st, but I would guess you may need the part sooner. 

Let me know if you are interested soon, as we are planning to sail over to Vieques on Saturday. 

Regards,
Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72

Flyboyscd at gmail dot com


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main sail line tender

Donato Valente
 

Thanks Joel, you are right.  
Sorry for the mistake. 
All the best
Donato 

SM #468 Ocean Bird now in Fajardo

Inviato da iPad

Il giorno 18 nov 2015, alle ore 21:30, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> ha scritto:

 

Hello Donato. Please tell me that you own SM 53 # 468 and not #486.

Thanks in advance.

All The best. Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 18, 2015 10:21 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main sail line tender

Goodmorning,

Unfortunately my partner in Portorico has to change the gears on the
electric line tender on the boom of our SM 2000 (year 2004).
He is having the assistance of a local 'technician' but unsuccesfully.
The gears are completely gone and need to dismantle the whole line
tender since it seems blocked (rust, salt etc).
How to start to free the vertical shaft ? starting from the cap on
top, or freeing the bottom gears first.
I apologize for my very poor description.
Any suggestions ?
Is there any drawing on the net ?
Many thanks for your help

Donato
SM 486 Ocean Bird in Fajardo Puertorico

--
___/)_____/)____/)_____

Ing. Donato Valente
mobile:+39 392 5390810
Skype ID: donato.valente