Date   

Yanmar Engine issue

rickgrimes1@...
 

Surely there is an easy fix but…this has me stumped:

I have the Yanmar 4JH-3-HTE engine on my SM2000 (#404).  When I start it up cold, no water flows from the impeller to the heat exchanger.  A large air bubble forms in the bottom of the translucent hose that goes from the impeller and, of course, the engine begins to overheat if not shut down.  (Before I detected this problem, we overheated and melted the plastic muffler early into the Salty Dawg venture last month). 

Impeller recently replaced and working fine, water is flowing freely from the sea chest (e.g., when the heads are filled or the air conditioning is turned on), belts are new and snug.  There are no leaks, water or air, that I can detect anywhere along the path from the sea chest to and through the engine. 

But here’s the interesting part:

When I disconnect the hose from the heat exchanger (the hose that goes from the impeller to the heat exchanger), lay it down on the floor of the boat below the level of the impeller, and then start the engine, the water (and bubbles) starts flowing forcefully through the hose into the bilge—after which, with engine still running, I immediately slam the end of the hose back into the heat exchanger and tighten it down, the water continues to flow forcefully as it should (but no bubbles), the engine remains cool, and all is right with the world.

It seems to stay ‘primed’ if I shut it down and start it again after only a few hours.  However, if I start the engine up after a couple of days of not running the engine, I then have the same symptoms and cure it with the same solution.  

Thoughts? Ideas? THANKS!

Rick Grimes

S/V Rascal

Amel SM2K (#404)

 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Intermittent bow thruster - Maramu

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Hello Graham,

We are birds of a feather in various ways (pun intended).  Retired Airline pilot/gynaecologist(amateur)!!  :-)

Eleuthera is hull number 007 built in 1989 … doubtful yours is number 240… perhaps more like 024.

As far as steering while going astern, the bugger is almost as bad as a full keel; however, fully manageable if one counts in wind/tide effects and has a brain capable of doing 1,000,000 calculations a second.  Not capable of so many tasks instantly, I have decided to use the Amel formula and to spend some handling time with (non judgemental) friends.

GL and enjoy your boat.



Jean-Pierre Germain,
SY Eleuthera, Amel Super Maramu 007


On 2 Jan 2016, at 17:02, Graham Cresswell grahamjcresswell@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Dear Joel,

Many thanks for your thoughts.  As a retired airline pilot and aviation medicine specialist physician, I'm acutely aware that I may have had brain failure so I certainly don't feel scolded!  In particular, owing to my current inexperience with the boat, the limited space in the marina where I'm berthed and the unnerving proximity of various million dollar yachts, my mental capacity was dramatically reduced by this event and I cannot now be absolutely sure that the bow thruster motor was turning when I diagnosed the failure.  Plainly, if the motor was not turning, then there is a completely different set of possibilities, including the possibility that I'd inadvertently switched it off.  The marina where I'm berthed has virtually no current and is very sheltered so that there is almost no wind so I doubt that they are factors. 

I did have some manoeuvring practice with the previous owner although it was not extensive and all the sternward manoeuvring was accomplished with the aid of the bow thruster.  I agree with you that it makes sense to try to use the standard handling techniques employing prop kick and prop wash rather than resorting to the bow thruster in the first instance and I'm trying to acquire the necessary skills.  However, I've been warned by a friend, who is a very experienced SM owner, to expect it to be very difficult to manage when it is making sternway so I'm currently developing a plan for managing my berthing in the event of another bow thruster failure.  I'm also planning to take the boat out tomorrow and to dive to observe the bow thruster functioning. 

Finally, I wonder if there exists an exploded diagram of the bow thruster that would help me to understand its mechanisms and how technical problems might be addressed.  My Maramu is the 1989 model launched in 1988 and is hull number 240.  Maude has been unable to supply more than a very rudimentary owners manual. 

With many thanks and kind regards

Graham


On 31/12/2015 18:58, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 

Graham, as odd as it might sound, Trevor’s suggestion of ‘heat of the moment brain fade’ could be the likely culprit. I have sold hundreds of used Amel’s and offer clients a training period of several days to get them up to speed. On more occasions than you would believe, when things get tense the first few times with the new owner on the helm ( after I demonstrate that “THIS IS EASY”), they lower the thruster and then turn off the power switch the first time they reach for the toggle/joy stick. Especially with short timers, panic ensues and the helmsperson goes into save the boat mode and neglects to turn the power on. Just to make an indelible impression, I wait until the helmsperson gulps, loudly , before restoring power.

If this is the case, don’t feel bad. I’ve had many folks much brighter than I, which is just about everybody, do this. Some have even turned the power back on in their panic without realizing they had turned it off! Go easy on yourself.

Were you fortunate to have the seller/other knowledgeable person spend time with you familiarizing you with your-new-to-you Amel? I sure hope so, If not, find an Amel owner close to you and buy them dinner with many adult beverages if they will get you on the path. Lots of little secrets, all of which add to the greatness and enjoyment of these very cleverly conceived and mostly well engineered cruisers.

Some misconceptions that have been inadvertently offered here…

Your bow thruster is an early Amel BISSON/BUFFLE type, more than likely. Lots of evolution since. It is a 12 volt unit, not 24 volts as on the Super Maramu and subsequent Amel models. It is better than nothing certainly but not a game changer/life saver like the much more powerful 24 volt units that followed. The bow thruster on the Amel 54 is a completely different animal, dual props, counter-rotating, very powerful. Your installed bow thruster won’t allow you to dock your Amel Maramu with impunity in 20 plus knots of wind until you practice and really learn the capabilities and limitations and even then... Practice makes perfect and I try to use the bow thruster as little as possible to keep my boat handling skills alive but do not hesitate to employ it before it is needed.

There is no fuse/thermal limiter on the electric motor on any Amel installed bow thruster on a Sharki, Maramu, Mango, Santorin, Super Maramu, or Amel 54 so don’t go looking for that as there is none

Anybody close to Graham in Barbados? I think you will be getting a dinner invite.

I waited to chime in as I make my living selling experienced Amels and I wanted someone else to make the suggestion that Trevor did. I can’t afford to have anyone feel I have scolded them and I sure hope you don’t. You will love and appreciate this owners group.

Have Fun With Your Amel, Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2015 12:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Intermittent bow thruster - Maramu

Graham,

The motor (15hp) has so much torque it will either throw off weed or light plastic immediately, or break the nylon shear bolts.

This is a really lame suggestion, but as it is all a bit new to you, is it possible you turned off the switch beside the toggle switch in the heat of the moment?

The good news is the more that you practice the easier it will become, you will quickly be able to wander through a marina in 25kts+ of winds stern too, without a thought.

Happy new year.

Trevor

Seafever of Cuan

SM 425 Redline 2004

For Sale

$295k

Mexico






Posted by: Graham Cresswell <grahamjcresswell@...>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (18)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Intermittent bow thruster - Maramu

Graham Cresswell <grahamjcresswell@...>
 

Dear Joel,

Many thanks for your thoughts.  As a retired airline pilot and aviation medicine specialist physician, I'm acutely aware that I may have had brain failure so I certainly don't feel scolded!  In particular, owing to my current inexperience with the boat, the limited space in the marina where I'm berthed and the unnerving proximity of various million dollar yachts, my mental capacity was dramatically reduced by this event and I cannot now be absolutely sure that the bow thruster motor was turning when I diagnosed the failure.  Plainly, if the motor was not turning, then there is a completely different set of possibilities, including the possibility that I'd inadvertently switched it off.  The marina where I'm berthed has virtually no current and is very sheltered so that there is almost no wind so I doubt that they are factors. 

I did have some manoeuvring practice with the previous owner although it was not extensive and all the sternward manoeuvring was accomplished with the aid of the bow thruster.  I agree with you that it makes sense to try to use the standard handling techniques employing prop kick and prop wash rather than resorting to the bow thruster in the first instance and I'm trying to acquire the necessary skills.  However, I've been warned by a friend, who is a very experienced SM owner, to expect it to be very difficult to manage when it is making sternway so I'm currently developing a plan for managing my berthing in the event of another bow thruster failure.  I'm also planning to take the boat out tomorrow and to dive to observe the bow thruster functioning. 

Finally, I wonder if there exists an exploded diagram of the bow thruster that would help me to understand its mechanisms and how technical problems might be addressed.  My Maramu is the 1989 model launched in 1988 and is hull number 240.  Maude has been unable to supply more than a very rudimentary owners manual. 

With many thanks and kind regards

Graham


On 31/12/2015 18:58, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 

Graham, as odd as it might sound, Trevor’s suggestion of ‘heat of the moment brain fade’ could be the likely culprit. I have sold hundreds of used Amel’s and offer clients a training period of several days to get them up to speed. On more occasions than you would believe, when things get tense the first few times with the new owner on the helm ( after I demonstrate that “THIS IS EASY”), they lower the thruster and then turn off the power switch the first time they reach for the toggle/joy stick. Especially with short timers, panic ensues and the helmsperson goes into save the boat mode and neglects to turn the power on. Just to make an indelible impression, I wait until the helmsperson gulps, loudly , before restoring power.

If this is the case, don’t feel bad. I’ve had many folks much brighter than I, which is just about everybody, do this. Some have even turned the power back on in their panic without realizing they had turned it off! Go easy on yourself.

Were you fortunate to have the seller/other knowledgeable person spend time with you familiarizing you with your-new-to-you Amel? I sure hope so, If not, find an Amel owner close to you and buy them dinner with many adult beverages if they will get you on the path. Lots of little secrets, all of which add to the greatness and enjoyment of these very cleverly conceived and mostly well engineered cruisers.

Some misconceptions that have been inadvertently offered here…

Your bow thruster is an early Amel BISSON/BUFFLE type, more than likely. Lots of evolution since. It is a 12 volt unit, not 24 volts as on the Super Maramu and subsequent Amel models. It is better than nothing certainly but not a game changer/life saver like the much more powerful 24 volt units that followed. The bow thruster on the Amel 54 is a completely different animal, dual props, counter-rotating, very powerful. Your installed bow thruster won’t allow you to dock your Amel Maramu with impunity in 20 plus knots of wind until you practice and really learn the capabilities and limitations and even then... Practice makes perfect and I try to use the bow thruster as little as possible to keep my boat handling skills alive but do not hesitate to employ it before it is needed.

There is no fuse/thermal limiter on the electric motor on any Amel installed bow thruster on a Sharki, Maramu, Mango, Santorin, Super Maramu, or Amel 54 so don’t go looking for that as there is none

Anybody close to Graham in Barbados? I think you will be getting a dinner invite.

I waited to chime in as I make my living selling experienced Amels and I wanted someone else to make the suggestion that Trevor did. I can’t afford to have anyone feel I have scolded them and I sure hope you don’t. You will love and appreciate this owners group.

Have Fun With Your Amel, Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, December 31, 2015 12:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Intermittent bow thruster - Maramu

Graham,

The motor (15hp) has so much torque it will either throw off weed or light plastic immediately, or break the nylon shear bolts.

This is a really lame suggestion, but as it is all a bit new to you, is it possible you turned off the switch beside the toggle switch in the heat of the moment?

The good news is the more that you practice the easier it will become, you will quickly be able to wander through a marina in 25kts+ of winds stern too, without a thought.

Happy new year.

Trevor

Seafever of Cuan

SM 425 Redline 2004

For Sale

$295k

Mexico





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Recommendtions for replacement fridge for a Santorin

Ric Gottschalk <ric@...>
 

I used vitrifrigo DW180. It is a 2 drawer ac/dc unit that has a freezer top & frig below. Stainless steel finish. I like the big freezer. Easy installation. I also have Engel mt30 and mt60. The engel 60 I use in the cockpit for drinks only for crew. Easy to set on seat to access engine

Ric Gottschalk
Kitchen Magic Refacers, Inc
Office 410-923-5800
Fax 410-923-5802

On Jan 2, 2016, at 4:13 AM, joemac4sail@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi All 

            Can anyone recommend a replacement fridge (one that requires the minimum amount of surgery to fit) for the original Electrolux fitted to the Santorin's. After 23 years of service ours has finally said enough. 

Regards and Happy New Year to you all

                                                             Joe McDonnell  


Re: Recommendtions for replacement fridge for a Santorin

Ian Park <oceanhobo@...>
 

I replaced mine with a 140 litre Waeco. Fits ok and I also installed a computer fan above the condenser on the wooden facia at the back of the work surface. Helps on a hot day.
Ian

Ocean Hobo. SN96

Sent from my iPod


Re: Santorin: Why no starter battery?

Ian Park
 

My Santorin has a separate starter battery plus four house batteries. My Amel factory plans for the boat show one starter and two house batteries. Perhaps a previous owner decided to use all the batteries as house batteries given that the Santorin has a prop shaft alternator and also came with a Honda EX350 2 stroke generator as an emergency back up charger, albeit only 6 amps.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Santorin: Why no starter battery?

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Bob,

Bob, KAIMI S&M :-) 429 wrote: "("BeBe Bill" pressured me into posting this)"

I never realized I had such an influence on you. However, come polish my boat as soon as possible! ;)  ;)  :>)


Bill
BeBe 387

On Sat, Jan 2, 2016 at 10:47 AM, rossidesigngroup@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

My 1993 Santorin #86 had a single dedicated 12V 31 series battery for starting in its own Amel factory battery box near the back of the engine. Was charged by the engine alternator along with house 31s using a battery isolator. When I bought her in 2003 ABYC standards required a manual shut off switch to the starter battery (house already had the Amel lever). This was to prevent a fire in the case of a stuck starter. A 250 amp fuse was also required for the house batteries, never needed replacement despite the judicious use of the bow thruster.

Bob, KAIMI S&M :-) 429 ("BeBe Bill" pressured me into posting this)



Re: Santorin: Why no starter battery?

rossirossix4
 

My 1993 Santorin #86 had a single dedicated 12V 31 series battery for starting in its own Amel factory battery box near the back of the engine. Was charged by the engine alternator along with house 31s using a battery isolator. When I bought her in 2003 ABYC standards required a manual shut off switch to the starter battery (house already had the Amel lever). This was to prevent a fire in the case of a stuck starter. A 250 amp fuse was also required for the house batteries, never needed replacement despite the judicious use of the bow thruster.

Bob, KAIMI S&M :-) 429 ("BeBe Bill" pressured me into posting this)


Re: Recommendtions for replacement fridge for a Santorin

rossirossix4
 

In 2010 I replaced my 1993 Santorin #86 with the Isotherm Cruise 130 Classic with ASU. It fit perfectly with no modifications although I elected not to reinstall the old wooden door. I especially liked the ASU which simply runs the unit at full tilt if it senses an alternator, generator or solar panel is charging...adjustable if you are plugged in at a dock. It consumed less energy than the old one. From my actual order history. http://www.defender.com/product.jsp?path=-1|2276179|2276204|2276226|2276234&id=922241. (Defender product number 402159) There was also room to attach some kind of super foam board I got to Home Depot to 3 sides and top using 2 sided tape Eric M has the boat now....he might update.
Bob, KAIMI SM429


Recommendtions for replacement fridge for a Santorin

joseph mc donnell
 

Hi All 

            Can anyone recommend a replacement fridge (one that requires the minimum amount of surgery to fit) for the original Electrolux fitted to the Santorin's. After 23 years of service ours has finally said enough. 

Regards and Happy New Year to you all

                                                             Joe McDonnell  


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Trevo,

Thanks for your recommendations.

Vladimir
S/V Life is Good
SM 345

On Jan 1, 2016 6:53 PM, "seafeverofcuan@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Vladimir,

           When your boat was brand new Amel typically used a clever knot on all of the halyards and outhaul ropes.
The tail of the rope is whipped with cord back on to the standing part of the halyard which means two things.

1. The knot will never unravel when there is tension on it.

BUT

2. You can slacken the knot as much as you like when there is no tension and then the halyard will very easily slide through the gate in the mast. Once you have the halyard back inside the mast them you can tighten up the knot again.

I appreciate this all sounds confusing, but maybe if you have a look at all of the ropes on your boat there might be an original halyard and you will easily identify it as you will see the cord whipping on the standing (longest) part of the rope. The you can see how simple it is.

Years ago I cut off one of these knots from an old halyard and kept in in a drawer so that I could always copy it correctly.

Good luck.

Trevor

Seafever SM 425
Ireland


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

seafeverofcuan@...
 

Vladimir,
           When your boat was brand new Amel typically used a clever knot on all of the halyards and outhaul ropes.
The tail of the rope is whipped with cord back on to the standing part of the halyard which means two things.

1. The knot will never unravel when there is tension on it.

BUT

2. You can slacken the knot as much as you like when there is no tension and then the halyard will very easily slide through the gate in the mast. Once you have the halyard back inside the mast them you can tighten up the knot again.

I appreciate this all sounds confusing, but maybe if you have a look at all of the ropes on your boat there might be an original halyard and you will easily identify it as you will see the cord whipping on the standing (longest) part of the rope. The you can see how simple it is.

Years ago I cut off one of these knots from an old halyard and kept in in a drawer so that I could always copy it correctly.

Good luck.

Trevor

Seafever SM 425
Ireland


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

Eric Freedman
 

I forgot to mention that the blue  line is Vectran expensive stuff.

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 5:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

 

 

Hi,

The loop does have a bowline in it.

I am not on Kimberlite now, I am in NY and she is in Colombia.

I would just buy a bunch of line, it will come in handy for other projects.

If you look at the mast slot it is open more at the center than the top or bottom. That is where  the bowlines will go through. Make sure you tie a long bowline on the 3 strand so you do not have to pass 2 knots through the slot at the same time.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 5:22 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

 

 

Hi Eric,

Thanks for your help. Yes the halyard colors blue and yellow as original line. But the loop at the halyard end is not spliced. The loop is made by bowline knot. It looks like it can't go thought the mast slot, but perhaps I have to try. Original 3 straddle line is not on the boat. I will buy a new one. Please advise the length. I think it should be 18-20 m.

On Jan 1, 2016 4:19 PM, "sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi,

Is the halyard teal colored with a yellow tracer and a bowline on the end?

 

If so there should be another piece of the same line about 3 -4 feet long with a loop on it.

You tie the long 3 strand line to the loop on the end of the halyard with a long bowline.

 

You then take the short teal colored line and put it on the bottom hook of the track car.

You put the short line on a winch and tighten it with a winch so you can release the tension on the locking pin of the car. As soon as the car is lose you can let it slide to the top of the car track and remove the halyard line with 3 strand attached. It might jam at the mast cutout. Just stand on a winch and help the knot through the cutout.

 

The main should then be able to be pulled down.

The reverse procedure is used to raise the main.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 2:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

 

 

Joel,

Thank you very much. That is very helpful.

My boat changed hands 2 times. Most likely original halyard is replaced. Now I have a bowline knot loop at the end of mainsail halyard. Is the method that you described going to work if I attached a messenger line to bowline loop? Perhaps the nut is too big and can jam  in the mast. Does original  halyard have spliced loop? Please describe both ends of the original halyard.

I am cruising Carabbian now. I think that I have to be ready to drop mainsail if something goes wrong.

On Jan 1, 2016 1:18 PM, "'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
>
>  
>
> Hello Mr. Sonsev. When your boat was first delivered, it had onboard a long three strand line that is less than 2cm in diameter. When removing the mainsail, this line was tied to the eye at the end of the main halyard which allowed the sail to be lowered as the three strand would go into the mast and would act as a ‘messenger’ so you could use it to pull the mainsail back up. There is an additional line, exactly the same size/color as the main halyard, about three meters in length. It is used to ‘tighten’ the main halyard. You put the eye of this line on the vertically mounted car on the main mast that the permanent halyard is attached to. The temporary adjuster line is lead to the winch and the vertical adjustment car is repositioned this way to set halyard tension.
>
>  
>
> From memory, the messenger line is about 40-45 meters in length, but my memory is not infallible.
>
>  
>
> This system works well as it leaves the big winch free for the ballooner halyard and reserve external halyard that most SM 53 had fitted optionally.
>
>  
>
> Some people have fitted a full length conventional halyard and when outfitted with a ‘line stopper’ such as is fitted on the mizzen halyard, works well too.
>
>  
>
> Have fun with your Amel. Joel
>
> Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC
>
> THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
>
> 954 462 5869 office
>
> 954 812 2485 cell
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
> From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
> Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 12:01 PM
> To: amelyachtowners@...
> Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Running rigging type and length
>
>  
>
>  
>
> I bought Amel-Super-Maramu hull 345 "Life is Good" recently.
> Mainsail halyard exits from the mast only for about one meter. If I drop mainsail the end will get pool in the mast.
> This thread recommends mainsail length to be 17.2 m. I question this recommendation.
> Normally we use mainsail halyard 2.5 of the mast length. We have 16.5 m mast. Therefore mainsail halyard mast be about 41 m.
> Please recommend mainsail halyard length and diameter. I plan to use polyester line.
>
> HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!!!.
>
> Vladimir Sonsev
> S/V LIFE IS GOOD
> SM 345.
>
>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

Eric Freedman
 

Hi,

The loop does have a bowline in it.

I am not on Kimberlite now, I am in NY and she is in Colombia.

I would just buy a bunch of line, it will come in handy for other projects.

If you look at the mast slot it is open more at the center than the top or bottom. That is where  the bowlines will go through. Make sure you tie a long bowline on the 3 strand so you do not have to pass 2 knots through the slot at the same time.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 5:22 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

 

 

Hi Eric,

Thanks for your help. Yes the halyard colors blue and yellow as original line. But the loop at the halyard end is not spliced. The loop is made by bowline knot. It looks like it can't go thought the mast slot, but perhaps I have to try. Original 3 straddle line is not on the boat. I will buy a new one. Please advise the length. I think it should be 18-20 m.

On Jan 1, 2016 4:19 PM, "sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi,

Is the halyard teal colored with a yellow tracer and a bowline on the end?

 

If so there should be another piece of the same line about 3 -4 feet long with a loop on it.

You tie the long 3 strand line to the loop on the end of the halyard with a long bowline.

 

You then take the short teal colored line and put it on the bottom hook of the track car.

You put the short line on a winch and tighten it with a winch so you can release the tension on the locking pin of the car. As soon as the car is lose you can let it slide to the top of the car track and remove the halyard line with 3 strand attached. It might jam at the mast cutout. Just stand on a winch and help the knot through the cutout.

 

The main should then be able to be pulled down.

The reverse procedure is used to raise the main.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 2:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

 

 

Joel,

Thank you very much. That is very helpful.

My boat changed hands 2 times. Most likely original halyard is replaced. Now I have a bowline knot loop at the end of mainsail halyard. Is the method that you described going to work if I attached a messenger line to bowline loop? Perhaps the nut is too big and can jam  in the mast. Does original  halyard have spliced loop? Please describe both ends of the original halyard.

I am cruising Carabbian now. I think that I have to be ready to drop mainsail if something goes wrong.

On Jan 1, 2016 1:18 PM, "'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
>
>  
>
> Hello Mr. Sonsev. When your boat was first delivered, it had onboard a long three strand line that is less than 2cm in diameter. When removing the mainsail, this line was tied to the eye at the end of the main halyard which allowed the sail to be lowered as the three strand would go into the mast and would act as a ‘messenger’ so you could use it to pull the mainsail back up. There is an additional line, exactly the same size/color as the main halyard, about three meters in length. It is used to ‘tighten’ the main halyard. You put the eye of this line on the vertically mounted car on the main mast that the permanent halyard is attached to. The temporary adjuster line is lead to the winch and the vertical adjustment car is repositioned this way to set halyard tension.
>
>  
>
> From memory, the messenger line is about 40-45 meters in length, but my memory is not infallible.
>
>  
>
> This system works well as it leaves the big winch free for the ballooner halyard and reserve external halyard that most SM 53 had fitted optionally.
>
>  
>
> Some people have fitted a full length conventional halyard and when outfitted with a ‘line stopper’ such as is fitted on the mizzen halyard, works well too.
>
>  
>
> Have fun with your Amel. Joel
>
> Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC
>
> THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
>
> 954 462 5869 office
>
> 954 812 2485 cell
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
> From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
> Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 12:01 PM
> To: amelyachtowners@...
> Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Running rigging type and length
>
>  
>
>  
>
> I bought Amel-Super-Maramu hull 345 "Life is Good" recently.
> Mainsail halyard exits from the mast only for about one meter. If I drop mainsail the end will get pool in the mast.
> This thread recommends mainsail length to be 17.2 m. I question this recommendation.
> Normally we use mainsail halyard 2.5 of the mast length. We have 16.5 m mast. Therefore mainsail halyard mast be about 41 m.
> Please recommend mainsail halyard length and diameter. I plan to use polyester line.
>
> HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!!!.
>
> Vladimir Sonsev
> S/V LIFE IS GOOD
> SM 345.
>
>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Hi Eric,

Thanks for your help. Yes the halyard colors blue and yellow as original line. But the loop at the halyard end is not spliced. The loop is made by bowline knot. It looks like it can't go thought the mast slot, but perhaps I have to try. Original 3 straddle line is not on the boat. I will buy a new one. Please advise the length. I think it should be 18-20 m.

On Jan 1, 2016 4:19 PM, "sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi,

Is the halyard teal colored with a yellow tracer and a bowline on the end?

 

If so there should be another piece of the same line about 3 -4 feet long with a loop on it.

You tie the long 3 strand line to the loop on the end of the halyard with a long bowline.

 

You then take the short teal colored line and put it on the bottom hook of the track car.

You put the short line on a winch and tighten it with a winch so you can release the tension on the locking pin of the car. As soon as the car is lose you can let it slide to the top of the car track and remove the halyard line with 3 strand attached. It might jam at the mast cutout. Just stand on a winch and help the knot through the cutout.

 

The main should then be able to be pulled down.

The reverse procedure is used to raise the main.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 2:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

 

 

Joel,

Thank you very much. That is very helpful.

My boat changed hands 2 times. Most likely original halyard is replaced. Now I have a bowline knot loop at the end of mainsail halyard. Is the method that you described going to work if I attached a messenger line to bowline loop? Perhaps the nut is too big and can jam  in the mast. Does original  halyard have spliced loop? Please describe both ends of the original halyard.

I am cruising Carabbian now. I think that I have to be ready to drop mainsail if something goes wrong.

On Jan 1, 2016 1:18 PM, "'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
>
>  
>
> Hello Mr. Sonsev. When your boat was first delivered, it had onboard a long three strand line that is less than 2cm in diameter. When removing the mainsail, this line was tied to the eye at the end of the main halyard which allowed the sail to be lowered as the three strand would go into the mast and would act as a ‘messenger’ so you could use it to pull the mainsail back up. There is an additional line, exactly the same size/color as the main halyard, about three meters in length. It is used to ‘tighten’ the main halyard. You put the eye of this line on the vertically mounted car on the main mast that the permanent halyard is attached to. The temporary adjuster line is lead to the winch and the vertical adjustment car is repositioned this way to set halyard tension.
>
>  
>
> From memory, the messenger line is about 40-45 meters in length, but my memory is not infallible.
>
>  
>
> This system works well as it leaves the big winch free for the ballooner halyard and reserve external halyard that most SM 53 had fitted optionally.
>
>  
>
> Some people have fitted a full length conventional halyard and when outfitted with a ‘line stopper’ such as is fitted on the mizzen halyard, works well too.
>
>  
>
> Have fun with your Amel. Joel
>
> Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC
>
> THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
>
> 954 462 5869 office
>
> 954 812 2485 cell
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
> From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
> Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 12:01 PM
> To: amelyachtowners@...
> Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Running rigging type and length
>
>  
>
>  
>
> I bought Amel-Super-Maramu hull 345 "Life is Good" recently.
> Mainsail halyard exits from the mast only for about one meter. If I drop mainsail the end will get pool in the mast.
> This thread recommends mainsail length to be 17.2 m. I question this recommendation.
> Normally we use mainsail halyard 2.5 of the mast length. We have 16.5 m mast. Therefore mainsail halyard mast be about 41 m.
> Please recommend mainsail halyard length and diameter. I plan to use polyester line.
>
> HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!!!.
>
> Vladimir Sonsev
> S/V LIFE IS GOOD
> SM 345.
>
>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Santorin: Why no starter battery?

Ric Gottschalk <ric@...>
 

My SN 24 1990 had 1  group 31 for starting & genset & 1 for house. I changed that to 2 start, 1 genset, and 6 - 2 volt rolls batteries placed in strbd nav berth. This also put the boat on an even keel to solve the 3 tilt to port. I did major upgrades to the wires & upgraded switches, added inverter, chargers, and fuse links. 

Ric Gottschalk
Kitchen Magic Refacers, Inc
Office 410-923-5800
Fax 410-923-5802

On Jan 1, 2016, at 10:10 AM, danielmfrey63@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Does anybody know why the Santorin originally was not equipped with a starter battery? Earlier and later AMEL models were equipped with separate starter and service batteries, but not the Santorin. Maybe someone can put some light on this. Thx.


Best - Daniel



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

Eric Freedman
 

Hi,

Is the halyard teal colored with a yellow tracer and a bowline on the end?

 

If so there should be another piece of the same line about 3 -4 feet long with a loop on it.

You tie the long 3 strand line to the loop on the end of the halyard with a long bowline.

 

You then take the short teal colored line and put it on the bottom hook of the track car.

You put the short line on a winch and tighten it with a winch so you can release the tension on the locking pin of the car. As soon as the car is lose you can let it slide to the top of the car track and remove the halyard line with 3 strand attached. It might jam at the mast cutout. Just stand on a winch and help the knot through the cutout.

 

The main should then be able to be pulled down.

The reverse procedure is used to raise the main.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 2:32 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

 

 

Joel,

Thank you very much. That is very helpful.

My boat changed hands 2 times. Most likely original halyard is replaced. Now I have a bowline knot loop at the end of mainsail halyard. Is the method that you described going to work if I attached a messenger line to bowline loop? Perhaps the nut is too big and can jam  in the mast. Does original  halyard have spliced loop? Please describe both ends of the original halyard.

I am cruising Carabbian now. I think that I have to be ready to drop mainsail if something goes wrong.

On Jan 1, 2016 1:18 PM, "'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
>
>  
>
> Hello Mr. Sonsev. When your boat was first delivered, it had onboard a long three strand line that is less than 2cm in diameter. When removing the mainsail, this line was tied to the eye at the end of the main halyard which allowed the sail to be lowered as the three strand would go into the mast and would act as a ‘messenger’ so you could use it to pull the mainsail back up. There is an additional line, exactly the same size/color as the main halyard, about three meters in length. It is used to ‘tighten’ the main halyard. You put the eye of this line on the vertically mounted car on the main mast that the permanent halyard is attached to. The temporary adjuster line is lead to the winch and the vertical adjustment car is repositioned this way to set halyard tension.
>
>  
>
> From memory, the messenger line is about 40-45 meters in length, but my memory is not infallible.
>
>  
>
> This system works well as it leaves the big winch free for the ballooner halyard and reserve external halyard that most SM 53 had fitted optionally.
>
>  
>
> Some people have fitted a full length conventional halyard and when outfitted with a ‘line stopper’ such as is fitted on the mizzen halyard, works well too.
>
>  
>
> Have fun with your Amel. Joel
>
> Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC
>
> THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
>
> 954 462 5869 office
>
> 954 812 2485 cell
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
> From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
> Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 12:01 PM
> To: amelyachtowners@...
> Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Running rigging type and length
>
>  
>
>  
>
> I bought Amel-Super-Maramu hull 345 "Life is Good" recently.
> Mainsail halyard exits from the mast only for about one meter. If I drop mainsail the end will get pool in the mast.
> This thread recommends mainsail length to be 17.2 m. I question this recommendation.
> Normally we use mainsail halyard 2.5 of the mast length. We have 16.5 m mast. Therefore mainsail halyard mast be about 41 m.
> Please recommend mainsail halyard length and diameter. I plan to use polyester line.
>
> HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!!!.
>
> Vladimir Sonsev
> S/V LIFE IS GOOD
> SM 345.
>
>


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM 53 mainsail halyard

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Joel,

Thank you very much. That is very helpful.

My boat changed hands 2 times. Most likely original halyard is replaced. Now I have a bowline knot loop at the end of mainsail halyard. Is the method that you described going to work if I attached a messenger line to bowline loop? Perhaps the nut is too big and can jam  in the mast. Does original  halyard have spliced loop? Please describe both ends of the original halyard.

I am cruising Carabbian now. I think that I have to be ready to drop mainsail if something goes wrong.

On Jan 1, 2016 1:18 PM, "'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
>
>  
>
> Hello Mr. Sonsev. When your boat was first delivered, it had onboard a long three strand line that is less than 2cm in diameter. When removing the mainsail, this line was tied to the eye at the end of the main halyard which allowed the sail to be lowered as the three strand would go into the mast and would act as a ‘messenger’ so you could use it to pull the mainsail back up. There is an additional line, exactly the same size/color as the main halyard, about three meters in length. It is used to ‘tighten’ the main halyard. You put the eye of this line on the vertically mounted car on the main mast that the permanent halyard is attached to. The temporary adjuster line is lead to the winch and the vertical adjustment car is repositioned this way to set halyard tension.
>
>  
>
> From memory, the messenger line is about 40-45 meters in length, but my memory is not infallible.
>
>  
>
> This system works well as it leaves the big winch free for the ballooner halyard and reserve external halyard that most SM 53 had fitted optionally.
>
>  
>
> Some people have fitted a full length conventional halyard and when outfitted with a ‘line stopper’ such as is fitted on the mizzen halyard, works well too.
>
>  
>
> Have fun with your Amel. Joel
>
> Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC
>
> THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
>
> 954 462 5869 office
>
> 954 812 2485 cell
>
>  
>
>  
>
>  
>
> From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
> Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 12:01 PM
> To: amelyachtowners@...
> Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Running rigging type and length
>
>  
>
>  
>
> I bought Amel-Super-Maramu hull 345 "Life is Good" recently.
> Mainsail halyard exits from the mast only for about one meter. If I drop mainsail the end will get pool in the mast.
> This thread recommends mainsail length to be 17.2 m. I question this recommendation.
> Normally we use mainsail halyard 2.5 of the mast length. We have 16.5 m mast. Therefore mainsail halyard mast be about 41 m.
> Please recommend mainsail halyard length and diameter. I plan to use polyester line.
>
> HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!!!.
>
> Vladimir Sonsev
> S/V LIFE IS GOOD
> SM 345.
>
>


SM 53 mainsail halyard

amelforme
 

Hello Mr. Sonsev. When your boat was first delivered, it had onboard a long three strand line that is less than 2cm in diameter. When removing the mainsail, this line was tied to the eye at the end of the main halyard which allowed the sail to be lowered as the three strand would go into the mast and would act as a ‘messenger’ so you could use it to pull the mainsail back up. There is an additional line, exactly the same size/color as the main halyard, about three meters in length. It is used to ‘tighten’ the main halyard. You put the eye of this line on the vertically mounted car on the main mast that the permanent halyard is attached to. The temporary adjuster line is lead to the winch and the vertical adjustment car is repositioned this way to set halyard tension.

 

From memory, the messenger line is about 40-45 meters in length, but my memory is not infallible.

 

This system works well as it leaves the big winch free for the ballooner halyard and reserve external halyard that most SM 53 had fitted optionally.

 

Some people have fitted a full length conventional halyard and when outfitted with a ‘line stopper’ such as is fitted on the mizzen halyard, works well too.

 

Have fun with your Amel. Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, January 01, 2016 12:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Running rigging type and length

 

 

I bought Amel-Super-Maramu hull 345 "Life is Good" recently.
Mainsail halyard exits from the mast only for about one meter. If I drop mainsail the end will get pool in the mast.
This thread recommends mainsail length to be 17.2 m. I question this recommendation.
Normally we use mainsail halyard 2.5 of the mast length. We have 16.5 m mast. Therefore mainsail halyard mast be about 41 m.
Please recommend mainsail halyard length and diameter. I plan to use polyester line.

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!!!.

Vladimir Sonsev
S/V LIFE IS GOOD
SM 345.


Re: Running rigging type and length

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

I bought Amel-Super-Maramu hull 345 "Life is Good" recently.
Mainsail halyard exits from the mast only for about one meter. If I drop mainsail the end will get pool in the mast.
This thread recommends mainsail length to be 17.2 m. I question this recommendation.
Normally we use mainsail halyard 2.5 of the mast length. We have 16.5 m mast. Therefore mainsail halyard mast be about 41 m.
Please recommend mainsail halyard length and diameter. I plan to use polyester line.

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO ALL OF YOU!!!.

Vladimir Sonsev
S/V LIFE IS GOOD
SM 345.