Date   

Parasailor

Bernard <gander.gmc@...>
 

Hello friends

I am the owner of Adorsa, a 88 Maramu and I am evaluating a light front sail. Did any of you have experienced a Parasailor or a code D?
Thank you for sharing
Best
Bernard

Envoyé de mon iPhone


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wanted (needed) Used Genoa from older Maramu 48

eric freedman
 

Ross,

I am out here on Long Island and have a head sail.

Please write to me at Kimberlite@...

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, March 10, 2016 11:48 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wanted (needed) Used Genoa from older Maramu 48

 

 

Hi All,

 My Genoa 130 is Totally worn out after 26 years, but it outlasted the *iron genny*, anyway it's still a year or so out from my selling all, moving aboard  and leaving and I cannot invest in a new sail this season. So if anyone has replaced yours and have an old used sail with any life in it I would be glad to buy it from you or if you were going to trash it anyway I will reimburse you for shipping and packing. Or one from a SM may be able to cut down to fit a Maramu 48.

Thanks for reading,

Ross in NYC having an early spring (74 degrees F)!!!!

1989 Maramu #261

  


Question about HyroGenerators or other electric sources

saki24m@yahoo.com <saki24m@...>
 


Hello Everyone,


I was wondering if anyone has installed a HyroGenerators on their amels, if so how do you like them compared to solar or wind or what do you recommend to boost electric.


Fairwinds...

Rob





Sent from my MetroPCS 4G LTE Android device


Wanted (needed) Used Genoa from older Maramu 48

rossny@mail.com
 

Hi All,

 My Genoa 130 is Totally worn out after 26 years, but it outlasted the *iron genny*, anyway it's still a year or so out from my selling all, moving aboard  and leaving and I cannot invest in a new sail this season. So if anyone has replaced yours and have an old used sail with any life in it I would be glad to buy it from you or if you were going to trash it anyway I will reimburse you for shipping and packing. Or one from a SM may be able to cut down to fit a Maramu 48.

Thanks for reading,

Ross in NYC having an early spring (74 degrees F)!!!!

1989 Maramu #261

  


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Volvo Penta Alarms and Idiot Lights

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good morning Gary,

I won’t be able to help you with the question.
But I have used a Volvo Mechanic with a good reputation in Martinique.
His name is Frank he own www.inboarddiesel.com
596 596 78 71 96

I have the same TMD 22 P I had my alarm lights checked and they worked, but I don’t know at what temperature.
Mine shows 195*F which I thought was hard, but long story short, I had a 2nd gage installed and it shows 10*F less…

Hope the mechanic can help or you find the solution!

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 3/9/16, gary@sunshineduo.us [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Volvo Penta Alarms and Idiot Lights
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Wednesday, March 9, 2016, 7:26 PM


 









Well, the panel holding the tach, key swicth
and stuff like that was looking a little ratty (and cracked)
so I found a replacement and swapped it out.  Not too hard
of a job, and a bit revealing about the
'oh-man-that's-a-huge-bunch-of-wires' concept
there at that location.
A
couple of the light bulbs were fried so I replaced them (I
couldn't find any potential candidates for LED
replacements, but maybe at a later date ...) and it got me
to wondering about a couple of things;When we were
crossing to the Caribbean we had a blockage in the heat
exchanger (Volvo TMD22) and the water temp gradually started
to rise.  It was good that I/we noticed it creeping up and
we had to shut down and let it cool off a couple of times so
I could set out to troubleshoot it (of course, this was
during three days of total doldrums...)
I don't know what the alarm
temperature should be and since the bulbs were burnt out we
never saw a 'trouble' light come on. Nor did the
alarm yell at us (thinking back, I guess I'm thankful
for that).  Nevertheless, does anyone know at what water
temperature the light and alarm should come
on?  Our motor usually runs at about 180-190
degrees (f) and will warm up to just over 200 when we push
it hard for awhile.  My car-engine days say that a system
that's pressurized to about 15psi should be safe at 220
or 225 without risking anything, (but we shut down before
that).  
So, I'm just
trying to learn a bit more about the bundle of wires back
there and see if I should be chasing things a bit deeper.
 Thanks in advance!
Gary
W.AM 209
"Adagio"Martinique ...
where they can fix anything ... 










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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Coppercoat revisited

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Hanspeter,    In 2010, in England, I think it cost us about £4,500. However, that included hauling, storing, sandblasting and Coppercoating. The work is all in the preparation, not least on the iron keel. Actually applying the Coppercoat is very simple as it's a water based paint that  is applied by rollers and can be overcoated quickly. Many people do this themselves with good results. The most important thing is to have two people when applying, one to keep mixing small quantities ( to keep the copper content in suspension) while the other uses the roller.

Wives can be very useful!


Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Greece




From: amelyachtowners@... on behalf of 'Hanspeter.baettig' hanspeter.baettig@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: 09 March 2016 22:48
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Coppercoat revisited
 


Hello Ian 
How much cost the cuppercoat application for a Super Maramu?
On a clean boat ?
Best regards
Hanspeter, SM16,Tamango 2

Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 09.03.2016 um 16:10 schrieb Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

 Hi Bill,


 Well, that's a first ! not heard of any other supplier who has had that problem. Nor we, now in our sixth year. It's not perfect, but for us it has saved us endless sandings , fillings and paintings, to say nothing of hauling charges. There are many recorded instances of people using it happily in all waters for ten years and more.


I guess that, as with all paint jobs, fail to prepare and prepare to fail.


   There are at least 50,000 boats worldwide, including many commercial ( oil service vessels etc,) and multimillion dollar yachts who use Coppercoat.  If you google  Coppercoat you can read of  issues that people have raised, but actually extraordinarily few.


 Up with the Coppercoaters!


 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Preveza Greece




From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 09 March 2016 13:22
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Coppercoat revisited
 


As some of you know I am prejudiced against Coppercoat because of the experiences of others that I know and what I have seen. I am also prejudiced against Coppercoat and any other product that makes claims of endurance 2-4 times the normal range.

I received this from a Canadian Professor (Chemistry PhD) and active cruiser to the Med, Caribbean, Pacific, Indian, South Africa, and North America:

"There was a discussion about Coppercoat some time ago and I said that
we had it for 3 years and were happy with it. Well, I just want to
post an update:

We've noticed bubbles on our Coppercoat. There were a few, but then
regularly more and more started appearing all over the place. We were
sure that it was because of unprofessional application of Coppercoat
back in South Africa.

We've just hauled out at a yard who used to be a Coppercoat supplier.
It turns out that our issue with bubbles is not unique, but rather a
byproduct of Coppercoat design. They said that the issue is with the
primer being solvent-based and Coppercoat being water-based. If
Coppercoat is applied even on slightly not-cured epoxy primer, then
the primer will off gas resulting in bubbles. On the other hand if
Coppercoat is applied to the dry primer it won't be able to adhere
well resulting in larger areas falling off. That's why this yard
stopped distributing and applying Coppercoat.

So now we're up to redoing the bottom paint including epoxy primer
frown emoticon. There is a quite new large Catana next to us that also
had to strip falling off Coppercoat. An expensive lesson in chemistry,
eh?"

I thought that you Coppercoat believers should know and be aware of this.

Bill
BeBe 387
Rodney Bay Marina for a week





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Volvo Penta Alarms and Idiot Lights

eric freedman
 

Hi Gary,

This is a very simple solution to the higher temperature in the engine.

It has saved us a couple of times.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

http://www.borelmfg.com/products_alarm.htm

 

PS I just noticed the photo of the Vetus muffler is from Kimberlite before I installed the alarm. By the time the engine alarm went off the muffler was already smoldering.

 

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, March 09, 2016 8:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Volvo Penta Alarms and Idiot Lights

 

 

Well, the panel holding the tach, key swicth and stuff like that was looking a little ratty (and cracked) so I found a replacement and swapped it out.  Not too hard of a job, and a bit revealing about the 'oh-man-that's-a-huge-bunch-of-wires' concept there at that location.

 

A couple of the light bulbs were fried so I replaced them (I couldn't find any potential candidates for LED replacements, but maybe at a later date ...) and it got me to wondering about a couple of things;

When we were crossing to the Caribbean we had a blockage in the heat exchanger (Volvo TMD22) and the water temp gradually started to rise.  It was good that I/we noticed it creeping up and we had to shut down and let it cool off a couple of times so I could set out to troubleshoot it (of course, this was during three days of total doldrums...)

 

I don't know what the alarm temperature should be and since the bulbs were burnt out we never saw a 'trouble' light come on. Nor did the alarm yell at us (thinking back, I guess I'm thankful for that).  Nevertheless, does anyone know at what water temperature the light and alarm should come on?

  

Our motor usually runs at about 180-190 degrees (f) and will warm up to just over 200 when we push it hard for awhile.  My car-engine days say that a system that's pressurized to about 15psi should be safe at 220 or 225 without risking anything, (but we shut down before that).  

 

So, I'm just trying to learn a bit more about the bundle of wires back there and see if I should be chasing things a bit deeper.  Thanks in advance!

 

Gary W.

AM 209 "Adagio"

Martinique ... where they can fix anything ... 

 


Volvo Penta Alarms and Idiot Lights

Gary Wells
 

Well, the panel holding the tach, key swicth and stuff like that was looking a little ratty (and cracked) so I found a replacement and swapped it out.  Not too hard of a job, and a bit revealing about the 'oh-man-that's-a-huge-bunch-of-wires' concept there at that location.


A couple of the light bulbs were fried so I replaced them (I couldn't find any potential candidates for LED replacements, but maybe at a later date ...) and it got me to wondering about a couple of things;

When we were crossing to the Caribbean we had a blockage in the heat exchanger (Volvo TMD22) and the water temp gradually started to rise.  It was good that I/we noticed it creeping up and we had to shut down and let it cool off a couple of times so I could set out to troubleshoot it (of course, this was during three days of total doldrums...)


I don't know what the alarm temperature should be and since the bulbs were burnt out we never saw a 'trouble' light come on. Nor did the alarm yell at us (thinking back, I guess I'm thankful for that).  Nevertheless, does anyone know at what water temperature the light and alarm should come on?

  

Our motor usually runs at about 180-190 degrees (f) and will warm up to just over 200 when we push it hard for awhile.  My car-engine days say that a system that's pressurized to about 15psi should be safe at 220 or 225 without risking anything, (but we shut down before that).  


So, I'm just trying to learn a bit more about the bundle of wires back there and see if I should be chasing things a bit deeper.  Thanks in advance!


Gary W.

AM 209 "Adagio"

Martinique ... where they can fix anything ... 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Coppercoat revisited

hanspeter baettig
 

Hello Ian 
How much cost the cuppercoat application for a Super Maramu?
On a clean boat ?
Best regards
Hanspeter, SM16,Tamango 2

Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 09.03.2016 um 16:10 schrieb Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

 Hi Bill,


 Well, that's a first ! not heard of any other supplier who has had that problem. Nor we, now in our sixth year. It's not perfect, but for us it has saved us endless sandings , fillings and paintings, to say nothing of hauling charges. There are many recorded instances of people using it happily in all waters for ten years and more.


I guess that, as with all paint jobs, fail to prepare and prepare to fail.


   There are at least 50,000 boats worldwide, including many commercial ( oil service vessels etc,) and multimillion dollar yachts who use Coppercoat.  If you google  Coppercoat you can read of  issues that people have raised, but actually extraordinarily few.


 Up with the Coppercoaters!


 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Preveza Greece




From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 09 March 2016 13:22
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Coppercoat revisited
 


As some of you know I am prejudiced against Coppercoat because of the experiences of others that I know and what I have seen. I am also prejudiced against Coppercoat and any other product that makes claims of endurance 2-4 times the normal range.

I received this from a Canadian Professor (Chemistry PhD) and active cruiser to the Med, Caribbean, Pacific, Indian, South Africa, and North America:

"There was a discussion about Coppercoat some time ago and I said that
we had it for 3 years and were happy with it. Well, I just want to
post an update:

We've noticed bubbles on our Coppercoat. There were a few, but then
regularly more and more started appearing all over the place. We were
sure that it was because of unprofessional application of Coppercoat
back in South Africa.

We've just hauled out at a yard who used to be a Coppercoat supplier.
It turns out that our issue with bubbles is not unique, but rather a
byproduct of Coppercoat design. They said that the issue is with the
primer being solvent-based and Coppercoat being water-based. If
Coppercoat is applied even on slightly not-cured epoxy primer, then
the primer will off gas resulting in bubbles. On the other hand if
Coppercoat is applied to the dry primer it won't be able to adhere
well resulting in larger areas falling off. That's why this yard
stopped distributing and applying Coppercoat.

So now we're up to redoing the bottom paint including epoxy primer
frown emoticon. There is a quite new large Catana next to us that also
had to strip falling off Coppercoat. An expensive lesson in chemistry,
eh?"

I thought that you Coppercoat believers should know and be aware of this.

Bill
BeBe 387
Rodney Bay Marina for a week



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Solar Energy System

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Duane,

I would listen to John, Maramu #91 Popeye as a voice of experience and someone who I respect his opinion. You never know when your boat will be in a serious blow and you never know if you will be aboard when it happens...and it usually happens at dark-thirty.

Good luck! I love solar!

Best,

Bill
BeBe 387
Currently Rodney Bay Marina, St. Lucia for about a week

On Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 10:19 PM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,

I used your solar spreadsheet (nice!) to check out needed capacity.  At first I was interested in just enough solar just to keep the batteries topped up when we're gone.  The more I got into it, it seemed that I might as well mount as much capacity as would reasonable fit.  If I go with the fixed mount I can run some props up from the pole that will stabilize the bigger panels.  Two of the 260 watt panels would improve on the reduction in generator run time.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477



Re: Solar Energy System

Duane Siegfri
 

Bill,

I used your solar spreadsheet (nice!) to check out needed capacity.  At first I was interested in just enough solar just to keep the batteries topped up when we're gone.  The more I got into it, it seemed that I might as well mount as much capacity as would reasonable fit.  If I go with the fixed mount I can run some props up from the pole that will stabilize the bigger panels.  Two of the 260 watt panels would improve on the reduction in generator run time.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: Solar Energy System

jjjk12s@...
 

It can be confusing if you look at land based solar information and transpose it to a boat. There are two issues for pointing the panels in the right direction. One is distance from the equator and the other is tracking through the day. On land it is definitely worth trying to angle the panels for latitude, for example at 16 degrees south the 5kW of panels on my house are on a north facing roof. Generally it is not worth tracking due to the complexity and cost of machinery in a land based situation.

 

On a boat it is obviously different circumstances and also shading has the greatest impact on efficiency. Do not underestimate the difficulty of moving a large panel in heavy weather. They have sharp corners and are fragile. Personally I wouldn't put one on a pole, especially a very large pivoting panel for a number of reasons. 

 

It's possible to make pivoting rail brackets yourself out of aluminium bar and a block of nylon or plastic for a few dollars. If you decide later to add a different mounting system or number of panels there is not much lost. Cost of panels is so much less these days, I would suggest the most convenient size is far more important than cost per watt on the size of system on a boat.

 

John, Maramu #91 Popeye

 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Solar Energy System

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Duane,

I agree completely with your logic.

One thing to consider is if the pole mounts work, they will be far cheaper than an arch to support solar panels. I have not regretted adding 3 of the 135 watt Kyocera panels with a solar arch that looks really good. Generator time has been cut to about 1/3 of what it was before the solar, and the batteries do not discharge as much.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 8:11 PM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,

Thanks for your reply.  I agree with you about Cruisers Forum in general.

I saw the comment here several months ago that angle to the sun isn't a large factor anymore.  However on all the sizing programs there is a reduction in efficiency (larger in higher latitudes) for mounting the panel horizontal.  I haven't seen any discussion in Kyocera's literature about the angle of the panel being countered by the panel construction.

I found an article that had the following graph to demonstrate the impact of tilt (angle from Horizontal) "Iann" is the "annual incident solar radiation on a surface" for a panel oriented due south.


from: http://www.builditsolar.com/References/EFFECTS_OF_TILT_AND_AZIMUTH_ON_ANNUAL_INCIDENT_SOLAR_RADIATION.pdf

  Based on the graph, in Miami tilt doesn't have much impact, so a fixed mount may be just as well.  Also the recommended tilt angle is less in lower latitudes.  The swivel pole mount I found was over $500 each (not including the pole) so it's a pricey add, and probably not worth it. 

What got me started on the pole mount is that we have a stainless pole on the aft stbd quarter now supporting a Thrane Sailor 250 sat phone.  The Thrane is too pricey a monthly fee for me so I can use the pole for something else.  I also don't like having the panels along the rail, too prone to cause injury and not very aesthetic.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477



Re: Solar Energy System

Duane Siegfri
 

Bill,

Thanks for your reply.  I agree with you about Cruisers Forum in general.

I saw the comment here several months ago that angle to the sun isn't a large factor anymore.  However on all the sizing programs there is a reduction in efficiency (larger in higher latitudes) for mounting the panel horizontal.  I haven't seen any discussion in Kyocera's literature about the angle of the panel being countered by the panel construction.

I found an article that had the following graph to demonstrate the impact of tilt (angle from Horizontal) "Iann" is the "annual incident solar radiation on a surface" for a panel oriented due south.


from: http://www.builditsolar.com/References/EFFECTS_OF_TILT_AND_AZIMUTH_ON_ANNUAL_INCIDENT_SOLAR_RADIATION.pdf

  Based on the graph, in Miami tilt doesn't have much impact, so a fixed mount may be just as well.  Also the recommended tilt angle is less in lower latitudes.  The swivel pole mount I found was over $500 each (not including the pole) so it's a pricey add, and probably not worth it. 

What got me started on the pole mount is that we have a stainless pole on the aft stbd quarter now supporting a Thrane Sailor 250 sat phone.  The Thrane is too pricey a monthly fee for me so I can use the pole for something else.  I also don't like having the panels along the rail, too prone to cause injury and not very aesthetic.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Things Recently Learned:Outboard engines, Dinghy, & NMEA connections

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

I agree, nothing beats the 2 stroke 15 HP Yamaha outboard.
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl



From: "Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Wednesday, 9 March 2016 9:05 PM
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Things Recently Learned:Outboard engines, Dinghy, & NMEA connections

 
Hello Gang,

I passed on 3D tenders when shopping for a new dinghy… I’d spotted the design problems.  I bought an AB with double alu bottom capable of 15 HP.  I luckily found a brand new Yamaha Enduro, bought and placed in a garage and the bloke died 3 days later. Had never been run.  The Yamaha is the best OB i’ve ever owned.

I had a Honda 4 ST on my last boat and it was a PITA.  Vibrations were its key feature.  Hard to start too.


Jean-Pierre
Eleuthera SM 007


On 9 Mar 2016, at 08:50, mkbiz@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
Thanks Bill, for the introduction to the joys of 3D tender :)

I am awaiting my own first 3D (UL 270) these days now. So the oars really prevent sitting on the pontoon ? Wonder how the French ride a dinghy...
I didn't order the frontlocker to keep the weight light. So storing them in the alternate position should work I hope.

Have you any other issues with the dinghy by now ?

Michael
Sioned, Maramu # 148

Posted by: mkbiz@...
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (5)




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Solar Energy System

Bill Kinney <greatketch@...>
 

Bill,

Angling solar panels  to the sun is not a panel technology issue, it is simple physics.  The benefit has not changed.  It is true that some panel manufacturers make use of internal reflections, back side generation, and such, it makes a VERY small difference in overall output if the panel doesn’t track the sun.

When the sun is at 45 degrees the panels only “see” about 70% of the incident solar radiation they do when at 90 deg. What they don’t “see” they can not generate power from.  That’s physics and hasn’t changed.

The hard part is deciding if it is worth it to mount adjustable angled panels on a moving platform like an anchored sailboat.  I don’t have an easy answer for that one...

Bill Kinney
Harmonie, SM #160
Cape Canaveral, Florida



On Mar 9, 2016, at 12:45, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Duane,

Regarding the size "gravitation," I think it is because what will fit on liferails and what will fit on an arch.

Regarding the rotation to the sun, it is my understanding that with modern solar panels that this is not as important as in the past, albeit some benefit still exists. That benefit needs to be quantified before you go to a great deal of trouble and expense. You should check this out with a reliable source...in other words, not Cruisers Forum. There has got to be a good, knowledgeable and honest source for this information, although I do not know where to go...maybe someone else can refer you.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 5:07 PM, Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Duane,


The reason the 140 W panels are popular on boats, is they are the largest standard panels that easily fold flat against lifelines.  Larger panels start to get too wide to easily store vertically inside the standard lifeline height.

If you are shopping with eMarine for panels in the 320 W size range, you might consider the LG panels.  They have a higher efficiency than the Kyocera panels, hence a bit smaller, and the price is attractive.

Bill Kinney
Harmonie, SM#160
Cape Canaveral, Florida


On Mar 9, 2016, at 11:59, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I'm considering adding solar panels and an MPPT Controller to the boat.  I'm wondering why everyone seems to gravitate toward the 100 to 140 watt panels (these have 36 cells).  Manufacturers also make larger (by wattage and size) 260 to 325 watt panels (having 60 and 80 cells respectively).  The Kyocera 140 watt panels sell for $2.12 per watt and the 325 watt panel sells for $1.31 per watt (about 62% of the 140 watt panel, prices from eMarineInc.com).  For the same wattage I think you'll need the same controller (especially if you wire the panels in series).  If you wire the 140 watt panels in parallel the total voltage would be less so you would save marginally on the controller.

The reason I'm asking is I'm planning on mounting them on poles at the stern quarters with rotating mounts so they can be positioned.  The only real downside that I know of with the 325 watt panels would be their size and weight.  60 pounds is a lot to dismount if heavy weather was expected (I wouldn't think this be too much of an issue).  I'm still researching whether it makes sense to pole mount these 65" by 52" panels.  Kyocera also makes a 260 watt panel (60 cells) that's only 41 pounds and 65"x39".  That would seem easier on me and the pole!

Any thoughts or experiences with pole mounts and these larger panels is appreciated.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477









Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Solar Energy System

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Duane,

Regarding the size "gravitation," I think it is because what will fit on liferails and what will fit on an arch.

Regarding the rotation to the sun, it is my understanding that with modern solar panels that this is not as important as in the past, albeit some benefit still exists. That benefit needs to be quantified before you go to a great deal of trouble and expense. You should check this out with a reliable source...in other words, not Cruisers Forum. There has got to be a good, knowledgeable and honest source for this information, although I do not know where to go...maybe someone else can refer you.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Wed, Mar 9, 2016 at 5:07 PM, Bill Kinney greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Duane,


The reason the 140 W panels are popular on boats, is they are the largest standard panels that easily fold flat against lifelines.  Larger panels start to get too wide to easily store vertically inside the standard lifeline height.

If you are shopping with eMarine for panels in the 320 W size range, you might consider the LG panels.  They have a higher efficiency than the Kyocera panels, hence a bit smaller, and the price is attractive.

Bill Kinney
Harmonie, SM#160
Cape Canaveral, Florida


On Mar 9, 2016, at 11:59, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I'm considering adding solar panels and an MPPT Controller to the boat.  I'm wondering why everyone seems to gravitate toward the 100 to 140 watt panels (these have 36 cells).  Manufacturers also make larger (by wattage and size) 260 to 325 watt panels (having 60 and 80 cells respectively).  The Kyocera 140 watt panels sell for $2.12 per watt and the 325 watt panel sells for $1.31 per watt (about 62% of the 140 watt panel, prices from eMarineInc.com).  For the same wattage I think you'll need the same controller (especially if you wire the panels in series).  If you wire the 140 watt panels in parallel the total voltage would be less so you would save marginally on the controller.

The reason I'm asking is I'm planning on mounting them on poles at the stern quarters with rotating mounts so they can be positioned.  The only real downside that I know of with the 325 watt panels would be their size and weight.  60 pounds is a lot to dismount if heavy weather was expected (I wouldn't think this be too much of an issue).  I'm still researching whether it makes sense to pole mount these 65" by 52" panels.  Kyocera also makes a 260 watt panel (60 cells) that's only 41 pounds and 65"x39".  That would seem easier on me and the pole!

Any thoughts or experiences with pole mounts and these larger panels is appreciated.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Coppercoat revisited

Peter Killen
 

I had exactly the same experience with Coppercoat some years ago, and reverted to normal anti fouling as a result. 
Peter killen
Pure Magic
SM433


On 9 Mar 2016, at 14:22, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

As some of you know I am prejudiced against Coppercoat because of the experiences of others that I know and what I have seen. I am also prejudiced against Coppercoat and any other product that makes claims of endurance 2-4 times the normal range.

I received this from a Canadian Professor (Chemistry PhD) and active cruiser to the Med, Caribbean, Pacific, Indian, South Africa, and North America:

"There was a discussion about Coppercoat some time ago and I said that
we had it for 3 years and were happy with it. Well, I just want to
post an update:

We've noticed bubbles on our Coppercoat. There were a few, but then
regularly more and more started appearing all over the place. We were
sure that it was because of unprofessional application of Coppercoat
back in South Africa.

We've just hauled out at a yard who used to be a Coppercoat supplier.
It turns out that our issue with bubbles is not unique, but rather a
byproduct of Coppercoat design. They said that the issue is with the
primer being solvent-based and Coppercoat being water-based. If
Coppercoat is applied even on slightly not-cured epoxy primer, then
the primer will off gas resulting in bubbles. On the other hand if
Coppercoat is applied to the dry primer it won't be able to adhere
well resulting in larger areas falling off. That's why this yard
stopped distributing and applying Coppercoat.

So now we're up to redoing the bottom paint including epoxy primer
frown emoticon. There is a quite new large Catana next to us that also
had to strip falling off Coppercoat. An expensive lesson in chemistry,
eh?"

I thought that you Coppercoat believers should know and be aware of this.

Bill
BeBe 387
Rodney Bay Marina for a week


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Solar Energy System

Bill Kinney <greatketch@...>
 

Duane,

The reason the 140 W panels are popular on boats, is they are the largest standard panels that easily fold flat against lifelines.  Larger panels start to get too wide to easily store vertically inside the standard lifeline height.

If you are shopping with eMarine for panels in the 320 W size range, you might consider the LG panels.  They have a higher efficiency than the Kyocera panels, hence a bit smaller, and the price is attractive.

Bill Kinney
Harmonie, SM#160
Cape Canaveral, Florida


On Mar 9, 2016, at 11:59, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I'm considering adding solar panels and an MPPT Controller to the boat.  I'm wondering why everyone seems to gravitate toward the 100 to 140 watt panels (these have 36 cells).  Manufacturers also make larger (by wattage and size) 260 to 325 watt panels (having 60 and 80 cells respectively).  The Kyocera 140 watt panels sell for $2.12 per watt and the 325 watt panel sells for $1.31 per watt (about 62% of the 140 watt panel, prices from eMarineInc.com).  For the same wattage I think you'll need the same controller (especially if you wire the panels in series).  If you wire the 140 watt panels in parallel the total voltage would be less so you would save marginally on the controller.

The reason I'm asking is I'm planning on mounting them on poles at the stern quarters with rotating mounts so they can be positioned.  The only real downside that I know of with the 325 watt panels would be their size and weight.  60 pounds is a lot to dismount if heavy weather was expected (I wouldn't think this be too much of an issue).  I'm still researching whether it makes sense to pole mount these 65" by 52" panels.  Kyocera also makes a 260 watt panel (60 cells) that's only 41 pounds and 65"x39".  That would seem easier on me and the pole!

Any thoughts or experiences with pole mounts and these larger panels is appreciated.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477





Solar Energy System

Duane Siegfri
 

I'm considering adding solar panels and an MPPT Controller to the boat.  I'm wondering why everyone seems to gravitate toward the 100 to 140 watt panels (these have 36 cells).  Manufacturers also make larger (by wattage and size) 260 to 325 watt panels (having 60 and 80 cells respectively).  The Kyocera 140 watt panels sell for $2.12 per watt and the 325 watt panel sells for $1.31 per watt (about 62% of the 140 watt panel, prices from eMarineInc.com).  For the same wattage I think you'll need the same controller (especially if you wire the panels in series).  If you wire the 140 watt panels in parallel the total voltage would be less so you would save marginally on the controller.

The reason I'm asking is I'm planning on mounting them on poles at the stern quarters with rotating mounts so they can be positioned.  The only real downside that I know of with the 325 watt panels would be their size and weight.  60 pounds is a lot to dismount if heavy weather was expected (I wouldn't think this be too much of an issue).  I'm still researching whether it makes sense to pole mount these 65" by 52" panels.  Kyocera also makes a 260 watt panel (60 cells) that's only 41 pounds and 65"x39".  That would seem easier on me and the pole!

Any thoughts or experiences with pole mounts and these larger panels is appreciated.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477