Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Information about Amel 1987 Maramu Sueno

James Alton
 

JPG,

  Thanks a lot.  Best of luck on your journeys with Eleuthera.

James

On Apr 30, 2016, at 12:47 PM, Jean-Pierre Germain jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi James,

Michel is a top notch broker and he would not list a hulk. 

Get Olivier Beauté to survey the vessel.  

GL with the buy

Jpg

Eleuthera SM007


On 30 Apr 2016, at 12:22, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello again,


   I just found out that the Maramu that I am planning to purchase is hull #220.

Thanks,

James
On Apr 29, 2016, at 2:27 PM, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hello,

I am in the process of purchasing the 1987 Maramu listed on Yacht World named “Sueno” currently located in Italy. I have not seen the vessel in person as of yet but plan to do so soon. I was hoping that someone here might know the boat and know something about her history. I am aware that she has been sitting for at least 2 years and will need a lot of service work but I am told that there are not any major issues. The listing agent is Mr. Michel Charpentier in St. Raphael, France. My email is Lokiyawl@... in case anyone would prefer to respond via email. 

I want to thank all of the members that helped me by giving me input on the various Amel models, especially the Maramu. Also for all of the great information on the Amel bow thruster which this particular boat has.  

I contacted Amel btw regarding the regular servicing of the bow thruster and was given a rough labour estimate of 3 hours to change seals and oil which aligns very well with Joel’s estimate that was recently posted. I am very excited about the prospects of soon being an Amel owner and know that I have a lot to learn about the Amel’s, feel free to help enlighten me.

Best,

James






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Information about Amel 1987 Maramu Sueno

James Alton
 

Trevor,

   I am very impressed with Michel.  He seems to be very honest, easy to talk to and to the point.  I felt comfortable enough to wire him $$ without any actual paperwork at the time which is not something I would normally do but he is one of those people that you just know it’s ok.   If things do not work out with Sueno for some reason I will definitely have him look for another boat for me.  

  Could you tell me more about the psychology behind the design that you mentioned?  

  I believe that I recall a post recently that talked about backing a SM down a narrow canal in South Florida with barely a foot of clearance on each side using the bow thruster to illustrate the capabilities but don’t recall who posted it.  I do like the concept of keeping a boat simple but the research that I did convinced me that the Amel BT is worthy of the additional maintenance.  As a part of my research I  came across an amazing story of how the Amel BT likely saved a SM  (and possibly the crew) that had gone up on an exposed reef in gale force winds.  The story if anyone is interested is available on You Tube.  I am not clear on whether links are allowed so just search You Tube with “SV Delos Copenhagen”.  Then choose the 3rd video (#3) in that group and advance to time stamp 8:18.  

   Thanks for passing along Michel’s tip to you about retaining control of the bow until alongside, noted.   Sueno will be the first vessel I have owned which had a bow thruster.  Am I correct that the Maramu bow thruster will be 12v and considerably less powerful than the SM?  I wonder if they share the same components..  As to trusting the Amel bits,  I probably should mention that I have worked on so many poorly designed boats that required modifications and upgrading to even function that this is an all new concept for me.  It was however the genius that I saw in the Amel  that I inspected along with the workmanship that drew me in originally and it does seem logical to extend that to the Amel “bits” that I am not familiar with.  Nothing would make me happier than to find that the design in all areas was so well thought out that only maintenance was required.  

All the best to you Trevor and I hope that you can find what you are looking for.

James

  

  

On Apr 30, 2016, at 11:43 AM, seafeverofcuan@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

James,

          I have dealt with Michel Charpentier on two occasions. He is simply straight as a die and a pleasure to do business with.
If I were lucky enough to be looking for another Amel it would be Joel in the USA and Michel in Europe with Oliver as the surveyor, that way you minimise you risk. 
With the purchase of a boat through Michel or Joel, they will give you a number days training to instruct you in not only the practical workings of Amel, but equally the psychology behind the design.
Your recent concerns regarding bow thrusters  being a case in point, properly maintained they are excellent. I am surprised that no one mention that the Super Maramu is designed to be maneuvered stern to when docking using the bow thruster, Michel told me that on my first day and it was simple ever since,just NEVER hand over the bow warp until you are along side.
Good luck with your search, the bits built by Amel will not let you down, as ever, the more that you can reduce the moving parts, the more time you will have for sailing.
I am only sorry that Amel no longer build smaller boats, it has been a real pain trying to find a worthy replacement for my SM.
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty
Former owner Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Ireland







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Information about Amel 1987 Maramu Sueno

Jean-Pierre Germain <jgermain@...>
 

Hi James,

Michel is a top notch broker and he would not list a hulk. 

Get Olivier Beauté to survey the vessel.  

GL with the buy

Jpg

Eleuthera SM007


On 30 Apr 2016, at 12:22, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello again,


   I just found out that the Maramu that I am planning to purchase is hull #220.

Thanks,

James
On Apr 29, 2016, at 2:27 PM, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hello,

I am in the process of purchasing the 1987 Maramu listed on Yacht World named “Sueno” currently located in Italy. I have not seen the vessel in person as of yet but plan to do so soon. I was hoping that someone here might know the boat and know something about her history. I am aware that she has been sitting for at least 2 years and will need a lot of service work but I am told that there are not any major issues. The listing agent is Mr. Michel Charpentier in St. Raphael, France. My email is Lokiyawl@... in case anyone would prefer to respond via email. 

I want to thank all of the members that helped me by giving me input on the various Amel models, especially the Maramu. Also for all of the great information on the Amel bow thruster which this particular boat has.  

I contacted Amel btw regarding the regular servicing of the bow thruster and was given a rough labour estimate of 3 hours to change seals and oil which aligns very well with Joel’s estimate that was recently posted. I am very excited about the prospects of soon being an Amel owner and know that I have a lot to learn about the Amel’s, feel free to help enlighten me.

Best,

James



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Information about Amel 1987 Maramu Sueno

seafeverofcuan
 

James,
          I have dealt with Michel Charpentier on two occasions. He is simply straight as a die and a pleasure to do business with.
If I were lucky enough to be looking for another Amel it would be Joel in the USA and Michel in Europe with Oliver as the surveyor, that way you minimise you risk. 
With the purchase of a boat through Michel or Joel, they will give you a number days training to instruct you in not only the practical workings of Amel, but equally the psychology behind the design.
Your recent concerns regarding bow thrusters  being a case in point, properly maintained they are excellent. I am surprised that no one mention that the Super Maramu is designed to be maneuvered stern to when docking using the bow thruster, Michel told me that on my first day and it was simple ever since,just NEVER hand over the bow warp until you are along side.
Good luck with your search, the bits built by Amel will not let you down, as ever, the more that you can reduce the moving parts, the more time you will have for sailing.
I am only sorry that Amel no longer build smaller boats, it has been a real pain trying to find a worthy replacement for my SM.
Fair winds,
Trevor Lusty
Former owner Seafever of Cuan
SM 425
Ireland





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Information about Amel 1987 Maramu Sueno

James Alton
 

Hello again,

   I just found out that the Maramu that I am planning to purchase is hull #220.

Thanks,

James

On Apr 29, 2016, at 2:27 PM, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hello,

I am in the process of purchasing the 1987 Maramu listed on Yacht World named “Sueno” currently located in Italy. I have not seen the vessel in person as of yet but plan to do so soon. I was hoping that someone here might know the boat and know something about her history. I am aware that she has been sitting for at least 2 years and will need a lot of service work but I am told that there are not any major issues. The listing agent is Mr. Michel Charpentier in St. Raphael, France. My email is Lokiyawl@... in case anyone would prefer to respond via email. 

I want to thank all of the members that helped me by giving me input on the various Amel models, especially the Maramu. Also for all of the great information on the Amel bow thruster which this particular boat has.  

I contacted Amel btw regarding the regular servicing of the bow thruster and was given a rough labour estimate of 3 hours to change seals and oil which aligns very well with Joel’s estimate that was recently posted. I am very excited about the prospects of soon being an Amel owner and know that I have a lot to learn about the Amel’s, feel free to help enlighten me.

Best,

James



Information about Amel 1987 Maramu Sueno

James Alton
 

Hello,

I am in the process of purchasing the 1987 Maramu listed on Yacht World named “Sueno” currently located in Italy. I have not seen the vessel in person as of yet but plan to do so soon. I was hoping that someone here might know the boat and know something about her history. I am aware that she has been sitting for at least 2 years and will need a lot of service work but I am told that there are not any major issues. The listing agent is Mr. Michel Charpentier in St. Raphael, France. My email is Lokiyawl@... in case anyone would prefer to respond via email.

I want to thank all of the members that helped me by giving me input on the various Amel models, especially the Maramu. Also for all of the great information on the Amel bow thruster which this particular boat has.

I contacted Amel btw regarding the regular servicing of the bow thruster and was given a rough labour estimate of 3 hours to change seals and oil which aligns very well with Joel’s estimate that was recently posted. I am very excited about the prospects of soon being an Amel owner and know that I have a lot to learn about the Amel’s, feel free to help enlighten me.

Best,

James


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

Beaute Olivier
 

Good morning,

since 1989, the engine room fans (on SMs and 54s) are 24V ones, running with 12V. This was designed on purpose, in order to make their life longer. In fact, if you install 12V fans, they will constantly run with 14V+ (because of the engine alternator) and will quickly quit (after 200 hours).
The fans run as soon as you power the engine with the key. This means you can run the fans without running the engine...but bear in mind that you will drain the starter battery after a few hours...
Of course the amount of air circulated is less than if the fans were powered with 24V, but it is still far enough (as you can feel when you put your hand on the air deck output.

The 230V fan that is located above the generator runs only once the generator is started.

Have a good day.


On Friday, April 29, 2016 4:31 AM, "Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Hey Joel. The fans come on as soon as the key is turned on, and prior to the engine actually starting. 

Steve

On Apr 28, 2016, at 18:01, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
Hi Steve. Do the fans run when the starting system is enabled but not actually cranking or does the diesel need to be running for the fans to power up?
 
Joel
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 10:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
 
 
My 1992 SM has 24v fans which run off the 12v circuit. I thought it odd when I first figured this out, but have been told this is how Amel designed the system. 
 
Steve
Aloha SM72
Martinique

On Apr 28, 2016, at 09:35, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Thanks for this information Alexandre. Hmmmmm. Back in the mid 1990’s, I had a SM 53 demonstrator that I could have sworn today that the blower ran off the 24 volt alternator. I am far from salt water today but when I get back to Fort Lauderdale next week I will check out an early/pre Millennium boat as well as a 2003 boat and see what is what. Anyone with a pre 1999 Super Maramu reading this, does your fan come on when you energize the start circuit or only after the engine starts and the alternator is turning? Perhaps this evolved over the years like many other things.
 
Joel
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
 
 
Good morning Joel,

Thanks for your reply, actually this is from the 12 Volt alternateur it runs off.

My question is why the 24 volt Fans are connected to a 12 Volt circuit?
The manual says “both 24 V devices work intentionally on 12 V deliver by the main engine alternator” but does not explain why.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_15.jpg

To make sure it was the fan being defective, I started the Volvo and measured 13 volt (on the wires going to the fan).
Later I also connected directly on 24 volt and it did not work. Will get replacement once I am in Puerto Rico in 2 or 3 weeks.

Removing it, yesterday I was the manufacturer date (1999) so quite impressed it last 16 years…
I remember changing the intake one 3 years ago

Thanks again!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 4/27/16, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 7:01 PM


 









The engine room fan that operates when the
propulsion diesel is running runs off the 24 volt
alternator. Fire up your Yanmar and check the voltage then.
It has been my experience that the 24 volt DC extractor
fails well before the 220 volt extractor that is run from
the Onan when it is producing 220 volts. Non scientific
opinion but pretty much proven by my
experiences.
Hope your
extractor fan fires up on 24 volts!

Joel THE EXPERIENCED AMEL
GUY954-812-2485
On Apr 27,
2016, at 2:50 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Update:



Looking at the owner manual, I just saw the engine, in
addition to the intake fan, has also an extraction fan FASCO
24 Volt 2807-513-122 --- 93004-2815

http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans.html



Engine on, I noted it was not working and likely the cause
of the warmer engine room.



With a Volt Meter I checked current was going to it and it
did: measured 13 Volt.

It seems normal as the owner manual says so…



Does someone know why this “24 Volt” FASCO 2807-513-122
--- 93004-2815 is connected to a 12 volt connection?



Olivier?

Joel?

Bill? Anyone?



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican
Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/27/16, Alexandre Uster von Baar <uster@...>
wrote:



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and
cooling

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 10:54 AM





Good morning,



May be I am a control freak, but when using the engine
or

genset I monitor the temperature of the engine
compartment

via a wireless temperature sensor. 



I rarely use the engine for more than an hour at the
time

(mostly to leave and come back to a marina), but in a
few

occasions had to motor for 10 or more hours.

The temperature in the engine room, will gradually
increase;

when it reaches 47*C I open the engine hatch (sea
condition

permitting obviously) for 1/2 hour to cool it down to
45*C

and so on. 

“My” reason to do this is because of component from
the

generator melting at 50*C. 



Note:  the “suction” (intake) 24 Volt Jabsco

35440-0010 250 CFM Blower Fan is working (starts when
engine

is ON). 



Is there may be an air intake our outtake that could be

partially blocked? 

Is there another fan I am forgetting about? 





Other note: when using the Generator, it rarely goes
over

46*C after 2.5 hour use (its fan is also working).



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican

Republic
























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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

amelforme
 

Ah, Faith and Begorrah then to you Willy. Got the same roots, with a major load of Scots to balance the Hibernian dominance. Oh Eye. Some Yankees remember where they came from….

 

I hope we have helped you walk towards a logical conclusion. I think it is the crankcase ventilation system, but I could be very wrong. Let us know the discovery.

 

All The Best, Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 7:40 PM
To: Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

 

 

Joel, thanks for your imput,  if the anti syphon was clogged and she flooded via the exhaust / inlet valves overlap and crankcase ventilation, the piston would have been top of cycle so minimal water in the cylinder on starting, thus no hydrolock and motor damage. I'm starting to thank my Irish forbears for lucky coincidences. Now if this is correct then I need to unblock the anti syphon U. I might also move the anti syphon "U" higher in the engine room and closer to centerline of boat.

 

Need also to check the inlet manifold and air filter for traces of salt crystals to confirm hypothesis.

Im away from the boat for a week so will report on findings on or about the 10th.


Bob Grey

Amel 55 #25.

Renaissance 3
Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Friday, April 29, 2016, 06:17, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Sorry, accidentally hit send before I finished. When this siphon happens, it usually fills up a cylinder with an open exhaust valve and 'hydro-locks' the engine. If the starter is powerful enough, it can damage Pistons, con rods. And the crankshaft. Since you have run your engine that did not happen. Perhaps your engine has a positive crankcase ventilation system plumbed through the air intake system, I don't know. What a puzzle. I agree with Bill/BEBE, get a tech who knows this gen set to have a look.

 

Good luck and keep us posted.

Joel F. Potter

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY


On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Bob Grey renaissanceiii@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, when drained water was not green and level of coolant was not low. Onan not used during crossing about 10 hours heeled on starboard tack.  Agree normally water in oil would be head gasket, ran Onan for 4 hours after second oil change, oil clean and no trace of milkiness.

 

I estimate 1+ liters water, nothing since.

 

I'm scratching my head. Only thing for sure is Onan hull exhaust and cooling water ports would have been under water during crossing.

 

Bob


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, 20:42, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bob,

I think that for water to be in the oil from the exhaust, it would have to be pushed past the pistons and rings. This is unlikely because if seawater enters through the exhaust system, it will usually bend or break piston connecting rods.

If your coolant level decreased at the same time, it is most certainly a blown head gasket or cracked head. Did the coolant level decrease? Can you estimate the total increase in volume of the oil including the water?

The most likely cause is a blown head gasket, or some other breach in the coolant pathway. I think that you should get an Onan mechanic on the boat. If you are still under Amel warranty contact SAV.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

Bob Grey
 

Joel, thanks for your imput,  if the anti syphon was clogged and she flooded via the exhaust / inlet valves overlap and crankcase ventilation, the piston would have been top of cycle so minimal water in the cylinder on starting, thus no hydrolock and motor damage. I'm starting to thank my Irish forbears for lucky coincidences. Now if this is correct then I need to unblock the anti syphon U. I might also move the anti syphon "U" higher in the engine room and closer to centerline of boat.

Need also to check the inlet manifold and air filter for traces of salt crystals to confirm hypothesis.

Im away from the boat for a week so will report on findings on or about the 10th.

Bob Grey
Amel 55 #25.

On Friday, April 29, 2016, 06:17, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Sorry, accidentally hit send before I finished. When this siphon happens, it usually fills up a cylinder with an open exhaust valve and 'hydro-locks' the engine. If the starter is powerful enough, it can damage Pistons, con rods. And the crankshaft. Since you have run your engine that did not happen. Perhaps your engine has a positive crankcase ventilation system plumbed through the air intake system, I don't know. What a puzzle. I agree with Bill/BEBE, get a tech who knows this gen set to have a look.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Joel F. Potter
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Bob Grey renaissanceiii@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, when drained water was not green and level of coolant was not low. Onan not used during crossing about 10 hours heeled on starboard tack.  Agree normally water in oil would be head gasket, ran Onan for 4 hours after second oil change, oil clean and no trace of milkiness.


I estimate 1+ liters water, nothing since.

I'm scratching my head. Only thing for sure is Onan hull exhaust and cooling water ports would have been under water during crossing.

Bob


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, 20:42, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bob,

I think that for water to be in the oil from the exhaust, it would have to be pushed past the pistons and rings. This is unlikely because if seawater enters through the exhaust system, it will usually bend or break piston connecting rods.

If your coolant level decreased at the same time, it is most certainly a blown head gasket or cracked head. Did the coolant level decrease? Can you estimate the total increase in volume of the oil including the water?

The most likely cause is a blown head gasket, or some other breach in the coolant pathway. I think that you should get an Onan mechanic on the boat. If you are still under Amel warranty contact SAV.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

Stephen Davis
 

Hey Joel. The fans come on as soon as the key is turned on, and prior to the engine actually starting. 

Steve

On Apr 28, 2016, at 18:01, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Steve. Do the fans run when the starting system is enabled but not actually cranking or does the diesel need to be running for the fans to power up?

 

Joel

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 10:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

 

 

My 1992 SM has 24v fans which run off the 12v circuit. I thought it odd when I first figured this out, but have been told this is how Amel designed the system. 

 

Steve

Aloha SM72

Martinique


On Apr 28, 2016, at 09:35, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for this information Alexandre. Hmmmmm. Back in the mid 1990’s, I had a SM 53 demonstrator that I could have sworn today that the blower ran off the 24 volt alternator. I am far from salt water today but when I get back to Fort Lauderdale next week I will check out an early/pre Millennium boat as well as a 2003 boat and see what is what. Anyone with a pre 1999 Super Maramu reading this, does your fan come on when you energize the start circuit or only after the engine starts and the alternator is turning? Perhaps this evolved over the years like many other things.

 

Joel

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

 

 

Good morning Joel,

Thanks for your reply, actually this is from the 12 Volt alternateur it runs off.

My question is why the 24 volt Fans are connected to a 12 Volt circuit?
The manual says “both 24 V devices work intentionally on 12 V deliver by the main engine alternator” but does not explain why.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_15.jpg

To make sure it was the fan being defective, I started the Volvo and measured 13 volt (on the wires going to the fan).
Later I also connected directly on 24 volt and it did not work. Will get replacement once I am in Puerto Rico in 2 or 3 weeks.

Removing it, yesterday I was the manufacturer date (1999) so quite impressed it last 16 years…
I remember changing the intake one 3 years ago

Thanks again!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 4/27/16, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 7:01 PM


 









The engine room fan that operates when the
propulsion diesel is running runs off the 24 volt
alternator. Fire up your Yanmar and check the voltage then.
It has been my experience that the 24 volt DC extractor
fails well before the 220 volt extractor that is run from
the Onan when it is producing 220 volts. Non scientific
opinion but pretty much proven by my
experiences.
Hope your
extractor fan fires up on 24 volts!

Joel THE EXPERIENCED AMEL
GUY954-812-2485
On Apr 27,
2016, at 2:50 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Update:



Looking at the owner manual, I just saw the engine, in
addition to the intake fan, has also an extraction fan FASCO
24 Volt 2807-513-122 --- 93004-2815

http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans.html



Engine on, I noted it was not working and likely the cause
of the warmer engine room.



With a Volt Meter I checked current was going to it and it
did: measured 13 Volt.

It seems normal as the owner manual says so…



Does someone know why this “24 Volt” FASCO 2807-513-122
--- 93004-2815 is connected to a 12 volt connection?



Olivier?

Joel?

Bill? Anyone?



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican
Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/27/16, Alexandre Uster von Baar <uster@...>
wrote:



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and
cooling

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 10:54 AM





Good morning,



May be I am a control freak, but when using the engine
or

genset I monitor the temperature of the engine
compartment

via a wireless temperature sensor. 



I rarely use the engine for more than an hour at the
time

(mostly to leave and come back to a marina), but in a
few

occasions had to motor for 10 or more hours.

The temperature in the engine room, will gradually
increase;

when it reaches 47*C I open the engine hatch (sea
condition

permitting obviously) for 1/2 hour to cool it down to
45*C

and so on. 

“My” reason to do this is because of component from
the

generator melting at 50*C. 



Note:  the “suction” (intake) 24 Volt Jabsco

35440-0010 250 CFM Blower Fan is working (starts when
engine

is ON). 



Is there may be an air intake our outtake that could be

partially blocked? 

Is there another fan I am forgetting about? 





Other note: when using the Generator, it rarely goes
over

46*C after 2.5 hour use (its fan is also working).



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican

Republic
























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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

Bob Grey
 

Joel, you are correct it has a positive vent system to crankcase via air intake, surprisingly the anti siphon "U" pipe is mounted horizontal not virtical so when I first found the problem, the anti syphon loop was was my chief suspect. Still waiting on advice from the yard but thought I would ask the collective Amel brain trust for an answer as well.

If your demonstrator 55 was in La Rochelle, it's the same boat.

Bob Grey

On Friday, April 29, 2016, 01:26, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 


On the Amel 55 that I had as a demonstrator, also called RENAISSANCE, I believe there was a vented loop, with a siphon break in the highest point, on the gen set exhaust. If your boat is so equipped, sometimes the siphon break can get stopped up with salt crystals and fail to prevent a siphon of sea water into the engine on the side exit exhaust system.
Joel F. Potter
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Bob Grey renaissanceiii@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, when drained water was not green and level of coolant was not low. Onan not used during crossing about 10 hours heeled on starboard tack.  Agree normally water in oil would be head gasket, ran Onan for 4 hours after second oil change, oil clean and no trace of milkiness.


I estimate 1+ liters water, nothing since.

I'm scratching my head. Only thing for sure is Onan hull exhaust and cooling water ports would have been under water during crossing.

Bob


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, 20:42, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bob,

I think that for water to be in the oil from the exhaust, it would have to be pushed past the pistons and rings. This is unlikely because if seawater enters through the exhaust system, it will usually bend or break piston connecting rods.

If your coolant level decreased at the same time, it is most certainly a blown head gasket or cracked head. Did the coolant level decrease? Can you estimate the total increase in volume of the oil including the water?

The most likely cause is a blown head gasket, or some other breach in the coolant pathway. I think that you should get an Onan mechanic on the boat. If you are still under Amel warranty contact SAV.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

amelforme
 

Hi Steve. Do the fans run when the starting system is enabled but not actually cranking or does the diesel need to be running for the fans to power up?

 

Joel

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 10:38 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

 

 

My 1992 SM has 24v fans which run off the 12v circuit. I thought it odd when I first figured this out, but have been told this is how Amel designed the system. 

 

Steve

Aloha SM72

Martinique


On Apr 28, 2016, at 09:35, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for this information Alexandre. Hmmmmm. Back in the mid 1990’s, I had a SM 53 demonstrator that I could have sworn today that the blower ran off the 24 volt alternator. I am far from salt water today but when I get back to Fort Lauderdale next week I will check out an early/pre Millennium boat as well as a 2003 boat and see what is what. Anyone with a pre 1999 Super Maramu reading this, does your fan come on when you energize the start circuit or only after the engine starts and the alternator is turning? Perhaps this evolved over the years like many other things.

 

Joel

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

 

 

Good morning Joel,

Thanks for your reply, actually this is from the 12 Volt alternateur it runs off.

My question is why the 24 volt Fans are connected to a 12 Volt circuit?
The manual says “both 24 V devices work intentionally on 12 V deliver by the main engine alternator” but does not explain why.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_15.jpg

To make sure it was the fan being defective, I started the Volvo and measured 13 volt (on the wires going to the fan).
Later I also connected directly on 24 volt and it did not work. Will get replacement once I am in Puerto Rico in 2 or 3 weeks.

Removing it, yesterday I was the manufacturer date (1999) so quite impressed it last 16 years…
I remember changing the intake one 3 years ago

Thanks again!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 4/27/16, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 7:01 PM


 









The engine room fan that operates when the
propulsion diesel is running runs off the 24 volt
alternator. Fire up your Yanmar and check the voltage then.
It has been my experience that the 24 volt DC extractor
fails well before the 220 volt extractor that is run from
the Onan when it is producing 220 volts. Non scientific
opinion but pretty much proven by my
experiences.
Hope your
extractor fan fires up on 24 volts!

Joel THE EXPERIENCED AMEL
GUY954-812-2485
On Apr 27,
2016, at 2:50 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Update:



Looking at the owner manual, I just saw the engine, in
addition to the intake fan, has also an extraction fan FASCO
24 Volt 2807-513-122 --- 93004-2815

http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans.html



Engine on, I noted it was not working and likely the cause
of the warmer engine room.



With a Volt Meter I checked current was going to it and it
did: measured 13 Volt.

It seems normal as the owner manual says so…



Does someone know why this “24 Volt” FASCO 2807-513-122
--- 93004-2815 is connected to a 12 volt connection?



Olivier?

Joel?

Bill? Anyone?



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican
Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/27/16, Alexandre Uster von Baar <uster@...>
wrote:



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and
cooling

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 10:54 AM





Good morning,



May be I am a control freak, but when using the engine
or

genset I monitor the temperature of the engine
compartment

via a wireless temperature sensor. 



I rarely use the engine for more than an hour at the
time

(mostly to leave and come back to a marina), but in a
few

occasions had to motor for 10 or more hours.

The temperature in the engine room, will gradually
increase;

when it reaches 47*C I open the engine hatch (sea
condition

permitting obviously) for 1/2 hour to cool it down to
45*C

and so on. 

“My” reason to do this is because of component from
the

generator melting at 50*C. 



Note:  the “suction” (intake) 24 Volt Jabsco

35440-0010 250 CFM Blower Fan is working (starts when
engine

is ON). 



Is there may be an air intake our outtake that could be

partially blocked? 

Is there another fan I am forgetting about? 





Other note: when using the Generator, it rarely goes
over

46*C after 2.5 hour use (its fan is also working).



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican

Republic
























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FW: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

amelforme
 


Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

Sorry, accidentally hit send before I finished my previous comment. When this siphon happens, it usually fills up a cylinder with an open exhaust valve and 'hydro-locks' the engine. If the starter is powerful enough, it can damage pistons, con rods, and the crankshaft. Since you have run your engine that did not happen. Perhaps your engine has a positive crankcase ventilation system plumbed through the air intake system, that would allow water that came into the cylinder to then get into the air intake tract and into the crankcase, if the camshaft provides for some overlap of the opening of the exhaust and intake valves as most do. I don't know. What a puzzle. I agree with Bill/BEBE, get a tech who knows this gen set to have a look.

 

Good luck and keep us posted.

Joel F. Potter

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954-812-2485


On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Bob Grey renaissanceiii@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, when drained water was not green and level of coolant was not low. Onan not used during crossing about 10 hours heeled on starboard tack.  Agree normally water in oil would be head gasket, ran Onan for 4 hours after second oil change, oil clean and no trace of milkiness.

 

I estimate 1+ liters water, nothing since.

 

I'm scratching my head. Only thing for sure is Onan hull exhaust and cooling water ports would have been under water during crossing.

 

Bob


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, 20:42, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bob,

I think that for water to be in the oil from the exhaust, it would have to be pushed past the pistons and rings. This is unlikely because if seawater enters through the exhaust system, it will usually bend or break piston connecting rods.

If your coolant level decreased at the same time, it is most certainly a blown head gasket or cracked head. Did the coolant level decrease? Can you estimate the total increase in volume of the oil including the water?

The most likely cause is a blown head gasket, or some other breach in the coolant pathway. I think that you should get an Onan mechanic on the boat. If you are still under Amel warranty contact SAV.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

amelforme
 

Sorry, accidentally hit send before I finished. When this siphon happens, it usually fills up a cylinder with an open exhaust valve and 'hydro-locks' the engine. If the starter is powerful enough, it can damage Pistons, con rods. And the crankshaft. Since you have run your engine that did not happen. Perhaps your engine has a positive crankcase ventilation system plumbed through the air intake system, I don't know. What a puzzle. I agree with Bill/BEBE, get a tech who knows this gen set to have a look.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Joel F. Potter
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
954-812-2485

On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Bob Grey renaissanceiii@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, when drained water was not green and level of coolant was not low. Onan not used during crossing about 10 hours heeled on starboard tack.  Agree normally water in oil would be head gasket, ran Onan for 4 hours after second oil change, oil clean and no trace of milkiness.


I estimate 1+ liters water, nothing since.

I'm scratching my head. Only thing for sure is Onan hull exhaust and cooling water ports would have been under water during crossing.

Bob


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, 20:42, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bob,

I think that for water to be in the oil from the exhaust, it would have to be pushed past the pistons and rings. This is unlikely because if seawater enters through the exhaust system, it will usually bend or break piston connecting rods.

If your coolant level decreased at the same time, it is most certainly a blown head gasket or cracked head. Did the coolant level decrease? Can you estimate the total increase in volume of the oil including the water?

The most likely cause is a blown head gasket, or some other breach in the coolant pathway. I think that you should get an Onan mechanic on the boat. If you are still under Amel warranty contact SAV.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

amelforme
 

Sorry, accidentally hit send before I finished. When this siphon happens, it usually fills up a cylinder with an open exhaust valve and 'hydro-locks' the engine. If the starter is powerful enough, it can damage Pistons, con rods. And the crankshaft. Since you have run your engine that did not happen. Perhaps your engine has a positive crankcase ventilation system plumbed through the air intake system, I don't know. What a puzzle. I agree with Bill/BEBE, get a tech who knows this gen set to have a look.

Good luck and keep us posted.

Joel F. Potter
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
954-812-2485

On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Bob Grey renaissanceiii@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, when drained water was not green and level of coolant was not low. Onan not used during crossing about 10 hours heeled on starboard tack.  Agree normally water in oil would be head gasket, ran Onan for 4 hours after second oil change, oil clean and no trace of milkiness.


I estimate 1+ liters water, nothing since.

I'm scratching my head. Only thing for sure is Onan hull exhaust and cooling water ports would have been under water during crossing.

Bob


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, 20:42, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bob,

I think that for water to be in the oil from the exhaust, it would have to be pushed past the pistons and rings. This is unlikely because if seawater enters through the exhaust system, it will usually bend or break piston connecting rods.

If your coolant level decreased at the same time, it is most certainly a blown head gasket or cracked head. Did the coolant level decrease? Can you estimate the total increase in volume of the oil including the water?

The most likely cause is a blown head gasket, or some other breach in the coolant pathway. I think that you should get an Onan mechanic on the boat. If you are still under Amel warranty contact SAV.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Flooded onan

amelforme
 


On the Amel 55 that I had as a demonstrator, also called RENAISSANCE, I believe there was a vented loop, with a siphon break in the highest point, on the gen set exhaust. If your boat is so equipped, sometimes the siphon break can get stopped up with salt crystals and fail to prevent a siphon of sea water into the engine on the side exit exhaust system.
Joel F. Potter
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
954-812-2485

On Apr 28, 2016, at 9:06 AM, Bob Grey renaissanceiii@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, when drained water was not green and level of coolant was not low. Onan not used during crossing about 10 hours heeled on starboard tack.  Agree normally water in oil would be head gasket, ran Onan for 4 hours after second oil change, oil clean and no trace of milkiness.


I estimate 1+ liters water, nothing since.

I'm scratching my head. Only thing for sure is Onan hull exhaust and cooling water ports would have been under water during crossing.

Bob


Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, April 28, 2016, 20:42, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bob,

I think that for water to be in the oil from the exhaust, it would have to be pushed past the pistons and rings. This is unlikely because if seawater enters through the exhaust system, it will usually bend or break piston connecting rods.

If your coolant level decreased at the same time, it is most certainly a blown head gasket or cracked head. Did the coolant level decrease? Can you estimate the total increase in volume of the oil including the water?

The most likely cause is a blown head gasket, or some other breach in the coolant pathway. I think that you should get an Onan mechanic on the boat. If you are still under Amel warranty contact SAV.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Hi Joël,

The fans on Eleuthera (SM 007) are activated by the engine start battery.

They are 24 V fans supplied with 12 V power.  At 27 yo, she still has her original fans… without the dust deposits which were removed.

:-)

Cheers,


Jean-Pierre Germain,
SY Eleuthera, Amel Super Maramu 007



On 28 Apr 2016, at 15:35, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for this information Alexandre. Hmmmmm. Back in the mid 1990’s, I had a SM 53 demonstrator that I could have sworn today that the blower ran off the 24 volt alternator. I am far from salt water today but when I get back to Fort Lauderdale next week I will check out an early/pre Millennium boat as well as a 2003 boat and see what is what. Anyone with a pre 1999 Super Maramu reading this, does your fan come on when you energize the start circuit or only after the engine starts and the alternator is turning? Perhaps this evolved over the years like many other things.
 
Joel
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
 
 
Good morning Joel,

Thanks for your reply, actually this is from the 12 Volt alternateur it runs off.

My question is why the 24 volt Fans are connected to a 12 Volt circuit?
The manual says “both 24 V devices work intentionally on 12 V deliver by the main engine alternator” but does not explain why.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_15.jpg

To make sure it was the fan being defective, I started the Volvo and measured 13 volt (on the wires going to the fan).
Later I also connected directly on 24 volt and it did not work. Will get replacement once I am in Puerto Rico in 2 or 3 weeks.

Removing it, yesterday I was the manufacturer date (1999) so quite impressed it last 16 years…
I remember changing the intake one 3 years ago

Thanks again!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 4/27/16, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 7:01 PM


 









The engine room fan that operates when the
propulsion diesel is running runs off the 24 volt
alternator. Fire up your Yanmar and check the voltage then.
It has been my experience that the 24 volt DC extractor
fails well before the 220 volt extractor that is run from
the Onan when it is producing 220 volts. Non scientific
opinion but pretty much proven by my
experiences.
Hope your
extractor fan fires up on 24 volts!

Joel THE EXPERIENCED AMEL
GUY954-812-2485
On Apr 27,
2016, at 2:50 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Update:



Looking at the owner manual, I just saw the engine, in
addition to the intake fan, has also an extraction fan FASCO
24 Volt 2807-513-122 --- 93004-2815

http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans.html



Engine on, I noted it was not working and likely the cause
of the warmer engine room.



With a Volt Meter I checked current was going to it and it
did: measured 13 Volt.

It seems normal as the owner manual says so…



Does someone know why this “24 Volt” FASCO 2807-513-122
--- 93004-2815 is connected to a 12 volt connection?



Olivier?

Joel?

Bill? Anyone?



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican
Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/27/16, Alexandre Uster von Baar <uster@...>
wrote:



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and
cooling

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 10:54 AM





Good morning,



May be I am a control freak, but when using the engine
or

genset I monitor the temperature of the engine
compartment

via a wireless temperature sensor. 



I rarely use the engine for more than an hour at the
time

(mostly to leave and come back to a marina), but in a
few

occasions had to motor for 10 or more hours.

The temperature in the engine room, will gradually
increase;

when it reaches 47*C I open the engine hatch (sea
condition

permitting obviously) for 1/2 hour to cool it down to
45*C

and so on. 

“My” reason to do this is because of component from
the

generator melting at 50*C. 



Note:  the “suction” (intake) 24 Volt Jabsco

35440-0010 250 CFM Blower Fan is working (starts when
engine

is ON). 



Is there may be an air intake our outtake that could be

partially blocked? 

Is there another fan I am forgetting about? 





Other note: when using the Generator, it rarely goes
over

46*C after 2.5 hour use (its fan is also working).



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican

Republic
























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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

Stephen Davis
 

My 1992 SM has 24v fans which run off the 12v circuit. I thought it odd when I first figured this out, but have been told this is how Amel designed the system. 

Steve
Aloha SM72
Martinique

On Apr 28, 2016, at 09:35, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for this information Alexandre. Hmmmmm. Back in the mid 1990’s, I had a SM 53 demonstrator that I could have sworn today that the blower ran off the 24 volt alternator. I am far from salt water today but when I get back to Fort Lauderdale next week I will check out an early/pre Millennium boat as well as a 2003 boat and see what is what. Anyone with a pre 1999 Super Maramu reading this, does your fan come on when you energize the start circuit or only after the engine starts and the alternator is turning? Perhaps this evolved over the years like many other things.

 

Joel

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

 

 

Good morning Joel,

Thanks for your reply, actually this is from the 12 Volt alternateur it runs off.

My question is why the 24 volt Fans are connected to a 12 Volt circuit?
The manual says “both 24 V devices work intentionally on 12 V deliver by the main engine alternator” but does not explain why.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_15.jpg

To make sure it was the fan being defective, I started the Volvo and measured 13 volt (on the wires going to the fan).
Later I also connected directly on 24 volt and it did not work. Will get replacement once I am in Puerto Rico in 2 or 3 weeks.

Removing it, yesterday I was the manufacturer date (1999) so quite impressed it last 16 years…
I remember changing the intake one 3 years ago

Thanks again!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 4/27/16, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 7:01 PM


 









The engine room fan that operates when the
propulsion diesel is running runs off the 24 volt
alternator. Fire up your Yanmar and check the voltage then.
It has been my experience that the 24 volt DC extractor
fails well before the 220 volt extractor that is run from
the Onan when it is producing 220 volts. Non scientific
opinion but pretty much proven by my
experiences.
Hope your
extractor fan fires up on 24 volts!

Joel THE EXPERIENCED AMEL
GUY954-812-2485
On Apr 27,
2016, at 2:50 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Update:



Looking at the owner manual, I just saw the engine, in
addition to the intake fan, has also an extraction fan FASCO
24 Volt 2807-513-122 --- 93004-2815

http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans.html



Engine on, I noted it was not working and likely the cause
of the warmer engine room.



With a Volt Meter I checked current was going to it and it
did: measured 13 Volt.

It seems normal as the owner manual says so…



Does someone know why this “24 Volt” FASCO 2807-513-122
--- 93004-2815 is connected to a 12 volt connection?



Olivier?

Joel?

Bill? Anyone?



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican
Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/27/16, Alexandre Uster von Baar <uster@...>
wrote:



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and
cooling

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 10:54 AM





Good morning,



May be I am a control freak, but when using the engine
or

genset I monitor the temperature of the engine
compartment

via a wireless temperature sensor. 



I rarely use the engine for more than an hour at the
time

(mostly to leave and come back to a marina), but in a
few

occasions had to motor for 10 or more hours.

The temperature in the engine room, will gradually
increase;

when it reaches 47*C I open the engine hatch (sea
condition

permitting obviously) for 1/2 hour to cool it down to
45*C

and so on. 

“My” reason to do this is because of component from
the

generator melting at 50*C. 



Note:  the “suction” (intake) 24 Volt Jabsco

35440-0010 250 CFM Blower Fan is working (starts when
engine

is ON). 



Is there may be an air intake our outtake that could be

partially blocked? 

Is there another fan I am forgetting about? 





Other note: when using the Generator, it rarely goes
over

46*C after 2.5 hour use (its fan is also working).



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican

Republic
























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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Thank you so much Joel,

Please, no need to go out of your way, I was just curious…

I just turn the key (before cranking/ignition), the intake fan is working (I am assuming the out take would be as well - did not measure the current).

I just look at the wiring (Circuit Electric) looks like the 2 fans are connected to the 12 Volt alternator - just surprised there is current without the alternator running.
Also interesting “intake” fan is on a 10 amp fuse and the “extractor” is on a 16 amp fuse… while they are the same fans.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_16.jpg

Again, I solved the cause of my main question which was the engine room temperature.
I am confident than once I replace the extraction fan, it will remain below 47 or 48*C.

Tanks again for all your precious help.

Sincerely, Alexandre




--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 4/28/16, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, April 28, 2016, 8:35 AM


 









Thanks for this information
Alexandre. Hmmmmm. Back in the mid 1990’s, I had a SM 53
demonstrator that I could have sworn today that the blower
ran off the 24 volt alternator. I am far from salt water
today but when I get back to Fort Lauderdale next week I
will check out an early/pre Millennium boat as well as a
2003 boat and see what is what. Anyone with a pre 1999 Super
Maramu reading this, does your fan come on when you energize
the start circuit or only after the engine starts and the
alternator is turning? Perhaps this evolved over the years
like many other things.  Joel  From: amelyachtowners@...
[mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:07
AM
To:
amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine
room temperature and cooling    Good morning Joel,

Thanks for your reply,
actually this is from the 12 Volt alternateur it runs off.


My question is why the 24
volt Fans are connected to a 12 Volt circuit?
The manual says “both 24 V devices work
intentionally on 12 V deliver by the main engine
alternator” but does not explain why.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_15.jpg

To make sure it was the fan
being defective, I started the Volvo and measured 13 volt
(on the wires going to the fan).
Later I
also connected directly on 24 volt and it did not work. Will
get replacement once I am in Puerto Rico in 2 or 3 weeks.


Removing it, yesterday I
was the manufacturer date (1999) so quite impressed it last
16 years…
I remember changing the intake
one 3 years ago

Thanks
again!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 4/27/16, Joel Potter jfpottercys@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel
Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: "amelyachtowners@..."
<amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 7:01 PM


 









The engine room fan that operates when the
propulsion diesel is running runs off the 24
volt
alternator. Fire up your Yanmar and
check the voltage then.
It has been my
experience that the 24 volt DC extractor
fails well before the 220 volt extractor that
is run from
the Onan when it is producing
220 volts. Non scientific
opinion but pretty
much proven by my
experiences.
Hope your
extractor fan fires
up on 24 volts!

Joel THE
EXPERIENCED AMEL
GUY954-812-2485
On Apr 27,
2016, at 2:50 PM,
Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Update:



Looking at the owner manual, I
just saw the engine, in
addition to the
intake fan, has also an extraction fan FASCO
24 Volt 2807-513-122 --- 93004-2815

http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans.html



Engine on, I noted it was not working and
likely the cause
of the warmer engine room.




With a Volt Meter I checked current was going
to it and it
did: measured 13 Volt.

It seems normal as the owner
manual says so…



Does someone know why this
“24 Volt” FASCO 2807-513-122
---
93004-2815 is connected to a 12 volt connection?



Olivier?

Joel?

Bill?
Anyone?



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto
Bahia, Samana, Dominican
Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/27/16, Alexandre
Uster von Baar <uster@...>
wrote:



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners]
Engine room temperature and
cooling

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Wednesday, April 27,
2016, 10:54 AM





Good morning,



May be I am a
control freak, but when using the engine
or

genset I
monitor the temperature of the engine
compartment

via a wireless temperature sensor. 



I rarely use the engine for more than an hour
at the
time

(mostly to leave and come back to a marina),
but in a
few

occasions had to motor for 10 or more hours.


The temperature in the
engine room, will gradually
increase;

when it reaches 47*C I open
the engine hatch (sea
condition

permitting obviously) for 1/2
hour to cool it down to
45*C

and so on. 

“My” reason to do this is
because of component from
the

generator melting at 50*C. 




Note:  the “suction” (intake) 24 Volt
Jabsco

35440-0010 250 CFM
Blower Fan is working (starts when
engine

is ON). 



Is there may
be an air intake our outtake that could be

partially blocked? 

Is there another fan I am
forgetting about? 





Other note: when using the Generator, it rarely
goes
over

46*C after 2.5 hour use (its fan is also
working).



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto
Bahia, Samana, Dominican

Republic
























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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

amelforme
 

Thanks for this information Alexandre. Hmmmmm. Back in the mid 1990’s, I had a SM 53 demonstrator that I could have sworn today that the blower ran off the 24 volt alternator. I am far from salt water today but when I get back to Fort Lauderdale next week I will check out an early/pre Millennium boat as well as a 2003 boat and see what is what. Anyone with a pre 1999 Super Maramu reading this, does your fan come on when you energize the start circuit or only after the engine starts and the alternator is turning? Perhaps this evolved over the years like many other things.

 

Joel

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 28, 2016 8:07 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling

 

 

Good morning Joel,

Thanks for your reply, actually this is from the 12 Volt alternateur it runs off.

My question is why the 24 volt Fans are connected to a 12 Volt circuit?
The manual says “both 24 V devices work intentionally on 12 V deliver by the main engine alternator” but does not explain why.
http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans/engine_room_fan_15.jpg

To make sure it was the fan being defective, I started the Volvo and measured 13 volt (on the wires going to the fan).
Later I also connected directly on 24 volt and it did not work. Will get replacement once I am in Puerto Rico in 2 or 3 weeks.

Removing it, yesterday I was the manufacturer date (1999) so quite impressed it last 16 years…
I remember changing the intake one 3 years ago

Thanks again!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Wed, 4/27/16, Joel Potter jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and cooling
To: "amelyachtowners@..." <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 7:01 PM


 









The engine room fan that operates when the
propulsion diesel is running runs off the 24 volt
alternator. Fire up your Yanmar and check the voltage then.
It has been my experience that the 24 volt DC extractor
fails well before the 220 volt extractor that is run from
the Onan when it is producing 220 volts. Non scientific
opinion but pretty much proven by my
experiences.
Hope your
extractor fan fires up on 24 volts!

Joel THE EXPERIENCED AMEL
GUY954-812-2485
On Apr 27,
2016, at 2:50 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@...
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
wrote:
















 






Update:



Looking at the owner manual, I just saw the engine, in
addition to the intake fan, has also an extraction fan FASCO
24 Volt 2807-513-122 --- 93004-2815

http://nikimat.com/engine_room_fans.html



Engine on, I noted it was not working and likely the cause
of the warmer engine room.



With a Volt Meter I checked current was going to it and it
did: measured 13 Volt.

It seems normal as the owner manual says so…



Does someone know why this “24 Volt” FASCO 2807-513-122
--- 93004-2815 is connected to a 12 volt connection?



Olivier?

Joel?

Bill? Anyone?



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican
Republic



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/27/16, Alexandre Uster von Baar <uster@...>
wrote:



Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Engine room temperature and
cooling

To: amelyachtowners@...

Date: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 10:54 AM





Good morning,



May be I am a control freak, but when using the engine
or

genset I monitor the temperature of the engine
compartment

via a wireless temperature sensor. 



I rarely use the engine for more than an hour at the
time

(mostly to leave and come back to a marina), but in a
few

occasions had to motor for 10 or more hours.

The temperature in the engine room, will gradually
increase;

when it reaches 47*C I open the engine hatch (sea
condition

permitting obviously) for 1/2 hour to cool it down to
45*C

and so on. 

“My” reason to do this is because of component from
the

generator melting at 50*C. 



Note:  the “suction” (intake) 24 Volt Jabsco

35440-0010 250 CFM Blower Fan is working (starts when
engine

is ON). 



Is there may be an air intake our outtake that could be

partially blocked? 

Is there another fan I am forgetting about? 





Other note: when using the Generator, it rarely goes
over

46*C after 2.5 hour use (its fan is also working).



Sincerely, Alexandre

SM2K #289 NIKIMAT

Private Slip, Marina Puerto Bahia, Samana, Dominican

Republic
























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