Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Refrigeration Compressors - Frigoboat and others using Danfoss

amelforme
 

That’s from the pen of Rob Warren, the owner of Costal  Climate Control. I don’t own shares in his business. He is not my brother in law. He is ‘The Real deal’ and he forgot more about the things he chooses to blog about than most of us will ever know. Seriously, Rob is a soft spoken, modest man who does as he promises and does it right. His recommendations to me and my clients have always been spot on and even his competitors say good things about him. Here’s an example of my experiences with Rob. He was manning a booth at a boat show I had the Amel 55 displaying in. I had a small problem with my Clima air conditioner. He was there in ten minutes and climbed into the engine room and didn’t come out until a few hours later after all was made right. He was absolutely drenched with sweat and looking  worse than fire hosed. It proved to me that he cares more about his customers than anything else. Visit the website www.costalclimatecontrol.com and take a look at Robs advice in the blogs and product representations. He knows of what he speaks. Why this shameless plug? Easy. I like to keep good people happily in business so they can take good care of my clients now and in the future. You will be pleased with everyone who works at Costal Climate Control. Great people all.  

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, May 12, 2016 11:54 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Refrigeration Compressors - Frigoboat and others using Danfoss

 

 

This link will take you to a really great article on Frigoboat compressors. I really liked how plain-spoken and direct the writer is in this informative article.

http://coastalclimatecontrol.com/index.php/blog/167-so-what-makes-you-think-your-compressor-is-bad.html

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Fore / Aft Tuning

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Hi Gary you might think about using a laser. Using one of the halyards pulled tight. Shot up the line to check it. Just a thought. Of course I'd also sort of follow the AMEL setup too. 

Regards
Capt Richard Piller

On May 12, 2016, at 09:03, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Gary, I would not expect the mast step to be level, as there is little chance that any boat , sitting in the water is level, due to the allocation of items stored on the boat. I think what you would want to determine is , that the mast is at a right angle, or 90 degrees relative to the mast step. If you ran a thin line from the center of the mast head (fore to aft) to the center of the mast, at the step, pulling the line very tight .Then take a carpenters framing square with the short side resting on the mast step you could determine if the line is parallel to the square along its vertical leg. The line would also show you if the mast is in column ( straight) . If you could extend the long ( vertical ) leg of the square with a straight edge , such as a six ft. level it would give an even more accurate ,easier to read determination that you have a right angle. If the line is running , lets say 1/16 inch from the end of the square two feet up from mast step you could do the math and determine how far the mast is aft or forward of step.
 
Pat SM#123
 
 
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Thu, May 12, 2016 8:09 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Fore / Aft Tuning

 
Gary,

If the mast step is level fore-and-aft (big if, need to measure with a level) then wouldn't a plumb line from the top of the mast should show verticality/alignment of the mast with the mast step and even highlight any S-bend?

Derick

SM2K #400 Brava
Currently in Sapphire Beach Marina, USVI


Refrigeration Compressors - Frigoboat and others using Danfoss

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

This link will take you to a really great article on Frigoboat compressors. I really liked how plain-spoken and direct the writer is in this informative article.

http://coastalclimatecontrol.com/index.php/blog/167-so-what-makes-you-think-your-compressor-is-bad.html

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Graham,

Good question. I do not know the answer because the Plexiglass supplier I used to cut the pieces chose the paint. He did an exact job predrilling all of the holes which matched up exactly.

I can see a few tiny places where he used too much sealant to secure the foam gasket for the port side opening windshield. Take care with the use of sealant on the gasket. Possibly if you can use your router to cut a slightly smaller slot for the gasket, you will not need to use sealant. My guess is this is how Amel did it. Try with some scraps of plexiglass before you decide.

I believe that the paint us an important part of making this look good. I used gray tinted plexiglass. Through the plexiglass the white paint he used looks gray. Probably should have used black paint, but white looks OK. 

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On May 12, 2016 9:38 AM, "crwggb@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I am replacing the perspex windows on my fixed wind screen. On removal of the old ones it was observed that the edges of the windows were painted to hide the sealant when in position. Can any one tell me what sort of paint was used for this job and how the perspex was treated prior to painting to allow maximum adhesion.


I believe there has been a thread on this subject before but for the life of me I cant find it, perhaps someone has the message number?


Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong


Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

Graham Boyd
 

I am replacing the perspex windows on my fixed wind screen. On removal of the old ones it was observed that the edges of the windows were painted to hide the sealant when in position. Can any one tell me what sort of paint was used for this job and how the perspex was treated prior to painting to allow maximum adhesion.


I believe there has been a thread on this subject before but for the life of me I cant find it, perhaps someone has the message number?


Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong


Re: 24V/230V Inverter

Duane Siegfri
 

Peregrinus,

Thanks for sharing your setup!

Duane


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Fore / Aft Tuning

Patrick McAneny
 

Gary, I would not expect the mast step to be level, as there is little chance that any boat , sitting in the water is level, due to the allocation of items stored on the boat. I think what you would want to determine is , that the mast is at a right angle, or 90 degrees relative to the mast step. If you ran a thin line from the center of the mast head (fore to aft) to the center of the mast, at the step, pulling the line very tight .Then take a carpenters framing square with the short side resting on the mast step you could determine if the line is parallel to the square along its vertical leg. The line would also show you if the mast is in column ( straight) . If you could extend the long ( vertical ) leg of the square with a straight edge , such as a six ft. level it would give an even more accurate ,easier to read determination that you have a right angle. If the line is running , lets say 1/16 inch from the end of the square two feet up from mast step you could do the math and determine how far the mast is aft or forward of step.
 
Pat SM#123
 
 
 
 

-----Original Message-----
From: derickgates@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Thu, May 12, 2016 8:09 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Fore / Aft Tuning

 
Gary,

If the mast step is level fore-and-aft (big if, need to measure with a level) then wouldn't a plumb line from the top of the mast should show verticality/alignment of the mast with the mast step and even highlight any S-bend?

Derick

SM2K #400 Brava
Currently in Sapphire Beach Marina, USVI


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Installation and Rigging Fore / Aft Tuning

Beaute Olivier
 

Good morning Gary,

this topic is probably going to raise a lot of questions, but I like the challenge...

I will start with "How did AMEL install the masts and tune the rigging on Santorins, SMs and 54s?" It has now changed as the masts of the 64 and 55 are rigged with discontinuous side shrouds, and the tension is finally set thanks to an hydraulic mast jack tool system and wedges.

The mast steps are bolted through the deck in metal inserts glassed in. 
They are installed horizontally, this means parallel to the saloon floor, or perpendicular to the main bulkhead (underneath).
"How did AMEL install the masts?":
First of all, the spreaders are attached to the top shrouds as follows:
-bring the shroud along the mast and mark it (with a permanent marker) at the bottom side of the spreader's hex nut. Mark both shrouds the same way at both speaders. At spreader's end, put the eye bolt at the mark.
The intermediate shrouds will be secured at spreader's ends only once the rigging is tuned.

As the main mast is hanging from the top (thanks to a crane), it is set on the mast step, centered thanks to both "hubs". The first shrouds to be secured are the 4 lower shrouds, which is enough to hold the mast in place. The crane is going away.
Then the forestay with genoa furler is installed on its chain-plate, then both top shrouds, then the backstay.
Once the forestay, backstay and top shrouds' turnbuckles are gently tightened by hand, the lower shrouds should be eased a bit, in order not to interfere with the operation of "setting the mast foot flat on its mast step":
-Concerning the top shrouds, this is made by measuring the distance between the top of the lower swage, and the bottom of the clevis pin which secures the shroud into the chain-plate. This distance must be the same on both sides.
-Concerning the forestay and backstay, they are adjusted (by hand) in order there is no gap between the rubber sole and the aluminum mast step (front and aft). If you see no gap from the beginning, and you want to check if it is close to a gap, ease the backstay (two turns) and tighten the forestay (two turns). If you start seeing a gap aft, then ease the forestay again (one turn) and tighten the backstay again (one turn). If there is no gap: GOOD, if there is still a gap aft, then come back to the original position (one turn less on the forestay, one more turn on the backstay).
Now, you can say the mast is "vertical" (in fact, the Santorins, SMs and 54s are never horizontal, back to front, but always with the bow up, which means the mast is leaning slightly aft).
It is vertical but it should also be straight as no strong tension has been put on the shrouds.

Once the mast is vertical, you will start tensioning the shrouds by pairs, checking that the mast is straight after each tensioning, like, for instance:
-two turns on front lower shrouds, two turns on aft lower shrouds, check
-two turns on top shrouds, check
-three turns on forestay, three turns on backstay, check

And so on until the shrouds feel very stiff. In the end, you will tension the front lower shrouds a bit more than the aft ones, in order to initiate a slight curve aft (the middle of the mast being in front of the foot and top) and then only the intermediate shrouds, not too tight.
To confirm the rigging is tight enough, go out sailing, close hauling with 18/20 knots. The mast should keep straight sideways, and not bend forward, the leeward shrouds should not be loose. If the mast bends forward, then tighten the backstay and the front lower shrouds.

If the mast is not "vertical" from the beginning, it will bend front if you  a gap at the front or aft if there is a gap at the aft.

Once the main mast and rigging are set, you can start with the mizzen mast:
-first line it up with the main mast, looking at both from the far aft of the vessel
-then tension the shrouds in order to make a slight curve aft

This is a first description. I probably forgot some details, so... feel free to ask.

Olivier







On Thursday, May 12, 2016 8:58 AM, amelliahona wrote:


 
This is mainly directed to Olivier Beaute as it relates to Amel's initial tuning of the masts angle to the boat in the fore/aft direction.   I am in the process of tweaking the tuning done to my standing rigging when I had professional riggers place the new ACMO rigging about 18 months ago now.  My main mast isn't quite straight fore and aft and in fact has a bit of an "S" curve in it.  I plan on adjusting this.  I can measure the side to side straightness by assuring that the mast-top to toenail distance is the same on each side, However, Olivier, how did Amel know when the mast was vertical relative to the step of the mast on the deck when they originally rigged the boat.  Since the deck fore and aft isn't symmetrical I can't quite conjure up a method for assuring that the masts are vertical to their step plate since it is such a small surface area.  The only thing I can think of is to place a straight edge fore and aft across the step plate molded into the fiberglass then actually measuring the angle to assure it is 90 degrees.  Did Amel have a better way, perhaps a measurement from some point on the bow to the mast-top for the main and something similar for the mizzen?  

Thanks for any input you might have.

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver  (original owner and the guy you patiently tutored both myself and my family when we took ownership in 2001)
s/v Liahona  Amel SM #335
Puerto Del Rey,  Puerto Rico 



Re: Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Fore / Aft Tuning

Derick Gates
 

Gary,

If the mast step is level fore-and-aft (big if, need to measure with a level) then wouldn't a plumb line from the top of the mast should show verticality/alignment of the mast with the mast step and even highlight any S-bend?

Derick

SM2K #400 Brava
Currently in Sapphire Beach Marina, USVI


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Fore / Aft Tuning

James Alton
 

Gary,

   As to taking the measurement of the current mast rake fore/aft, a good way to do this is by using a digital level.  The boat needs to be on her proper waterline and the conditions should be calm.  The spar should also be straight in the fore aft plane to get an accurate reading.  The level that I use measures to 1/10 of a degree. 

   As to the correct rake angle and the proper Amel setup, I don’t have that information but I am sure that there are others here that can help.

Best,

James

On May 12, 2016, at 3:58 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:


This is mainly directed to Olivier Beaute as it relates to Amel's initial tuning of the masts angle to the boat in the fore/aft direction.   I am in the process of tweaking the tuning done to my standing rigging when I had professional riggers place the new ACMO rigging about 18 months ago now.  My main mast isn't quite straight fore and aft and in fact has a bit of an "S" curve in it.  I plan on adjusting this.  I can measure the side to side straightness by assuring that the mast-top to toenail distance is the same on each side, However, Olivier, how did Amel know when the mast was vertical relative to the step of the mast on the deck when they originally rigged the boat.  Since the deck fore and aft isn't symmetrical I can't quite conjure up a method for assuring that the masts are vertical to their step plate since it is such a small surface area.  The only thing I can think of is to place a straigh t edge fore and aft across the step plate molded into the fiberglass then actually measuring the angle to assure it is 90 degrees.  Did Amel have a better way, perhaps a measurement from some point on the bow to the mast-top for the main and something similar for the mizzen?  


Thanks for any input you might have.


Sincerely, 


Gary S. Silver  (original owner and the guy you patiently tutored both myself and my family when we took ownership in 2001)

s/v Liahona  Amel SM #335

Puerto Del Rey,  Puerto Rico 




Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Fore / Aft Tuning

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

This is mainly directed to Olivier Beaute as it relates to Amel's initial tuning of the masts angle to the boat in the fore/aft direction.   I am in the process of tweaking the tuning done to my standing rigging when I had professional riggers place the new ACMO rigging about 18 months ago now.  My main mast isn't quite straight fore and aft and in fact has a bit of an "S" curve in it.  I plan on adjusting this.  I can measure the side to side straightness by assuring that the mast-top to toenail distance is the same on each side, However, Olivier, how did Amel know when the mast was vertical relative to the step of the mast on the deck when they originally rigged the boat.  Since the deck fore and aft isn't symmetrical I can't quite conjure up a method for assuring that the masts are vertical to their step plate since it is such a small surface area.  The only thing I can think of is to place a straight edge fore and aft across the step plate molded into the fiberglass then actually measuring the angle to assure it is 90 degrees.  Did Amel have a better way, perhaps a measurement from some point on the bow to the mast-top for the main and something similar for the mizzen?  


Thanks for any input you might have.


Sincerely, 


Gary S. Silver  (original owner and the guy you patiently tutored both myself and my family when we took ownership in 2001)

s/v Liahona  Amel SM #335

Puerto Del Rey,  Puerto Rico 


Re: Lalizas navigation lights

Alan Leslie
 

OK....solved....
There's a tiny phillips head screw on the outside at the bottom, you;d never see it unless you hang right over the rail.
Undo this screw and the cover lifts off
Cheers
Alan'
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Problem changing transmission oil on Santorin 1991

yahoogroups@...
 


Fabio,

I got the photos. 

You have disconnected the small hose fitting on top of the C Drive that goes to the expansion tank. You are attempting to fill the C Drive through an oil pathway that normally flows out of the C Drive for heat expansion.

I am sure that you have an early model C Drive, but I think your problem may be in how you are filling it.

The way I fill the C Drive is I pour oil into the expansion tank. The oil drains out of the expansion tank through the large hose connected at the bottom of the expansion tank and to the side of the C Drive.

Is there some reason that you are filling it this way?

CW Bill Rouse, Admiral (Hon) Texas Navy
Yacht BeBe
+1758-384-8606 SE Caribbean
+1832-380-4970 Global VoiceMail


Re: Problem changing transmission oil on Santorin 1991

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Fabio,

I got the photos. 

You have disconnected the small hose fitting on top of the C Drive that goes to the expansion tank. You are attempting to fill the C Drive through an oil pathway that normally flows out of the C Drive for heat expansion.

I am sure that you have an early model C Drive, but I think your problem may be in how you are filling it.

The way I fill the C Drive is I pour oil into the expansion tank. The oil drains out of the expansion tank through the large hose connected at the bottom of the expansion tank and to the side of the C Drive.

Is there some reason that you are filling it this way?

CW Bill Rouse, Admiral (Hon) Texas Navy
Yacht BeBe

+1758-384-8606 SE Caribbean
+1832-380-4970 Global VoiceMail

On May 11, 2016, at 13:13, Fabio Cavalieri <mas1766@...> wrote:

> Hi Bill and thank you for your prompt reply to my post.
>
> What I intend as thebcube is the following:
>
>
>
> The expansion tank is the following:
>
>
>
> The oil is not going down from the transmission cube to the propeller foot...
>
> I don't understand why, the only thinking now is that in 2011 the transmission have been disassembled and the conical gasket between the cube and the lower part has been substituted with a special big oring as web couldn't find the original one at that time.... The mechanic the made the job at that time told me today that this cannot cause and oil blockage and also the transmission properly worked for 5 years...I hope he is right!
>
> Not I was thinking to try putting the oil with a pressure pump from the lower hole, the one used to discharge the oil, in order to see if the oil is going up till the cube transmission...
>
> What do you think?
>
> Thanks and regards.
> Fabio
>
> Inviato da iPhone
>
>> Il giorno 09 mag 2016, alle ore 19:42, Bill & Judy Rouse <svbebe@...> ha scritto:
>>
>> Fabio,
>>
>> Do not listen to a mechanic who does not know Amel.
>>
>> First, I would look for something blocking the oil flow in the expansion tank (you refer to it as cube) and the line from the tank to the C Drive, including the fitting on top of the C Drive.
>>
>> Blockage will prevent oil from entering and will also slow oil when draining.
>>
>> I hope this helps you.
>>
>> CW Bill Rouse, Admiral (Hon) Texas Navy
>> Yacht BeBe
>>
>> +1758-384-8606 SE Caribbean
>> +1832-380-4970 Global VoiceMail


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Problem changing transmission oil on Santorin 1991

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Hello Fabio,

Attaching pictures like that won't work...
We are not able to see them...
Either put a link to a web site, blog, etc. or may be use the Yahoo forum to post them...
Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 5/11/16, Fabio Cavalieri mas1766@yahoo.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Problem changing transmission oil on Santorin 1991
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Cc: "stilemare@yahoo.it" <stilemare@yahoo.it>
Date: Wednesday, May 11, 2016, 12:23 PM


 









Good evening everybody and thank you for
your replies.
What I intend
as the cube (in aluminum) is the following:


The expansion tank is the following:


The oil is not going down from the transmission
cube to the propeller foot...

I don't understand why, the only thinking
now is that in 2011 the transmission have been disassembled
and the conical gasket between the cube and the lower part
has been substituted with a big oring as we couldn't
find the original one at that time.... The mechanic the made
the job at that time told me today that this cannot cause
and oil blockage and also the transmission properly worked
for 5 years...I hope he is right!

Now I was thinking to try putting the oil with
a pressure pump from the lower hole, the one used to
discharge the oil, in order to see if the oil is going up
till the cube transmission and verify that there isn't
any obstruction.
I also didn't tried
with a warm oil as suggested by Olivier and shall
try....
P.s. I could not verify
the exact quantity of oil drained from the transmission as
someone in the shipyard thrown it away before I
could measure it.
Suggestions are always welcome.

Thanks and regards.
Fabio

Inviato da iPhone
Il giorno 09 mag 2016, alle ore 20:22, Beaute
Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@yahoo.com
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
ha scritto:
















 






Good
evening Fabio,
first
question: do you know how much oil you drained from the
transmission?The
first Santorins, maybe up to n°40, had the first type of
transmission, with aluminum housing. Could you post a
picture of the upper part of the
transmission?This
transmission holds probably less than 8 liters. However,
filling the transmission with warm oil and moving the
propeller by hand while filling will help you. (And...be
patient...)How
do you warm up the oil? Put it in black jerrycans in the
sunlight.
Your
old mechanic is right: don't fill up the reservoir, but
only up to the first third. The oil needs to
expand.The
oil will never get warmer than 70°C because the lower part
in constantly cooled with seawater. So no problem with the
temperature.
Bon
courage.
Olivier



On Monday, May 9,
2016 7:19 PM, "Fabio Cavalieri mas1766@yahoo.com
[amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:



 









Hello
everybody,
I'm
in troubles as I drained the oil from the transmission to
change it and I'm not able anymore to fill the
trasmission with the 8 kgs 15W 40 diesel oil as
prescribed.I
started to put the oil and after approx. 3,5kgs the oil
didn't go down. Trasmission cube is full of oil but do
not go down...I tried to take out again the drainage nut on
the keel nearby the propeller thinking about a possible air
bubble but the oil was caming out in very small quantity and
very slowly.Is
there some trick
I do
not know?
And
also, an old experienced mechanics told me that is a mistake
to keep oil in the plastic
in
place
in
the upper reservoir
above the transmission
should
not contain oil
but
should
only
serve as an expansion
vessel for
collecting
the
excess oil which
heats
up and
expands
might
make
working
pressure
causing
the
transmission in high
and harmful
temperatures.
Thanks
in advance for your suggestions.
Fabios/y
Italica - Santorin #28 1991



































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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Problem changing transmission oil on Santorin 1991

MAS
 

Good evening everybody and thank you for your replies.

What I intend as the cube (in aluminum) is the following:


The expansion tank is the following:


The oil is not going down from the transmission cube to the propeller foot...

I don't understand why, the only thinking now is that in 2011 the transmission have been disassembled and the conical gasket between the cube and the lower part has been substituted with a big oring as we couldn't find the original one at that time.... The mechanic the made the job at that time told me today that this cannot cause and oil blockage and also the transmission properly worked for 5 years...I hope he is right!

Now I was thinking to try putting the oil with a pressure pump from the lower hole, the one used to discharge the oil, in order to see if the oil is going up till the cube transmission and verify that there isn't any obstruction.

I also didn't tried with a warm oil as suggested by Olivier and shall try....

P.s. I could not verify the exact quantity of oil drained from the transmission as someone in the shipyard thrown it away before I could measure it.

Suggestions are always welcome.

Thanks and regards.
Fabio

Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 09 mag 2016, alle ore 20:22, Beaute Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> ha scritto:

 

Good evening Fabio,

first question: do you know how much oil you drained from the transmission?
The first Santorins, maybe up to n°40, had the first type of transmission, with aluminum housing. Could you post a picture of the upper part of the transmission?
This transmission holds probably less than 8 liters. However, filling the transmission with warm oil and moving the propeller by hand while filling will help you. (And...be patient...)
How do you warm up the oil? Put it in black jerrycans in the sunlight.

Your old mechanic is right: don't fill up the reservoir, but only up to the first third. The oil needs to expand.
The oil will never get warmer than 70°C because the lower part in constantly cooled with seawater. So no problem with the temperature.

Bon courage.

Olivier


On Monday, May 9, 2016 7:19 PM, "Fabio Cavalieri mas1766@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 
Hello everybody,

I'm in troubles as I drained the oil from the transmission to change it and I'm not able anymore to fill the trasmission with the 8 kgs 15W 40 diesel oil as prescribed.
I started to put the oil and after approx. 3,5kgs the oil didn't go down. Trasmission cube is full of oil but do not go down...I tried to take out again the drainage nut on the keel nearby the propeller thinking about a possible air bubble but the oil was caming out in very small quantity and very slowly.
Is there some trick I do not know?

And also, an old experienced mechanics told me that is a mistake to keep oil in the plastic in place in the upper reservoir above the transmission should not contain oil but should only serve as an expansion vessel for collecting the excess oil which heats up and expands might make working pressure causing the transmission in high and harmful temperatures.

Thanks in advance for your suggestions.

Fabio
s/y Italica - Santorin #28 1991



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Morning Dove

amelforme
 

Hi again Dave and Merry. That ain’t the half of it! I sold Independence again for Howard and Mary Chamberlain to Dr. Tom Hacket in New Hampshire. Sold it for him to Dr. Jeff and Phyllis Rapp. They got unexpectedly pregnant while cruising so I sold it to Doug and Faye Garneau in Bonaire where I contracted dengue fever, and, unrelated to anything here, got served with divorce papers on my return home. I was involved in the sale from the Garneau’s but my memory clouds up at that point. The Rapp’s had a fine son, and promised they would cruise again. Once young Rapp was delivered to college, off they went in a SM 53 I found them that I had built for the original owner. I could go on and on but suffice it to say that each and every one of the folks I was involved with on this  boat were all characters of the first degree and unusually interesting folks. Looks like the tradition continues. Making money is important. So are lasting treasured memories of being a small part of all these sailors quest to go cruising. I’m self employed so the fringe bennies are slight but the rewards are awesome.

 

Enjoy Air Ops. One hell of a boat with a thousand stories surrounding her.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2016 2:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Morning Dove

 

 

Joel,

 

I flew jets (A-4 and A-7, which reveals my vintage) off aircraft carriers for most of my career in the Navy, and was Air Operations Officer on the USS Kitty Hawk toward the end.  When we were trying to decide on a new name for the boat, Merry suggested Air Ops, which was the short version for that Navy position.  After all, she said, sailing is an Air Operation.  Who was I to say no?

 

There’s another connection between you and Air Ops.  Her second owner was Jeffrey Rapp, who moved up to the SM Antares. 

 

Dave

s/v Air Ops

Amel Maramu #104

Sea of Cortez, Mexico

 

On May 7, 2016, at 10:31 AM, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:



 

That is a nice boat with a great ‘soul’. I have a few thousand miles aboard and every one was a pleasure. Are you a military or commercial aviator?

 

After I sold INDEPENDENCE, the Chamberlains bought a brand new Amel MANGO 52/53 ( dependent on which brochure you read!) which got destroyed in a hurricane in Guadaloupe FWI. They actually figured out that they preferred the Maramu for the two of them, which was their normal compliment, so I sold them the one from Wisconsin which I shipped down and recommissioned in Fort Lauderdale. It was in my backyard on my dock when they fell in love with it.

 

Good luck with Air Ops!

 

All The Best, Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2016 1:07 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Morning Dove

 

 

Hi Joel,

 

Yes, the loss of Morning Dove is very sad, but of course we’re glad that the entire crew was safely rescued.  We met Bruce and saw Morning Dove last spring in Puerto Escondido, Baja California Sur.  She was a beautiful boat.

 

Also, you have found the current owners of the Maramu formerly named Independence, Maramu #104. My wife and I are the fifth owners, having bought the boat in 2000. She had gone through two name changes since the Chamberlains owned her (Jezebel, then Doing It) , and we changed it again to her great delight. She is now named Air Ops, and is in great shape.  Since 2007 we have kept her in Mexican waters, home-porting her in Puerto Escondido and sailing her about ½ each year in the Sea of Cortez and down the Mexican Pacific coast.

 

Dave and Merry Wallace

s/v Air Ops

Amel Maramu #104

Sea of Cortez, Mexico

 

On May 7, 2016, at 4:35 AM, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:




 

Mr. Alton, the information on MORNING DOVE was forwarded to me by Bill Kinney, a customer and now friend who recently purchased a Super Maramu 53 called HARMONIE from me. Bill on Bebe had nothing to do with this sequence. I sold MORNING DOVE to the original owner who kept the boat in Door County Wisconsin on Lake Michigan. I later sold it to Howard and Mary Chamberlain who renamed it MORNING DOVE. Coincidentally, the Chamberlains previously owned the first Maramu sold to Americans in 1982. That boat was called Independence and I sold it several times but have lost track of it. Anyone out there own a 1982 Maramu that was previously called Independence? I should have connected the name with the Amel Maramu, but I have also sold a 53 Amel called MORNING DOVE.

Howard and Mary sold the MORNING DOVE to the current owner, I believe, who had the misfortune of losing her recently. Glad nobody was hurt. Sad end to a great boat.

 

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

-----Original Message-----
From: James Alton [mailto:Lokiyawl2@...] 
Sent: Saturday, May 07, 2016 6:44 AM
To: Joel Potter <jfpottercys@...>; Bill & Judy Rouse <svbebe@...>
Subject: Morning Dove

 

Bill and Joel,

 

   It appears that there may be some confusion.  I believe that SV Morning Dove is a Maramu 46,  not a SM.   Do search on You Tube,  Bruce has a number of videos of his travels on Morning Dove.  He was also last reported in the Marquesas.   Very sad.

 

James=

 

 

 

 


Amel leg drive maintenance

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Guys 'n Gals,


I have just changed the oil on my leg drive. In doing so I compared the notes I had made in 2002 while watching the Amel engineer in La Rochelle show me for the first time  against  Amel's own notes. In the Amel notes , item 2, they show the key being removed from the prop shaft using pliers or a chisel.


I was surprised to see this, as both instruments can put a dent or a nick  in the stainless key.


The Amel engineer used a simpler solution--with a rubber hammer he tapped the key on the forward end, then on the aft end, and did this about 20 times, each time just a sharp tap.  ( I also give it a squirt of WD40)The effect is to gently rock the key , loosening it so that you can pick it out with your fingers.  No damage.


Ian and Judy,  Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece


Re: 24V/230V Inverter

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

Duane,


Since I'm not an electrician... here's what I can tell you about how ours works:


(1) We normally have the inverter "off" and only turn in "on" while devices are being used.  We normally have the inverter "off" if there is shore power or genset available.  Having said that, the inverter can be left on as you plug shore power or run the Onan or both.


(2) The "mw" and "outlets" breakers automatically receive shore, genset, or inverter A/C as available.  No need for user intervention.


(3) The green A/C 230V light on ours only comes on when there is A/C from shore or from genset.  The inverter has no effect on this light.


(4)  At a glance you can know where is A/C coming from or if there is no A/C.  We installed the inverter LCD/switch panel a few centimetres below the Onan start/stop switch, and it lights up quite visibly in  greenish-yellow anytime the Xantrex is on.  So,

(4.1) if shore power: green light on 230V panel; 

(4.2) if generator: orange light on Onan switch plus green on 230V panel; 

(4.3) if inverter, Xantrex greenish-yellow

All these lights more or less vertically in the port/aft of the main cabin.  

All three lights can be on at the same time, if this is the case!



As to the installation itself:


(A) We would have loved to run separate outlets as in Bill's (No. 387), but did not.


(B) On #350, the vertical copper bus bars behind the 230V A/C panel had to be split (sawed off) at the bottom; i.e., "mw" and "outlets" are discontinuous respect to the other breakers.  The inverter only supplies power to the "mw" and "outlets" breakers.


(C) We installed an RCD device on the shore power feed before it gets to the inverter.  


(D) We installed another RCD device on the load side of the inverter.


(E) There is a little trick in our installation that we used in the U.S. and Canada to power our 50Hz devices while plugged on 60Hz shorepower:  turn off the 32A white breaker located on the side of the 230V panel.  In this case, 60 Hz shore power ceases to reach the outlets/mw and only clean 50Hz power from the inverter can reach “mw” and “outlets”.  Could one mess this up?  Sure.  But in our 1.5 years in the US/Canada, with this system, we did not kill any 50Hz devices.


(F) You can leave the Xantrex ON while the genset is running; however, eventually the Xantrex will overheat and shut down.  You can turn the Xantrex ON immediately after turning off a hot genset and leave it ON indefinitely; no problem.  You can leave the Xantrex ON indefinitely as you motor; no problem.


Cheerio,



Peregrinus

SM2K No. 350

At anchor, Port-Cros (Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur)



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins Prima 60 Dimensions

James Alton
 

John,

   I have had  good luck with the Yanmar engines.  How did the size and weight work out for you?  Did the beds have to be altered much?  Is that a turbocharged engine?

Best,

James

On May 10, 2016, at 11:06 PM, jjjk12s@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


James,

 

I've had Popeye for about 5 years. Last year I removed the Perkins M60 and installed a 75hp Yanmar. 

 

John Maramu #91 1981