Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

James Alton
 

JPG,

   I took a look at some of the photos around Carlo Forte and they are amazing.  Perhaps we can make it there this summer.

  Thanks for the suggestion of a safe in the water location to store the boat,  I will keep that in mind.  Can you recommend a bottom paint that seems effective in Med. waters?  

   Also that is very interesting about the residency permit option.  The 3 month limit is a bit problematic.  Can you tell me if I am in the EU for August and Sept., return to Canada for a month and then return to the EU if I would be granted a fresh 90 day stay?

   Have a safe passage and stay in touch.

James

On May 15, 2016, at 3:34 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Greetings James,


We are headed to Sardinia after a stay in the Egadi islands (Favignana).  We’ll head to the SW of Sardinia and begin at Carlo Forte.. apparently one of the most beautiful spots in the Med.

Regarding the possibility of spending a few seasons here, check the noonsite.com for the latest on EU regs.  Numerous of the liveaboards this winter were Yanks and some had a residency permit issued by Italy… gave them time to cruise.  As a suggestion, if you don’t mind keeping your baot in the water for the winter, Marina di Ragusa in Sicily has the best Med rates and the harbour is very secure.  We wintered there last winter and even in F9 conditions, the waves were a mere flick flock… also the marina receives lots of fresh water from in basin fresh water “fontanas” and the expected barnacles are definitely not there… 

Let me know where your “new to you” is located.  We may see it during our travels.

Cheers,

JPG



On 15 May 2016, at 20:03, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

JPG,


  You have certainly done some amazing flying..and landings!  You must have made some good judgement calls to still be here.   I used to fly sailplanes cross country and sometimes would end up in a pasture instead of at an airport at the end of a flight.  I found that it be pretty interesting to try and judge the ground conditions from the air, but thankfully it always worked out.

  The Maramu is located in Sardinia.   This will be my very first visit to the Med.  One of the primary reasons for wanting to buy a boat in this area was to insure that we had a chance to cruise the Med. since  I don’t feel comfortable with the Red Sea entry option and the other way is a long way out of the way.  

   The general plan is to come back in August to work on the boat and sail for perhaps 1 month this year, likely returning the boat to Sardinia for dry storage.  Then in 2017,  we would plan to work a solid 2+ months on the boat spending a pile of money to get her ready for the trip back to Florida.  Go back home for long enough to haul and secure all of our clients boats, then return in October to move aboard and begin working our way West to Florida.   The exact timing will depend on a lot of things so none of this is carved in stone.  I also have a lot to learn about the best times to cross the Med. going West and then there is the potential that if we are having too much fun that we might even keep the boat there for a third season.  If you have any suggestions feel free to share.

   Looking forward at the wind patterns for your area, it looks like that things should improve in a couple of days.

  Many thanks for the invitation to meet up somewhere or even cross together, that no doubt would have been fun!  I don’t know where you might be headed once you are on the other side, but if you end up in Florida and need anything or would just like to meet let me know.  

Best
On May 15, 2016, at 2:17 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Well done James,  


At one time in my career, I flew Twin Otters on Super Floatation tires.  (The main wheels were shod with DC3 tires inflated to 4 PSI… tubes installed …the hubs were drilled and the tire was held in place with sheet metal screws screwed into the casing… you knew the inflation was correct when the wrinkle in the casing was horizontal below the wheel hub.  The nose tire was installed on a larger nosewheel fork and had a DHC 5 Main gear tire on it… all this extra stuff reduced our cruise speed to 145 KTS)  … but you could land on some 1 foot boulders without too much concern.  We did surveying work in the high Arctic and we normally landed on “eskers” (Wikipedia has a good description) of about 600 feet in length (could not be done shorter with reasonable safety or life expectancy) :-)  Each landing involved a risk assessment discussion between the pilots (only 2 of us accepted the challenge.. we always flew together during these flights) .  WAS FUN!

I assume you will be in Italy as this is where your “in waiting” Maramu is located?

We are still in southern Sicily awaiting Eole’s whims… been worse this year than at anytime in my memory of the Med… beautiful but a PITA to sail in.

If you sail your boat across, give me a heads up… we are crossing this year also.

Cheers,

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera SM 007


On 15 May 2016, at 18:47, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

JPG,


   One of my dreams has been to fly an STOL across the back country of Canada as a group.  Landing on river banks and camping along the way.  There are numerous videos on you tube of others doing this.  I haven’t landed a powered plane short but I have safely put a sailplane into 1/2 of a hang glider field at LMFP that was small enough that a lot of hang glider pilots could get in there. (grin)  There are some really interesting comparisons between soaring and sailing.

  Thanks again for all of your help with my questions about the Amel models.  If all goes well I should be an owner a week from now.

Best,

James
On May 15, 2016, at 4:45 AM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Pretty cool… once landed a Twin Otter across a 200 foot wide runway and managed to only use one half of the width… the wind was blowing a steady 50 knots across the runway.


On the other hand, I used 12000 plus feet of a LONG runway to takeoff with a Boeing 747-400 freighter… you do wonder what this invasive cloth is doing up your back 40… its your underwear being swallowed up!  :-)

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM 007



On 15 May 2016, at 06:30, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I just saw this and know some of you are pilots. I thought you would enjoy this.
Fair Winds
Eric
 





Re: Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

jjjk12s@...
 

I love that area. I have fantastic memories of Ustica and the Aeolian Islands. I wish my Maramu was in Sardinia!

 

As a way to head west I've done the trip twice up the Red Sea as far as UK. Once across the south of Sardinia (I'm pretty sure Spartivento means very windy!) and also up the coast of Italy and France. From Sicily via the Italian coast to Elba then Corsica and then Monaco and westward was easy coast hopping by comparison but we did miss out on Sardinia so have to go back! But the south of France was also a much better cruising area than we expected.

 

John, Popeye, Maramu #91


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Greetings James,

We are headed to Sardinia after a stay in the Egadi islands (Favignana).  We’ll head to the SW of Sardinia and begin at Carlo Forte.. apparently one of the most beautiful spots in the Med.

Regarding the possibility of spending a few seasons here, check the noonsite.com for the latest on EU regs.  Numerous of the liveaboards this winter were Yanks and some had a residency permit issued by Italy… gave them time to cruise.  As a suggestion, if you don’t mind keeping your baot in the water for the winter, Marina di Ragusa in Sicily has the best Med rates and the harbour is very secure.  We wintered there last winter and even in F9 conditions, the waves were a mere flick flock… also the marina receives lots of fresh water from in basin fresh water “fontanas” and the expected barnacles are definitely not there… 

Let me know where your “new to you” is located.  We may see it during our travels.

Cheers,

JPG



On 15 May 2016, at 20:03, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

JPG,


  You have certainly done some amazing flying..and landings!  You must have made some good judgement calls to still be here.   I used to fly sailplanes cross country and sometimes would end up in a pasture instead of at an airport at the end of a flight.  I found that it be pretty interesting to try and judge the ground conditions from the air, but thankfully it always worked out.

  The Maramu is located in Sardinia.   This will be my very first visit to the Med.  One of the primary reasons for wanting to buy a boat in this area was to insure that we had a chance to cruise the Med. since  I don’t feel comfortable with the Red Sea entry option and the other way is a long way out of the way.  

   The general plan is to come back in August to work on the boat and sail for perhaps 1 month this year, likely returning the boat to Sardinia for dry storage.  Then in 2017,  we would plan to work a solid 2+ months on the boat spending a pile of money to get her ready for the trip back to Florida.  Go back home for long enough to haul and secure all of our clients boats, then return in October to move aboard and begin working our way West to Florida.   The exact timing will depend on a lot of things so none of this is carved in stone.  I also have a lot to learn about the best times to cross the Med. going West and then there is the potential that if we are having too much fun that we might even keep the boat there for a third season.  If you have any suggestions feel free to share.

   Looking forward at the wind patterns for your area, it looks like that things should improve in a couple of days.

  Many thanks for the invitation to meet up somewhere or even cross together, that no doubt would have been fun!  I don’t know where you might be headed once you are on the other side, but if you end up in Florida and need anything or would just like to meet let me know.  

Best
On May 15, 2016, at 2:17 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Well done James,  


At one time in my career, I flew Twin Otters on Super Floatation tires.  (The main wheels were shod with DC3 tires inflated to 4 PSI… tubes installed …the hubs were drilled and the tire was held in place with sheet metal screws screwed into the casing… you knew the inflation was correct when the wrinkle in the casing was horizontal below the wheel hub.  The nose tire was installed on a larger nosewheel fork and had a DHC 5 Main gear tire on it… all this extra stuff reduced our cruise speed to 145 KTS)  … but you could land on some 1 foot boulders without too much concern.  We did surveying work in the high Arctic and we normally landed on “eskers” (Wikipedia has a good description) of about 600 feet in length (could not be done shorter with reasonable safety or life expectancy) :-)  Each landing involved a risk assessment discussion between the pilots (only 2 of us accepted the challenge.. we always flew together during these flights) .  WAS FUN!

I assume you will be in Italy as this is where your “in waiting” Maramu is located?

We are still in southern Sicily awaiting Eole’s whims… been worse this year than at anytime in my memory of the Med… beautiful but a PITA to sail in.

If you sail your boat across, give me a heads up… we are crossing this year also.

Cheers,

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera SM 007


On 15 May 2016, at 18:47, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

JPG,


   One of my dreams has been to fly an STOL across the back country of Canada as a group.  Landing on river banks and camping along the way.  There are numerous videos on you tube of others doing this.  I haven’t landed a powered plane short but I have safely put a sailplane into 1/2 of a hang glider field at LMFP that was small enough that a lot of hang glider pilots could get in there. (grin)  There are some really interesting comparisons between soaring and sailing.

  Thanks again for all of your help with my questions about the Amel models.  If all goes well I should be an owner a week from now.

Best,

James
On May 15, 2016, at 4:45 AM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Pretty cool… once landed a Twin Otter across a 200 foot wide runway and managed to only use one half of the width… the wind was blowing a steady 50 knots across the runway.


On the other hand, I used 12000 plus feet of a LONG runway to takeoff with a Boeing 747-400 freighter… you do wonder what this invasive cloth is doing up your back 40… its your underwear being swallowed up!  :-)

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM 007



On 15 May 2016, at 06:30, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I just saw this and know some of you are pilots. I thought you would enjoy this.
Fair Winds
Eric
 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

James Alton
 

JPG,

  You have certainly done some amazing flying..and landings!  You must have made some good judgement calls to still be here.   I used to fly sailplanes cross country and sometimes would end up in a pasture instead of at an airport at the end of a flight.  I found that it be pretty interesting to try and judge the ground conditions from the air, but thankfully it always worked out.

  The Maramu is located in Sardinia.   This will be my very first visit to the Med.  One of the primary reasons for wanting to buy a boat in this area was to insure that we had a chance to cruise the Med. since  I don’t feel comfortable with the Red Sea entry option and the other way is a long way out of the way.  

   The general plan is to come back in August to work on the boat and sail for perhaps 1 month this year, likely returning the boat to Sardinia for dry storage.  Then in 2017,  we would plan to work a solid 2+ months on the boat spending a pile of money to get her ready for the trip back to Florida.  Go back home for long enough to haul and secure all of our clients boats, then return in October to move aboard and begin working our way West to Florida.   The exact timing will depend on a lot of things so none of this is carved in stone.  I also have a lot to learn about the best times to cross the Med. going West and then there is the potential that if we are having too much fun that we might even keep the boat there for a third season.  If you have any suggestions feel free to share.

   Looking forward at the wind patterns for your area, it looks like that things should improve in a couple of days.

  Many thanks for the invitation to meet up somewhere or even cross together, that no doubt would have been fun!  I don’t know where you might be headed once you are on the other side, but if you end up in Florida and need anything or would just like to meet let me know.  

Best

On May 15, 2016, at 2:17 PM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Well done James,  


At one time in my career, I flew Twin Otters on Super Floatation tires.  (The main wheels were shod with DC3 tires inflated to 4 PSI… tubes installed …the hubs were drilled and the tire was held in place with sheet metal screws screwed into the casing… you knew the inflation was correct when the wrinkle in the casing was horizontal below the wheel hub.  The nose tire was installed on a larger nosewheel fork and had a DHC 5 Main gear tire on it… all this extra stuff reduced our cruise speed to 145 KTS)  … but you could land on some 1 foot boulders without too much concern.  We did surveying work in the high Arctic and we normally landed on “eskers” (Wikipedia has a good description) of about 600 feet in length (could not be done shorter with reasonable safety or life expectancy) :-)  Each landing involved a risk assessment discussion between the pilots (only 2 of us accepted the challenge.. we always flew together during these flights) .  WAS FUN!

I assume you will be in Italy as this is where your “in waiting” Maramu is located?

We are still in southern Sicily awaiting Eole’s whims… been worse this year than at anytime in my memory of the Med… beautiful but a PITA to sail in.

If you sail your boat across, give me a heads up… we are crossing this year also.

Cheers,

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera SM 007


On 15 May 2016, at 18:47, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

JPG,


   One of my dreams has been to fly an STOL across the back country of Canada as a group.  Landing on river banks and camping along the way.  There are numerous videos on you tube of others doing this.  I haven’t landed a powered plane short but I have safely put a sailplane into 1/2 of a hang glider field at LMFP that was small enough that a lot of hang glider pilots could get in there. (grin)  There are some really interesting comparisons between soaring and sailing.

  Thanks again for all of your help with my questions about the Amel models.  If all goes well I should be an owner a week from now.

Best,

James
On May 15, 2016, at 4:45 AM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Pretty cool… once landed a Twin Otter across a 200 foot wide runway and managed to only use one half of the width… the wind was blowing a steady 50 knots across the runway.


On the other hand, I used 12000 plus feet of a LONG runway to takeoff with a Boeing 747-400 freighter… you do wonder what this invasive cloth is doing up your back 40… its your underwear being swallowed up!  :-)

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM 007



On 15 May 2016, at 06:30, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I just saw this and know some of you are pilots. I thought you would enjoy this.
Fair Winds
Eric
 



Posted by: James Alton <Lokiyawl2@...> 
Reply via web postReply to sender Reply to group Start a New TopicMessages in this topic (3)

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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Well done James,  

At one time in my career, I flew Twin Otters on Super Floatation tires.  (The main wheels were shod with DC3 tires inflated to 4 PSI… tubes installed …the hubs were drilled and the tire was held in place with sheet metal screws screwed into the casing… you knew the inflation was correct when the wrinkle in the casing was horizontal below the wheel hub.  The nose tire was installed on a larger nosewheel fork and had a DHC 5 Main gear tire on it… all this extra stuff reduced our cruise speed to 145 KTS)  … but you could land on some 1 foot boulders without too much concern.  We did surveying work in the high Arctic and we normally landed on “eskers” (Wikipedia has a good description) of about 600 feet in length (could not be done shorter with reasonable safety or life expectancy) :-)  Each landing involved a risk assessment discussion between the pilots (only 2 of us accepted the challenge.. we always flew together during these flights) .  WAS FUN!

I assume you will be in Italy as this is where your “in waiting” Maramu is located?

We are still in southern Sicily awaiting Eole’s whims… been worse this year than at anytime in my memory of the Med… beautiful but a PITA to sail in.

If you sail your boat across, give me a heads up… we are crossing this year also.

Cheers,

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera SM 007


On 15 May 2016, at 18:47, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

JPG,


   One of my dreams has been to fly an STOL across the back country of Canada as a group.  Landing on river banks and camping along the way.  There are numerous videos on you tube of others doing this.  I haven’t landed a powered plane short but I have safely put a sailplane into 1/2 of a hang glider field at LMFP that was small enough that a lot of hang glider pilots could get in there. (grin)  There are some really interesting comparisons between soaring and sailing.

  Thanks again for all of your help with my questions about the Amel models.  If all goes well I should be an owner a week from now.

Best,

James
On May 15, 2016, at 4:45 AM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Pretty cool… once landed a Twin Otter across a 200 foot wide runway and managed to only use one half of the width… the wind was blowing a steady 50 knots across the runway.


On the other hand, I used 12000 plus feet of a LONG runway to takeoff with a Boeing 747-400 freighter… you do wonder what this invasive cloth is doing up your back 40… its your underwear being swallowed up!  :-)

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM 007



On 15 May 2016, at 06:30, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I just saw this and know some of you are pilots. I thought you would enjoy this.
Fair Winds
Eric
 



Posted by: James Alton <Lokiyawl2@...>
Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic Messages in this topic (3)

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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

James Alton
 

JPG,

   One of my dreams has been to fly an STOL across the back country of Canada as a group.  Landing on river banks and camping along the way.  There are numerous videos on you tube of others doing this.  I haven’t landed a powered plane short but I have safely put a sailplane into 1/2 of a hang glider field at LMFP that was small enough that a lot of hang glider pilots could get in there. (grin)  There are some really interesting comparisons between soaring and sailing.

  Thanks again for all of your help with my questions about the Amel models.  If all goes well I should be an owner a week from now.

Best,

James

On May 15, 2016, at 4:45 AM, Germain Jean-Pierre jgermain@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Pretty cool… once landed a Twin Otter across a 200 foot wide runway and managed to only use one half of the width… the wind was blowing a steady 50 knots across the runway.


On the other hand, I used 12000 plus feet of a LONG runway to takeoff with a Boeing 747-400 freighter… you do wonder what this invasive cloth is doing up your back 40… its your underwear being swallowed up!  :-)

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM 007



On 15 May 2016, at 06:30, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I just saw this and know some of you are pilots. I thought you would enjoy this.
Fair Winds
Eric
 


Jean-Pierre Germain,
SY Eleuthera, Amel Super Maramu 007
Porto Turistico Marina di Ragusa, Pontoon M15,
97100 Ragusa, Sicily, Italy
+44 7551 211 511
jp.germain@...




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Pretty cool… once landed a Twin Otter across a 200 foot wide runway and managed to only use one half of the width… the wind was blowing a steady 50 knots across the runway.

On the other hand, I used 12000 plus feet of a LONG runway to takeoff with a Boeing 747-400 freighter… you do wonder what this invasive cloth is doing up your back 40… its your underwear being swallowed up!  :-)

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM 007



On 15 May 2016, at 06:30, sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I just saw this and know some of you are pilots. I thought you would enjoy this.
Fair Winds
Eric
 


Jean-Pierre Germain,
SY Eleuthera, Amel Super Maramu 007
Porto Turistico Marina di Ragusa, Pontoon M15,
97100 Ragusa, Sicily, Italy
+44 7551 211 511
jp.germain@...


Nothing to do with sailing--Flying STOL

eric freedman
 

I just saw this and know some of you are pilots. I thought you would enjoy this.

Fair Winds

Eric

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Markings of rigging lengths

Craig Briggs
 


Hi Eric,
Yes, ACMO used to engrave the exact length of each shroud on the swages.  It was in mm so you'd see numbers like 21728 and so on. They stopped doing that some time ago, I think in the early 2000's and now they stamp the production date, as Bill has seen.  It was a little confusing, though, and differed from what would show on your ACMO order form because one was pin-to-pin with the turnbuckle (bottle screw) at its halfway point and the other was the cable itself from pin to end of bolt.  Best bet is to just get the specs from ACMO - they've got all the AMEL models.
Cheers,
Craig

---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

Eric,

Each piece of ACMO rigging that I have seen on many different model Amels is engraved with ACMO's production date near the swage fitting.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On May 13, 2016 9:12 PM, "sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Aren’t the length of each piece of rigging engraved on the swage fitting?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

__


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Markings of rigging lengths

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Eric,

Each piece of ACMO rigging that I have seen on many different model Amels is engraved with ACMO's production date near the swage fitting.

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On May 13, 2016 9:12 PM, "sailormon kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Aren’t the length of each piece of rigging engraved on the swage fitting?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

__


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

Graham Boyd
 

Thank you gentlemen....GELCOAT!! It's obvious now. Just so happens Sula is parked up on the hard at RHKYC with her bow more or less poking into the fibre glass work shop!

Graham
SM140 Sula
Hong Kong


Markings of rigging lengths

eric freedman
 

Aren’t the length of each piece of rigging engraved on the swage fitting?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

__


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Installation and Rigging Fore / Aft Tuning

Duane Siegfri
 

Gary,

Thanks in advance for the rig tuning pdf.  I'm looking forward to it!

Duane
Wanderer SM477


Re: toilet base forward head

Gary Wells
 

Just finished the same project on Adagio. Three out of four bolts snapped on FWD head and one out of four snapped on the AFT.
Had successful outcome drilling out 4 of them (gradually increasing bit size until the shred of old bolt came loose)./I chose not to try a bolt extractor because of how much force was used to snap the heads off).
On the last one I snapped the drill bit off inside the bolt. After that, I snapped a Dremel bit off trying to get the drill bit. out ...
It took patience, but I finally got all that stuff out (Dremel's rock if you are just patient ... and wear hearing protection) and chased the threads with the same sized tap.
I used copious amounts of Lanacote on the new bolts to help fend off the corrosion that was bound to occur in this location so I'm hoping that the next time I have to do this it'll be a little less of a project :)

Gary W.
Adagio, SM 209
Bermuda, ARC Europe.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

James Alton
 

Joel,
  I wanted to let you know that there is also a non air inhibited gel coat that cures hard and even shiny without any additives or PVA needed.  I have used it for boat repairs and also on sailplanes.  It isgreat for bilges and lockers etc. It can be tinted with regular polyester tints or the factory will mix even small quanities to a chip.  There is only one source that I know of, it is Simtec Coatings in Noroco Ca.  I can provide the contact information if anyone wants it. The product blends beautifully when feathered.  The UV resistance is less than moulded factory gel coat unfortunately.  Best. James


Sent from Samsung Mobile



-------- Original message --------
From: "'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 05-13-2016 10:36 AM (GMT-04:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu Dodger window replacement


 

Or use gel coat with surfactant wax already in, then you don’t need to cover the curing  gel coat with PVC spray. The guy at the gel coat store will know what you want if you just tell him you want wax in and not waxless. That’s how they taught me at Amel school!

 

Thanks for remembering, Craig. I forgot…

 

Joel

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2016 8:52 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

 

 

Graham and all,

Joel gave me this secret a few years back - Amel used gelcoat - same color as dodger. Be sure to use additive so it cures in air. Works like a charm.

Cheers, Craig, SN#68 Sangaris



---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

Graham,

Good question. I do not know the answer because the Plexiglass supplier I used to cut the pieces chose the paint. He did an exact job predrilling all of the holes which matched up exactly.

I can see a few tiny places where he used too much sealant to secure the foam gasket for the port side opening windshield. Take care with the use of sealant on the gasket. Possibly if you can use your router to cut a slightly smaller slot for the gasket, you will not need to use sealant. My guess is this is how Amel did it. Try with some scraps of plexiglass before you decide.

I believe that the paint us an important part of making this look good. I used gray tinted plexiglass. Through the plexiglass the white paint he used looks gray. Probably should have used black paint, but white looks OK. 

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On May 12, 2016 9:38 AM, "crwggb@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am replacing the perspex windows on my fixed wind screen. On removal of the old ones it was observed that the edges of the windows were painted to hide the sealant when in position. Can any one tell me what sort of paint was used for this job and how the perspex was treated prior to painting to allow maximum adhesion.

 

I believe there has been a thread on this subject before but for the life of me I cant find it, perhaps someone has the message number?

 

Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Installation and Rigging Fore / Aft Tuning

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Olivier:  

Many thanks for your excellent write-up.  It was perfect and exactly answered my questions.  I can't tell you how much I appreciate your willingness to share your knowledge and time to help us all in the Amel community. 

I have searched the forum from stem to stern and collected now 10 pages of standing rigging tuning information from you, Joel and others.  I plan on compiling it all with references and posting it here on the forum as a PDF file so that others can quickly and easily reference the material as it is so very valuable. 

Again, thanks for the clear, concise and timely response to my question.  I think I will add a laser level to my bag of tricks along with a 60 ft tape measure and large scale protractor. 

All the best to you and your family, 

Gary S. SIlver
s/v Liahona
Amel SM #335
Puerto Rico


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

amelforme
 

Or use gel coat with surfactant wax already in, then you don’t need to cover the curing  gel coat with PVC spray. The guy at the gel coat store will know what you want if you just tell him you want wax in and not waxless. That’s how they taught me at Amel school!

 

Thanks for remembering, Craig. I forgot…

 

Joel

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, May 13, 2016 8:52 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

 

 

Graham and all,

Joel gave me this secret a few years back - Amel used gelcoat - same color as dodger. Be sure to use additive so it cures in air. Works like a charm.

Cheers, Craig, SN#68 Sangaris



---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

Graham,

Good question. I do not know the answer because the Plexiglass supplier I used to cut the pieces chose the paint. He did an exact job predrilling all of the holes which matched up exactly.

I can see a few tiny places where he used too much sealant to secure the foam gasket for the port side opening windshield. Take care with the use of sealant on the gasket. Possibly if you can use your router to cut a slightly smaller slot for the gasket, you will not need to use sealant. My guess is this is how Amel did it. Try with some scraps of plexiglass before you decide.

I believe that the paint us an important part of making this look good. I used gray tinted plexiglass. Through the plexiglass the white paint he used looks gray. Probably should have used black paint, but white looks OK. 

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On May 12, 2016 9:38 AM, "crwggb@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am replacing the perspex windows on my fixed wind screen. On removal of the old ones it was observed that the edges of the windows were painted to hide the sealant when in position. Can any one tell me what sort of paint was used for this job and how the perspex was treated prior to painting to allow maximum adhesion.

 

I believe there has been a thread on this subject before but for the life of me I cant find it, perhaps someone has the message number?

 

Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong


Re: Super Maramu Dodger window replacement

Craig Briggs
 

Graham and all,
Joel gave me this secret a few years back - Amel used gelcoat - same color as dodger. Be sure to use additive so it cures in air. Works like a charm.
Cheers, Craig, SN#68 Sangaris


---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

Graham,

Good question. I do not know the answer because the Plexiglass supplier I used to cut the pieces chose the paint. He did an exact job predrilling all of the holes which matched up exactly.

I can see a few tiny places where he used too much sealant to secure the foam gasket for the port side opening windshield. Take care with the use of sealant on the gasket. Possibly if you can use your router to cut a slightly smaller slot for the gasket, you will not need to use sealant. My guess is this is how Amel did it. Try with some scraps of plexiglass before you decide.

I believe that the paint us an important part of making this look good. I used gray tinted plexiglass. Through the plexiglass the white paint he used looks gray. Probably should have used black paint, but white looks OK. 

Bill Rouse
BeBe Amel 53 #387
Sent from my tablet
+1832-380-4970 USA Voice Mail

On May 12, 2016 9:38 AM, "crwggb@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I am replacing the perspex windows on my fixed wind screen. On removal of the old ones it was observed that the edges of the windows were painted to hide the sealant when in position. Can any one tell me what sort of paint was used for this job and how the perspex was treated prior to painting to allow maximum adhesion.


I believe there has been a thread on this subject before but for the life of me I cant find it, perhaps someone has the message number?


Graham Boyd

SM140 Sula

Hong Kong


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Installation and Rigging Fore / Aft Tuning

James Alton
 

Oliver,

   I appreciate the very clear instructions that you provided on how to set up the Amel spars and tune.  Replacement of the standing rigging will be high on the list of priorities for the 1987 Maramu that I am in the process of purchasing.  I would like to make a  comment followed by a few questions about setting up the Amel rigging:

1.  First,  I have never rigged and tuned  a  boat that could be set up as you described  due to the lack of symmetry in the chainplates, the position of the mast step etc.    For the set up you described to work, both the boat, the rig and the rigging itself would need to be very precise. Since this method obviously does work on the Amel the accuracy in the construction must be at a level that I have never seen before... I am in shock…and very happy to read about this!!

2.  In general do the longer shrouds require more tension than the shorter ones to allow for the additional stretch in the longer pc. of wire?  In other words, to keep the spar straight when loaded, would the caps be tighter in proper tune than the lowers?  

3.  Can you provide a rough measurement to describe the desired amount of fore/aft bend per your detailed instructions?   I am guessing that the internal furling systems bow aft some due to sail loads and if too much mast bend is induced that it could cause the system to rub on the inside of the spar at the mid point?   

Thanks,
James

On May 12, 2016, at 11:03 PM, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Olivier, you are the best!  Thanks again and again for all your time and efforts on our behalf!
Kent
SM243
Kristy
En route to Bonaire and points West.


On May 12, 2016, at 8:54 AM, Beaute Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Good morning Gary,

this topic is probably going to raise a lot of questions, but I like the challenge...

I will start with "How did AMEL install the masts and tune the rigging on Santorins, SMs and 54s?" It has now changed as the masts of the 64 and 55 are rigged with discontinuous side shrouds, and the tension is finally set thanks to an hydraulic mast jack tool system and wedges.

The mast steps are bolted through the deck in metal inserts glassed in. 
They are installed horizontally, this means parallel to the saloon floor, or perpendicular to the main bulkhead (underneath).
"How did AMEL install the masts?":
First of all, the spreaders are attached to the top shrouds as follows:
-bring the shroud along the mast and mark it (with a permanent marker) at the bottom side of the spreader's hex nut. Mark both shrouds the same way at both speaders. At spreader's end, put the eye bolt at the mark.
The intermediate shrouds will be secured at spreader's ends only once the rigging is tuned.

As the main mast is hanging from the top (thanks to a crane), it is set on the mast step, centered thanks to both "hubs". The first shrouds to be secured are the 4 lower shrouds, which is enough to hold the mast in place. The crane is going away.
Then the forestay with genoa furler is installed on its chain-plate, then both top shrouds, then the backstay.
Once the forestay, backstay and top shrouds' turnbuckles are gently tightened by hand, the lower shrouds should be eased a bit, in order not to interfere with the operation of "setting the mast foot flat on its mast step":
-Concerning the top shrouds, this is made by measuring the distance between the top of the lower swage, and the bottom of the clevis pin which secures the shroud into the chain-plate. This distance must be the same on both sides.
-Concerning the forestay and backstay, they are adjusted (by hand) in order there is no gap between the rubber sole and the aluminum mast step (front and aft). If you see no gap from the beginning, and you want to check if it is close to a gap, ease the backstay (two turns) and tighten the forestay (two turns). If you start seeing a gap aft, then ease the forestay again (one turn) and tighten the backstay again (one turn). If there is no gap: GOOD, if there is still a gap aft, then come back to the original p osition (one turn less on the forestay, one more turn on the backstay).
Now, you can say the mast is "vertical" (in fact, the Santorins, SMs and 54s are never horizontal, back to front, but always with the bow up, which means the mast is leaning slightly aft).
It is vertical but it should also be straight as no strong tension has been put on the shrouds.

Once the mast is vertical, you will start tensioning the shrouds by pairs, checking that the mast is straight after each tensioning, lik e, for instance:
-two turns on front lower shrouds, two turns on aft lower shrouds, check
-two turns on top shrouds, check
-three turns on forestay, three turns on backstay, check

And so on until the shrouds feel very stiff. In the end, you will tension the front lower shrouds a bit more than the aft ones, in order to initiate a slight curve aft (the middle of the mast being in front of the foot and top) and then o nly the intermediate shrouds, not too tight.
To confirm the rigging is tight enough, go out sailing, close hauling with 18/20 knots. The mast should keep straight sideways, and not bend forward, the leeward shrouds should not be loose. If the mast bends forward, then tighten the backstay and the front lower shrouds.

If the mast is not "vertical" from the beginning, it will bend front if you  a gap at the front or aft if there is a gap at the aft.

Once the main mast and rigging are set, you can start with the mizzen mast:
-first line it up with the main mast, looking at both from the far aft of the vessel
-then tension the shrouds in order to make a slight curve aft

This is a first description. I probably forgot some details, so... feel free to ask.

Olivier







On Thurs day, May 12, 2016 8:58 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:


 
This is mainly directed to Olivier Beaute as it relates to Amel's initial tuning of the masts angle to the boat in the fore/aft direction.   I am in the process of tweaking the tuning done to my standing rigging when I had professional riggers place the new ACMO rigging about 18 months ago now.  My main mast isn't quite straight fore and aft and in fact has a bit of an "S" curve in it.  I plan on adjusting this.  I can measure the side to side straightness by assuring that the mast-top to toenail distance is the same on each side, However, Olivier, how did Amel know when the mast was vertical relative to the step of the mast on the deck when they originally rigged the boat.  Since the deck fore and aft isn't symmetrical I can't quite conjure up a method for assuring that the masts are vertical to their step plate since it is such a small surface area.  The only thing I can think of is to place a straight edge fore and aft across the step plate molded into the fiberglass then actually measuring the angle to assure it is 90 degrees.  Did Amel have a better way, perhaps a measurement from some point on the bow to the mast-top for the main and something similar for the mizzen?  

Thanks for any input you might have.

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver  (original owner and the guy you patiently tutored both myself and my family when we took ownership in 2001)
s/v Liahona  Amel SM #335
Puerto Del Rey,  Puerto Rico 






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Mast ( Main & Mizzen ) Installation and Rigging Fore / Aft Tuning

karkauai
 

Olivier, you are the best!  Thanks again and again for all your time and efforts on our behalf!
Kent
SM243
Kristy
En route to Bonaire and points West.


On May 12, 2016, at 8:54 AM, Beaute Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Good morning Gary,

this topic is probably going to raise a lot of questions, but I like the challenge...

I will start with "How did AMEL install the masts and tune the rigging on Santorins, SMs and 54s?" It has now changed as the masts of the 64 and 55 are rigged with discontinuous side shrouds, and the tension is finally set thanks to an hydraulic mast jack tool system and wedges.

The mast steps are bolted through the deck in metal inserts glassed in. 
They are installed horizontally, this means parallel to the saloon floor, or perpendicular to the main bulkhead (underneath).
"How did AMEL install the masts?":
First of all, the spreaders are attached to the top shrouds as follows:
-bring the shroud along the mast and mark it (with a permanent marker) at the bottom side of the spreader's hex nut. Mark both shrouds the same way at both speaders. At spreader's end, put the eye bolt at the mark.
The intermediate shrouds will be secured at spreader's ends only once the rigging is tuned.

As the main mast is hanging from the top (thanks to a crane), it is set on the mast step, centered thanks to both "hubs". The first shrouds to be secured are the 4 lower shrouds, which is enough to hold the mast in place. The crane is going away.
Then the forestay with genoa furler is installed on its chain-plate, then both top shrouds, then the backstay.
Once the forestay, backstay and top shrouds' turnbuckles are gently tightened by hand, the lower shrouds should be eased a bit, in order not to interfere with the operation of "setting the mast foot flat on its mast step":
-Concerning the top shrouds, this is made by measuring the distance between the top of the lower swage, and the bottom of the clevis pin which secures the shroud into the chain-plate. This distance must be the same on both sides.
-Concerning the forestay and backstay, they are adjusted (by hand) in order there is no gap between the rubber sole and the aluminum mast step (front and aft). If you see no gap from the beginning, and you want to check if it is close to a gap, ease the backstay (two turns) and tighten the forestay (two turns). If you start seeing a gap aft, then ease the forestay again (one turn) and tighten the backstay again (one turn). If there is no gap: GOOD, if there is still a gap aft, then come back to the original position (one turn less on the forestay, one more turn on the backstay).
Now, you can say the mast is "vertical" (in fact, the Santorins, SMs and 54s are never horizontal, back to front, but always with the bow up, which means the mast is leaning slightly aft).
It is vertical but it should also be straight as no strong tension has been put on the shrouds.

Once the mast is vertical, you will start tensioning the shrouds by pairs, checking that the mast is straight after each tensioning, like, for instance:
-two turns on front lower shrouds, two turns on aft lower shrouds, check
-two turns on top shrouds, check
-three turns on forestay, three turns on backstay, check

And so on until the shrouds feel very stiff. In the end, you will tension the front lower shrouds a bit more than the aft ones, in order to initiate a slight curve aft (the middle of the mast being in front of the foot and top) and then only the intermediate shrouds, not too tight.
To confirm the rigging is tight enough, go out sailing, close hauling with 18/20 knots. The mast should keep straight sideways, and not bend forward, the leeward shrouds should not be loose. If the mast bends forward, then tighten the backstay and the front lower shrouds.

If the mast is not "vertical" from the beginning, it will bend front if you  a gap at the front or aft if there is a gap at the aft.

Once the main mast and rigging are set, you can start with the mizzen mast:
-first line it up with the main mast, looking at both from the far aft of the vessel
-then tension the shrouds in order to make a slight curve aft

This is a first description. I probably forgot some details, so... feel free to ask.

Olivier







On Thursday, May 12, 2016 8:58 AM, amelliahona <no_reply@...> wrote:


 
This is mainly directed to Olivier Beaute as it relates to Amel's initial tuning of the masts angle to the boat in the fore/aft direction.   I am in the process of tweaking the tuning done to my standing rigging when I had professional riggers place the new ACMO rigging about 18 months ago now.  My main mast isn't quite straight fore and aft and in fact has a bit of an "S" curve in it.  I plan on adjusting this.  I can measure the side to side straightness by assuring that the mast-top to toenail distance is the same on each side, However, Olivier, how did Amel know when the mast was vertical relative to the step of the mast on the deck when they originally rigged the boat.  Since the deck fore and aft isn't symmetrical I can't quite conjure up a method for assuring that the masts are vertical to their step plate since it is such a small surface area.  The only thing I can think of is to place a straight edge fore and aft across the step plate molded into the fiberglass then actually measuring the angle to assure it is 90 degrees.  Did Amel have a better way, perhaps a measurement from some point on the bow to the mast-top for the main and something similar for the mizzen?  

Thanks for any input you might have.

Sincerely, 

Gary S. Silver  (original owner and the guy you patiently tutored both myself and my family when we took ownership in 2001)
s/v Liahona  Amel SM #335
Puerto Del Rey,  Puerto Rico