Date   
Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Surveyor

mimtsqwbzz5xbfai4gco4otu3lpigperpq6qnatm@...
 

Thank you for the feedback much appericated it. 



Sent from Yahoo Mail. Get the app


On Saturday, October 22, 2016 6:43 PM, "ofer magen ofermagen@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Hi,
Olivier did the survey also for us in Gocek turkey. I agree with every word that was written by Mohammed. Olivier knows the Amel better than any other as he warked  there for more than 20 years.
The training you get while he is doing the survey has no price.
Ofer Magen
Amel 54 #160
Now in Gocek Turkey


PCB board for an MDKAV onan generator

eric freedman
 

Does anyone know of a source of a reasonably priced PCB board part number 327-1533 for an Onan generator model MDKAV ?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pickling watermaker

seagasm
 

Yep, readily available from your local Home Brew Shop, cheers!

Best Regards
Barry & Robyn
Tradewinds III SM 171

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pickling watermaker

Alan Leslie
 

OK,

Here's what I got from Dessalator...

Dear Sir,

 

Thank you for your message.

 

For the sterilization we use Sodium metabisulphite HP (see specification sheet enclosed and procedure). You need 80gr of it

 

We don’t recommend to use a cleaning product: Simply rinse your system once a month.

 

With best regards

 

Secretary Dessalator

Rosyne Castino



Note Sodium meta BISULPHITE....not sulphate.....

Cheers
Alan
Elyse Sm437

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bilge pump alarm

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Installation of a bilge pump alarm was one of the first improvements that I implemented on my boat. That is very importent safety related improvment. It is ezy to implement and inexpensive. I just installed a buzzer that cost approximately $2.00 parallel to bilge pump light on 24V panel. The buzzer sits behind the pannel. I highly recommend this improvement to evrybody.

Vladimir
SM 345  "Life is Good"

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bilge pump alarm

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Ofer,

When Amel joins hoses in the pressurized fresh water system, they use not only some sort of glue, but also 2 clamps. You may know why they do this now.

Regarding your gray water pump, I assume that you have the Reya/AMFA "Marina ZZ" Bilge pump. 

If so, the most likely reasons for it not pumping are, in order, most likely, first:
  1. Air leaking on the suction side of the pump. If the hose is brittle and not flexible anymore replace it and use two hose clamps on each end
  2. Water leaking out at the Joker Valve at the foot. Remove the hose from the pump, fill the hose with water, if it leaks out, replace the Joker Valve at the foot..buy 2 or 3 of these and replace the one you have...store them inside of something ridged so that they do not get deformed.
  3. If the above are OK and you still have the problem, the pump needs a rebuilt kit consisting of a new diaphragm and two flapper valves...get the kit from Amel...there are copies being sold by others that are terrible, do not even try them!
  4.  The pump mechanical parts have failed. The most common part that fails is the white Delrin® gear (looks like Nylon). Get it from Amel.
CW Bill Rouse, Admiral Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Yacht BeBe
+1832-380-4970 Global VoiceMail


On Sun, Oct 23, 2016 at 1:17 PM, ofer magen ofermagen@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi to all,

A year ago when I was in Gocek turkey, I asked a carbon filter to be installed. In August on the way from Cyprus to Finike, the new hose that was installed has failed and we lost all the water in our water tank,it was spayed in the engine room....
I fixed it and a day later it  happened again, and as our frigis are using fresh water instead of sea water, the pump was pumping air and died.
We decided to install an alarm on the bilge pump so we can hear evrytime it's working.
Now the bilge pump itself does not pump  and we knew it immediately and could pump manually, as the alarm didn't stop.
The pump is just pushing air out.
It looks like I have to replace the down hose and the valve in the small box in the bottom.
More ideas?

Thanks,

Ofer Magen
Alba Amel 54 #160
Gocek Turkey.


Bilge pump alarm

ofer magen
 

Hi to all,

A year ago when I was in Gocek turkey, I asked a carbon filter to be installed. In August on the way from Cyprus to Finike, the new hose that was installed has failed and we lost all the water in our water tank,it was spayed in the engine room....
I fixed it and a day later it  happened again, and as our frigis are using fresh water instead of sea water, the pump was pumping air and died.
We decided to install an alarm on the bilge pump so we can hear evrytime it's working.
Now the bilge pump itself does not pump  and we knew it immediately and could pump manually, as the alarm didn't stop.
The pump is just pushing air out.
It looks like I have to replace the down hose and the valve in the small box in the bottom.
More ideas?

Thanks,

Ofer Magen
Alba Amel 54 #160
Gocek Turkey.

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 55' Amel

James Alton
 

Richards,
 
    I am very glad to hear that you are so happy with your Amel 55.  While that boat is out of my cruising budget, it is great to know that Amel is still building boats that make owners happy.  The ongoing success of Amel is important I think to all of us.
 
   As someone who is familiar with sailing the 46, 53 and now the 55,  I was hoping that you could make some general comparisions between the models based on your own opinion of course. 
 
   I am just getting to know my Maramu and have not yet sailed any of the other models, though I have sailed alongside two Super Maramus so the input would be of interest to me.  With regards to the Maramu,  I was truly expecting to have to make some significant sacrifices in performance and handling based on my previous boat but I have been very pleasantly surprised with the Maramu in both areas.   Sailing out of Oblia this month with the wind aft and gusting to over 40, the boat was hitting 9.6 in flat water and well over 10 after the waves built up a little and she began to surf...and it was all quite comfortable.   It is clear of course that the pointing ability will not be the best, but it is acceptable and most of my sailing will be with the wind aft of the beam.   The handling of the Maramu is what surprised me the most.  The turning radius is very good, the boat carries very well,  rudder response is excellent at very low speeds with almost no tendency for the bow to blow off.  I am looking forward to sailing some of the other designs in the future.
 
   The lines of both the Super Maramu and the Santorin suggest an improvement in performance over the Maramu which would be expected with the evolution of the design and it sounds like the 55 is another step up in that area.  For myself,  I am quite happy with the Maramu due to the great handling, the fantastic storage under all of the bunks since all of the water is in the bilge and the moderate disp/length ratio of 276 which though a little lighter than I am used to but the motion is still quite nice on the boat.   I know nothing of the 55 but I cannot imagine anyone not being happy with any of the Amel designs that I have looked at.
 
Best,
 
James Alton
 
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy
 
 

---- Original Message ----
From: Richard03801 richard03801@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Oct 23, 2016 7:41 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 55' Amel

 
The new 55 AMEL is a wonderful sailing and live aboard yacht of the moderne era she's easy to in the sea way and comfortable on the hook. I know this as I've got over 1500 miles aboard doing and ocean race as well as Crusing parts of New England as a captain of a well maintained 55. To be sure the 46, 53, and 54's are wonderful yachts as I've owned and or sailed them for over 20 years. 
Change is always difficult for all of us, for example the transition from alcohol to propane. You get the
Picture. If you are considering a 55 go to the factory and do a sea trial. Be careful you may just fall in love with a younger model. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing 
Capt Richard Piller
Newport RI 
Cell 603 767 5330

On Oct 20, 2016, at 0 8:38, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
John,

I have only owned a Super Maramu...a 2003 model. I am a huge fan of Amel.

I will attempt to tell you my limited understanding of the comparison...hopefully I will not ramble too much, but appologies if I do:
As an Amel SM 53 owner, my first reaction to the 55 was, "...what are they crazy, what the heck are they thinking?" It was such a departure from what I thought of Amel that it did not immediately compute to me. Most of the reason for my impression was the fault of Amel management...they overlooked using the power of Amel owners to introduce a new product. In this day and time, that was a big mistake, one that could be corrected, but is still overlooked.

The 55 is more of a different boat than the previous Amel models and the 55 has not been accepted by previous owners as much as the previous models were. Of course, this stands to reason because with each model progression prior to the 55, the new models carried over 'tried and true' Henri Amel designs mostly with a blind eye to change. I could argue that this was very good, but if you asked me to argue the other side, I could argue that it was bad. This is something that regrettably Amel did a poor job of. In their defense, they had never made a design change as radical as the 55 and maybe they simply did not realize how to "launch a really new product."

The 55 has a completely different keel than the 53 or 54 which allows it to point better and sail faster. This means the freshwater is relocated and the water gauge is missing. The 55 has batteries stored in the cabin sole in a watertight compartment rather than above the waterline in a water tight compartment as in the 53 and 54...there are advantages to either design...we were accustomed to the latter. The rigging is inside the life line to make it point better and sail faster. The ru dder is further back making it turn faster and it allows the rudder gear and autopilots to be in a compartment inside the rear lazarette. If you like galleys and galley conveniences, you will love the 55. The freeboard is higher giving the 55 more interior room and volume. The cockpit is deeper for greater protection, but it is more difficult to get in and out of as compared to the 53 & 54. The table in the cockpit is great, but it requires extra steps to get in the engine room.

I think the 55 is a yacht that is something like a sailing yacht that Oyster would make if they wanted to knock-off Amel. I also think that Amel management did a terrible job of utilizing the power of probably at least 1,000 Amel owners to promote the 55. Amel could have pitched the 55 and all of its changes, features and benefits to Amel Owners around the world, and some of us could have helped the launch of the 55. But they ignore us...or at the very least, they ignore me.

Maybe y ou should email Dimitris Krasopoulos <dkrasopoulos@...>. He has owned several Amels including 53 and 54. He has been looking closely at the 55. He may have what you are looking for.

I think that you will see more negative remarks from 53 and 54 owners than you will from new Amel 55 owners, but hopefully my explanation above will explain that and you can take that into consideration.

I hope this helps you.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Thu, Oct 20, 2016 at 6:32 AM, John Folino jfolino901@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
I am interested in hearing reports from owners of the Amel 55' versus the SM 53' which I have previously owned from 2001 to 2014 SM #347 Sulajon, I am interested in any quirks that seem to be common amongst the 55'?
John Folino

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 55' Amel

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

The new 55 AMEL is a wonderful sailing and live aboard yacht of the moderne era she's easy to in the sea way and comfortable on the hook. I know this as I've got over 1500 miles aboard doing and ocean race as well as Crusing parts of New England as a captain of a well maintained 55. To be sure the 46, 53, and 54's are wonderful yachts as I've owned and or sailed them for over 20 years. 
Change is always difficult for all of us, for example the transition from alcohol to propane. You get the
Picture. If you are considering a 55 go to the factory and do a sea trial. Be careful you may just fall in love with a younger model. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing 
Capt Richard Piller
Newport RI 
Cell 603 767 5330

On Oct 20, 2016, at 08:38, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

John,

I have only owned a Super Maramu...a 2003 model. I am a huge fan of Amel.

I will attempt to tell you my limited understanding of the comparison...hopefully I will not ramble too much, but appologies if I do:
As an Amel SM 53 owner, my first reaction to the 55 was, "...what are they crazy, what the heck are they thinking?" It was such a departure from what I thought of Amel that it did not immediately compute to me. Most of the reason for my impression was the fault of Amel management...they overlooked using the power of Amel owners to introduce a new product. In this day and time, that was a big mistake, one that could be corrected, but is still overlooked.

The 55 is more of a different boat than the previous Amel models and the 55 has not been accepted by previous owners as much as the previous models were. Of course, this stands to reason because with each model progression prior to the 55, the new models carried over 'tried and true' Henri Amel designs mostly with a blind eye to change. I could argue that this was very good, but if you asked me to argue the other side, I could argue that it was bad. This is something that regrettably Amel did a poor job of. In their defense, they had never made a design change as radical as the 55 and maybe they simply did not realize how to "launch a really new product."

The 55 has a completely different keel than the 53 or 54 which allows it to point better and sail faster. This means the freshwater is relocated and the water gauge is missing. The 55 has batteries stored in the cabin sole in a watertight compartment rather than above the waterline in a water tight compartment as in the 53 and 54...there are advantages to either design...we were accustomed to the latter. The rigging is inside the life line to make it point better and sail faster. The rudder is further back making it turn faster and it allows the rudder gear and autopilots to be in a compartment inside the rear lazarette. If you like galleys and galley conveniences, you will love the 55. The freeboard is higher giving the 55 more interior room and volume. The cockpit is deeper for greater protection, but it is more difficult to get in and out of as compared to the 53 & 54. The table in the cockpit is great, but it requires extra steps to get in the engine room.

I think the 55 is a yacht that is something like a sailing yacht that Oyster would make if they wanted to knock-off Amel. I also think that Amel management did a terrible job of utilizing the power of probably at least 1,000 Amel owners to promote the 55. Amel could have pitched the 55 and all of its changes, features and benefits to Amel Owners around the world, and some of us could have helped the launch of the 55. But they ignore us...or at the very least, they ignore me.

Maybe you should email Dimitris Krasopoulos <dkrasopoulos@...>. He has owned several Amels including 53 and 54. He has been looking closely at the 55. He may have what you are looking for.

I think that you will see more negative remarks from 53 and 54 owners than you will from new Amel 55 owners, but hopefully my explanation above will explain that and you can take that into consideration.

I hope this helps you.

Bill
BeBe 387

On Thu, Oct 20, 2016 at 6:32 AM, John Folino jfolino901@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I am interested in hearing reports from owners of the Amel 55' versus the SM 53' which I have previously owned from 2001 to 2014 SM #347 Sulajon, I am interested in any quirks that seem to be common amongst the 55'?
John Folino


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Surveyor

mimtsqwbzz5xbfai4gco4otu3lpigperpq6qnatm@...
 

Thank you i have taken note of your comments and appreciate the feedback.

Regards
Steve
 


Sent from Yahoo Mail. Get the app


On Friday, October 21, 2016 5:23 PM, "mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
HI Steve;

I want to add my endorsement of Olivier. We did fly him to Turkey for the survey of our Amel 54. He was extremely professional and knowlegeable. Olivier spent 3 days during his survey and inspected everything from the top of the mast to the bottom of the keel. One of the extremely important benefits of using Olivier is the training that you receive during the survey which it's importance cannot be understated. Amels are complex boats with many systems and designs that are unique to Amels.

Olivier was also extremely patient with hundreds of questions that we had for him and took time to answer each and every one in detail. I would highly recommend using him so you avoid any potential surprises down the road.


Mohammad and Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54 #099


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Instal AC / Genset on Santorin

Richard03801 <richard03801@...>
 

We did a in out swap with the same rated Gen set at half the price from Bata marine. You can find them on the net it was an exact bolt in exhaust cool and wire harness plugged in. 

Fair Winds Smooth Sailing 
Capt Richard Piller
Newport RI 
Cell 603 767 5330

On Oct 20, 2016, at 01:59, tfortner1975@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello all,


Has any of the SN owners ever installed an AC and Genset? 

Just looking to see what others have done in the last and possibly gain some lessons learnt by others. 


Thanks heaps. 


Trevor 

Iris, SN027

Langkawi 

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Hello Mike,
Personally I would keep it as it is, just add grease, never seen or your favorite lubricant.
I believe that if you do that maintenance on a regular basis, like Kent, you won't have problem removing that bolt.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Club Nautico de San Juan, Puerto Rico



--------------------------------------------

On Sat, 10/22/16, mdondra@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Saturday, October 22, 2016, 8:03 AM


 









Just about complete with the reinstallation
of the windlass. Question on the last bolt that finishes
into the glassed in plate at the hawse pipe. To avoid future
difficulty extracting and to be assured that the bolt is
well secured, I would like to drill through the bottom of
the bolt hole and through-bolt with washer and nut exposed
below in the bow locker like the other 3 bolts. Does anyone
have ideas about why Amel did not through-bolt this last
bolt in the first place? Anyone see a downside for this
solution? We are always nervous about varying from what the
Captain designed.Mike OndraAletes
SM#240Rock Hall, MD










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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pickling watermaker

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Tm with you on this Eric,
I approached the Watermaker with fear and trembling. How to care for it, how to clean it how to pickle it. When to pickle it. How long could you leave it before you should pickle it. 
I am grateful to the advice from this group which lead me to the fresh water back flush. Now I just back flush with fresh water after every use. There are times I leave it untouched for two months or more when I am away from the boat. I just start it up, run to waste for a few minutes and all good. The membranes are still good. 120 ppm. The pre filter does need changing periodically but that would apply anyway.
It is some years since we put any outside water into our tanks. Got to avoid introducing chlorine. Another good bit of advice from this group.
Cheers
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl



From: "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]"
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Saturday, 22 October 2016 8:39 PM
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pickling watermaker

 
Alan,
When I leave the boat at a marina and am away for a month or more I pay the dockmaster to run my watermaker. I added a switch to the fresh water pump in the engine room , so that the only time the pressure water is on is when they run the watermaker.
Works for me but each case is unique. I just lost faith in sodium- whatever as it destroyed all the fittings and bobbin on my watermaker.
Fair Winds
Eric
Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376
 
 
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, October 22, 2016 3:25 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pickling watermaker
 
 
Hi Eric,
That's fine if you are near the boat, or can guarantee that you always have enough fresh water and do what Bill on Bebe did with a solenoid valve and a timer to flush the system regularly, but my point was the distinction between SMBsulphate and sulphite which are completely different chemicals.
I prefer to follow what the membrane manufacturer says, rather than what somebody "believes" to be true.
But each to his own....whatever works for you can be fine for you...but maybe not for me...
Cheers
Alan'
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mike,
having been through the same experience I did through bolt. It cant make any difference to the strength. As I said in an earlier post this bolt carries more load than the others being anchored to the hawse pipe. I used the anchor a couple of times before I got it replaced and there was deck flex. If you don't through bolt it I suggest you use a stud (a bolt threaded both ends) and have a nut on top. Why risk the same thing happening again.
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
 


From: "mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: Sunday, 23 October 2016 2:03 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

 
Just about complete with the reinstallation of the windlass. Question on the last bolt that finishes into the glassed in plate at the hawse pipe. To avoid future difficulty extracting and to be assured that the bolt is well secured, I would like to drill through the bottom of the bolt hole and through-bolt with washer and nut exposed below in the bow locker like the other 3 bolts. Does anyone have ideas about why Amel did not through-bolt this last bolt in the first place? Anyone see a downside for this solution? We are always nervous about varying from what the Captain designed.
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM#240
Rock Hall, MD


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

greatketch@...
 

Mike,

If you think think you have enough threads left in the metal plate, the best thing to do is to use it, and the best way to avoid future problems is to make sure the windlass is well bedded down so it doesn't leak, and use a good thread lubricant on the bolt.  Tef-gel, Lanacote, or something similar.  

The reason Amel put a plate in the deck only for that bolt, is that for the other three bolts there was plenty of room to add proper backing plates under the deck.  With the chainpipe right there, there was no room for a backing plate. A bolt and washer is not sufficient to distribute the load from a windlass to an unreinforced deck.  Now, since the plate will still be there to help distribute the load, even if you do switch to a thru-bolt, it's not that big a change.

Oh, yes and then follow Lofrans recommendations for rebedding the windlass on a regular basis.

By the way, I have seen people refer to the plate as "steel", but there is nothing magnetic in my deck there, so I am guessing it is stainless.

Bill Kinney
SM #160 Harmonie
Annapolis, MD

 

Re: Surveyor

ofer magen
 

Hi,
Olivier did the survey also for us in Gocek turkey. I agree with every word that was written by Mohammed. Olivier knows the Amel better than any other as he warked  there for more than 20 years.
The training you get while he is doing the survey has no price.

Ofer Magen
Amel 54 #160
Now in Gocek Turkey

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Digest Number 4736

sbmesasailor
 

I'm not familiar with the Echotec but I installed a Spectra in my engine compartment and discovered that I had to relocate the feed pump or it would overheat.  Other than that I found no other problems with locating the other components in the engine compartment.

Dennis Johns
Libertad
Maramu #121 


On Saturday, October 22, 2016 1:31 AM, "amelyachtowners@..." wrote:


1 Message

Digest #4736

Message

1

Echotec watermaker on old Maramu

Sat Oct 22, 2016 1:15 am (PDT) . Posted by:

mikon18084

Hi folks, has anyone of the Maramu (not SM) owners here installed an echotec watermaker ? Would be interested to learn where you put all the different components. Curently I am pondering the following options:

1. High pressure pump below the bed in the aft cabin, membran (vertically) and control panel in the aft head.
2. High pressure pump in the front right corner of the engine room and membran (vertically) and controlpanel in the antechamber of the aft cabin
3. High pressure pump below one bed in the forecabin and the mebran (vertically again) in the foreward closet.

Would there be a temperature issue when trying to install pump and membran in the engine room ?

Not sure where to install the filters (and booster pump if necessary) in any case.

Any input is welcome.

Michael, SY Sioned, Maramu # 148




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Windlass bolt to deck

Mike Ondra
 

Just about complete with the reinstallation of the windlass. Question on the last bolt that finishes into the glassed in plate at the hawse pipe. To avoid future difficulty extracting and to be assured that the bolt is well secured, I would like to drill through the bottom of the bolt hole and through-bolt with washer and nut exposed below in the bow locker like the other 3 bolts. Does anyone have ideas about why Amel did not through-bolt this last bolt in the first place? Anyone see a downside for this solution? We are always nervous about varying from what the Captain designed.

Mike Ondra

Aletes SM#240

Rock Hall, MD

Re: Echotec watermaker on old Maramu

Ian Park
 

I have an Echotec 500 in my Santorin. Control panel on engine room wall in back cabin. Engine driven HP pump beside aft end of engine. Membranes suspended from roof of engine room opposite engine. Filters are in the cockpit locker and I have diverter valve from cockpit shower to flush the filters and membranes direct from boat's water system. Only 1 membrane currently giving 80 l per hour, but considering a 2nd to give 150 l per hour. The same pump will provide the power. There is a new hole in the hull with seacock with filter with a magnetic drive booster pump.
Can't provide photos as I'm in UK and boat's in Grenada. Also not sure of similarity between Santorin and Maramu.

One of best bits of kit on the boat!

Ian
Ocean Hobo
SN96

Echotec watermaker on old Maramu

mkbiz@...
 

Hi folks, has anyone of the Maramu (not SM) owners here installed an echotec watermaker ? Would be interested to learn where you put all the different components. Curently I am pondering the following options:

1. High pressure pump below the bed in the aft cabin, membran (vertically) and control panel in the aft head.
2. High pressure pump in the front right corner of the engine room and membran (vertically) and controlpanel in the antechamber of the aft cabin
3. High pressure pump below one bed in the forecabin and the mebran (vertically again) in the foreward closet.

Would there be a temperature issue when trying to install pump and membran in the engine room ?

Not sure where to install the filters (and booster pump if necessary) in any case.

Any input is welcome.

Michael, SY Sioned, Maramu # 148