Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

Ann-Sofie Svanberg <kanalmamman@...>
 

We used a paint remover in 2013, it didn’t save any time maybe some effort. But it was a really relly messy job that we don’t recomend anyone to do. You have to have wear a full Water proof protection to not be hurt, you have to use tons of Water to washit away with, not only from the hull but even from the ground as the solutions is high corrosive. It you don’t wash the ground properly dogs or cats or other animal can get their pawn really bad damaged. We didn’t have this full body waterproof coverage and got some nasty burns where the raincoat didn’t cover.
Also you have to have the right temperature. If it is to hot the solution dries out and do the work. We hade to cover with adhesive plastic film to keep the moisture. As I said really really messy.

 

We had the work re-done in Trinidad, scraped down to the gelcoat and then new paint. I belive that we paid about 2500 USD for it. And it was done manualy.

 

Regards

Ann-Sofie

 

Skickades från E-post för Windows 10

 

Från: Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]
Skickat: den 16 januari 2017 14:38
Till: amelyachtowners@...
Ämne: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

 

 

I have been thinking I would like to get rid of all the layers of bottom paint. I was wondering about chemical stripers , if they work and how well. Seems like you may run the risk of scratching the gel coat scraping , is that a concern and how wide of a scraper would you use. I got a quote of almost $3000. to sandblast, more than I expected , being a one day job , but if it saves ten days of scraping ... Just wondering what others have done. Also wondering how one deals with the bottom of the keel only a couple of inches off the ground and resting on blocking.
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Jan 15, 2017 8:16 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

 
I have always avoided the chemical strippers myself due to concerns of short and long term damage to the gel coat.  The stuff goes into any cracks in the gel coat and can get into the laminate and or into any voids under the gel coat which is not a good thing.   The suggestion that was made to use a good sharp scrapper is IMO a good way to go,  just take your time.  As was also suggested, go with the carbide blades.  The Bahco 660 or 665 scrapper works well for me,  you can find these on Amazon.  You can also sand it off with a dustless system or use this as a follow up to the scrapping.  Definitely avoid using a heat gun as it is just too easy to craze the gel coat. 

Best of luck,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy

On Jan 15, 2017, at 1:11 PM, santorinlo18@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Forum, Just about to scrap bottom - is sand blasting good method? seen the end result - looks neat but rough compare to manual. Not sure if good or bad, however, about 50% cost compare to manual + chemical. Any experiences or view



Trying to reach Kimberlite /eric

n33077@...
 

Eric,

the time has come to replace my companionway door.  The delam is too far gone and the bottom edge is all chewed up.  I'm wondering if you could send me your notes on replacing the door. 

In fact anyone with experience on this any advice would be most welcome. 

Regards,

Aras Grinius
S/V FIASCO
Sharki #183






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

Patrick McAneny
 

I have been thinking I would like to get rid of all the layers of bottom paint. I was wondering about chemical stripers , if they work and how well. Seems like you may run the risk of scratching the gel coat scraping , is that a concern and how wide of a scraper would you use. I got a quote of almost $3000. to sandblast, more than I expected , being a one day job , but if it saves ten days of scraping ... Just wondering what others have done. Also wondering how one deals with the bottom of the keel only a couple of inches off the ground and resting on blocking.
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Jan 15, 2017 8:16 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

 
I have always avoided the chemical strippers myself due to concerns of short and long term damage to the gel coat.  The stuff goes into any cracks in the gel coat and can get into the laminate and or into any voids under the gel coat which is not a good thing.   The suggestion that was made to use a good sharp scrapper is IMO a good way to go,  just take your time.  As was also suggested, go with the carbide blades.  The Bahco 660 or 665 scrapper works well for me,  you can find these on Amazon.  You can also sand it off with a dustless system or use this as a follow up to the scrapping.  Definitely avoid using a heat gun as it is just too easy to craze the gel coat. 

Best of luck,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy

On Jan 15, 2017, at 1:11 PM, santorinlo18@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Forum, Just about to scrap bottom - is sand blasting good method? seen the end result - looks neat but rough compare to manual. Not sure if good or bad, however, about 50% cost compare to manual + chemical. Any experiences or view



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Replacement Chain Counter with new Lewmar/Maxwell/AA system

Patrick McAneny
 

George, I just had a Maxwell counter installed and it was necessary to install new wiring . I did not do the work , so do not know if it was difficult to pull the new wires. A few months ago someone wrote that the Quick did not need new wiring , you may want to check into that.
Pat SM # 123


-----Original Message-----
From: gdagreen@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Jan 15, 2017 3:43 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Replacement Chain Counter with new Lewmar/Maxwell/AA system

 
I have a 2004 Amel 53( COCO) with a non functioning chain counter and intend to replace it with  either a wired or wireless system from Lewmar/Maxwell/AA ( They are all made by  AA!).

Would be most appreciative to learn of other owners who have dealt with this problem. Specifically:

1. Can the existing original wire from the windlass to the cockpit be easily replaced by snaking the new wires onto the old or by another method?
1.b  If not, can the original wiring be used to splice onto the wire end fittings of the AA system without loss of signal strength.
2. Failing that, wireless systems are availible, but I have no idea how reliable they are, given the distance from windlass to cockpit. Experience,please??  I believe wireless systems work up to 30ft.

many thanks in advance

George


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Replacement Chain Counter with new Lewmar/Maxwell/AA system

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good morning George,

I know this is not really the question you asked, but as Ben said if you were happy with the original one.

Here is a link with the Windlass overall:
http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul.html

Part 23 will show you the installation of the new eye.
http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul_part_23.html

Part 28 will show you the reconnection of the electric wires of the chain counter
http://nikimat.com/lofrans_tigres_windlass_overhaul_part_28.html

Good luck.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Harbor View Marina, Tortola, BVI




--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 1/15/17, gdagreen@yahoo.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Replacement Chain Counter with new Lewmar/Maxwell/AA system
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, January 15, 2017, 2:43 PM


 









I have a 2004 Amel 53( COCO) with a non functioning
chain counter and intend to replace it with  either a wired
or wireless system from Lewmar/Maxwell/AA ( They are all
made by  AA!).

Would be
most appreciative to learn of other owners who have dealt
with this problem. Specifically:

1. Can the existing original wire from the
windlass to the cockpit be easily replaced by snaking the
new wires onto the old or by another method?
1.b  If not, can the original wiring be used
to splice onto the wire end fittings of the AA system
without loss of signal strength.
2. Failing
that, wireless systems are availible, but I have no idea how
reliable they are, given the distance from windlass to
cockpit. Experience,please??  I believe wireless systems
work up to 30ft.

many
thanks in advance

George











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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380

hanspeter baettig
 

Thank you very much for your fast reply, Colin
For my understanding; you use only the rotary el. motor inside the hatch above the gally for both AP's course computer and control units in the cockpit ; means you have not installed a linear drive engin close beside the rudder Quadrant under the aft cabin berth ?
 
Regards Hanspeter

----Ursprüngliche Nachricht----
Von : amelyachtowners@...
Datum : 16/01/2017 - 01:31 (UTC)
An : amelyachtowners@...
Betreff : Re: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380

 

Hi Hanspeter

I see I missed your other question about how we installed the 2nd autopilot. It is the same as many others on this forum, ie 2nd new course computer is inside hatch above galley sink as is the quick change over switch between autopilot A & B. 2nd autopilot head just fitted next to original ST7001 in cockpit. Will send pic when we get back if you still need one.

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II
Amel 53 #332, Brisbane

On Mon, Jan 16, 2017 at 1:50 AM, 'hanspeter.baettig@...' hanspeter.baettig@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Dear Colin
I'm interessted how you installed the second Raymarine Autopilot to the helm. As I understood, you installed not a linear drive AP direct to the rudder Quadrant.Correct ?
Can you send me some pics per email ? Also if you can send me infos/pics about the installation of your fwd/rear facing camera.
my email: Hanspeter.baettig at bluemail dot ch
 
Thank you very much.
Hanspeter
SM Tamango 2
----Ursprüngliche Nachricht----
Von : amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Datum : 15/01/2017 - 01:26 (UTC)
An : amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Betreff : Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380

 

On Island Pearl II we like the old B&G instruments but we have linked these to two new Raymarine E70 chart plotters (Nav station & rear cabin) plus a new ES97 at the helm. We went with a Raymarine 650 AIS, a Raymarine Network system to network all displays off any one of the plotters chart cards and added a 2nd full new Raymarine Autopilot at the helm with quick change over switch between autopilot 1 and 2.

These are all great but you could do the same with any brand, we just happen to prefer Raymarine now as it is robust (like B&G used to be before being bought out).

By far the best new equipment we added was the latest Raymarine Quantum radar. This little unit is absolutely incredible in picking up even isolated unlit thin mooring poles when night sailing and best of all uses almost nil power!! We now have it on all the time whilst sailing, and for the first time ever we now have peace of mind sailing on pitch black nights with no moonlight! It was not all that expensive either, and we kept the old Amel supplied radar as well as backup and for seeing further but haven't even switched the old one on once since getting the Quantum. Just moved it's screen back in the nav station area so we can fit a monitor in front of it on a swing arm to access the old radar when/if required. Also on the 2nd radar mount (1 meter below the original) we have a fwd and rear facing camera linked to the TV's so can see what's coming and going whilst sailing solo and down making a cup of tea etc..

Lastly, if it is not yet done, have the old B&G instruments linked to your auto-pilots and network. This way everything talks to each other via NMEA. We also have 4 extra Raymarine i 70 displays on the boat so we can see wind, radar, AIS, Speed, Depth on these too, plus to get the benefit of using the new autopilot on "wind pilot" mode which we sometimes find handy. Possibly all the I70's was overkill though and not necessary as we generally only have 2 of these on most of the time. 

But of everything I would say absolutely the Quantum Radar was the very best buy.

Colin & Lauren Streeter, 
Island Pearl II, Amel 53 # 332
Brisbane

On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Good afternoon Steve,

First, congratulations for becoming the owner of #380, you definitely acquire a beautiful sailing vessel and welcome to the Amel Family.

I can’t reply your question, but want to pick your mind on it…

Just like you, when I purchased my SM2K not so long ago in 2012, I was very excited, had lots of ideas… changing, upgrading, etc…
many people (Bill, Kent, etc.) gave the same advice: don’t change anything for at least one year.

If I may ask, what is wrong with your current Furuno radar? Just Old? Not the latest?
The technician that installed my ICOM AIS Transmitter in 2013, give me his opinion on the rest of my electronics, since he was highly recommended and I would have done (right or wrong) anything he said. He actually said my Furuno Radar (regardless of its age) is a great one, still used by many fishermen, so don’t replace it. And I follow his advice.

Regarding the Navigation equipments, my plan was to do like Francisco and Oddette on Peregrinus SM2K #250 having a B&G Zeus 12 with slave monitor, etc.).
Therefore, to be honest, the 20% spending budget on the purchasing price for the 1st year, was already spent, so I decided to keep using multiple (for back up reason) iPad with Navionics charts on and Bad Elf to send GPS location through Blue Tooth.
I am sure it is very deferent to what most people use, but has been working very well for me for the last 4 years in the Bahamas and the Caribbean.
I can walk anywhere I want with my iPad (with water proof protection), etc.
If not use as a primary, I would definitely recommend use it as back up, countless stories of sailing I met (non-Amel owners) who had their primary Chart plotter failing and end up using the iPad + GPS sending.

As one of my instructors said, don’t spend too much money upgrading what is already working (and has been working sufficiently for over a decade), think more about spending money on “expected/scheduled” maintenance (like Bow Thruster, C-Drive, engine, genset, etc.).

Just sharing, and congratulations again on purchasing SM#280!

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Harbor View Marina, Tortola, BVI

--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 1/14/17, steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380
To: amelyachtowners@...m
Date: Saturday, January 14, 2017, 3:36 PM




 









Hi all, I am headed down to Fort
Lauderdale next week to continue getting to know my newly
acquired SM and am planning on meeting with Jeff Grossman of
Associated Electronics to evaluate the current Furuno vx2
set up and discuss possible upgrades.  I have recently seen
a few comments on the forum warning against letting regular
'electronics types' poke around and work in the
electrically bonded world of Amel electronics.  Are there
specific things I need to be aware of before going ahead
with an upgrade?  Are there 24v/bonded protocols or
specialists in the south Florida
area?
I must say, the sense I get
from reading the various threads on the forum make me feel
as if I need to educate myself to a level higher than most
of those I ask to service my vessel so that I can personally
oversee all work done to her, and this seems daunting to a
new owner.  
Those that have altered or
replaced the original Nav electronics (Chartplotters, radar,
AIS, etc), what have you gone with, and where and who did
the work, or would you recommend to do the
work?
Thanks for your time,
consideration, and knowledge,Steve
MorrisonSM#380
TouraiFt Lauderdale





--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445






--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445




Olivier e mail address

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

James Alton
 

I have always avoided the chemical strippers myself due to concerns of short and long term damage to the gel coat.  The stuff goes into any cracks in the gel coat and can get into the laminate and or into any voids under the gel coat which is not a good thing.   The suggestion that was made to use a good sharp scrapper is IMO a good way to go,  just take your time.  As was also suggested, go with the carbide blades.  The Bahco 660 or 665 scrapper works well for me,  you can find these on Amazon.  You can also sand it off with a dustless system or use this as a follow up to the scrapping.  Definitely avoid using a heat gun as it is just too easy to craze the gel coat. 

Best of luck,

James Alton
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220
Sardinia,  Italy

On Jan 15, 2017, at 1:11 PM, santorinlo18@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Forum, Just about to scrap bottom - is sand blasting good method? seen the end result - looks neat but rough compare to manual. Not sure if good or bad, however, about 50% cost compare to manual + chemical. Any experiences or view




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Hanspeter

I see I missed your other question about how we installed the 2nd autopilot. It is the same as many others on this forum, ie 2nd new course computer is inside hatch above galley sink as is the quick change over switch between autopilot A & B. 2nd autopilot head just fitted next to original ST7001 in cockpit. Will send pic when we get back if you still need one.

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II
Amel 53 #332, Brisbane

On Mon, Jan 16, 2017 at 1:50 AM, 'hanspeter.baettig@...' hanspeter.baettig@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Dear Colin
I'm interessted how you installed the second Raymarine Autopilot to the helm. As I understood, you installed not a linear drive AP direct to the rudder Quadrant.Correct ?
Can you send me some pics per email ? Also if you can send me infos/pics about the installation of your fwd/rear facing camera.
my email: Hanspeter.baettig at bluemail dot ch
 
Thank you very much.
Hanspeter
SM Tamango 2
----Ursprüngliche Nachricht----
Von : amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Datum : 15/01/2017 - 01:26 (UTC)
An : amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Betreff : Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380

 

On Island Pearl II we like the old B&G instruments but we have linked these to two new Raymarine E70 chart plotters (Nav station & rear cabin) plus a new ES97 at the helm. We went with a Raymarine 650 AIS, a Raymarine Network system to network all displays off any one of the plotters chart cards and added a 2nd full new Raymarine Autopilot at the helm with quick change over switch between autopilot 1 and 2.

These are all great but you could do the same with any brand, we just happen to prefer Raymarine now as it is robust (like B&G used to be before being bought out).

By far the best new equipment we added was the latest Raymarine Quantum radar. This little unit is absolutely incredible in picking up even isolated unlit thin mooring poles when night sailing and best of all uses almost nil power!! We now have it on all the time whilst sailing, and for the first time ever we now have peace of mind sailing on pitch black nights with no moonlight! It was not all that expensive either, and we kept the old Amel supplied radar as well as backup and for seeing further but haven't even switched the old one on once since getting the Quantum. Just moved it's screen back in the nav station area so we can fit a monitor in front of it on a swing arm to access the old radar when/if required. Also on the 2nd radar mount (1 meter below the original) we have a fwd and rear facing camera linked to the TV's so can see what's coming and going whilst sailing solo and down making a cup of tea etc..

Lastly, if it is not yet done, have the old B&G instruments linked to your auto-pilots and network. This way everything talks to each other via NMEA. We also have 4 extra Raymarine i 70 displays on the boat so we can see wind, radar, AIS, Speed, Depth on these too, plus to get the benefit of using the new autopilot on "wind pilot" mode which we sometimes find handy. Possibly all the I70's was overkill though and not necessary as we generally only have 2 of these on most of the time. 

But of everything I would say absolutely the Quantum Radar was the very best buy.

Colin & Lauren Streeter, 
Island Pearl II, Amel 53 # 332
Brisbane

On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Good afternoon Steve,

First, congratulations for becoming the owner of #380, you definitely acquire a beautiful sailing vessel and welcome to the Amel Family.

I can’t reply your question, but want to pick your mind on it…

Just like you, when I purchased my SM2K not so long ago in 2012, I was very excited, had lots of ideas… changing, upgrading, etc…
many people (Bill, Kent, etc.) gave the same advice: don’t change anything for at least one year.

If I may ask, what is wrong with your current Furuno radar? Just Old? Not the latest?
The technician that installed my ICOM AIS Transmitter in 2013, give me his opinion on the rest of my electronics, since he was highly recommended and I would have done (right or wrong) anything he said. He actually said my Furuno Radar (regardless of its age) is a great one, still used by many fishermen, so don’t replace it. And I follow his advice.

Regarding the Navigation equipments, my plan was to do like Francisco and Oddette on Peregrinus SM2K #250 having a B&G Zeus 12 with slave monitor, etc.).
Therefore, to be honest, the 20% spending budget on the purchasing price for the 1st year, was already spent, so I decided to keep using multiple (for back up reason) iPad with Navionics charts on and Bad Elf to send GPS location through Blue Tooth.
I am sure it is very deferent to what most people use, but has been working very well for me for the last 4 years in the Bahamas and the Caribbean.
I can walk anywhere I want with my iPad (with water proof protection), etc.
If not use as a primary, I would definitely recommend use it as back up, countless stories of sailing I met (non-Amel owners) who had their primary Chart plotter failing and end up using the iPad + GPS sending.

As one of my instructors said, don’t spend too much money upgrading what is already working (and has been working sufficiently for over a decade), think more about spending money on “expected/scheduled” maintenance (like Bow Thruster, C-Drive, engine, genset, etc.).

Just sharing, and congratulations again on purchasing SM#280!

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Harbor View Marina, Tortola, BVI

--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 1/14/17, steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380
To: amelyachtowners@...m
Date: Saturday, January 14, 2017, 3:36 PM




 









Hi all, I am headed down to Fort
Lauderdale next week to continue getting to know my newly
acquired SM and am planning on meeting with Jeff Grossman of
Associated Electronics to evaluate the current Furuno vx2
set up and discuss possible upgrades.  I have recently seen
a few comments on the forum warning against letting regular
'electronics types' poke around and work in the
electrically bonded world of Amel electronics.  Are there
specific things I need to be aware of before going ahead
with an upgrade?  Are there 24v/bonded protocols or
specialists in the south Florida
area?
I must say, the sense I get
from reading the various threads on the forum make me feel
as if I need to educate myself to a level higher than most
of those I ask to service my vessel so that I can personally
oversee all work done to her, and this seems daunting to a
new owner.  
Those that have altered or
replaced the original Nav electronics (Chartplotters, radar,
AIS, etc), what have you gone with, and where and who did
the work, or would you recommend to do the
work?
Thanks for your time,
consideration, and knowledge,Steve
MorrisonSM#380
TouraiFt Lauderdale





--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445






--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

JOHN HAYES
 

Pain in the butt but we scraped ours off (carefully) with small tungsten tipped blades. Took two of us 10 days

John Hayes

NGA Waka Wellington NZ


On 16/01/2017, at 7:11 AM, santorinlo18@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Forum, Just about to scrap bottom - is sand blasting good method? seen the end result - looks neat but rough compare to manual. Not sure if good or bad, however, about 50% cost compare to manual + chemical. Any experiences or view


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Taking your engine out

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Craig

That is amazing, I really would never have thought this possible. Thank you for sharing this information which I have filed away in case of future need, but I really hope never have to follow it! One just never knows though I guess.

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II
Amel 53 # 332. Brisbane

On Mon, Jan 16, 2017 at 8:04 AM, sangaris@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, wrote :

Hi Craig/ Kent

With all that experience and such swift engine removal I was just wondering for future reference, ahead of cruising off myself finally and in case I ever need to do it, how do you lift your engine out?

Do you use the boom and which halyard and winch? Is it strong enough? Any tips for the group?

Thanks for sharing this Craig and Kent.

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II
Amel 53 #332, Brisbane 

Hi Colin, 

My Amel is a Santorin, and your 53 may be a bit different, but, yes, I do use the halyards plus sheet tail ends or any similarly sized lines to lift the engine.

    My engine with transmission weighs 465 pounds. My mizzen staysail – foc d’artimon - halyard (the smallest of the lines I use) is 10mm which has a 4800 pounds tensile strength. ABYC recommends not to exceed 1/5 tensile strength for determining the SWL (Safe Working Load) or, say, about 1000 pounds in my case. Other, more conservative sources, suggest using 1/10 TS for SWL, to account for age and deterioration, which puts me right at the limit. Consider your halyard blocks, too.

    Whatever the case, you are dealing with serious weight and have to be really careful not to put yourself in any position where a miscue by a helper on a winch or a line or block failing will take a lot of the fun out of this project.

    So, now that nobody can sue me, let me start by saying there are lots of ways to skin a cat and I probably don’t do it exactly the same way each time, but here are the basics.  After removing the engine room hatch cover so the engine will clear and disconnecting/unbolting everything – do put plastic caps on the fuel lines - I then put shackles on the engine lifting rings and tie a short sturdy line between the shackles.

Then I take the main sheet out of its block on the tang on the mizzen and run a lifting line from one main winch, through the jib sheet turning block and up through the main sheet block on the tang on the mizzen and then down to the engine, tying a bowline around the line between the shackles. (You could use any spare line, of course, but I use the bitter end of the genoa sheet that had been on the winch.) When you tie the lifting line on you can guess the fore/aft balance point pretty easily and/or adjust the position as you first start to lift the engine.

    Make sure the lifting sheet has a clear lead from its turning block up to the tang – mine has to go aft of the mizzen cap stay. Put the lifting line on the winch, ready to hoist, but before you tension it put a snatch block on it and run a line from the snatch block forward to a mast winch. The tail end of the main sheet works well for this. Do put a second snatch block on this line and suspend that block with a fixed length line down from the boom so this “fore guy” doesn’t press down on the bimini. This “fore guy” is going to give you fore and aft adjustment as you lift.

    Next I put a third line on, tied to the lifting point and going over to the opposite genoa winch – this will allow swinging the engine over to a side cockpit seat after lifting, plus giving lateral adjustment as you lift. Alternatively, you can lift the engine straight up and slide the hatch cover back in place – I find the extra height of the seat means less stooping.

    Finally, and perhaps most important, rig the mizzen staysail halyard to act as a secondary lifting halyard. This does two things: it acts as a safety line (kind of like using a second halyard when you hoist your wife up the mast) and, second, when the angle of the primary lifting line (going to the main sheet tang on the mizzen) gets too tight, you can continue lifting with the second halyard to get enough height to clear the seat.

     At this point you can either lower the engine and go to work on it in your cockpit or swing it over the side to lower onto the dock, or lower it to the bottom as a mooring. Put the main boom to work for going over the side and use a line to the dock, but don’t trust the boom topping lift to hold all the weight – keep the mizzen halyard attached.

I use cardboard boxes under and around to protect from scratching anything.

Cheers from DIY heaven,

Craig Briggs, SN#68, Sangaris – Vero Beach, FL USA





--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronic Connections for a SM2k [1 Attachment]

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Bill, Steve, Hanspeter

Firstly Bill, it is with a heavy heart that we hear this could be your last posting. Of everyone on this forum, it is you who has taught us the most, on so many subjects, always being there to offer advice and help with such passion and commitment to the Amel brand. We still hope you could dial in and participate in the future. Welcome Dan and Lori. 

Steve, from what you have said it appears there is quite a lot of equipment on your boat already. As Alexandre said, take your time before rushing in and replacing anything at all, as long as you can get that all working after discussions with the previous owner. We are away this week returning 26th January so will send a picture of Nav station when we get back. As you can see from Bill's note this is pretty complex electronics, and to get things to talk to each other we hired an expert as it was well beyond our capability. The item they installed to get the old and new equipment to talk to each other was called "actisense" though if your tech guy wanted to know, but there are other brands that will do the job well too.

Hanspeter, we will also send you a picture of the fwd and rear facing camera's and how they appear on the 4 x TV's when we return too. We also have linked the Raymarine ES97 chart info to the TV's so you can flick channels between TV, Mast cameras and Plotter info. Apart from running the wires up the mizzen along with our 2 x radar cables, this job of installing camera's was quite simple.

Colin Streeter
Island Pearl II, Amel 53 #332
Brisbane

On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 9:35 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Bill & Judy Rouse included below]

All,

As maybe one of my last postings and a parting gift for your use, I uploaded to the Files section a slide presentation of "BeBe Electronic Equipment, Reasons, Connections and Interrelationships.pdf." And I attached an overview flowchart to this email.

The 6.5mb file reflects what you can do with B&G Electronics, Furuno and Raymarine; adding things like Furuno heading sensor, Furuno radar 1832 automatic tracking board (ARP-10), AIS Transponder, and PC Computers running OpenCPN chartplotting. I installed 2 PCs for "hot" redundancy which is certainly "double overkill," but you can see how that can be done. BTW, the Furuno 1832 CRT Radar will paint and report TCPA in time and distance and automatically track a target when you install the ARP-10 and a Heading sensor. You can also connect the heading sensor via NMEA to a NMEA multiplexer to distribute heading to PC chartplotters. 

It was very interesting to note our heading yesterday, displayed as a boat icon moving across the chart in heavy weather and high currents. The boat icon's heading was about 20 degrees off of the GPS COG which was displayed as a time/distance vector. This looked like we were going through the water 20 degrees sideways...and we were!!! At 2000 RPM, we were making 2.5kts SOG because of the conditions.

There is detail in the file I uploaded. For instance, where to connect NMEA OUT or IN to the B&G 2000 FFD and how to program and connect to Furuno Radar, GPS, and Raymarine control head and course computer. For instance, when we are in very shallow water, we look at Depth, digitally, in 3" numbers on the Raymarine 7001+ control head...when we are a passage, we might display COG or SOG in 3" numbers on the 7001+ control head...one connected via NEMA from the B&G 2000 FFD, the Raymarine 7001+ is fully capable of displaying many different pieces of NMEA information...a multifunction display unit. This connection will also allow the Raymarine 7001+ to steer in Windvane mode...really great on ocean passages.

I hope this helps you on small electronic connection questions as well as large projects. Don't try to do this all at once...I didn't.

Dan and Lori Carlson are now the owners of BeBe and will keep the same name. As you see BeBe in the future, please say hello to Dan and Lori from Chicago.

Best,

Bill
BeBe #387
Currently St. John with new owners


On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 7:27 AM, John Hayes johnhayes862@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi Steve

Welcome to the club so to speak!  I am travelling about two months ahead of you having just purchased a Santorin sailed out to New Zealand a couple of years ago
It's been a quick learning curve. I've learned a lot from this group and every time I set foot  on Nga Waka

As to your electronics questions I inherited an original set of B & G ELECTRONICS and heaps of European charts not much use in the South Pacific 

So step one was to buy a Vestures AIS transponder (nz) made. Brilliant

Then brought a zeus2 b& g chart plotter, wind speed and direction (easy enough to drop new wires down the mast but you need 100 feet of cable not the 80 foot option)
Replaced the speed sensor with a combined speedo depth sounder in the old sensor hole)

And looking at a forward scanner to go in place of the now redundant depth sounder sensor (planning to head to Vavau Tonga in May

Also spent a fortune on getting a pactor modem so can run emails from the SSB 

Might have been smarter to have brought an iridium hot spot. 

Bringing the boat to CAT 1 have reserviced the life raft adding a n epirb 

Replaced house batteries. All running rigging.  Been over the engine replacing the rubber mounts for the prop drive, impellers hoses oil and flushed and changed the engine fresh water 

The motor on the main outhaul stopped working on day 2 of ownership. Stripped the gear box and motor discovered a bearing in the motor had siezed so replaced both bearings 

Still have to replace a bearing in the wind generator 

Still plenty to go over but am really pleased with my purchase. They are great yachts 

An annual race from our north to South Island was canceled last month because of 50 knot winds. So as a trial I went anyway. The boat was faultless   Very dry and easy to pull out as much sail as appropriate and had a very safe feel about it

Enjoy you purchase you won't be dissapointed

John hayes. Nga Waka based in Wellington nz




On 15/01/2017, at 6:41 PM, Steve Morrison steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:

 

Thank you Colin and Lauren,


Thank you for your detailed response. I admit that it will take me a little research to envision the various components you mentioned, though I am interested to go online and begin to mentally build your system in my head.  It is my understanding that todays systems integrate more completely and with far fewer wires and cables than systems even a few years ago.  Did you experience any issues with installation?  Would you possibly be willing and able to send me a photo of your nav station as well as helm station?  

All the best,
Steve

 
On 14 January 2017, at 7:26 PM, SV Island Pearl II colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:


On Island Pearl II we like the old B&G instruments but we have linked these to two new Raymarine E70 chart plotters (Nav station & rear cabin) plus a new ES97 at the helm. We went with a Raymarine 650 AIS, a Raymarine Network system to network all displays off any one of the plotters chart cards and added a 2nd full new Raymarine Autopilot at the helm with quick change over switch between autopilot 1 and 2.

These are all great but you could do the same with any brand, we just happen to prefer Raymarine now as it is robust (like B&G used to be before being bought out).

By far the best new equipment we added was the latest Raymarine Quantum radar. This little unit is absolutely incredible in picking up even isolated unlit thin mooring poles when night sailing and best of all uses almost nil power!! We now have it on all the time whilst sailing, and for the first time ever we now have peace of mind sailing on pitch black nights with no moonlight! It was not all that expensive either, and we kept the old Amel supplied radar as well as backup and for seeing further but haven't even switched the old one on once since getting the Quantum. Just moved it's screen back in the nav station area so we can fit a monitor in front of it on a swing arm to access the old radar when/if required. Also on the 2nd radar mount (1 meter below the original) we have a fwd and rear facing camera linked to the TV's so can see what's coming and going whilst sailing solo and down making a cup of tea etc..

Lastly, if it is not yet done, have the old B&G instruments linked to your auto-pilots and network. This way everything talks to each other via NMEA. We also have 4 extra Raymarine i 70 displays on the boat so we can see wind, radar, AIS, Speed, Depth on these too, plus to get the benefit of using the new autopilot on "wind pilot" mode which we sometimes find handy. Possibly all the I70's was overkill though and not necessary as we generally only have 2 of these on most of the time. 

But of everything I would say absolutely the Quantum Radar was the very best buy.

Colin & Lauren Streeter, 
Island Pearl II, Amel 53 # 332
Brisbane

On Sun, Jan 15, 2017 at 8:20 AM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Good afternoon Steve, 

First, congratulations for becoming the owner of #380, you definitely acquire a beautiful sailing vessel and welcome to the Amel Family.  

I can’t reply your question, but want to pick your mind on it…  

Just like you, when I purchased my SM2K not so long ago in 2012, I was very excited, had lots of ideas… changing, upgrading, etc… 
many people (Bill, Kent, etc.) gave the same advice: don’t change anything for at least one year.  

If I may ask, what is wrong with your current Furuno radar? Just Old? Not the latest?  
The technician that installed my ICOM AIS Transmitter in 2013, give me his opinion on the rest of my electronics, since he was highly recommended and I would have done (right or wrong) anything he said. He actually said my Furuno Radar (regardless of its age) is a great one, still used by many fishermen, so don’t replace it. And I follow his advice.  

Regarding the Navigation equipments, my plan was to do like Francisco and Oddette on Peregrinus SM2K #250 having a B&G Zeus 12 with slave monitor, etc.).
Therefore, to be honest, the 20% spending budget on the purchasing price for the 1st year, was already spent, so I decided to keep using multiple (for back up reason) iPad with Navionics charts on and Bad Elf to send GPS location through Blue Tooth.  
I am sure it is very deferent to what most people use, but has been working very well for me for the last 4 years in the Bahamas and the Caribbean.  
I can walk anywhere I want with my iPad (with water proof protection), etc. 
If not use as a primary, I would definitely recommend use it as back up, countless stories of sailing I met (non-Amel owners) who had their primary Chart plotter failing and end up using the iPad + GPS sending.  

As one of my instructors said, don’t spend too much money upgrading what is already working (and has been working sufficiently for over a decade), think more about spending money on “expected/scheduled” maintenance (like Bow Thruster, C-Drive, engine, genset, etc.).  

Just sharing, and congratulations again on purchasing SM#280!

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Harbor View Marina, Tortola, BVI

--------------------------------------------
On Sat, 1/14/17, steve_morrison@...m [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics questions for 2003 sm#380
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, January 14, 2017, 3:36 PM




 









Hi all, I am headed down to Fort
Lauderdale next week to continue getting to know my newly
acquired SM and am planning on meeting with Jeff Grossman of
Associated Electronics to evaluate the current Furuno vx2
set up and discuss possible upgrades.  I have recently seen
a few comments on the forum warning against letting regular
'electronics types' poke around and work in the
electrically bonded world of Amel electronics.  Are there
specific things I need to be aware of before going ahead
with an upgrade?  Are there 24v/bonded protocols or
specialists in the south Florida
area?
I must say, the sense I get
from reading the various threads on the forum make me feel
as if I need to educate myself to a level higher than most
of those I ask to service my vessel so that I can personally
oversee all work done to her, and this seems daunting to a
new owner.  
Those that have altered or
replaced the original Nav electronics (Chartplotters, radar,
AIS, etc), what have you gone with, and where and who did
the work, or would you recommend to do the
work?
Thanks for your time,
consideration, and knowledge,Steve
MorrisonSM#380
TouraiFt Lauderdale






-- 
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445






--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Replacement Chain Counter with new Lewmar/Maxwell/AA system

Ben and Gayle Super Maramu #347
 

Hi George,
If you were happy with original unit, they are still available from manufacture in Pennsylvania for about $100.  Model is IB5124.        It's a 45 minute job to switch old for new.   Assume your boat has same as mine.  When you post,  list your serial number; you will get responses from similar vintage boats.  See manufacturer below:

ifm efector, inc.

PO Box 8538-307

Philadelphia PA 19171-0307

E-mail:  mailto:info@...

Homepage: http://www.ifmefector.com



Ben Driver
La Bella Vita
SM #347

On Jan 15, 2017, at 4:43 PM, gdagreen@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I have a 2004 Amel 53( COCO) with a non functioning chain counter and intend to replace it with  either a wired or wireless system from Lewmar/Maxwell/AA ( They are all made by  AA!).

Would be most appreciative to learn of other owners who have dealt with this problem. Specifically:

1. Can the existing original wire from the windlass to the cockpit be easily replaced by snaking the new wires onto the old or by another method?
1.b  If not, can the original wiring be used to splice onto the wire end fittings of the AA system without loss of signal strength.
2. Failing that, wireless systems are availible, but I have no idea how reliable they are, given the distance from windlass to cockpit. Experience,please??  I believe wireless systems work up to 30ft.

many thanks in advance

George



Taking your engine out

Craig Briggs
 

---In amelyachtowners@..., <colin.d.streeter@...> wrote :

Hi Craig/ Kent

With all that experience and such swift engine removal I was just wondering for future reference, ahead of cruising off myself finally and in case I ever need to do it, how do you lift your engine out?

Do you use the boom and which halyard and winch? Is it strong enough? Any tips for the group?

Thanks for sharing this Craig and Kent.

Colin Streeter, Island Pearl II
Amel 53 #332, Brisbane 

Hi Colin, 

My Amel is a Santorin, and your 53 may be a bit different, but, yes, I do use the halyards plus sheet tail ends or any similarly sized lines to lift the engine.

    My engine with transmission weighs 465 pounds. My mizzen staysail – foc d’artimon - halyard (the smallest of the lines I use) is 10mm which has a 4800 pounds tensile strength. ABYC recommends not to exceed 1/5 tensile strength for determining the SWL (Safe Working Load) or, say, about 1000 pounds in my case. Other, more conservative sources, suggest using 1/10 TS for SWL, to account for age and deterioration, which puts me right at the limit. Consider your halyard blocks, too.

    Whatever the case, you are dealing with serious weight and have to be really careful not to put yourself in any position where a miscue by a helper on a winch or a line or block failing will take a lot of the fun out of this project.

    So, now that nobody can sue me, let me start by saying there are lots of ways to skin a cat and I probably don’t do it exactly the same way each time, but here are the basics.  After removing the engine room hatch cover so the engine will clear and disconnecting/unbolting everything – do put plastic caps on the fuel lines - I then put shackles on the engine lifting rings and tie a short sturdy line between the shackles.

Then I take the main sheet out of its block on the tang on the mizzen and run a lifting line from one main winch, through the jib sheet turning block and up through the main sheet block on the tang on the mizzen and then down to the engine, tying a bowline around the line between the shackles. (You could use any spare line, of course, but I use the bitter end of the genoa sheet that had been on the winch.) When you tie the lifting line on you can guess the fore/aft balance point pretty easily and/or adjust the position as you first start to lift the engine.

    Make sure the lifting sheet has a clear lead from its turning block up to the tang – mine has to go aft of the mizzen cap stay. Put the lifting line on the winch, ready to hoist, but before you tension it put a snatch block on it and run a line from the snatch block forward to a mast winch. The tail end of the main sheet works well for this. Do put a second snatch block on this line and suspend that block with a fixed length line down from the boom so this “fore guy” doesn’t press down on the bimini. This “fore guy” is going to give you fore and aft adjustment as you lift.

    Next I put a third line on, tied to the lifting point and going over to the opposite genoa winch – this will allow swinging the engine over to a side cockpit seat after lifting, plus giving lateral adjustment as you lift. Alternatively, you can lift the engine straight up and slide the hatch cover back in place – I find the extra height of the seat means less stooping.

    Finally, and perhaps most important, rig the mizzen staysail halyard to act as a secondary lifting halyard. This does two things: it acts as a safety line (kind of like using a second halyard when you hoist your wife up the mast) and, second, when the angle of the primary lifting line (going to the main sheet tang on the mizzen) gets too tight, you can continue lifting with the second halyard to get enough height to clear the seat.

     At this point you can either lower the engine and go to work on it in your cockpit or swing it over the side to lower onto the dock, or lower it to the bottom as a mooring. Put the main boom to work for going over the side and use a line to the dock, but don’t trust the boom topping lift to hold all the weight – keep the mizzen halyard attached.

I use cardboard boxes under and around to protect from scratching anything.

Cheers from DIY heaven,

Craig Briggs, SN#68, Sangaris – Vero Beach, FL USA



Replacement Chain Counter with new Lewmar/Maxwell/AA system

George Green
 

I have a 2004 Amel 53( COCO) with a non functioning chain counter and intend to replace it with  either a wired or wireless system from Lewmar/Maxwell/AA ( They are all made by  AA!).

Would be most appreciative to learn of other owners who have dealt with this problem. Specifically:

1. Can the existing original wire from the windlass to the cockpit be easily replaced by snaking the new wires onto the old or by another method?
1.b  If not, can the original wiring be used to splice onto the wire end fittings of the AA system without loss of signal strength.
2. Failing that, wireless systems are availible, but I have no idea how reliable they are, given the distance from windlass to cockpit. Experience,please??  I believe wireless systems work up to 30ft.

many thanks in advance

George



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Onan frequency variation

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Jean Philippe is right!
Even thought I mentioned it a few months ago (1500 rpm for 50 herzt) I forgot about it!
Unless you can hear your genset going faster (which I hope not) than looks like my intuition is on the right track regarding the microwave oven leaking...
Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 1/15/17, Jean-Pierre Germain jgermain@xs4all.nl [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Onan frequency variation
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, January 15, 2017, 1:51 PM


 









Hertz are a direct relation to the RPM of
your genset AFAIK. 
Was great meeting
yesterday pm. :-)
JPGEleuthera SM 007
On 15 Jan
2017, at 14:49, derickgates@comcast.net
[amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:
















 






Hi all,
I recently installed meters
on my 230 volt panel and have been using them to monitor the
volts, amps and frequency of both shore power and the
generator.  Today, one of my crew noticed that the
generator was unexpectedly putting out at much to high a
frequency (75 Hz).  We turned off the microwave he was
using, but left the 100 amp and 30 amp chargers going.  The
frequency settled down to the normal
50Hz.
Not
understanding how a microwave could affect the frequency put
out by the generator, we did several experiments and found
that the frequency began to fluctuate under high loads, and
the microwave was not part of the issue.  Later on, high
loads had no impact on the frequency, so the problem seems
to be intermittent.  Has anyone else experienced this
issue?
Derick
GatesSM2K#400 BravaCurrently at Pigeon
Islands, Guadeloupe






















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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Onan frequency variation

Jean-Pierre Germain <jgermain@...>
 

Hertz are a direct relation to the RPM of your genset AFAIK. 

Was great meeting yesterday pm. :-)

JPG
Eleuthera SM 007


On 15 Jan 2017, at 14:49, derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,


I recently installed meters on my 230 volt panel and have been using them to monitor the volts, amps and frequency of both shore power and the generator.  Today, one of my crew noticed that the generator was unexpectedly putting out at much to high a frequency (75 Hz).  We turned off the microwave he was using, but left the 100 amp and 30 amp chargers going.  The frequency settled down to the normal 50Hz.


Not understanding how a microwave could affect the frequency put out by the generator, we did several experiments and found that the frequency began to fluctuate under high loads, and the microwave was not part of the issue.  Later on, high loads had no impact on the frequency, so the problem seems to be intermittent.  Has anyone else experienced this issue?


Derick Gates

SM2K#400 Brava

Currently at Pigeon Islands, Guadeloupe


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

I don’t know.

Out of curiosity, why do you want to remove your antifouling?
The only time I read that was from Kent who use the SeaHawk 44 antifouling (on which nothing will stick) and wanted to put a different one.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Harbor View Marina, Tortola, BVI




--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 1/15/17, santorinlo18@yahoo.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Sandblasting Good or Bad?(to remove Antifouling to Gellcoat)
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, January 15, 2017, 12:11 PM


 









Hi Forum, Just about to scrap bottom -
is sand blasting good method? seen the end result - looks
neat but rough compare to manual. Not sure if good or bad,
however, about 50% cost compare to manual + chemical. Any
experiences or view









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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Onan frequency variation

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good afternoon Derick,

I haven’t use my microwave in a while, next time I use the genset I will try.

Do you have a microwave leak detector?
My mom use to have one to periodically check for microwave oven leaks

Without technical proof, my intuition tells me your microwave is leaking creating a false reading on the AC Meter, which I guess is near your 220 Volt panel.

I was just look at the specs of my MDP, Dolphin, etc. Battery charger, and they accept 50 to 60 Hw +/1 10%
I also look at a Victron and it says 45 to 65 Hezt (still +/- 10%)
I think a real 75 Hz would damage them…

Whether I am right or wrong, you obviously can’t use your microwave…

Please let us know what you find!

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
Harbor View Marina, Tortola, BVI





--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 1/15/17, derickgates@comcast.net [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Onan frequency variation
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Sunday, January 15, 2017, 12:49 PM


 









Hi all,
I recently installed meters
on my 230 volt panel and have been using them to monitor the
volts, amps and frequency of both shore power and the
generator.  Today, one of my crew noticed that the
generator was unexpectedly putting out at much to high a
frequency (75 Hz).  We turned off the microwave he was
using, but left the 100 amp and 30 amp chargers going.  The
frequency settled down to the normal
50Hz.
Not
understanding how a microwave could affect the frequency put
out by the generator, we did several experiments and found
that the frequency began to fluctuate under high loads, and
the microwave was not part of the issue.  Later on, high
loads had no impact on the frequency, so the problem seems
to be intermittent.  Has anyone else experienced this
issue?
Derick
GatesSM2K#400 BravaCurrently at Pigeon
Islands, Guadeloupe









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Onan frequency variation

Derick Gates SM2K #400 Brava
 

Hi all,


I recently installed meters on my 230 volt panel and have been using them to monitor the volts, amps and frequency of both shore power and the generator.  Today, one of my crew noticed that the generator was unexpectedly putting out at much to high a frequency (75 Hz).  We turned off the microwave he was using, but left the 100 amp and 30 amp chargers going.  The frequency settled down to the normal 50Hz.


Not understanding how a microwave could affect the frequency put out by the generator, we did several experiments and found that the frequency began to fluctuate under high loads, and the microwave was not part of the issue.  Later on, high loads had no impact on the frequency, so the problem seems to be intermittent.  Has anyone else experienced this issue?


Derick Gates

SM2K#400 Brava

Currently at Pigeon Islands, Guadeloupe