Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: New owners of an old Maramu

John Clark
 

Lagoonies is great!

On Apr 18, 2017 8:14 PM, "jacob.champness@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thanks, John!

That sounds great. We'd love to get together. Maybe hook up at Lagoonies?

All the best!


Re: New owners of an old Maramu

Jacob Champness
 

Thanks, John!

That sounds great. We'd love to get together. Maybe hook up at Lagoonies?

All the best!


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Reefing procedure

John Clark
 

I second very strongly Bill's comment to WATCH what is happening.  the motorized sails and winches are great but can cause a tremendous amount of damage very quickly.  

Vent de Soleil  SM 37
Great Bay St. Maarten

On Tue, Apr 18, 2017 at 6:15 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I'll add a couple of my own thoughts to Ian's excellent comments.  Some might be obvious, but it never hurts to be explicit...


Roll and unroll the sail while it is luffing.

Whenever possible (I really want to say "always") roll and unroll the sail while you are headed far enough up into the wind that the sail is not being dragged tightly across the edge of the gap in the mast.

On any in-mast furler, if the boom rises too high when unfurling, the top of the sail might not unroll properly.  If you don't have a vang, ease the sheet enough to let the sail luff, but not enough for the boom to rise too high. This is another reason for not unfurling too far off the wind.  On a close reach you can put the traveler under the boom and have some control of its height will still leaving it free to move side to side.

Always, always, always WATCH what's happening.  You do not get the tactile feedback you get with a manual system that lets you know when something has gone pear-shaped. If you keep pulling with the motors when something is wrong, something has to give, and it is usually the most expensive part!

Our usual sail setting goes like this... stop the engine, and while off the wind a bit, unfurl the jib.  Sheet in the jib, and sail as close to the wind as it easily allows-a comfortable close reach.  Then at that point of sail, set the boomed sails, then trim to desired course, and off you go.

When it is time to put the sails away, we furl the mizzen and main while on a close reach.  Once we are sailing under jib alone, we start the engine, and furl the jib.

Something to remember:  Unlike the jib, the main does not really care which way you roll it up.  Sometimes on a starboard tack, if you are a bit more off the wind than ideal, you can more easily furl the sail if you roll it "backwards" (i.e., rotating clockwise looking down the mast) avoiding a tight rub across the edge of the mast.  Just be sure you unroll it the right way the next time you use it!

Bill Kinney
SM160  Harmonie
Culebra, P.R.



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dinghy choices?

John Clark
 

Hi Steve,
  Gosh there are a lot of new Amel owners right now!  I also just bought my SM 37 in December and am still learning...  I am in St. Maarten right now and also just bought a new dinghy.  My thoughts on dinghy:

Vent de Soleil (VDS) came with a small Zodiac with a soft inflatable floor.   I think it is a 6-7 ft.  She also came with two outboards,  a 4 hp Yamaha and a 2.5hp Suzuki.    All serviceable and OK when in calm water.  Slow but OK.  

After we started sailing and anchoring out, the shortcomings of the dinghy became apparent.  Soft bottom will not go up on a plane, so you are pushing a barge, and the low HP engines while reliable were just not able to push a loaded dinghy (three people or loaded with provisions) through swells without everything getting wet.  It would take about 40 minutes to get from Budget Marine to the outer anchorage at Simpson Bay. 

  I got a really, really good deal at Budget Marine in St. Maarten on a new AB Mares RIB with a center console and 20hp Tohatsu outboard.  She handles three people and provisions with authority and gets up on a plane with ease, cutting thru the waves rather than plowing.    I am very happy with the tender.  I opted for a center console tender because I liked it and planned to be island hopping in the Caribbean for a while where I could tow it instead of mounting on deck.  I have not seen any issues towing the tender, but have been doing very easy day or two day sails.   I am comfortable going in good weather from one island to the next towing, but would definitely want a more secure set up for bad weather or long distance.  I will probably sell the center console tender later as we make out way west and go for some sort of RIB that can be inverted on deck.  But for now we have a cool tender.

If you are on the Amel FB page you will see the conversation Bill Rouse and I are having about mounting the dinghy while making a passage.   The old dinghy was stored on the aft cabin roof, with the outboards on the rail.  The 20HP seems a tad big for the rail(and at the moment I am retaining both dinghies and all three motors) so I am working to place the 20hp in the lazarette and cradle the new RIB on cabin roof fwd of the main mast.  We are fabricating a very simple low profile cradle for the dinghy.  A bit of a hassle caused by the center console setup.

The davits that came with the boat seem flimsy to me and are attached tot he thin part of the transom, so i won't use them for anything heavy.  Even the previous owners did not use them.  They are shiny though.   :)

I too am waiting for an Emek arch...Riza told me it is supposed to be shipping in a week.  I opted to leave out the davit option because I am still unsure of what my long term dinghy selection will be.  Are you receiving your arch in Miami/Ft. Lauderdale?


Regards,   John

John Clark
Vent de Soleil SM 37
Great Bay St. Maarten

On Apr 18, 2017 6:15 PM, "steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

When we bought SM380 this fall, it was in need of a new dinghy, and as we prepare to move aboard in mid June, the time has come to make some decisions.  We are a family of four (girls 8&10) and plan to spend at least the next season in the Caribbean if not two seasons there before pushing through into the Pacific.  Riza promises that our aft arch will ship soon and so we will have aft davits onto which to pull up in the evenings at anchor.  I am looking at the AB Lamina series 10AL or 10UL.  


My question is this - what are some of you using?  How big, how small, and how heavy.  Also, where do you stow it underway, and how - in a cradle, upside down, deflated...?  What are some of your experiences and what do you think are the most important considerations.  


Thanks for your time,

Steve Morrison

SM 380 TouRai

Brunswick, Georgia



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dinghy choices?

Germain Jean-Pierre <jgermain@...>
 

Hello Steve,

I bought the 9.5AL because it accepts a 15 HP Yamaha 2 Stroke and planes nicely 4 up.  It will also let you take the kids water skiing.

It fits nicely on the forward deck for long passages…. in spite of claims to the contrary, the solar gantry is not man enough to take the weight of the dinghy during heavy sea conditions.  (I have the dual cross braces installed and I consider these absolutely mandatory for safe dinghy carriage.)

I also installed heavy tie downs to attach the rib to the fore deck.

Kind regards,



Jean-Pierre Germain,
SY Eleuthera SM007


On 18 Apr 2017, at 18:15, steve_morrison@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

When we bought SM380 this fall, it was in need of a new dinghy, and as we prepare to move aboard in mid June, the time has come to make some decisions.  We are a family of four (girls 8&10) and plan to spend at least the next season in the Caribbean if not two seasons there before pushing through into the Pacific.  Riza promises that our aft arch will ship soon and so we will have aft davits onto which to pull up in the evenings at anchor.  I am looking at the AB Lamina series 10AL or 10UL.  


My question is this - what are some of you using?  How big, how small, and how heavy.  Also, where do you stow it underway, and how - in a cradle, upside down, deflated...?  What are some of your experiences and what do you think are the most important considerations.  


Thanks for your time,

Steve Morrison

SM 380 TouRai

Brunswick, Georgia





Re: Reefing procedure

greatketch@...
 

I'll add a couple of my own thoughts to Ian's excellent comments.  Some might be obvious, but it never hurts to be explicit...

Roll and unroll the sail while it is luffing.

Whenever possible (I really want to say "always") roll and unroll the sail while you are headed far enough up into the wind that the sail is not being dragged tightly across the edge of the gap in the mast.

On any in-mast furler, if the boom rises too high when unfurling, the top of the sail might not unroll properly.  If you don't have a vang, ease the sheet enough to let the sail luff, but not enough for the boom to rise too high. This is another reason for not unfurling too far off the wind.  On a close reach you can put the traveler under the boom and have some control of its height will still leaving it free to move side to side.

Always, always, always WATCH what's happening.  You do not get the tactile feedback you get with a manual system that lets you know when something has gone pear-shaped. If you keep pulling with the motors when something is wrong, something has to give, and it is usually the most expensive part!

Our usual sail setting goes like this... stop the engine, and while off the wind a bit, unfurl the jib.  Sheet in the jib, and sail as close to the wind as it easily allows-a comfortable close reach.  Then at that point of sail, set the boomed sails, then trim to desired course, and off you go.

When it is time to put the sails away, we furl the mizzen and main while on a close reach.  Once we are sailing under jib alone, we start the engine, and furl the jib.

Something to remember:  Unlike the jib, the main does not really care which way you roll it up.  Sometimes on a starboard tack, if you are a bit more off the wind than ideal, you can more easily furl the sail if you roll it "backwards" (i.e., rotating clockwise looking down the mast) avoiding a tight rub across the edge of the mast.  Just be sure you unroll it the right way the next time you use it!

Bill Kinney
SM160  Harmonie
Culebra, P.R.


Dinghy choices?

steve_morrison@...
 

When we bought SM380 this fall, it was in need of a new dinghy, and as we prepare to move aboard in mid June, the time has come to make some decisions.  We are a family of four (girls 8&10) and plan to spend at least the next season in the Caribbean if not two seasons there before pushing through into the Pacific.  Riza promises that our aft arch will ship soon and so we will have aft davits onto which to pull up in the evenings at anchor.  I am looking at the AB Lamina series 10AL or 10UL.  


My question is this - what are some of you using?  How big, how small, and how heavy.  Also, where do you stow it underway, and how - in a cradle, upside down, deflated...?  What are some of your experiences and what do you think are the most important considerations.  


Thanks for your time,

Steve Morrison

SM 380 TouRai

Brunswick, Georgia


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Reefing procedure

JOHN HAYES
 

Got left in the same when I brought mine in august last year

Yep managed to jam the sails in a few times but not insolvable .......  lots of practice and make sure your heading into wind when you furl in 


You might also want to go over furler gear boxes and motors to make sure all in good shape. Not doing that cost me a newheadsail when the furler stopped in a 50 knot blow and I had not properly understood how to rig the back up manual system!

A 1500 mile shake down cruise sorted out how to work the systems. Worth also taking the seawater engine cooling pump off the motor and checking the drive spline for wear as on the Perkins if you have one. Seems the pump requires more power than the spline provides and is subject to wear

Best
John
Nga Waka 




On 19/04/2017, at 2:22 AM, earoygqnobuqyxflnnlje6pvepcircllumuqqvak@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello, 

 This is a more procedural than technical inquiry.  We'll be getting to know our new/old Santorin sloop Liesse SN6 next month and the deal did not provide any seller tutelage on the boat systems unfortunately.  My familiarity with reefing is primarily full battened slab.  I am anxious to avoid either jamming the sail in mast slot or over stressing the motors.  Are there any Amel specific precepts/techniques one should know about, particularly when reefing in building wind conditions to avoid these unpleasant/dangerous potential events. Thanks to everyone for so generously sharing your expertise. 

 (Also congratulations James on your purchase of the Maramu, ex Bon Edda, you will just love how quiet that engine is!)

 Best regards,   Dave  s/v Liesse   SN6




Re: Reefing procedure

Ian Park
 

Dave,
We had little knowledge when we got our Santorin 3 years ago. First of all it would be very hard to jam the sails in the masts, they are a very well designed unit.
We just ease the main sheet and operate the out haul and furler just keeping sufficient tension for a neat furl. You will be able to tell if the motors are under duress as they will work both more slowly and a little louder! The mizzen you will find is straight forward using the same slackening of the sheet.
The Santorin shares many systems of the Super Maramu, but being a bit smaller the Santorin is nicely over engineered!
Just beware the Genoa furling motor. It is very powerful. Keep an eye on your ballooner halliards. If you don't ensure they are routed properly away from the forestay when not in use they can snarl things up and bend one or both the stainless bars that stick out on the top furler drum. I learnt the hard way!
I have managed to furl the main on a dead run in a strong wind in an emergency.
Not having sailed a ketch before I had to experiment with different ways of reefing. It's worth trying reeling the main first - the boat sails fine on genny and mizzen in a blow on a reach.
I look forward to other folks advice here.
Great boats, wouldn't swap!

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN96


Reefing procedure

earoygqnobuqyxflnnlje6pvepcircllumuqqvak@...
 

Hello, 

 This is a more procedural than technical inquiry.  We'll be getting to know our new/old Santorin sloop Liesse SN6 next month and the deal did not provide any seller tutelage on the boat systems unfortunately.  My familiarity with reefing is primarily full battened slab.  I am anxious to avoid either jamming the sail in mast slot or over stressing the motors.  Are there any Amel specific precepts/techniques one should know about, particularly when reefing in building wind conditions to avoid these unpleasant/dangerous potential events. Thanks to everyone for so generously sharing your expertise. 

 (Also congratulations James on your purchase of the Maramu, ex Bon Edda, you will just love how quiet that engine is!)

 Best regards,   Dave  s/v Liesse   SN6




Re: rigg of santorin when should it be changed?

Craig Briggs
 

Hello Lars,
Perhaps there are some items that should only be repaired if broken (maybe an electronic instrument or similar?), but something that holds up your mast does not fit in that category. The fact that your rigger felt that part of your 24 year rigging needed changing strongly suggests that the rest is not far behind. With all due respect, this does sound like a case of penny wise and pound foolish. I do agree with his advice to remove the protective plastic.
Cheers, Craig Briggs, SN#68 Sangaris



---In amelyachtowners@..., <yachtsalvagny@...> wrote :

Hi Christoph

I have just had my 24 years old Santorin Ketch rig checked by a professionel rigger. He also was very impressed by the quality of everything on the boat and found only minor problems resulting in changing 5 wires and some screws.

He advised to get rid of all the protective plastic around wires and screws as they collect salt and advances corrosion. 

So I would trust the rigger - as I have done - and only repair if broken and not just change everything.

Best regards
Lars
Santorin ketch #79, 1993 - Salvagny
Currently lying i Copenhagen, Denmark


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] New owners of an old Maramu

John Clark
 

Hi Jacob,
   congratulations on the upcoming launch.  I am currently anchored in Great Bay on the Dutch side.  I just got back to the boat after a couple of weeks in the States.  I have fallen out of touch these last few weeks while out of town, but I think there are several Amelians here in St. Maarten right now. We should try for a meet up...maybe "launch party."  

John Clark
Vent de Soleil  SM 37
Great Bay St. Maarten 


  

On Tue, Apr 18, 2017 at 12:35 AM, jacob.champness@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi all.

We're the new owners of Maramu 202, launched as Bon Edda in 1986. We've got her on the hard in French St. Martin while we address some deferred maintenance issues, but hope to launch her soon. I look forward to being a member of the Amel community. Thanks to you all for making it so awesome. Thanks to David for encouraging us, Olivier for a our survey, Horst for commissioning her, and Brigitte for helping us bring it all together!

Jacob, April, and our 2 girls
Maramu #202
Lark



New owners of an old Maramu

Jacob Champness
 

Hi all.

We're the new owners of Maramu 202, launched as Bon Edda in 1986. We've got her on the hard in French St. Martin while we address some deferred maintenance issues, but hope to launch her soon. I look forward to being a member of the Amel community. Thanks to you all for making it so awesome. Thanks to David for encouraging us, Olivier for a our survey, Horst for commissioning her, and Brigitte for helping us bring it all together!

Jacob, April, and our 2 girls
Maramu #202
Lark


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Hauling out Hurricane season in Cairns

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Fred,

I assume that you have ruled out New Zealand for Cyclone Season? If not, you will probably find New Zealand to be about 2/3rds the price of Australia on most everything.

We loved Gulf Harbour in New Zealand and hauled out there for maintenance. We were in the water there for 5 months, bought a used car and toured North and South Island.

We did stay at Cairns Marlin Marina in Carina and it was OK in the water. When we arrived in Australia from New Caledonia, we made landfall at Mackay and stayed in the water for about a month at Mackay Marina Village & Shipyard...it was also OK.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
X-BeBe #387
Amel School 
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, Apr 17, 2017 at 5:06 PM, scentstone@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

First thank you to all members for this awesome forum.

I just achieved a passage from Panama to Raiatea and I plan to haul out the boat in Cairns at the next September for 7/8 months.

I see that there are many shipyards in the area and I would like if one of you is able to provide some insights or experience report in order to help me to make a decison


Thanks a lot and kind regards.

Fred

S/V Scentstone SM2K #375



Hauling out Hurricane season in Cairns

scentstone
 

First thank you to all members for this awesome forum.

I just achieved a passage from Panama to Raiatea and I plan to haul out the boat in Cairns at the next September for 7/8 months.

I see that there are many shipyards in the area and I would like if one of you is able to provide some insights or experience report in order to help me to make a decison


Thanks a lot and kind regards.

Fred

S/V Scentstone SM2K #375


Re: rigg of santorin when should it be changed?

Amel Salvagny
 

Hi Christoph

I have just had my 24 years old Santorin Ketch rig checked by a professionel rigger. He also was very impressed by the quality of everything on the boat and found only minor problems resulting in changing 5 wires and some screws.

He advised to get rid of all the protective plastic around wires and screws as they collect salt and advances corrosion. 

So I would trust the rigger - as I have done - and only repair if broken and not just change everything.

Best regards
Lars
Santorin ketch #79, 1993 - Salvagny
Currently lying i Copenhagen, Denmark


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: rigg of santorin when should it be changed?

antonio scipioni
 

Hi christof, 
I bought two years ago my santorin (1994) and he was rigged with original standing rig. I sailed for 500 miles in very strong conditions and in Gulf of Lion with 25/30 knots. All was ok and without problems. Anyway I changed the rig and repaint the masts, I bought the rig in France by acmo and I did myself the installation and the dismounting/remounting. If you have experience and time is the better way to know your boat. If you want I can do this job for you in Rome in the Nautilus Marina on the river, I can send you a quote about. I can say that is no so difficult but you need tools and patience. 
Br 
Antonio
Santorin 108 Vagabundo

Inviato da iPhone

Il giorno 13 apr 2017, alle ore 15:30, biohead@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> ha scritto:

 

Hi Paul,
I just had rigging replaced in Le Marin by Caraibe for 10,500 Euro. They are the shop that Amel employs in Martinique and uses all original ACMO hardware.

They were working on a SM when I got my quote and I followed another SM into the work pier. As we were leaving another Amel was pulling in, so they are quite experienced with Amel rigs.
It was three days work, they handled everythIng.

Gatean was the fellow I talked to, he can speak english.

Regards. John

John Clark
Vent de Soleil SM 37
Great Bay, Sint Maarten


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Chlorine Removal with Carbon Filter

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi,
comment on both these threads. Carbon filters. Having seen the limitations, I have one installed but it would be 5 or 6 years since we put any water in our tank. Exclusively we fill with the water maker. Bilge pump warning light. We have a light, and have added a warning buzzer when the main pump is running. Irritating perhaps but the best warning, day or night, asleep or awake.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 18 April 2017 at 05:41 "'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Mark,

One of the things I had on my list to add to BeBe, but failed to get to, was two add two LED pilot lights near the B&G Boat Speed Gauge. A Blue one for fresh water pump and a red one for gray water bilge pump. It would be a simple job to do.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School 
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Mon, Apr 17, 2017 at 12:16 PM, mark_pitt@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

This discussion of an extra carbon filter between the fresh water pump and the water maker flush reminds me of an incident on my SM last summer.  On an overnight cruise, my wife noticed the bilge pump was on when she went to the head and was also on when she returned.  She checked the bilge pump counter (Aqualarm Bilge Pump Cycle Counter, thanks for the recommendation Eric!) and it revealed there had been many bilge cycles.  I looked in the engine room and found that the 10 inch filter cartridge housing had split and fresh water was gushing out.  This was not the Amel/Dessalator housing supplied with the watermaker but one that I had added.  I lost one-half a tank of fresh water.  


The housing was about 6 years old and either had a defective weakness since manufacture, or the heat of the engine room caused it to weaken.  I am replacing it with a Pentek 158319 1/2" #10 High Temperature Slim Line Black Housing tha t is rated for 160 degrees Fahrenheit.  Standard housings are made from styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) and are rated for 125 degrees.  That gets close to engine room temperatures when the ambient temperature is high.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III, SM#419, Carloforte, Italy

 



 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Chlorine Removal with Carbon Filter

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Mark,

One of the things I had on my list to add to BeBe, but failed to get to, was two add two LED pilot lights near the B&G Boat Speed Gauge. A Blue one for fresh water pump and a red one for gray water bilge pump. It would be a simple job to do.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School 
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Mon, Apr 17, 2017 at 12:16 PM, mark_pitt@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

This discussion of an extra carbon filter between the fresh water pump and the water maker flush reminds me of an incident on my SM last summer.  On an overnight cruise, my wife noticed the bilge pump was on when she went to the head and was also on when she returned.  She checked the bilge pump counter (Aqualarm Bilge Pump Cycle Counter, thanks for the recommendation Eric!) and it revealed there had been many bilge cycles.  I looked in the engine room and found that the 10 inch filter cartridge housing had split and fresh water was gushing out.  This was not the Amel/Dessalator housing supplied with the watermaker but one that I had added.  I lost one-half a tank of fresh water.  


The housing was about 6 years old and either had a defective weakness since manufacture, or the heat of the engine room caused it to weaken.  I am replacing it with a Pentek 158319 1/2" #10 High Temperature Slim Line Black Housing tha t is rated for 160 degrees Fahrenheit.  Standard housings are made from styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) and are rated for 125 degrees.  That gets close to engine room temperatures when the ambient temperature is high.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III, SM#419, Carloforte, Italy

 



Re: Chlorine Removal with Carbon Filter

Mark Pitt
 

This discussion of an extra carbon filter between the fresh water pump and the water maker flush reminds me of an incident on my SM last summer.  On an overnight cruise, my wife noticed the bilge pump was on when she went to the head and was also on when she returned.  She checked the bilge pump counter (Aqualarm Bilge Pump Cycle Counter, thanks for the recommendation Eric!) and it revealed there had been many bilge cycles.  I looked in the engine room and found that the 10 inch filter cartridge housing had split and fresh water was gushing out.  This was not the Amel/Dessalator housing supplied with the watermaker but one that I had added.  I lost one-half a tank of fresh water.  

The housing was about 6 years old and either had a defective weakness since manufacture, or the heat of the engine room caused it to weaken.  I am replacing it with a Pentek 158319 1/2" #10 High Temperature Slim Line Black Housing that is rated for 160 degrees Fahrenheit.  Standard housings are made from styrene-acrylonitrile (SAN) and are rated for 125 degrees.  That gets close to engine room temperatures when the ambient temperature is high.

Mark Pitt
Sabbatical III, SM#419, Carloforte, Italy