Date   

Master switch

pjn.mccallin@...
 

Just to advise charging with master switches turned "on" issue resolved take care!

Patrick CARAMELLE 385


Re: Santorin - propeller generator - Hutchinson belt to be changed

Ian Park
 

Thanks Craig. Haven't done the job myself. Just watched. Good tip about taking the weight off.
Ian


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Creaking floor plate

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Dean,

You are correct. The wood flooring extends from the solon down the passageway to the aft berth. Some of us, me included, were thinking about the Super Maramu with carpet in the passageway.

I do not know how that faux teak is applied in the passage way and if there is no obvious application, I would bet that it is attached with adhesive. 

If you consider this boat, I would certainly have the surveyor look closely in this area to determine why you have squeaking. One possibility, and if I am correct about the adhesive, maybe this area of the boat became wet. I would have the surveyor look closely there to eliminate that theoretical possibility. And, of course, more 54 owners may respond with better information. I have sailed a 54, but have not been aboard for long periods.

I hope this helps you and good luck on your search. Have you worked with Joel Potter in your search? He knows more about Amels that anyone in the Americas, and has sold more Amels than anyone. He usually has a few of the best pre-owned Amels available for resale.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, May 8, 2017 at 10:26 AM, trifin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Gents,

There is no carpet in the passageway, it is a single board of teak/holly laminate flooring.

The creaking happens when walking on the floor board. The board is slightly warped and moves (almost invisibly) as you walk on it, rubbing against the wall panel on the side of the battery compartment. 

Cheers
Dean

ps this is the third time I've tried to "reply" using the group web interface. My replies just seem to disappear into the ether. 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Creaking floor plate

Dean Gillies
 

Gents,

There is no carpet in the passageway, it is a single board of teak/holly laminate flooring.

 

The creaking happens when walking on the floor board. The board is slightly warped and moves (almost invisibly) as you walk on it, rubbing against the wall panel on the side of the battery compartment. I guess I’m interested in possible reasons for the floor board to warp and lose its fixing to the sub-floor. I can’t see any obvious way to look underneath this floor board. (Maybe there be a Hawaiian shirt hiding under there J)

 

Cheers

Dean

 

ps Having some comms issues. After trying 3 times unsuccessfully to "reply" using the group web interface, I’ve now tried to reply directly to Bill R’s email.  I’ll apologise now if the dam wall breaks and all my replies arrive later!

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, 8 May 2017 2:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Creaking floor plate

 

 

Dean,

 

Did you lift the carpet and inspect under the carpet? Was the sound apparent when you walked through the passageway, or was this when sailing the boat?

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School 
www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

 

On Mon, May 8, 2017 at 3:26 AM, trifin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,
We are the future owners of an Amel 54, we just don't yet know which one !

We have recently inspected a 54 which has a distinct creak coming from the floor plate in front of the battery compartment. We have not found creaky floors in any of the other 54's we've inspected.

Is this unusual? More importantly, could it be symptomatic of some underlying issue? Historical leaks from battery compartment maybe?

Many thanks
Dean

 

 

Virus-free. www.avg.com

 


Re: Creaking floor plate

Dean Gillies
 

Gents,
There is no carpet in the passageway, it is a single board of teak/holly laminate flooring.

The creaking happens when walking on the floor board. The board is slightly warped and moves (almost invisibly) as you walk on it, rubbing against the wall panel on the side of the battery compartment. 

Cheers
Dean

ps this is the third time I've tried to "reply" using the group web interface. My replies just seem to disappear into the ether. 



Re: Santorin - propeller generator - Hutchinson belt to be changed

Craig Briggs
 

Actually, you do have to remove the engine bolts and move the engine back two - three inches so you can open the coupling. Just loosening the bolts does not allow the engine to slide at all. Then, sliding the engine back is much easier to do if your un-weight the engine using a line between the two cockpit winches through the engine lift tabs. You don't actually lift the engine, just un-weight it so you can easily slide it back to open the coupling then slide it back in place. 
Cheers, Craig SN68 Sangaris

---In amelyachtowners@..., <parkianj@...> wrote :

Attilio
We had a belt replaced in Martinique during some Hurth gearbox work. Yes, you need to separate the Vetus shaft coupling. You do not need to lift the engine. The AMEL mechanic just moved the engine back a little by slackening the engine bolts. It didn't alter the engine alignment.
If your replacement belt is good then you could easily leave putting a spare on until you need to change the Vetus coupling joints. They should last a few years.

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: Creaking floor plate

Dean Gillies
 

Gents,
There is no carpet in the passageway. The noise occurs as a direct result of walking on the floor board, nothing else. The (teak/holly laminate?) board is one piece over the entire passageway floor, and I could not see any simple method to lift it to look underneath.  I cannot slide a piece of paper between the floor board and the wall panelling on each side.  

The noise seems to be a result of the floor board moving vertically when stood on, and it rubs on the vertical panel in front of the battery compartment.  Classic creaky floor - haunted house style!  

I don't know how that board is fixed down (no visible fixings), but I suspect it is a little warped.for some reason, and the high point sags when stood upon.

Cheers
Dean




 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat Fridge Door Seal for Super Maramu 2000

karkauai
 

Thank you again, Bill.  Makes perfect sense.  I'm on it!
Kent.

On May 8, 2017, at 8:30 AM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kent,


My shims are really simple.  They are hard plastic furniture glides.  Exactly 1/4 inch thick, and with adhesive backs.  On the top opening cold boxes I put four on each long side and three across the short ends.  It is not a esthetically perfect solution, but it does the job.

If I had access to my shop, I would have run a continuous frame of wood or plastic 1/4" high to support the seat and allow it to compress the gasket 1/16" out of its total thickness of 5/16".  The brand I used specified 17 to 30% compression.  20% seemed like a good target!

There are of course gaskets, generally of solid "rubber", who can be squeezed as tightly as possible and seal better the tighter they get.  Those are typically not used where there are frequent open/close cycles, and especially not to seal large panels where getting even pressure all the way round is very difficult.  The "D-form" gaskets with hollow interiors are best for these applications, but they do not tolerate constant high compression. 

The hard rubber bits that Bill R describes inserted into the deck hatch gasket I believe are not there to seal, but rather they act as the shim, supporting the weight of the hatch so the rest of the gasket is compressed within tolerance.  A typically very clever solution that would be very easy to miss in a retrofit. Then you wonder why the new gasket has a short lifespan compared to the original no matter how tightly you dog it down.

I don't have an answer for the engine room hatch, I haven't studied it carefully yet.  But you can be sure there is something there that Amel did to make the gasket work.

Bill Kinney
SM160 Harmonie
Road Town, Tortola, BVI


Re: Santorin - propeller generator - Hutchinson belt to be changed

Craig Briggs
 

Ciao amico,
Sorry, but yes, you will have to uncouple the engine and slide it back a little. No problem though, as I'm sure Maria can do it in about 15 minutes.
Looks like you are headed west. Will you be dropping down around the Pelopenese or doing the Canal?
Cheers,
Craig & Katherine 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <attilio.siviero@...> wrote :

Dear Craig,

Before to leave Didim last week, I noticed that the belt coupling the propeller shaft to the secondary generator, useful to have some power when sailing at 4kts or more and with the gear in neutral, was heavily damaged and close to failure. Since there was a spare one already positioned close to the propeller block, I changed the belt and now the system works properly.

Obviously now I do not have a spare belt, therefore the question is: to install a new belt, to keep as spare close to the propeller block, should I disconnect the junction, rise the entire engine, and place the new belt? Or, the belt can be assembled locally?

Thanks for a light

Attilio&Maria
Amel Santorin #84 "Sisila" now in Lavrion, Olympic Marina

Inviato da iPad


Re: Santorin - propeller generator - Hutchinson belt to be changed

Ian Park
 

Attilio
We had a belt replaced in Martinique during some Hurth gearbox work. Yes, you need to separate the Vetus shaft coupling. You do not need to lift the engine. The AMEL mechanic just moved the engine back a little by slackening the engine bolts. It didn't alter the engine alignment.
If your replacement belt is good then you could easily leave putting a spare on until you need to change the Vetus coupling joints. They should last a few years.

Ian
Ocean Hobo SN96


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat Fridge Door Seal for Super Maramu 2000

greatketch@...
 

Kent,

My shims are really simple.  They are hard plastic furniture glides.  Exactly 1/4 inch thick, and with adhesive backs.  On the top opening cold boxes I put four on each long side and three across the short ends.  It is not a esthetically perfect solution, but it does the job.

If I had access to my shop, I would have run a continuous frame of wood or plastic 1/4" high to support the seat and allow it to compress the gasket 1/16" out of its total thickness of 5/16".  The brand I used specified 17 to 30% compression.  20% seemed like a good target!

There are of course gaskets, generally of solid "rubber", who can be squeezed as tightly as possible and seal better the tighter they get.  Those are typically not used where there are frequent open/close cycles, and especially not to seal large panels where getting even pressure all the way round is very difficult.  The "D-form" gaskets with hollow interiors are best for these applications, but they do not tolerate constant high compression. 

The hard rubber bits that Bill R describes inserted into the deck hatch gasket I believe are not there to seal, but rather they act as the shim, supporting the weight of the hatch so the rest of the gasket is compressed within tolerance.  A typically very clever solution that would be very easy to miss in a retrofit. Then you wonder why the new gasket has a short lifespan compared to the original no matter how tightly you dog it down.

I don't have an answer for the engine room hatch, I haven't studied it carefully yet.  But you can be sure there is something there that Amel did to make the gasket work.

Bill Kinney
SM160 Harmonie
Road Town, Tortola, BVI


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Creaking floor plate

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Dean,

Did you lift the carpet and inspect under the carpet? Was the sound apparent when you walked through the passageway, or was this when sailing the boat?

CW Bill Rouse

Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Mon, May 8, 2017 at 3:26 AM, trifin@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi all,
We are the future owners of an Amel 54, we just don't yet know which one !

We have recently inspected a 54 which has a distinct creak coming from the floor plate in front of the battery compartment. We have not found creaky floors in any of the other 54's we've inspected.

Is this unusual? More importantly, could it be symptomatic of some underlying issue? Historical leaks from battery compartment maybe?

Many thanks
Dean



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Reverse steerage

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Daniel,

Of course, I should have included our beautiful baby sister (SN).

James,

In my experience/opinion, the LOA of the Mango, SM and 54, the size of the water tank, the size of the rudder, the size of the skeg, the position of the propeller with regard to the rudder (think propeller wash), and all of that multiplied by the speed of possible crosswinds reduced by lower boat speed; make maneuvering those boats in reverse very challenging without dropping an anchor or having a bow thruster. It is not as big of a challenge with a Maramu or the Santorin, but all of the same things come into play, except the Maramu's propeller position in relation to the rudder.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Mon, May 8, 2017 at 3:53 AM, danielmfrey63@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Bill

I assume the Santorin is included in Your list, too?

Best - Daniel



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Creaking floor plate

Alan Leslie
 

Agree with all that..our SM437 is totally silent.....now that we have everything tied down and stowed away!
Only things we could suggest would be slack rigging, moving batteries, other heavy items moving etc...

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Creaking floor plate

John Clark
 

Hi Dean,
   I'm a new owner of an older SM.  One of the things I heard was that unlike other boats Amels don't flex and "creak."  
During survey we did not note any creaking, but after moving aboard I noticed several.  All were traced to either lines stretching through the chocks,  think dock lines, anchor snubber; or were items moving as the boat rocked.  One such sound was just like an old pirate ship and it was coming from the bulkhead in aft passageway...turned out it was only the plastic button on a Hawaiian shirt rubbing on the wall.  Another was the liferaft rocking about 1/8" in its cradle inside the  portside locker.  All were traced to nonsubstantial issues.

In the battery well if the batteries aren't wedged in, they could be moving ever so slightly...or it could be a Hawaiian shirt.

If you are settling on this boat, make it a point that contract is contingent on surveyor signing off on the sound...and then get an Amel saavy surveyor.  

I bet it will turn out to be nothing, but find it before you commit to purchase.

Regards,  John

John Clark
Vent de Soleil. SM 37
Great Bay, Sint Martin

On May 8, 2017 5:02 AM, "trifin@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi all,
We are the future owners of an Amel 54, we just don't yet know which one !

We have recently inspected a 54 which has a distinct creak coming from the floor plate in front of the battery compartment. We have not found creaky floors in any of the other 54's we've inspected.

Is this unusual? More importantly, could it be symptomatic of some underlying issue? Historical leaks from battery compartment maybe?

Many thanks
Dean


Santorin - propeller generator - Hutchinson belt to be changed

Attilio Siviero <attilio.siviero@...>
 

Dear Craig,

Before to leave Didim last week, I noticed that the belt coupling the propeller shaft to the secondary generator, useful to have some power when sailing at 4kts or more and with the gear in neutral, was heavily damaged and close to failure. Since there was a spare one already positioned close to the propeller block, I changed the belt and now the system works properly.

Obviously now I do not have a spare belt, therefore the question is: to install a new belt, to keep as spare close to the propeller block, should I disconnect the junction, rise the entire engine, and place the new belt? Or, the belt can be assembled locally?

Thanks for a light

Attilio&Maria
Amel Santorin #84 "Sisila" now in Lavrion, Olympic Marina

Inviato da iPad


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Rub Rail on the SM

danielmfrey63@...
 

Bill

I assume the Santorin is included in Your list, too?

Best - Daniel


Creaking floor plate

Dean Gillies
 

Hi all,
We are the future owners of an Amel 54, we just don't yet know which one !

We have recently inspected a 54 which has a distinct creak coming from the floor plate in front of the battery compartment. We have not found creaky floors in any of the other 54's we've inspected.

Is this unusual? More importantly, could it be symptomatic of some underlying issue? Historical leaks from battery compartment maybe?

Many thanks
Dean


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Rub Rail on the SM

James Alton
 

Bill,

    I agree with all of the points you made.  Because I purchased my Maramu in Italy, all of my dockings so far have been stern to which is new to me as is having a bow thruster.  Thanks to good conditions with no current, moderate to light crosswinds and perhaps most importantly the excellent handling of the boat with the thruster the dockings have worked out well so far.   I know that I have a lot more to learn about the boat and would like to learn the best techniques.   As a voice of experience, thanks for the tips and suggestions. 

James

On May 7, 2017, at 11:58 AM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


James, 

When reversing out of a berth (in a Maramu, Mango, SM, and 54) when you are bow-in, you have very limited control of the stern, especially in the beginning. With any crosswinds, you'll likely go in a direction different than you intended. Even trying to point the stern using the bow thruster is limited with the bow because of the side limitations of the slip. Of the Amels I mentioned above, and in the conditions above, the Maramu stands a better chance of reversing from a berth with crosswinds because of less windage. 

And when stern in, bow out, the thruster steers the bow for tight turns in narrow fairways at even zero speed. As the speed increases and the berth is cleared by the stern, the rudder can turn the stern while the thruster steers the bow. 

I mentioned crosswinds above. Remember crosswind gusts can come out of nowhere and when conditions are calm. 

Although I know that most people don't do it, I always dropped the Bimini on a Super Maramu when manoeuvering into a berth...and with a dinghy on the mizzen deck, I always wanted to have crew tell me distance between the stern and dock. I preferred​ hand signals indicating distance in meters. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

    

On May 7, 2017 9:12 AM, "James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,


   Good information on dealing with dockhands.   Could you elaborate on the reasons for having the boat stern to if you have working thruster?  

James Alton
SV,  Sueno,  Maramu #220

On May 7, 2017, at 9:45 AM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


THIS IS MORE THAN YOU ASKED FOR, BUT...
I agree that dock staff around the world will know less than most Amel owners. But, they will experience the inexperienced crew more than a few times. They tend to take control all the time. 

I believe the crew should communicate with dock crews in a firm and specific manner. There should be no question as to who is in charge. For instance when you hand them a line tell them precisely what to do. If a dock hand starts giving direction to one of the crew, the captain should tell the dock hand that the captain of the vessel gives direction to the boat's crew. 

Obviously, when manoeuvering in a new-to-you marina, dock hands may have information that is u nknown to the crew. If that is the case, your crew should either direct the dockhand to communicate with the captain, or relay the information to the captain. If dock hands are handed a line, the boat's crew should identify the line, like spring, stern, bow, and point to the cleat or bollard the crew expects it to be placed on, even if there is only one possibility. I also prefer that dock hands are handed a line with a loop to place over the cleat or bollard, and that the tightness of the line is adjusted on the boat...this is a problem if single-handed, and should not be done. I also believe your Amel should be stern-to if you have a working bow thruster...lots of reasons for this. 

One last thing. We are always aware of wind when docking. Current can be your enemy, especially in a new-to-you marina. Be sure to pay attention to this, especially in riverside marinas. I saw a Super Maramu in a fairway come against the bows of berthed boats because he was unaware of a 5 knot current on his beam. He was experienced and more than halfway through his circumnavigation. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

    

On May 7, 2017 07:24, "sangaris@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Agree totally about marina crew. They are a rub-rail's worst enemy and usually have little sense about boat handling. It's impossible to tell them not to snub the dock line on the cleat while the boat is moving, so we try never to hand over a line until the boat is stopped where we want it, although that is often met with shouting and wild gesticulations which we largely ignore.

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, wrote :

I'm thinking about putting a metal or rubber extrusion on the center part of the rub rail to keep the red part off of dock pilings.


Has anyone looked at this and what product did you use?


It seems like even with a perfect docking maneuver the marina crew insists on dragging us tight to the piling before we can position a fender.  I have fenderboards that take two or three fenders but they are tough to pre-position.  I'm thinking of rigging the fenderboards so there is a board keyed on top of the liferail so you only have to move the one thing (instead of two lines for the fenderboard and three fenders).


Duane

Wanderer, SM#477








Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat Fridge Door Seal for Super Maramu 2000

greatketch@...
 

That problem with the bending of the seat was one of the reasons we added shims when we replaced the gaskets so the lid did not over compress the new gaskets.

Bill Kinney
SM160 Harmonie