Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

Patrick McAneny
 

I wrote the original question concerning battery charging on the hard. There
has been several responses,and more than one, that questioned why I felt it
necessary to charge my batteries and that it was a mistake for me to leave my
boat plugged in to shore power. So, I thought I'd respond.When I hauled my
boat my batteries didn't have a full charge. I know its not good for batteries
to be stored for the winter with less than a full charge, so that's why I
felt it necessary to charge them. As far as leaving my boat plugged in, I never
said nor would I ever leave my boat plugged in. I wrote only to determine if
anyone else ever had the main 220v breaker trip while plugged into 110v 60
hertz. I'm pretty sure my system has no short as someone suggested. Could it
be a voltage drop or could it be the 60 hertz? Anyway, thanks for all the
input, I'm sure I'll sort it out.

Pat SM 123



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Re Battery Charging while hauled out

williammelbourne <melbourne@...>
 

I agree with shutting off DC main breakers while hauled out. The
problem is what to do about self-discharge of the batteries during long
intervals between recharging? The rate of self-discharge for a lead
acid battery is about 0.1%/day (of amp-hour capacity) at an ambient
temperature of 10C, and roughly triple that at a temperature of 30C.
So, a 6 month absence from a cold boat in a winter layup is no big
deal; at most 10-20% of battery bank capacity would be lost from self-
discharge. But in the Caribbean, for example, the layup of a hot boat
during hurricane season, maybe 50% or more of battery capacity could be
lost, which is beginning to be serious.
William Melbourne
S/V Third Wish
SM306


Re: {Disarmed} RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohn@...>
 

I also agree that batteries should be fully charged and then isolated whilst the boat is not in use. I remember all too well seeing an unmanned Halberg Rassy on fire and being towed out of the marina to burn itself out and sink before it affected the other boats.This was in Spain and the owner was at home in Denmark. The cause was almost certainly a fault in the battery charger and or a battery drying out and catching fire to the locker. My original batteries are now seven years young. I assume that everyone knows that different makes of battery have different optimum charge rates and that the Chargers fitted by Amel since 2003 are capable of being adjusted to particular battery makes/types.

Best wishes, John Hollamby SM 319


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

john martin <symoondog@...>
 

I agree. Why do you need a battery charger if you aren't using any power? If I leave my boat for 6 months with all power cut off including the 2 main switches,and come back to find dead batteries, I'm going to get rid of those turkeys. Serge on Mango 51 was right. If you need parts for your Perkins, call Trans Atlantic diesel in the U.S. 804-6429296
John ' Moondog" SM 248




To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.comFrom: no_reply@yahoogroups.comDate: Sat, 8 Dec 2007 23:22:54 +0000
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out




I have had a Super Maramu (#195) for 10 years, currently hauled out in Deltaville, VA. Before that, a Maramu for 13 years. I have stored these boats hauled out in the US and Europe many of the winters. I NEVER left a boat plugged in for the winter. The batteries always did fine. (I turn off ALL power-drawing items) My batteries have lasted 5 - 8 years. I have always used the Delco sealed batteries (original Amel equipment), but other batteries should also do fine over the winter.If a battery charger trips a circuit breaker, the problem is a short somewhere in the system, or a faulty charger. Boat yard electrical systems are notoriously poor. Unless you are living aboard, don't leave your boat plugged in. It's not a good idea.Roy, Excalibur (SM #195)






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Re: Insulating our Amel for cool/cold weather sailing

m_iachelli
 

Hi Ian,
lately I've been searching in our group messages for a topic on
heating system and I found one of your messages very interesting (see
below). I'm actually living in the carebbean, but planning to move to
South America (Argentina and Patagonia) next year. For this reason
I'd like to know more about your Eberspächer system and see if it's
possible to install one on my vessel (Euros 41). Can you give all the
details? I thank you in advance. Best Regards.
Mauro
S/V Karyan
Euros 41 #166

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian Shepherd" <ocean53@...>
wrote:

Hi Richard,

as you know I have taken my SM to Greenland, Labrador &
Newfoundland on more
than one occasion. I can't say that at any time that I was really
cold other
than once having to dive under the boat to cut a rope off the prop
in a sea
temperature of 4 degrees Centigrade!

The boat's insulation is pretty good, and I suffered very little
condensation. Maybe just a little on the inside of the hull at the
back of
the hanging lockers. I did have the luxury of an Eberspacher heater
which I
did use some mornings in Greenland. It did dry the boat well.
Cooking was
another good source of heat. I take it that you don't have the a/c
units
with reverse cycle capability? Useful on shore power or when
running the
genset. I never had any shore power up there though. Maybe you
could carry a
couple of electric fan heaters for use when the genset is running?

You might want to take some thermal long john's along. I found them
useful
when I had to leave the sea berth to visit the cockpit for a quick
look
around or to trim sail. In fact I seem to rembember I slept in them
whilst
under way.

My cockpit has the side panels to the folding bimini plus the
vertical back
cover with the zipped door. This really helped keep the often gale
force
winds at bay, but when the wind was from aft, it did get draughty
due to the
poor seal between the back cover and the cockpit sides and the
seats. You
might want to add some overlap in this area to get a better seal.
Otherwise
the cockpit was quite snug. The disadvantage with this layout is
that if you
need to get to the winches, you need to unzip the door as they are
outside
the enclosed area altogther.

I don't know if you are planning any winter sailing in the UK, but
I would
say that from April till the end of October, you will be pleasantly
surprised at our climate, though it might rain a bit! Out of the
Gulf Stream
you might feel a bit cooler in Scandinavia, though the longer hours
of
daylight may compensate a bit.

Experience on previous boats has found that the Tilley lamp can be
a good
source of heat, as well as portable camping butune heaters. They
will
produce some condensation though. I would get one of those battery
driven
carbon monoxide monitors from one of your mega stores if you are
going to
use such devices. I picked one up for about $30 in Newfoundland
from
Canadian Tire. It did sound the alarm once when a side wind blew
the genset
exhaust into the cabin.

Have a super trip Richard. There are many great spots to visit
either side
of the English Channel, and when the sun shines in the Hebrides off
Scotland
there are few places better.

Spare a thought as I swelter in the Red Sea this summer!

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 'Crusader'



-------Original Message-------

From: closereach
Date: 01/05/06 04:16:01
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insulating our Amel for cool/cold
weather
sailing

We're planning on cruising over to Ireland, the UK and Scandinavia
Next year. I have a couple of questions for those out cruising the
Higher latitudes.

1. What have other members done to insulate their boats to prevent
or
Minimize condensation while living aboard?

2. Our Amel doesn't have any forced air or natural draft heating
System. How have you heated your boat 24x7, specifically when
passage-
Making and living on the hook?

Thanks
Richard Tate
SM#5 "Spice"






Yahoo! Groups Links








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Battery Charging while hauled out

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

I have had a Super Maramu (#195) for 10 years, currently hauled out
in Deltaville, VA. Before that, a Maramu for 13 years. I have stored
these boats hauled out in the US and Europe many of the winters. I
NEVER left a boat plugged in for the winter. The batteries always did
fine. (I turn off ALL power-drawing items) My batteries have lasted 5 -
8 years. I have always used the Delco sealed batteries (original Amel
equipment), but other batteries should also do fine over the winter.

If a battery charger trips a circuit breaker, the problem is a
short somewhere in the system, or a faulty charger. Boat yard
electrical systems are notoriously poor. Unless you are living aboard,
don't leave your boat plugged in. It's not a good idea.

Roy, Excalibur (SM #195)


[Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
 

Hi,

Just wanted to follow up on the last post.

As a Mango owner with a 85 hp Perkins sailing in the Med for two years until i crossed back in February 07, not only did i have enought motor power in all circumstances, but while in France and Spain i purchased spares for my motor at a lower cost from Trans Atlantic Diesel ...
in the USA, even after paying for transportation costs and duty...

BTW, Henri Amel' personal and experimental Mango was fitted with a 100hp Perkins but also with two tube bowthrusters (as opposed to the retractible system installed on Mangos and SM). I am advised the tube system absorbs up to 0.5kn of speed. The larger motor or the tube bowthruster were not retained as usual options for Amel's Mango clients. The SM being a bit heavier and the less efficient transmisson of power to the propeller, may justify a small power increment from the Mango 85 Hp.

What i would stay away from, motorwise and if possible, is a turbo charged diesel. The naturaly aspired motor offers more reliability and when you sail in areas where a factory trained mechanic and a fully supplied motor parts store are not to be found, the KISS principle makes more sense. Otherwise, you must at least have aboard all the spares for the turbo, including ... the motor workshop manual.

Serge, Mango 51

BeyersWF <BeyersWF@aol.com> a écrit :
Armin,

In 2000, I bought a 1982 Amel Mango with a 80 HP Perkins
[European engine] and spent five years chasing parts to no avail. Last Fall
I had installed a 90 HP Yanmar Turbo. Although I have not had her out in
strong winds and high seas [I'm a live aboard and work every day], she does
well with a Max prop in the Chesapeake Bay. I could have bought a new kid
and had money left over. The keel had to be re-bedded for the Yanmar.

Coming around Cape Hatteras in 2000 with the 80 HP in 48 knot winds and 20
foot seas in a North Easter, the Mango did fine motor sailing [on the other
hand, I didn't feel too great]. So I have no concern with the 90 HP Yanmar
unless things get much worse. I crewed on an Amel Mango like mine [the
engine looked like a Perkins, I wasn't in the engine room] and she did fine
motor sailing down Long Island Sound in a 38 knot South wind with a North
tide running. Every third wave threw water on the windscreen. A larger
engine will burn more fuel; however, I could not tolerate an engine [the
European Perkins] that I could not get parts or service for. Have no clue
if this helps you. I'd be more concerned about getting the 75 HP engine
parts and service than how she performs in lousy weather.

Crash

"Windrush," Solomons, MD, USA

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 1:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

Hi all,
I am in the process of buying a used SM2000. Older versions
(-2002) have a 75hp engine, but are interesting in sight of the price.
Has anybody experience in changing the engine or does anybody have good
arguements for the smaller engine?

Armin








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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

BeyersWF
 

Armin,

In 2000, I bought a 1982 Amel Mango with a 80 HP Perkins
[European engine] and spent five years chasing parts to no avail. Last Fall
I had installed a 90 HP Yanmar Turbo. Although I have not had her out in
strong winds and high seas [I'm a live aboard and work every day], she does
well with a Max prop in the Chesapeake Bay. I could have bought a new kid
and had money left over. The keel had to be re-bedded for the Yanmar.

Coming around Cape Hatteras in 2000 with the 80 HP in 48 knot winds and 20
foot seas in a North Easter, the Mango did fine motor sailing [on the other
hand, I didn't feel too great]. So I have no concern with the 90 HP Yanmar
unless things get much worse. I crewed on an Amel Mango like mine [the
engine looked like a Perkins, I wasn't in the engine room] and she did fine
motor sailing down Long Island Sound in a 38 knot South wind with a North
tide running. Every third wave threw water on the windscreen. A larger
engine will burn more fuel; however, I could not tolerate an engine [the
European Perkins] that I could not get parts or service for. Have no clue
if this helps you. I'd be more concerned about getting the 75 HP engine
parts and service than how she performs in lousy weather.



Crash

"Windrush," Solomons, MD, USA

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 1:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp



Hi all,
I am in the process of buying a used SM2000. Older versions
(-2002) have a 75hp engine, but are interesting in sight of the price.
Has anybody experience in changing the engine or does anybody have good
arguements for the smaller engine?

Armin


Coppercoat - removal of old antifouling

Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@...>
 

Prior to applying Coppercoat, we need to remove all the old antifouling.

Most of us will get a rather high quote for that - but - a friend mentioned that it can be done with a good paint remover so I experimented - it works. Brush on liberally, wait for a few minutes and scrape off with a normal scraper. Dispose in a bucket lined with paper as the paint remover may dissolve the bucket.

I'll do mine in March and will put photos on the web.

Horst

Puddleduck




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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

We bought a single charger for 260 to 90 volts, 80
amps 50/60 cycle from Dolphin in FL same as a Rea
system. The cost is less then a set of cooked
batteries. IT works well with no issues for 50 or 60
cycles. We DO NOT use 220 micro wave when pluged in
or the washer.

Richard and Joan SM 209


--- eric <kimberlite@optonline.net> wrote:

I wired two 12 volt $50- chargers in series and was
able to charge the
batteries.

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of amelliahona
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 10:07 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries



Pat Wrote: "-- ever this charger would cost about
$600.00. If anyone has a
cheaper solution or advice as to how best to charge
on the hard I'd
appreciate it.
Thanks,Pat SM 123"

Pat, I failed to mention my solution to this
problem. A couple of years ago
we
were going on the hard in a yard that did not have
power available (Nanny
Cay.
Tortola). I wanted to keep the batteries up so I
purchased three flexible
solar
panels (I forget the wattage, but minimal) for about
$125 each. Two I wired
in
series to get 24 volts for the house batteries, and
one I left as 12 volts
for the
starting battery. I bought a 24 volt controller and
a 12 volt controller
then
installed all this. It took a day or so to wire it
all up with some quick
disconnect plugs going behind where my cables
entered for my TwinScope
sonar unit on the port side of the cockpit.

When I go on the hard or leave the boat in a marina
for a period of time, I
place
these three panels on my foredeck, tie them down and
run the cable to the
quick
connects that are wired to the controllers and then
to the batteries.
They have kept my batteries at 100% without
overcooking them for about 4
years now, (intermittently of course as we remove
them when aboard the
boat). They even keep the batteries up with the auto
timer I installed to
flush
the watermater with fresh water three times a week
when off the boat so I
don't have to pickle the water maker.

I would guess the entire setup was about $600 USD so
it isn't cheaper
but it has worked well and doesn't require me to
leave the boat plugged in
long term in marinas with attendant stray current
problems or when on the
hard.

Gary





[Non-text portions of this message have been
removed]



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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries

Patrick McAneny
 

Gary, I have my boat in storage in Maryland.The only power available is 110v
which would be 60 herzt.I do have a step up transformer.I don't know the gauge
of the cable but it is hardwired into the electical system,I assume by
Amel.The cable is approx.50 feet long, however the outlet ,I plug into is perhaps
200 ft. from the boat yards panel.I take from what you said, that if there is a
significant voltage drop, that could explain the breaker tripping.Is that
correct?The battery monitor that came with the boat does'nt work,I need to replace
it.I bougth the boat a year ago today and have been using a multi-meter.I
don't have a great understanding of electrical systems,especially 220v and 24v
systems,not good for an Amel owner,110-12v not a problem.The Amel has more
complicated systems than my previous boats and Iam having a little problem climbing
the learning curve.So ,I appreciate owners taking the time to help me sort
things out. Pat McAneny SM 123


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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

Krassopoulos Dimitris <dkra@...>
 

The 100 Hp is the best choice for the SM-2000. I owned before the Santorin
and when I was motoring against the wind you felt that the boat was
underpowered. With the SM-2000 with the 100 Hp you can can easily motor
against the wind and depending on the waves you can reach between 5-7 Knots
which is satisfactory.











Dimitris Krassopoulos

SM 2000 Alma Libre



From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Friday, December 07, 2007 9:54 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp



Exactly. I think that 75 HP is a little less for a boat with 16to.
Especially if you need sometimes to go against wind and current. Newer
boats with weight have engines whith more power. Since 2003 the SM2000
was delivered with 100hp. If you look at similar Hallberg Rassey, they
are equiped with some hp more.

Therefor my question about. Do you think you need it realy or is it
just a modern tendency. For myself I own a SIGMA 41 (~8to) in the
moment and the engine is a 48hp BUKH. I never had the feeling that it
is too much.

Armin

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> , eric <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Are you speaking of the 75 horsepower Yanmar?

If so, why do you want to change the engine?

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com> ] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 1:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
<mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp



Hi all,
I am in the process of buying a used SM2000. Older versions
(-2002) have a 75hp engine, but are interesting in sight of the price.
Has anybody experience in changing the engine or does anybody have good
arguements for the smaller engine?

Armin







Re: Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

n4796p <n4796p@...>
 

Exactly. I think that 75 HP is a little less for a boat with 16to.
Especially if you need sometimes to go against wind and current. Newer
boats with weight have engines whith more power. Since 2003 the SM2000
was delivered with 100hp. If you look at similar Hallberg Rassey, they
are equiped with some hp more.

Therefor my question about. Do you think you need it realy or is it
just a modern tendency. For myself I own a SIGMA 41 (~8to) in the
moment and the engine is a 48hp BUKH. I never had the feeling that it
is too much.

Armin

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, eric <kimberlite@...> wrote:

Are you speaking of the 75 horsepower Yanmar?

If so, why do you want to change the engine?

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 1:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp



Hi all,
I am in the process of buying a used SM2000. Older versions
(-2002) have a 75hp engine, but are interesting in sight of the price.
Has anybody experience in changing the engine or does anybody have good
arguements for the smaller engine?

Armin







Domain: www.AmelYachtOwners.com--Future Owners Web Site?

rossirossix4 <equinoxsolstice@...>
 

Just FYI--

I have forwarded www.AmelYachtOwners.com to our forum--in case you
forget the address and haven't bookmarked it. I do web design
commercially and eventually would like to produce a site to augment our
forum. We could use some larger pictures and organization of
information by topic or boat. Let me know if there is any interest.

Bob, Brittany de la Mer


Re: Charging batteries

rossirossix4 <equinoxsolstice@...>
 

Chargers, despite their rating in amps should not overload or trip
unless there is a short or they are not properly cooled, either due to
location or failure of a cooling fan. No matter how many amps the
charging batteries will take, a charger should not exceed its capacity
unless it is defective.

I'm a big fan of Iota chargers...do a Google for 24 volt Iota. They
are not sealed and should not be used in an explosive environment, but
their stats are very good. Be sure to use the IQ4 regulator with. They
also are a very good supply for ham or SSB radios, etc.

24 volt chargers are common for forklifts...you could also search for
24 volt charger on eBay.


Bob, Brittany de la Mer

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "sailw32" <sailw32@...> wrote:

My SM is on the hard for the winter,I only have 110 ac available to
me.When I run the onboard charger the breaker behind the distribution
panel trips.Sometimes it does'nt trip for like an hour or so and
during
that time the charger is charging.Does anyone know what my problem
may
be?Could it be that the 110v is 60hrz.,would that trip the breaker?I
have contacted a large dist.of stand alone chargers for
24v.batteries,and it sounds as though there is'nt a charger out there
that will handle 8 batteries.I could purchase a charger with 4 leads
and charge 2 batteries per lead.However this charger would cost about
$600.00.If anyone has a cheaper solution or advice as to how best to
charge on the hard I'd appreciate it. Thanks,Pat SM 123


RE : RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries

Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
 

When my 50 amp charger/inverter quit last year, while looking for replacing same, i purchased a stand alone solid state 30 amp charger with 3 outputs.

I used two outputs, one for service batteries bank, one for starting batteries. The charger is permanently installed in the engine space and connected to the batteries, i plug it only in the AC source (120v 60hz ac or 220v 50hz ac) when i need to charge batteries or need DC power and other systems do not work.

Costs of about 350$. Cannot give you the make of the charger as i am away from the boat.

Serge, Mango 51






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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

eric freedman
 

Are you speaking of the 75 horsepower Yanmar?

If so, why do you want to change the engine?

Fair Winds,

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 1:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp



Hi all,
I am in the process of buying a used SM2000. Older versions
(-2002) have a 75hp engine, but are interesting in sight of the price.
Has anybody experience in changing the engine or does anybody have good
arguements for the smaller engine?

Armin


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries

eric freedman
 

I wired two 12 volt $50- chargers in series and was able to charge the
batteries.

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of amelliahona
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 10:07 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries



Pat Wrote: "-- ever this charger would cost about $600.00. If anyone has a
cheaper solution or advice as to how best to charge on the hard I'd
appreciate it.
Thanks,Pat SM 123"

Pat, I failed to mention my solution to this problem. A couple of years ago
we
were going on the hard in a yard that did not have power available (Nanny
Cay.
Tortola). I wanted to keep the batteries up so I purchased three flexible
solar
panels (I forget the wattage, but minimal) for about $125 each. Two I wired
in
series to get 24 volts for the house batteries, and one I left as 12 volts
for the
starting battery. I bought a 24 volt controller and a 12 volt controller
then
installed all this. It took a day or so to wire it all up with some quick
disconnect plugs going behind where my cables entered for my TwinScope
sonar unit on the port side of the cockpit.

When I go on the hard or leave the boat in a marina for a period of time, I
place
these three panels on my foredeck, tie them down and run the cable to the
quick
connects that are wired to the controllers and then to the batteries.
They have kept my batteries at 100% without overcooking them for about 4
years now, (intermittently of course as we remove them when aboard the
boat). They even keep the batteries up with the auto timer I installed to
flush
the watermater with fresh water three times a week when off the boat so I
don't have to pickle the water maker.

I would guess the entire setup was about $600 USD so it isn't cheaper
but it has worked well and doesn't require me to leave the boat plugged in
long term in marinas with attendant stray current problems or when on the
hard.

Gary


Re: Charging batteries

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Pat Wrote: "-- ever this charger would cost about $600.00. If anyone has a
cheaper solution or advice as to how best to charge on the hard I'd appreciate it.
Thanks,Pat SM 123"

Pat, I failed to mention my solution to this problem. A couple of years ago we
were going on the hard in a yard that did not have power available (Nanny Cay.
Tortola). I wanted to keep the batteries up so I purchased three flexible solar
panels (I forget the wattage, but minimal) for about $125 each. Two I wired in
series to get 24 volts for the house batteries, and one I left as 12 volts for the
starting battery. I bought a 24 volt controller and a 12 volt controller then
installed all this. It took a day or so to wire it all up with some quick
disconnect plugs going behind where my cables entered for my TwinScope
sonar unit on the port side of the cockpit.

When I go on the hard or leave the boat in a marina for a period of time, I place
these three panels on my foredeck, tie them down and run the cable to the quick
connects that are wired to the controllers and then to the batteries.
They have kept my batteries at 100% without overcooking them for about 4
years now, (intermittently of course as we remove them when aboard the
boat). They even keep the batteries up with the auto timer I installed to flush
the watermater with fresh water three times a week when off the boat so I
don't have to pickle the water maker.

I would guess the entire setup was about $600 USD so it isn't cheaper
but it has worked well and doesn't require me to leave the boat plugged in
long term in marinas with attendant stray current problems or when on the
hard.

Gary


Re: Charging batteries

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Pat:

Hi, Where is your boat on the hard? That will help me know what type power you have.
Do you have a step up transformer on your boat that steps 110 Volt AC up to 220 Volts
AC? This was an Amel option that had installed on my boat. I have a BlueWater
Multimeter wired to my 220 volt breaker panel that allows me to see the input power
(Watts), input volts (VAC), amperage draw (Amps), and Frequency of the power (Hertz).
Last week while on the hard in Antiqua, where the power is 110/220 VAC 60 Hertz, I only
had 110 volt AC available. I plugged in the 110 volts, ran it through the step up
transformer and checked the voltage on the the BlueSea, it was 235 volts AC 60 Hertz.
When I turned on only the small 35 amp Dolphin Charger the line voltage dropped to 185
volts (this was on about a 100 ft 18 gg extension cord in the yard). I was shocked that
there was that much voltage drop but I was pulling 13 amps with just the small charger
on. My breaker didn't open but anything could happen with that kind of line voltage drop.
Of course as the batteries came up to charge (mine were at 85%) the current draw and
hence the voltage drop decreased.

Suggestion, find out what your voltage is, what the frequency is (hertz), so we can
diagnose this better. In the meantime use the shortest possible extension cord, and
largest gauge wire extension cord you can, and if at all possible check what the voltage is
at the breaker panel with the charger on. This might give us more clues. Of course don't
electrocute yourself in the process. Good luck and report back.

Gary Silver, Now in the water in Antigua, Jolly Harbor, next to another Amel SM and an
Amel 54.

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "sailw32" <sailw32@...> wrote:

My SM is on the hard for the winter,I only have 110 ac available to
me.When I run the onboard charger the breaker behind the distribution
panel trips.Sometimes it does'nt trip for like an hour or so and during
that time the charger is charging.Does anyone know what my problem may
be?Could it be that the 110v is 60hrz.,would that trip the breaker?I
have contacted a large dist.of stand alone chargers for
24v.batteries,and it sounds as though there is'nt a charger out there
that will handle 8 batteries.I could purchase a charger with 4 leads
and charge 2 batteries per lead.However this charger would cost about
$600.00.If anyone has a cheaper solution or advice as to how best to
charge on the hard I'd appreciate it. Thanks,Pat SM 123