Date   

Insurance

Patrick McAneny
 

I've been self-insured with my past boats.Now that I have purchased my
SM, I no longer can afford that risk.Speaking to my insurance agent,he
implied it getting harder thus more exspensive to underwrite an extened
offshore cruise.I've often wondered what others sailors did about
insurance and what they typically paid for coverage for a year of
cruising offshore.I'm awaiting a quote but I have no basis to assess if
its fair.I know that there is a lot of variables,such as hull value and
cruising grounds,however I'd still be interested to know what other
Amel owners do about insurance. Thanks,Patrick


removing Freezer/Refrig unit under bench seat in salon

leonorebt@...
 

This is Bill on SM 72. I am trying to remove the unit and have disconnected electrics, undone bolts and removed all visable screws and the unit seems loose on the port side but the plywood section on the starboard side along the passageway will not come free from the apparent attachment to the galley island and I can not find any way to release it. I am trying to remove the freezer insert along with the plywood housing as it seems that is the only way without removing the compressor from the system which I do not wish to do. The unit works but I want to get to the inspection hatch for the water tank section under it. It feels like it will lift out if the starboard side could be released. Any suggestions?

Thank you

Bill Rahmig


leonorebt@earthlink.net
EarthLink Revolves Around You.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul

Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@...>
 

Eric,

On my Maramu the rope friction wheel is bolted on to the shaft, don't know the design on the SM, sorry.

Horst

----- Original Message ----
From: eric <kimberlite@optonline.net>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Thursday, 13 December, 2007 5:20:06 AM
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul













Horst,



How do you get the rod around the arm that is welded to the top of the

outhaul shaft that fits into the Anderson winch?



Thanks



Eric



Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite



_____



From: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

[mailto:amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com] On Behalf Of Horst Pause

Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2007 6:24 AM

To: amelyachtowners@ yahoogroups. com

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul



Certainly. The keyway in the shaft is 4mm, so I got myself a length of 3.5mm

key, bingo.



----- Original Message ----

From: svbebe <yahoogroups@ <mailto:yahoogroups %40svbebe. com> svbebe.com>

To: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtow ners%40yahoogrou ps.com>

yahoogroups. com

Sent: Tuesday, 11 December, 2007 9:17:53 PM

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul



Horst,



You wrote, "I now have a long rod in my spares locker with which I can



push the key out from above."



Can you provide us with the specifications of that "rod?"



Best,



Bill Rouse



s/v BeBe



SM2 #387



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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul

eric freedman
 

Horst,

How do you get the rod around the arm that is welded to the top of the
outhaul shaft that fits into the Anderson winch?

Thanks

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Horst Pause
Sent: Wednesday, December 12, 2007 6:24 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul



Certainly. The keyway in the shaft is 4mm, so I got myself a length of 3.5mm
key, bingo.

----- Original Message ----
From: svbebe <yahoogroups@ <mailto:yahoogroups%40svbebe.com> svbebe.com>
To: amelyachtowners@ <mailto:amelyachtowners%40yahoogroups.com>
yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, 11 December, 2007 9:17:53 PM
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul

Horst,

You wrote, "I now have a long rod in my spares locker with which I can

push the key out from above."

Can you provide us with the specifications of that "rod?"

Best,

Bill Rouse

s/v BeBe

SM2 #387

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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul

Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@...>
 

Certainly. The keyway in the shaft is 4mm, so I got myself a length of 3.5mm key, bingo.

----- Original Message ----
From: svbebe <yahoogroups@svbebe.com>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Tuesday, 11 December, 2007 9:17:53 PM
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Outhaul

















Horst,



You wrote, "I now have a long rod in my spares locker with which I can

push the key out from above."



Can you provide us with the specifications of that "rod?"



Best,



Bill Rouse

s/v BeBe

SM2 #387














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Re: Outhaul

svbebe <yahoogroups@...>
 

Horst,

You wrote, "I now have a long rod in my spares locker with which I can
push the key out from above."

Can you provide us with the specifications of that "rod?"


Best,

Bill Rouse
s/v BeBe
SM2 #387


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

Hi, we had the same kind of issues and removed the
AMEL supplied charger and transformer. One is tha the
transformer is alway hot given it is a coil designe to
store power. So you always have hgh voltage present.
BE VERY VERY CAREFUL IF YOU HAVE TO WORK ON IT...

We replaced the charger with a 90-260 volt 50/60 cycle
Dolphine (the US name for a Rya charger that Amel
used). We also installed an inverter wired to the 24
volt bank to run our 110 volt cycle stuff. This work
quite well with no "dock" voltage issues. We also ran
all of 110 volt plug off the inverter. That did not
take much to wire as we simply picked up the 110 line
in the engine room from the inverter. Not a big deal
and used the 110 breaker for safety...
good luck and good charging..
Richard on SM 209 in Port Annapolis
--- rbenven44 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Hi Pat,

I think I have the same electrical configuration
as you: a step-
up transformer that takes the 110V 60 Hz shore
power, and steps it up
to 220/230V 60 Hz. From there it goes to the
battery charger, the
water heater, A/C units, and other 220V appliances.
There is a
circuit breaker just above the transformer, near the
battery
charger. I have had this trip several times when
plugged in to shore
power in the US. Invariably, the problem was bad
shore power,
usually a small amount of voltage on the ground
lead, which leads to
the breaker tripping. As I said before, marina and
boatyard
electrical systems are notoriously prone to faults.
But it could also be caused by too high a voltage
on the 110V
input, resulting in more than 230V out of the
transformer. You can
check for both of these easily with a voltmeter. As
far as I know,
and in my experience, low voltage will not trip the
breaker, and 60Hz
(vs 50Hz)definitely will not. I have had low
voltage (around 180V
out of the transformer)for over a week at a marina,
and no problems
with either the battery charger or the circuit
breaker.
Finally, if the fault is not in the input line,
you need to check
the current draw of your battery charger. A circuit
breaker will
trip under three possible conditions: too high
current, too high
voltage (both of which will overheat the breaker and
trip it), or a
short (including a ground fault). If your breaker
trips after an
hour of operation, it may be that your battery
charger is drawing too
much current, causing the breaker to trip from
overheating. To check
for this, you need a system ammeter, or another way
to measure
current draw. (Look up amelliahona's posts on how to
measure
electricity draw).
Hope all this helps. Please ask more questions
as you work on the
problem. That's what this site is all about.

Roy, Excalibur, SM #195



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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

Hi Pat,

I think I have the same electrical configuration as you: a step-
up transformer that takes the 110V 60 Hz shore power, and steps it up
to 220/230V 60 Hz. From there it goes to the battery charger, the
water heater, A/C units, and other 220V appliances. There is a
circuit breaker just above the transformer, near the battery
charger. I have had this trip several times when plugged in to shore
power in the US. Invariably, the problem was bad shore power,
usually a small amount of voltage on the ground lead, which leads to
the breaker tripping. As I said before, marina and boatyard
electrical systems are notoriously prone to faults.
But it could also be caused by too high a voltage on the 110V
input, resulting in more than 230V out of the transformer. You can
check for both of these easily with a voltmeter. As far as I know,
and in my experience, low voltage will not trip the breaker, and 60Hz
(vs 50Hz)definitely will not. I have had low voltage (around 180V
out of the transformer)for over a week at a marina, and no problems
with either the battery charger or the circuit breaker.
Finally, if the fault is not in the input line, you need to check
the current draw of your battery charger. A circuit breaker will
trip under three possible conditions: too high current, too high
voltage (both of which will overheat the breaker and trip it), or a
short (including a ground fault). If your breaker trips after an
hour of operation, it may be that your battery charger is drawing too
much current, causing the breaker to trip from overheating. To check
for this, you need a system ammeter, or another way to measure
current draw. (Look up amelliahona's posts on how to measure
electricity draw).
Hope all this helps. Please ask more questions as you work on the
problem. That's what this site is all about.

Roy, Excalibur, SM #195


Outhaul

Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@...>
 

The problem with getting the vertical shaft out of the gear box is the key which prevents it from turning in the gear box. I was lucky to find a workshop with a 20 ton hydraulic press - after a few attempts, they got the shaft out.

I now have a long rod in my spares locker with which I can push the key out from above. Once that is removed, the shaft comes out quite easily; it actually turns if you remount it all without that key and there's no effective force on the outhaul.

Easy once you have that key out - hammering on the bolt as described before did not work for me.

Horst - Puddleduck




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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re Battery Charging while hauled out

Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@...>
 

I fitted a solar panel after losing 2 sets of batteries, 1 x gelcel, 1 x agm, because I had omitted to disconnect the inverter.
All's fine now, the batteries are now in their 3rd winter and I am not expecting any problems.

Horst

Puddleduck

----- Original Message ----
From: williammelbourne <melbourne@charter.net>
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Sent: Sunday, 9 December, 2007 6:13:24 PM
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re Battery Charging while hauled out













I agree with shutting off DC main breakers while hauled out. The

problem is what to do about self-discharge of the batteries during long

intervals between recharging? The rate of self-discharge for a lead

acid battery is about 0.1%/day (of amp-hour capacity) at an ambient

temperature of 10C, and roughly triple that at a temperature of 30C.

So, a 6 month absence from a cold boat in a winter layup is no big

deal; at most 10-20% of battery bank capacity would be lost from self-

discharge. But in the Caribbean, for example, the layup of a hot boat

during hurricane season, maybe 50% or more of battery capacity could be

lost, which is beginning to be serious.

William Melbourne

S/V Third Wish

SM306














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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

Patrick McAneny
 

I wrote the original question concerning battery charging on the hard. There
has been several responses,and more than one, that questioned why I felt it
necessary to charge my batteries and that it was a mistake for me to leave my
boat plugged in to shore power. So, I thought I'd respond.When I hauled my
boat my batteries didn't have a full charge. I know its not good for batteries
to be stored for the winter with less than a full charge, so that's why I
felt it necessary to charge them. As far as leaving my boat plugged in, I never
said nor would I ever leave my boat plugged in. I wrote only to determine if
anyone else ever had the main 220v breaker trip while plugged into 110v 60
hertz. I'm pretty sure my system has no short as someone suggested. Could it
be a voltage drop or could it be the 60 hertz? Anyway, thanks for all the
input, I'm sure I'll sort it out.

Pat SM 123



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Re Battery Charging while hauled out

williammelbourne <melbourne@...>
 

I agree with shutting off DC main breakers while hauled out. The
problem is what to do about self-discharge of the batteries during long
intervals between recharging? The rate of self-discharge for a lead
acid battery is about 0.1%/day (of amp-hour capacity) at an ambient
temperature of 10C, and roughly triple that at a temperature of 30C.
So, a 6 month absence from a cold boat in a winter layup is no big
deal; at most 10-20% of battery bank capacity would be lost from self-
discharge. But in the Caribbean, for example, the layup of a hot boat
during hurricane season, maybe 50% or more of battery capacity could be
lost, which is beginning to be serious.
William Melbourne
S/V Third Wish
SM306


Re: {Disarmed} RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

Anne and John Hollamby <annejohn@...>
 

I also agree that batteries should be fully charged and then isolated whilst the boat is not in use. I remember all too well seeing an unmanned Halberg Rassy on fire and being towed out of the marina to burn itself out and sink before it affected the other boats.This was in Spain and the owner was at home in Denmark. The cause was almost certainly a fault in the battery charger and or a battery drying out and catching fire to the locker. My original batteries are now seven years young. I assume that everyone knows that different makes of battery have different optimum charge rates and that the Chargers fitted by Amel since 2003 are capable of being adjusted to particular battery makes/types.

Best wishes, John Hollamby SM 319


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out

john martin <symoondog@...>
 

I agree. Why do you need a battery charger if you aren't using any power? If I leave my boat for 6 months with all power cut off including the 2 main switches,and come back to find dead batteries, I'm going to get rid of those turkeys. Serge on Mango 51 was right. If you need parts for your Perkins, call Trans Atlantic diesel in the U.S. 804-6429296
John ' Moondog" SM 248




To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.comFrom: no_reply@yahoogroups.comDate: Sat, 8 Dec 2007 23:22:54 +0000
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Battery Charging while hauled out




I have had a Super Maramu (#195) for 10 years, currently hauled out in Deltaville, VA. Before that, a Maramu for 13 years. I have stored these boats hauled out in the US and Europe many of the winters. I NEVER left a boat plugged in for the winter. The batteries always did fine. (I turn off ALL power-drawing items) My batteries have lasted 5 - 8 years. I have always used the Delco sealed batteries (original Amel equipment), but other batteries should also do fine over the winter.If a battery charger trips a circuit breaker, the problem is a short somewhere in the system, or a faulty charger. Boat yard electrical systems are notoriously poor. Unless you are living aboard, don't leave your boat plugged in. It's not a good idea.Roy, Excalibur (SM #195)






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Re: Insulating our Amel for cool/cold weather sailing

m_iachelli
 

Hi Ian,
lately I've been searching in our group messages for a topic on
heating system and I found one of your messages very interesting (see
below). I'm actually living in the carebbean, but planning to move to
South America (Argentina and Patagonia) next year. For this reason
I'd like to know more about your Eberspächer system and see if it's
possible to install one on my vessel (Euros 41). Can you give all the
details? I thank you in advance. Best Regards.
Mauro
S/V Karyan
Euros 41 #166

--- In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, "Ian Shepherd" <ocean53@...>
wrote:

Hi Richard,

as you know I have taken my SM to Greenland, Labrador &
Newfoundland on more
than one occasion. I can't say that at any time that I was really
cold other
than once having to dive under the boat to cut a rope off the prop
in a sea
temperature of 4 degrees Centigrade!

The boat's insulation is pretty good, and I suffered very little
condensation. Maybe just a little on the inside of the hull at the
back of
the hanging lockers. I did have the luxury of an Eberspacher heater
which I
did use some mornings in Greenland. It did dry the boat well.
Cooking was
another good source of heat. I take it that you don't have the a/c
units
with reverse cycle capability? Useful on shore power or when
running the
genset. I never had any shore power up there though. Maybe you
could carry a
couple of electric fan heaters for use when the genset is running?

You might want to take some thermal long john's along. I found them
useful
when I had to leave the sea berth to visit the cockpit for a quick
look
around or to trim sail. In fact I seem to rembember I slept in them
whilst
under way.

My cockpit has the side panels to the folding bimini plus the
vertical back
cover with the zipped door. This really helped keep the often gale
force
winds at bay, but when the wind was from aft, it did get draughty
due to the
poor seal between the back cover and the cockpit sides and the
seats. You
might want to add some overlap in this area to get a better seal.
Otherwise
the cockpit was quite snug. The disadvantage with this layout is
that if you
need to get to the winches, you need to unzip the door as they are
outside
the enclosed area altogther.

I don't know if you are planning any winter sailing in the UK, but
I would
say that from April till the end of October, you will be pleasantly
surprised at our climate, though it might rain a bit! Out of the
Gulf Stream
you might feel a bit cooler in Scandinavia, though the longer hours
of
daylight may compensate a bit.

Experience on previous boats has found that the Tilley lamp can be
a good
source of heat, as well as portable camping butune heaters. They
will
produce some condensation though. I would get one of those battery
driven
carbon monoxide monitors from one of your mega stores if you are
going to
use such devices. I picked one up for about $30 in Newfoundland
from
Canadian Tire. It did sound the alarm once when a side wind blew
the genset
exhaust into the cabin.

Have a super trip Richard. There are many great spots to visit
either side
of the English Channel, and when the sun shines in the Hebrides off
Scotland
there are few places better.

Spare a thought as I swelter in the Red Sea this summer!

Regards

Ian Shepherd SM 414 'Crusader'



-------Original Message-------

From: closereach
Date: 01/05/06 04:16:01
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insulating our Amel for cool/cold
weather
sailing

We're planning on cruising over to Ireland, the UK and Scandinavia
Next year. I have a couple of questions for those out cruising the
Higher latitudes.

1. What have other members done to insulate their boats to prevent
or
Minimize condensation while living aboard?

2. Our Amel doesn't have any forced air or natural draft heating
System. How have you heated your boat 24x7, specifically when
passage-
Making and living on the hook?

Thanks
Richard Tate
SM#5 "Spice"






Yahoo! Groups Links








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Battery Charging while hauled out

rbenven44 <no_reply@...>
 

I have had a Super Maramu (#195) for 10 years, currently hauled out
in Deltaville, VA. Before that, a Maramu for 13 years. I have stored
these boats hauled out in the US and Europe many of the winters. I
NEVER left a boat plugged in for the winter. The batteries always did
fine. (I turn off ALL power-drawing items) My batteries have lasted 5 -
8 years. I have always used the Delco sealed batteries (original Amel
equipment), but other batteries should also do fine over the winter.

If a battery charger trips a circuit breaker, the problem is a
short somewhere in the system, or a faulty charger. Boat yard
electrical systems are notoriously poor. Unless you are living aboard,
don't leave your boat plugged in. It's not a good idea.

Roy, Excalibur (SM #195)


[Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

Serge Tremblay <laetitiaii@...>
 

Hi,

Just wanted to follow up on the last post.

As a Mango owner with a 85 hp Perkins sailing in the Med for two years until i crossed back in February 07, not only did i have enought motor power in all circumstances, but while in France and Spain i purchased spares for my motor at a lower cost from Trans Atlantic Diesel ...
in the USA, even after paying for transportation costs and duty...

BTW, Henri Amel' personal and experimental Mango was fitted with a 100hp Perkins but also with two tube bowthrusters (as opposed to the retractible system installed on Mangos and SM). I am advised the tube system absorbs up to 0.5kn of speed. The larger motor or the tube bowthruster were not retained as usual options for Amel's Mango clients. The SM being a bit heavier and the less efficient transmisson of power to the propeller, may justify a small power increment from the Mango 85 Hp.

What i would stay away from, motorwise and if possible, is a turbo charged diesel. The naturaly aspired motor offers more reliability and when you sail in areas where a factory trained mechanic and a fully supplied motor parts store are not to be found, the KISS principle makes more sense. Otherwise, you must at least have aboard all the spares for the turbo, including ... the motor workshop manual.

Serge, Mango 51

BeyersWF <BeyersWF@aol.com> a écrit :
Armin,

In 2000, I bought a 1982 Amel Mango with a 80 HP Perkins
[European engine] and spent five years chasing parts to no avail. Last Fall
I had installed a 90 HP Yanmar Turbo. Although I have not had her out in
strong winds and high seas [I'm a live aboard and work every day], she does
well with a Max prop in the Chesapeake Bay. I could have bought a new kid
and had money left over. The keel had to be re-bedded for the Yanmar.

Coming around Cape Hatteras in 2000 with the 80 HP in 48 knot winds and 20
foot seas in a North Easter, the Mango did fine motor sailing [on the other
hand, I didn't feel too great]. So I have no concern with the 90 HP Yanmar
unless things get much worse. I crewed on an Amel Mango like mine [the
engine looked like a Perkins, I wasn't in the engine room] and she did fine
motor sailing down Long Island Sound in a 38 knot South wind with a North
tide running. Every third wave threw water on the windscreen. A larger
engine will burn more fuel; however, I could not tolerate an engine [the
European Perkins] that I could not get parts or service for. Have no clue
if this helps you. I'd be more concerned about getting the 75 HP engine
parts and service than how she performs in lousy weather.

Crash

"Windrush," Solomons, MD, USA

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 1:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

Hi all,
I am in the process of buying a used SM2000. Older versions
(-2002) have a 75hp engine, but are interesting in sight of the price.
Has anybody experience in changing the engine or does anybody have good
arguements for the smaller engine?

Armin








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[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp

BeyersWF
 

Armin,

In 2000, I bought a 1982 Amel Mango with a 80 HP Perkins
[European engine] and spent five years chasing parts to no avail. Last Fall
I had installed a 90 HP Yanmar Turbo. Although I have not had her out in
strong winds and high seas [I'm a live aboard and work every day], she does
well with a Max prop in the Chesapeake Bay. I could have bought a new kid
and had money left over. The keel had to be re-bedded for the Yanmar.

Coming around Cape Hatteras in 2000 with the 80 HP in 48 knot winds and 20
foot seas in a North Easter, the Mango did fine motor sailing [on the other
hand, I didn't feel too great]. So I have no concern with the 90 HP Yanmar
unless things get much worse. I crewed on an Amel Mango like mine [the
engine looked like a Perkins, I wasn't in the engine room] and she did fine
motor sailing down Long Island Sound in a 38 knot South wind with a North
tide running. Every third wave threw water on the windscreen. A larger
engine will burn more fuel; however, I could not tolerate an engine [the
European Perkins] that I could not get parts or service for. Have no clue
if this helps you. I'd be more concerned about getting the 75 HP engine
parts and service than how she performs in lousy weather.



Crash

"Windrush," Solomons, MD, USA

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of n4796p
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 1:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel SM2000 engine 75hp versus 100hp



Hi all,
I am in the process of buying a used SM2000. Older versions
(-2002) have a 75hp engine, but are interesting in sight of the price.
Has anybody experience in changing the engine or does anybody have good
arguements for the smaller engine?

Armin


Coppercoat - removal of old antifouling

Horst Pause <horst.puddleduck@...>
 

Prior to applying Coppercoat, we need to remove all the old antifouling.

Most of us will get a rather high quote for that - but - a friend mentioned that it can be done with a good paint remover so I experimented - it works. Brush on liberally, wait for a few minutes and scrape off with a normal scraper. Dispose in a bucket lined with paper as the paint remover may dissolve the bucket.

I'll do mine in March and will put photos on the web.

Horst

Puddleduck




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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries

Richard Piller <richard03801@...>
 

We bought a single charger for 260 to 90 volts, 80
amps 50/60 cycle from Dolphin in FL same as a Rea
system. The cost is less then a set of cooked
batteries. IT works well with no issues for 50 or 60
cycles. We DO NOT use 220 micro wave when pluged in
or the washer.

Richard and Joan SM 209


--- eric <kimberlite@optonline.net> wrote:

I wired two 12 volt $50- chargers in series and was
able to charge the
batteries.

Eric

Amel Super Maramu #376 Kimberlite





_____

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
[mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of amelliahona
Sent: Thursday, December 06, 2007 10:07 PM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Charging batteries



Pat Wrote: "-- ever this charger would cost about
$600.00. If anyone has a
cheaper solution or advice as to how best to charge
on the hard I'd
appreciate it.
Thanks,Pat SM 123"

Pat, I failed to mention my solution to this
problem. A couple of years ago
we
were going on the hard in a yard that did not have
power available (Nanny
Cay.
Tortola). I wanted to keep the batteries up so I
purchased three flexible
solar
panels (I forget the wattage, but minimal) for about
$125 each. Two I wired
in
series to get 24 volts for the house batteries, and
one I left as 12 volts
for the
starting battery. I bought a 24 volt controller and
a 12 volt controller
then
installed all this. It took a day or so to wire it
all up with some quick
disconnect plugs going behind where my cables
entered for my TwinScope
sonar unit on the port side of the cockpit.

When I go on the hard or leave the boat in a marina
for a period of time, I
place
these three panels on my foredeck, tie them down and
run the cable to the
quick
connects that are wired to the controllers and then
to the batteries.
They have kept my batteries at 100% without
overcooking them for about 4
years now, (intermittently of course as we remove
them when aboard the
boat). They even keep the batteries up with the auto
timer I installed to
flush
the watermater with fresh water three times a week
when off the boat so I
don't have to pickle the water maker.

I would guess the entire setup was about $600 USD so
it isn't cheaper
but it has worked well and doesn't require me to
leave the boat plugged in
long term in marinas with attendant stray current
problems or when on the
hard.

Gary





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