Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Ryan, 

That was a lot of words, but your question was, "how best to separate out some circuits so they always have 50Hz, but allow others to use whatever frequency is available."

The smart-ass answer is why.  You are over thinking this and negotiating with yourself without any real experience. 

The short answer is, it is much simpler to leave things as they are and buy 50htz devices.

The longer answer may be for someone who is willing to destroy the original design, which I will tell you is perfect and "child-proof," especially when traveling to many different countries. Search earlier posts for my definition of child-proof. 

I really hopes that this helps you make a decision... it would take me an hour to give you all the supporting data that I am sure you want. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Aug 18, 2017 11:31, "Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Wall power in the USA targets 120V (and they're very good at maintaining it), but it is allowed to vary from 110V to 125V. All at 60Hz; they will change the voltage to maintain the frequency if the grid is under heavy load.  So in my opinion it is most correct to call it 120V, but a lot of people call it 110V or even 115V.  Our homes (and larger boats, like the SM) are supplied with split-phase 240V, so you can use 240V directly or get two 120V circuits by connecting them across the middle of the transformer (the neutral wire) -- this is as Alan says.  Even larger buildings are supplied with 3-phase power, but that gets very complicated very quickly.

My question was regarding the actual wiring of the SM, how best to separate out some circuits so they always have 50Hz, but allow others to use whatever frequency is available. And also to switch the 50Hz circuit from the inverter to the generator as needed. Has anyone done this?

If I were to go hog wild, I'd build seven separate AC electrical systems: 50Hz, 60Hz, and "don't care"; each at both 120V and 240V; and a seventh that doesn't care about voltage or frequency.  But I'm resisting the temptation primarily because I don't want to mess too much with the Amel design, and also because that would be a lot of work and expense. Can you tell I'm an electrical engineer? 😂

Implicit in the above is a related question that's been marinating in my mind for a while: has anyone in the US tried swapping out their 3-wire shore power cord for a 4-wire cord and thus running 120V to US-style wall outlets?  I have a number of US wall outlets on board, but they're all powered from an inverter right now, which is not the most efficient thing and also limits how much power I can draw. I'd get 240V space heaters if I go forward with electric heat for this reason.

I think someone in this thread also mentioned the main breaker is 35A? Is the existing system sufficiently robust that I could safely replace it with 50A? Is this the breaker on the panel above the galley or is there another one closer to the shore power inlet (as required by ABYC...)?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, USA

On Fri, Aug 18, 2017 at 5:13 AM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

Hi Danny,

In the USA they have a four wire system. If you use one of the hot wires and neutral you get 110V . If you use the two hot wires you can get 220V @ 60Hz. It's a bit bizarre to us 220/240V folk....but that's the way it is. 
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
PS Nice pic on Facebook of you sailing in to Manganui



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: finding LED bulbs for overhead lights

Ken Powers <sailingaquarius@...>
 

Hello Ryan,

I also had a problem with the overhead lights with the two parallel inserts to make connection.  I did find some that "worked" but the only worked for about 10 minutes and blew out.  Also, they were not very bright.  So, here is what I did:

My SM is 24V...  So I bought 4 each of 12V LED lights and soldered 2 sets of 2 in series.  Then Kluged the connection into the socket and WA-LA....  Let there be light!!  My wife was VERY happy.

Ken
SM2000 #262
sailingaquarius.com


On Thursday, August 17, 2017 2:28 PM, "'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 
Here is a link to LED bulbs that are G4 bases 24v that we are using on Cream Puff:
 
 
and
 
 
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Grenada
www.creampuff.us
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 11:42 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: finding LED bulbs for overhead lights
 
 
Thanks for the tips.  You've given me a bunch of good ideas.  Also, I contacted boatlamps.co.uk and they knew exactly what I was talking about.  They recommend this bulb, which looks like it might work... I'll have to measure carefully to see if the fixture can accomodate the diameter.  It seems a little silly to me to waste the light that would be pointing up, but the bulbs are in theory brighter than the halogens they're replacing, so it might be OK.  Also I learned that the largest fixture on my boat, the one above the salon table, has the pins oriented straight out of the ceiling (so it would take a back-pin LED bulb).
 
Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, USA
 
On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 11:24 AM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Hello Ryan,
 
I converted all bulbs on hull № 350 to LED in 2013.  I faced the same problem as you have.
 
For my overhead lights, the two-pin socket which comes from the Amel factory aligning vertically consists of a brown or black bakelite terminal with the electric wires coming in the back and the two pins exposed to the center of the light assembly.
 
This bakelite terminal is held in place by a little screw.  The bakelite terminal is elongated in such a way that when the little screw tightens, it automatically rotates the pins to the factory vertical position; i.e., if you loosen the screw, rotate the bakelite terminal 90°, and try to tighten the screw, it will inevitably rotate the bakelite  terminal back to the Amel factory position with the pins aligned vertically.
 
In 2013, no suitable LED existed with vertically aligned pins, much less in the warm light variety we required, and which proved very hard to find.
 
So I took an abrasive tip on a dremel, loosened the screw, pulled bakelite terminal so I had one or two inches of electric wire exposed (for ease of work), and wore down the Amel factory elongation on each bakelite terminal.  Sometimes upon retightening the screw the base still rotated a bit so the LED was not perfectly horizontal, but frankly, this does not impact light distribution in any perceptible way.  One or two of mine are crooked enough that one edge of the flat disk LED may be touching the diffuser glass, but I don't think anyone has ever noticed.
 
It takes a bit of time.  And I ruined one of the LEDs in the process of installing, but so far, only one LED has burned out, just a week or two ago.
 
Cheerio,
 
Peregrinus
SM2000 № 350 (2002)
Underway, Thermopylae to Sciathus
 
 
 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Base for Jabsco Quiet Flush head Broken

Philippe Morel
 

Hello all , I hard the same issue on both toilets , ont have been fully glass fiber reinforced , and for the second , I have made long search on internet and found the following supplier .
If any body order , thanks for let us informed
Regards
Philippe 
BELAVITA SM2k n°238


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Pat,

I used the same, but thick cable and had almost the same "bait" in 58 countries...a 3.2 AB Aluminum with a 15hp 2 cycle...almost 13 years.

Maybe it was thickness...maybe luck!


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970




   

On Aug 18, 2017 08:16, "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill, I don't know the thickness of the cable I had, what ever Lowes stocks. Did not know it was available thicker . I was shocked how easy it was to cut . Fortunately / Unfortunately we have a dinghy we love , but thieves may love more , a  10.5' AB aluminum with a 18 hp. two stroke , both almost new. You did not say what you used .

Thanks,
Pat SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 5:58 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Pat,

In my experience, "Kryptonite" flex cable comes in several thicknesses and the one that is between 3/8" and 7/16" is difficult to cut. The thieves usually steal the best available dinghy with the easiest-to-cut cable.

But, if you have a nice dinghy and/or a stupid crook, you may lose your dinghy no matter what you do. BTW, most crooks hate 4 cycle Hondas, and love 15+ hp 2 cycle engines.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550








On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 3:43 PM, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 
Thanks all, it sounds like everyone is using chain, which is heavy and can be cut , I was hoping someone had discovered a flexible cable that was difficult to cut . I guess its chain and keeping the insurance premiums paid.
Thanks Again,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...om>
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 12:42 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Good morning Pat,

My solution is probably extreme.

Last year I purchased small length of 3/8 chain and 1/2 chains to secure dinghy and bicycles.

Then I realized the eyes on the dinghy to secure it are about 10 mm made of aluminium, so they will be cut quicker than the chain, so I use the 3/8 chain.

I use the 1/2 inch chain to secure my bicycles (around cleat, pole, etc.).
When people see its size of the chain they smile (many take pictures).
I assume/hope that a thief (a lazy person to start with) will be discouraged of cutting off such chain and look for another victim.
For the lock I use the German Made ABUS Granit which are Level 10
https://www.abus.com/eng/Mobile-Security/Marine/Padlocks/GRANIT-37-55-S-038-S

All the chains can also be linked together using shackles for my 2nd anchor.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
IGY Simpson Bay Marina, St Maarten, NA

--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 8/17/17, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore
To: amelyachtowners@...m
Date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 7:46 AM


 









The last time we were in the Caribbean
I secured my dinghy with a cable that was encased in gray
plastic . I think it was called Kryptonite , I was told by a
friend and where I bought it , that it was very difficult to
cut. Well I just cut it very easily with a very short
handled cable cutter. When we go ashore , I like to think
that are dinghy will be there when we get back . So does
anyone have a suggestion as to the most secure way to secure
a dinghy. Nothing is bullet proof , but I want to get as
close as possible.Thanks,
PatSM Shenanigans









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Re: winter liveaboard?

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

On No. 350, Peregrinus, no 60Hz devices come onboard.  All devices are 50Hz or 50/60Hz.  Most of the devices, by far, we purchased in the U.S.   Amazon.co.uk is a great source.

On #350, the 230V user panel has two vertical bus bars, one for the left breakers and one for the right breakers.  Also from factory, there is a breaker+RCD device hung to the left of the 230V panel, accessible only from inside the electronics cabinet above the kitchen sink.  Aftermarket, we installed the Xantrex Prosine International 1800w inverter (230V/50Hz).  Note this very Xantrex inverter is what the Amel factory installed on sisterships of the era of #350.  Our inverter, the 806-1884, has a transfer relay built-in.  Aftermarket, we also installed another RCD device and 32A breaker at the entry of shore power into the boat.

In Fort Lauderdale, an electrician sawed off the bus bars so that the bottom two breakers, i.e., Outlets (port) and Microwave (starboard) are isolated from the rest of the bus.  He then fed those two outlets from the 1800w Xantrex inverter (230V/50Hz).  

So here is how our setup works, even with inverter off:

1. If shore power is available and the 230V user panel breaker+RCD is OFF, Microwave and Outlets can only get 50Hz power, which must necessarily come from inverter or from genset.  Useful in the U.S. to keep our 50Hz devices from dying.

2.  If shore power is available and the 230V user panel breaker+RCD is ON, Microwave and Outlets get whatever Hz shore power supplies.  Useful in Europe.

Bottom line, in any countries with 60Hz power, the user panel 230V breaker on #350 stays OFF, and elsewhere this breaker stays ON.  

Works!

Cheers,

SM2K (2002)
underway to Salonica



---In amelyachtowners@..., <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote :

Wall power in the USA targets 120V (and they're very good at maintaining it), but it is allowed to vary from 110V to 125V. All at 60Hz; they will change the voltage to maintain the frequency if the grid is under heavy load.  So in my opinion it is most correct to call it 120V, but a lot of people call it 110V or even 115V.  Our homes (and larger boats, like the SM) are supplied with split-phase 240V, so you can use 240V directly or get two 120V circuits by connecting them across the middle of the transformer (the neutral wire) -- this is as Alan says.  Even larger buildings are supplied with 3-phase power, but that gets very complicated very quickly.

My question was regarding the actual wiring of the SM, how best to separate out some circuits so they always have 50Hz, but allow others to use whatever frequency is available. And also to switch the 50Hz circuit from the inverter to the generator as needed. Has anyone done this?

If I were to go hog wild, I'd build seven separate AC electrical systems: 50Hz, 60Hz, and "don't care"; each at both 120V and 240V; and a seventh that doesn't care about voltage or frequency.  But I'm resisting the temptation primarily because I don't want to mess too much with the Amel design, and also because that would be a lot of work and expense. Can you tell I'm an electrical engineer? 😂

Implicit in the above is a related question that's been marinating in my mind for a while: has anyone in the US tried swapping out their 3-wire shore power cord for a 4-wire cord and thus running 120V to US-style wall outlets?  I have a number of US wall outlets on board, but they're all powered from an inverter right now, which is not the most efficient thing and also limits how much power I can draw. I'd get 240V space heaters if I go forward with electric heat for this reason.

I think someone in this thread also mentioned the main breaker is 35A? Is the existing system sufficiently robust that I could safely replace it with 50A? Is this the breaker on the panel above the galley or is there another one closer to the shore power inlet (as required by ABYC...)?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, USA

On Fri, Aug 18, 2017 at 5:13 AM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... om> wrote:
 

Hi Danny,

In the USA they have a four wire system. If you use one of the hot wires and neutral you get 110V . If you use the two hot wires you can get 220V @ 60Hz. It's a bit bizarre to us 220/240V folk....but that's the way it is. 
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
PS Nice pic on Facebook of you sailing in to Manganui



Re: Intermittent A/C Seawater Pump

Dean Gillies
 

So here's the plan...

1. Start trying to find a replacement Capacitor as we cruise. 10 microfarads. (Ryan, you are quite correct, but I knew what Bill meant :-)

2. If it's the Cap, then we carry on with the system we have and a new cap.

3. If the cap doesn't fix it, I'll start looking for a new pump as suggested.

In the meantime, I'll keep twiddling the spindle each time we need A/C to work!

Will post again when things progress.

Cheers and thanks all
Dean
SY Stella Amel 54 #154
Patras, Greece.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

Ryan Meador
 

Wall power in the USA targets 120V (and they're very good at maintaining it), but it is allowed to vary from 110V to 125V. All at 60Hz; they will change the voltage to maintain the frequency if the grid is under heavy load.  So in my opinion it is most correct to call it 120V, but a lot of people call it 110V or even 115V.  Our homes (and larger boats, like the SM) are supplied with split-phase 240V, so you can use 240V directly or get two 120V circuits by connecting them across the middle of the transformer (the neutral wire) -- this is as Alan says.  Even larger buildings are supplied with 3-phase power, but that gets very complicated very quickly.

My question was regarding the actual wiring of the SM, how best to separate out some circuits so they always have 50Hz, but allow others to use whatever frequency is available. And also to switch the 50Hz circuit from the inverter to the generator as needed. Has anyone done this?

If I were to go hog wild, I'd build seven separate AC electrical systems: 50Hz, 60Hz, and "don't care"; each at both 120V and 240V; and a seventh that doesn't care about voltage or frequency.  But I'm resisting the temptation primarily because I don't want to mess too much with the Amel design, and also because that would be a lot of work and expense. Can you tell I'm an electrical engineer? 😂

Implicit in the above is a related question that's been marinating in my mind for a while: has anyone in the US tried swapping out their 3-wire shore power cord for a 4-wire cord and thus running 120V to US-style wall outlets?  I have a number of US wall outlets on board, but they're all powered from an inverter right now, which is not the most efficient thing and also limits how much power I can draw. I'd get 240V space heaters if I go forward with electric heat for this reason.

I think someone in this thread also mentioned the main breaker is 35A? Is the existing system sufficiently robust that I could safely replace it with 50A? Is this the breaker on the panel above the galley or is there another one closer to the shore power inlet (as required by ABYC...)?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, USA

On Fri, Aug 18, 2017 at 5:13 AM, divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:
 

Hi Danny,

In the USA they have a four wire system. If you use one of the hot wires and neutral you get 110V . If you use the two hot wires you can get 220V @ 60Hz. It's a bit bizarre to us 220/240V folk....but that's the way it is. 
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
PS Nice pic on Facebook of you sailing in to Manganui



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Base for Jabsco Quiet Flush head Broken

karkauai
 

I'll look into both of those solutions, Bill.  Thank you!

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
Panama cell: +507-61171896
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Aug 17, 2017, at 8:47 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I have not had to solve that particular problem, but it sounds like a rivnut might be an answer instead of a molly-bolt


Another creative solution, might be to get a sheet of 3/8" thick G10.  Epoxy it down on top of the existing fiberglass base.  If you go slow and are very careful with a sharp new tap you can drill and tap it.  It is strong enough to hold threads, and is non-corroding.  I have used it a lot as backing plates.  It usually comes in a light green color that is not horrible to the eye.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Gloucester, Mass



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

Patrick McAneny
 

Danny, No doubt you are right , if someone has a large cable/chain cutter , I guess they can steal your dinghy , no matter what you do. Its a shame , every time we go ashore I am concerned about losing my ride back to my boat . I have sailed to Annapolis probably 60 times over the last 40 yrs., I have never heard of a dinghy being stolen , although it probably has happened. The dinghy dock gets very crowded at the show, more likely someone moved yours to get their dinghy out. I remember well meeting you and about four other Amels there many years ago , we had a party , good times. Say hey ! to Yvonne .
Sail On,
Pat SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 6:06 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Hi Pat,
I think all the locking methods only stop the impulse thefts. If someone sets out to steel a dinghy and comes equipped they're going to get one no matter what we do. One time we were at the Annapolis boat show. We came back and found ours shifted but tied up again. The Mercury 4 stroke outboard we had was a bit hard to start and if you got it wrong it had a kick back that would break your arm. Might have saved us a new dinghy  and left a thief with a sore arm.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl
On 18 August 2017 at 07:43 "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
Thanks all, it sounds like everyone is using chain, which is heavy and can be cut , I was hoping som eone had discovered a flexible cable that was difficult to cut . I guess its chain and keeping the insurance premiums paid.
Thanks Again,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 12:42 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Good morning Pat,

My solution is probably extrem e.

Last year I purchased small length of 3/8 chain and 1/2 chains to secure dinghy and bicycles.

Then I realized the eyes on the dinghy to secure it are about 10 mm made of aluminium, so they will be cut quicker than the chain, so I use the 3/8 chain.

I use the 1/2 inch chain to secure my bicycles (around cleat, pole, etc.).
When people see its size of the chain they smile (many take pictures).
I assume/hope that a thief (a lazy person to start with) will be discouraged of cutting off such chain and look for another victim.
For the lock I use the German Made ABUS Granit which are Level 10
https://www.abus.com/eng/Mobile-Security/Marine/Padlocks/GRANIT-37-55-S-038-S

All the chains can also be linked together using shackles for my 2nd anchor.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
IGY Simpson Bay Marina, St Maarten, NA

--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 8/17/17, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 7:46 AM


 









The last time we were in the Caribbean
I secured my dinghy with a cable that was encased in gray
plastic . I think it was called Kryptonite , I was told by a
friend and where I bought it , that it was very difficult to
cut. Well I just cut it very easily with a very short
handled cable cutter. When we go ashore , I like to think
that are dinghy will be there when we get back . So does
anyone have a suggestion as to t he most secure way to secure
a dinghy. Nothing is bullet proof , but I want to get as
close as possible.Thanks,
PatSM Shenanigans









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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, I don't know the thickness of the cable I had, what ever Lowes stocks. Did not know it was available thicker . I was shocked how easy it was to cut . Fortunately / Unfortunately we have a dinghy we love , but thieves may love more , a  10.5' AB aluminum with a 18 hp. two stroke , both almost new. You did not say what you used .
Thanks,
Pat SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 5:58 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Pat,

In my experience, "Kryptonite" flex cable comes in several thicknesses and the one that is between 3/8" and 7/16" is difficult to cut. The thieves usually steal the best available dinghy with the easiest-to-cut cable.

But, if you have a nice dinghy and/or a stupid crook, you may lose your dinghy no matter what you do. BTW, most crooks hate 4 cycle Hondas, and love 15+ hp 2 cycle engines.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School  http://amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970








On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 3:43 PM, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Thanks all, it sounds like everyone is using chain, which is heavy and can be cut , I was hoping someone had discovered a flexible cable that was difficult to cut . I guess its chain and keeping the insurance premiums paid.
Thanks Again,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Aug 17, 2017 12:42 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore

 
Good morning Pat,

My solution is probably extreme.

Last year I purchased small length of 3/8 chain and 1/2 chains to secure dinghy and bicycles.

Then I realized the eyes on the dinghy to secure it are about 10 mm made of aluminium, so they will be cut quicker than the chain, so I use the 3/8 chain.

I use the 1/2 inch chain to secure my bicycles (around cleat, pole, etc.).
When people see its size of the chain they smile (many take pictures).
I assume/hope that a thief (a lazy person to start with) will be discouraged of cutting off such chain and look for another victim.
For the lock I use the German Made ABUS Granit which are Level 10
https://www.abus.com/eng/Mobile-Security/Marine/Padlocks/GRANIT-37-55-S-038-S

All the chains can also be linked together using shackles for my 2nd anchor.

Sincerely, Alexandre
SM2K #289 NIKIMAT
IGY Simpson Bay Marina, St Maarten, NA

--------------------------------------------
On Thu, 8/17/17, sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Securing dinghy ashore
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Thursday, August 17, 2017, 7:46 AM


 









The last time we were in the Caribbean
I secured my dinghy with a cable that was encased in gray
plastic . I think it was called Kryptonite , I was told by a
friend and where I bought it , that it was very difficult to
cut. Well I just cut it very easily with a very short
handled cable cutter. When we go ashore , I like to think
that are dinghy will be there when we get back . So does
anyone have a suggestion as to the most secure way to secure
a dinghy. Nothing is bullet proof , but I want to get as
close as possible.Thanks,
PatSM Shenanigans









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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Thomson Washer major water flooding !!!

karkauai
 

Hi Bill,
Yes, the tub empties.
There is no sound to indicate the motor is running or trying to start,  but I haven't opened it up to look inside yet.

 Finding someone to work on it is problematic, and I think it's above my pay grade without someone to guide me every step of the way...unless it's something simple like a capacitor or relay.  I don't have any schematics or repair manual.

Anybody know someone on the Chesapeake who might be able to help me with it?



Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
Panama cell: +507-61171896
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Aug 17, 2017, at 7:53 PM, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 


Kent,

My thoughts are:
Is the tub empty?
Belt?
Motor?
Control panel?
Fill level switch?
Replace it because it is 20 years old?

But, I cannot recommend which of the above to start with. 


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Aug 17, 2017 19:26, "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Anyone have any thoughts on a Thompson Australe washer and dryer that doesn't spin anymore?

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Down wind sail configuration

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

If you raise 2 headsails on one foil with 2 halyards, you will not be able to furl without dropping the additional (second) sail. 

Think about what will happen to the second halyard when furling. Amel's special swivel which allows you to secure the second sail and remove its halyard is the only solution. And, it requires 3 slots. The 3rd is for the "dehooker."


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

   

On Aug 18, 2017 4:35 AM, "smiles bernard smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello again
The maramu 46 we have bought doesn't have the original furling system.
It has a recently added frofurl ndec 430
I pick up the boat on tues 😎 but believe it has a twin luff grove
So parhaps my only option will be to add a second genoa halyard and hoist the second sail on the second luff groove
That way least I'll be able to raise and lower each sail independently. 
The original mouse plus 3 luff groove system  looks brilliant !
I wonder if I could replace the foil and swivel?
Is this the kind of thing amel might still supply or does anyone know the manufacturer of the amel furling system?
Many thanks
Miles

On 17 Aug 2017, at 19:10, smiles bernard smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Hi there Bill
I dont have a manual I'm afraid 

All the best
M

On 16 Aug 2017, at 22:41, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Miles,
He best
Read your manual...it is very straightforward. Let me know if you do not have a manual.


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Danny,
In the USA they have a four wire system. If you use one of the hot wires and neutral you get 110V . If you use the two hot wires you can get 220V @ 60Hz. It's a bit bizarre to us 220/240V folk....but that's the way it is. 
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
PS Nice pic on Facebook of you sailing in to Manganui


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Low pressure pump for the 160 liter Watermaker

Alan Leslie
 

Hi guys
There are quite a few different March pumps.
You need to be careful to specify the flow and pressure requirements before deciding which one to buy.
Remember they are centrifugal pumps not positive displacement pumps so there are direct relationships between flow and pressure on both in flow and outflow. The March website has lots of info and flow / pressure graphs to help you work out which one is best for your specific application.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Down wind sail configuration

smiles bernard
 

Hello again
The maramu 46 we have bought doesn't have the original furling system.
It has a recently added frofurl ndec 430
I pick up the boat on tues 😎 but believe it has a twin luff grove
So parhaps my only option will be to add a second genoa halyard and hoist the second sail on the second luff groove
That way least I'll be able to raise and lower each sail independently. 
The original mouse plus 3 luff groove system  looks brilliant !
I wonder if I could replace the foil and swivel?
Is this the kind of thing amel might still supply or does anyone know the manufacturer of the amel furling system?
Many thanks
Miles

On 17 Aug 2017, at 19:10, smiles bernard smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi there Bill
I dont have a manual I'm afraid 

All the best
M

On 16 Aug 2017, at 22:41, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Miles,
He best
Read your manual...it is very straightforward. Let me know if you do not have a manual.


CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Low pressure pump for the 160 liter Watermaker

Barry Connor
 

Hi Dean,

I bought the March pump from Tom Martland at  "flagshipmarine.com" in Florida USA.
I found Tom's price cheaper than the March distributors.

The unit was the:
March magnetic pump 510gph  220v - 230v,  50hz/60hz  with barbs and mounting plate. You need to make sure Tom supplies this one and not the normal US 110v unit.

Fitting was no problem, put some rubber gasket under the mounting plate to reduce any vibration. 
When I was in Hyeres they did not have the normal Amel replacement pump in stock so I found this March pump in USA. I had it shipped to Marseille in a few days.
My original pump was sticking and we pulled it apart in Hyeres and I thought that we had freed it up but it went back to getting stuck straight away.
I also bought from Tom a 12v March magnetic pump to replace my Sureflow refrigeration pump. I have not done this yet.

Hope this helps.
Best Regards

Barry and Penny
"Lady Penelope II'
Amel 54  # 17
Monastir, Tunisia




On Thursday, August 17, 2017 4:21 PM, "kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:


 

I was wondering if the March pump could also be substituted for the Calpeda LP pump. The March pump seems t have a very high flow rate.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

eric freedman
 

I was speaking about the power to our Amels from the 50 amp 220 volt 60 cycle outlet on the dock pedestal.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 10:11 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

I thought the USA was 110 volt??

Danny

On 18 August 2017 at 14:04 "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan,

Here in the USA you have 60 cycle 220-240 volts in all the outlets.

The water heater is a resistive device and doesn’t really care what frequency the electric is. The AC unit and chargers work on 50/60.

 

The dishwasher, Watermaker , and Washing Machine all work ONLY on  50 hz.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:14 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

Those are good ideas.  I used to have one of those Eva-Dry units and they are indeed a joke.  I had it for the summer though, not the winter.  It tends to be very dry here once the temperature goes below freezing.  My old boat had an Espar (Eberspacher), my new one does not.  That goes a long way towards keeping the boat dry because it exchanges air with the outside.  I think I'm going to try to heat with electric only this year rather than install one of those systems.  I also do not have a 50Hz inverter, but I'm sure I can find a similar dehumidifier that works at 60Hz.  I may also add a 50Hz inverter so I can run the washing machine.  Does anyone have experience separating out the electrical system so some things run on the inverter and some things don't?  Or did you just wire it right into the main breaker (in which case how do you run the hot water heater)?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 12:45 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For two people living permanently on am SM2K, we find in cool climates you need the following to avoid damage from condensation arising from high humidity.

 

1.  Always run the kitchen exhaust fan while using propane.

2.  Run at least two dehumidifiers permanently.  We have the Eva-Dry EDV-2200 with peltier technology, which is a bit of a joke and is not sufficient if people are living on the boat.  Don't recommend it.  We also have the DeLonghi DNC 65 with desiccant technology, highly recommended for low power use averaging about 50W, low noise, small size, and ability to keep dehumidifying even at low ambient temps when we are out and about.  Runs in the U.S. if you run it from your 50Hz inverter.

3.  Run the Eberspächer diesel heater at least once a day and for at least one hour.

4.  On any days with low ambient humidity, open all hatches and run fans.

5.  Install humidity monitors throughout the boat, and especially in the problem area on the berth above the batteries.  About $40 total.

6.  Open cabinet doors and rotate stored clothes as needed.

 

Cheers,

 

Peregrinus

SM2K N. 350

En route, Thermopylae to Skiathos

 

 

 

 

 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

I thought the USA was 110 volt??

Danny

On 18 August 2017 at 14:04 "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Ryan,

Here in the USA you have 60 cycle 220-240 volts in all the outlets.

The water heater is a resistive device and doesn’t really care what frequency the electric is. The AC unit and chargers work on 50/60.

 

The dishwasher, Watermaker , and Washing Machine all work ONLY on  50 hz.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:14 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

Those are good ideas.  I used to have one of those Eva-Dry units and they are indeed a joke.  I had it for the summer though, not the winter.  It tends to be very dry here once the temperature goes below freezing.  My old boat had an Espar (Eberspacher), my new one does not.  That goes a long way towards keeping the boat dry because it exchanges air with the outside.  I think I'm going to try to heat with electric only this year rather than install one of those systems.  I also do not have a 50Hz inverter, but I'm sure I can find a similar dehumidifier that works at 60Hz.  I may also add a 50Hz inverter so I can run the washing machine.  Does anyone have experience separating out the electrical system so some things run on the inverter and some things don't?  Or did you just wire it right into the main breaker (in which case how do you run the hot water heater)?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 12:45 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For two people living permanently on am SM2K, we find in cool climates you need the following to avoid damage from condensation arising from high humidity.

 

1.  Always run the kitchen exhaust fan while using propane.

2.  Run at least two dehumidifiers permanently.  We have the Eva-Dry EDV-2200 with peltier technology, which is a bit of a joke and is not sufficient if people are living on the boat.  Don't recommend it.  We also have the DeLonghi DNC 65 with desiccant technology, highly recommended for low power use averaging about 50W, low noise, small size, and ability to keep dehumidifying even at low ambient temps when we are out and about.  Runs in the U.S. if you run it from your 50Hz inverter.

3.  Run the Eberspächer diesel heater at least once a day and for at least one hour.

4.  On any days with low ambient humidity, open all hatches and run fans.

5.  Install humidity monitors throughout the boat, and especially in the problem area on the berth above the batteries.  About $40 total.

6.  Open cabinet doors and rotate stored clothes as needed.

 

Cheers,

 

Peregrinus

SM2K N. 350

En route, Thermopylae to Skiathos

 

 

 

 

 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

eric freedman
 

Ryan,

Here in the USA you have 60 cycle 220-240 volts in all the outlets.

The water heater is a resistive device and doesn’t really care what frequency the electric is. The AC unit and chargers work on 50/60.

 

The dishwasher, Watermaker , and Washing Machine all work ONLY on  50 hz.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 17, 2017 1:14 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: winter liveaboard?

 

 

Those are good ideas.  I used to have one of those Eva-Dry units and they are indeed a joke.  I had it for the summer though, not the winter.  It tends to be very dry here once the temperature goes below freezing.  My old boat had an Espar (Eberspacher), my new one does not.  That goes a long way towards keeping the boat dry because it exchanges air with the outside.  I think I'm going to try to heat with electric only this year rather than install one of those systems.  I also do not have a 50Hz inverter, but I'm sure I can find a similar dehumidifier that works at 60Hz.  I may also add a 50Hz inverter so I can run the washing machine.  Does anyone have experience separating out the electrical system so some things run on the inverter and some things don't?  Or did you just wire it right into the main breaker (in which case how do you run the hot water heater)?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

 

On Thu, Aug 17, 2017 at 12:45 PM, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For two people living permanently on am SM2K, we find in cool climates you need the following to avoid damage from condensation arising from high humidity.

 

1.  Always run the kitchen exhaust fan while using propane.

2.  Run at least two dehumidifiers permanently.  We have the Eva-Dry EDV-2200 with peltier technology, which is a bit of a joke and is not sufficient if people are living on the boat.  Don't recommend it.  We also have the DeLonghi DNC 65 with desiccant technology, highly recommended for low power use averaging about 50W, low noise, small size, and ability to keep dehumidifying even at low ambient temps when we are out and about.  Runs in the U.S. if you run it from your 50Hz inverter.

3.  Run the Eberspächer diesel heater at least once a day and for at least one hour.

4.  On any days with low ambient humidity, open all hatches and run fans.

5.  Install humidity monitors throughout the boat, and especially in the problem area on the berth above the batteries.  About $40 total.

6.  Open cabinet doors and rotate stored clothes as needed.

 

Cheers,

 

Peregrinus

SM2K N. 350

En route, Thermopylae to Skiathos

 

 

 


Re: Base for Jabsco Quiet Flush head Brojen

greatketch@...
 

I have not had to solve that particular problem, but it sounds like a rivnut might be an answer instead of a molly-bolt

Another creative solution, might be to get a sheet of 3/8" thick G10.  Epoxy it down on top of the existing fiberglass base.  If you go slow and are very careful with a sharp new tap you can drill and tap it.  It is strong enough to hold threads, and is non-corroding.  I have used it a lot as backing plates.  It usually comes in a light green color that is not horrible to the eye.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Gloucester, Mass