Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Turbo Rebuild

Jean Boucharlat
 

One more thing about turbos, which I hate as most everyone else: without a turbo you will run afoul of European emissions regulations (US, I don’t know). This might be a problem at the time of resale.

In the normal course of things you will never be chased on the high seas by the Coastguard to check on your emissions but, some day, they may become more strict.

 

Jean Boucharlat

Formerly SM 232

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: mercredi 20 septembre 2017 05:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Turbo Rebuild

 

 

As bad as hitting the turbo with high power right away is shutting the engine off without letting the turbo spool down and cool off in its oil bath. Turbos run at up to 300 thousand RPM and when shut down without oil to cool them down, they quickly bake the existing oil on to the bearings and you’ll go through turbos like oil filters. After running in the band where the turbo was engaged, let it idle for a few minutes to let the engine oil cool it down gently before shutting the engine down.   Same goes for your car if it doesn’t have a supplementary electric oil pump. 

Brent Cameron 

Future Amel Owner

 


On Sep 19, 2017, at 9:13 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am probably taking your suggestion of taking off your turbo way more seriously than the spirt in which you made it but here goes...

 

Just so you have the perspective right, a healthy TMD22 as installed by Amel will drive a clean hull Super Maramu at 8 knots at full throttle and 3000 RPM, and 7 knots throttled back to a sustainable cruising RPM of 2300 or 2400.  If your top speed is 6, you are loosing a LOT because you really don't want to drive this engine at full throttle for hours at a time.

 

The conversion you are talking about is much more complex than just removing the turbo, but I'll assume you can find all the bits and pieces to convert the engine to a naturally aspirated engine.  I think you'll end up with a Perkins M60--more or less.  Do you know if the injectors or injection pump have been jiggered as part of making this into a turbo engine?  I do not know for sure, but I'll bet they have.  But assuming ALL that...

 

Now you have a 60HP engine (more or less) and a serious mismatch between the prop and the engine.  You are what is know as "over-propped".  Running 2000 RPM at full throttle with this engine is lugging it very badly. It is not putting out the power it is capable of and there are lots of reasons why this is very bad for a diesel engine.  



You will need to re-prop the engine to get it running at a maximum rpm that is approaching specification. By the time you are done getting the parts you need for the conversion, and a new propeller, you will have spent as much--or more--than you would to have get the turbo fixed, and you will have a boat that doesn't perform as it should.



If all that doesn't convince you, and you can solve all those issues... you'll be killing the resale value of your boat by gelding its iron stallion.

 

I hate turbos too, but... an underpowered boat is not going to be a happy boat.  

 

Get the turbo fixed, or replaced, and then take good care of it.  It is not as fragile as some people make it out to be. More of them fail from abuse and lack of maintenance, rather than any inherent design flaws. 

 

The WORST thing you can do to a turbo charger is start the engine, and immediately run it at high speed before the oil has had a chance to circulate and warm up to operating temperature. The bearings will be dry, or nearly so, and at the speeds a turbo spins, the bearings will die a very quick death.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160,  Harmonie

Annapolis, Md

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Turbo Rebuild

Brent Cameron
 

As bad as hitting the turbo with high power right away is shutting the engine off without letting the turbo spool down and cool off in its oil bath. Turbos run at up to 300 thousand RPM and when shut down without oil to cool them down, they quickly bake the existing oil on to the bearings and you’ll go through turbos like oil filters. After running in the band where the turbo was engaged, let it idle for a few minutes to let the engine oil cool it down gently before shutting the engine down.   Same goes for your car if it doesn’t have a supplementary electric oil pump. 

Brent Cameron 
Future Amel Owner


On Sep 19, 2017, at 9:13 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am probably taking your suggestion of taking off your turbo way more seriously than the spirt in which you made it but here goes...


Just so you have the perspective right, a healthy TMD22 as installed by Amel will drive a clean hull Super Maramu at 8 knots at full throttle and 3000 RPM, and 7 knots throttled back to a sustainable cruising RPM of 2300 or 2400.  If your top speed is 6, you are loosing a LOT because you really don't want to drive this engine at full throttle for hours at a time.

The conversion you are talking about is much more complex than just removing the turbo, but I'll assume you can find all the bits and pieces to convert the engine to a naturally aspirated engine.  I think you'll end up with a Perkins M60--more or less.  Do you know if the injectors or injection pump have been jiggered as part of making this into a turbo engine?  I do not know for sure, but I'll bet they have.  But assuming ALL that...

Now you have a 60HP engine (more or less) and a serious mismatch between the prop and the engine.  You are what is know as "over-propped".  Running 2000 RPM at full throttle with this engine is lugging it very badly. It is not putting out the power it is capable of and there are lots of reasons why this is very bad for a diesel engine.  

You will need to re-prop the engine to get it running at a maximum rpm that is approaching specification. By the time you are done getting the parts you need for the conversion, and a new propeller, you will have spent as much--or more--than you would to have get the turbo fixed, and you will have a boat that doesn't perform as it should.

If all that doesn't convince you, and you can solve all those issues... you'll be killing the resale value of your boat by gelding its iron stallion.

I hate turbos too, but... an underpowered boat is not going to be a happy boat.  

Get the turbo fixed, or replaced, and then take good care of it.  It is not as fragile as some people make it out to be. More of them fail from abuse and lack of maintenance, rather than any inherent design flaws. 

The WORST thing you can do to a turbo charger is start the engine, and immediately run it at high speed before the oil has had a chance to circulate and warm up to operating temperature. The bearings will be dry, or nearly so, and at the speeds a turbo spins, the bearings will die a very quick death.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, Md


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi. I have a near new tmd22 turbo sitting in my cupboard. As part of my attempts to get my engine going I bought and installed. Shortly there after I gave up and bought a new motor. I also have a fully reconditioned injector pump.
If you or anyone else is interested contact me at simms@...
Regards
Danny
SM299 Ocean Pearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 20 Sep 2017 09:25, "pwschofield@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  


So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  


Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  


Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  


And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  


So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  


OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  


Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120


Paul

SM215

SV Trillium




Re: Turbo Rebuild

greatketch@...
 

I am probably taking your suggestion of taking off your turbo way more seriously than the spirt in which you made it but here goes...

Just so you have the perspective right, a healthy TMD22 as installed by Amel will drive a clean hull Super Maramu at 8 knots at full throttle and 3000 RPM, and 7 knots throttled back to a sustainable cruising RPM of 2300 or 2400.  If your top speed is 6, you are loosing a LOT because you really don't want to drive this engine at full throttle for hours at a time.

The conversion you are talking about is much more complex than just removing the turbo, but I'll assume you can find all the bits and pieces to convert the engine to a naturally aspirated engine.  I think you'll end up with a Perkins M60--more or less.  Do you know if the injectors or injection pump have been jiggered as part of making this into a turbo engine?  I do not know for sure, but I'll bet they have.  But assuming ALL that...

Now you have a 60HP engine (more or less) and a serious mismatch between the prop and the engine.  You are what is know as "over-propped".  Running 2000 RPM at full throttle with this engine is lugging it very badly. It is not putting out the power it is capable of and there are lots of reasons why this is very bad for a diesel engine.  

You will need to re-prop the engine to get it running at a maximum rpm that is approaching specification. By the time you are done getting the parts you need for the conversion, and a new propeller, you will have spent as much--or more--than you would to have get the turbo fixed, and you will have a boat that doesn't perform as it should.

If all that doesn't convince you, and you can solve all those issues... you'll be killing the resale value of your boat by gelding its iron stallion.

I hate turbos too, but... an underpowered boat is not going to be a happy boat.  

Get the turbo fixed, or replaced, and then take good care of it.  It is not as fragile as some people make it out to be. More of them fail from abuse and lack of maintenance, rather than any inherent design flaws. 

The WORST thing you can do to a turbo charger is start the engine, and immediately run it at high speed before the oil has had a chance to circulate and warm up to operating temperature. The bearings will be dry, or nearly so, and at the speeds a turbo spins, the bearings will die a very quick death.

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Annapolis, Md


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

paul schofield <pwschofield@...>
 

Thank you for your advice.  I will definitely exercise the engine at high RPMs regularly once I get this sorted. 

 

Alexandre, my best wishes to you.  Hang in there. 

 

Paul

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 6:31 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Good evening Paul,

In the 5 years I owned NIKIMAT, I replaced twice the turbo.
According to the 2 different mechanics, it was not reparable, so put a new one.
Things I did not do, was to push to 90% of power every 10 hours…

According to the latest diesel mechanic (Diesel of America in Fort Lauderdale, FL - which ripped me off of over $8000) you need the turbo. Personally I doubt that.
As my engine has provided me 2250 rpm (without working turbo).

If you can not exceed 2000 rpm, you might want to check if your propeller is clean, this will have a tremendous effect on your rpm.

Good luck to you.

Sincerely, Alexandre
NIKIMAT

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 9/19/17, pwschofield@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 4:25 PM


 









Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a
thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had
with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I
had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear
that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were
confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  
So now I look at my options.  My
current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many
sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective
brain.  
Has anyone had any
experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off
of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?
 
Does anyone know a source
for a new turbo?  
And if
you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that
I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me
preface the question with a couple observations.  1. 
Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of
associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat
this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to
Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well
and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot
exceed 2000rpm.  
So
here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing
the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot
or two?  
OK, putting on my
Kevlar underwear.  
Turbo
part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120
PaulSM215SV
Trillium





 


Re: Turbo Rebuild

Paul Osterberg
 

When we bought our SM the turbo was sized, 
We just left it to the local VP service shop who send it to A "specialist" in fixing Turbos. Total cost was around 650 euro including take it of and put the turbo back again.
Would not recommend to take the turbo away. With some headwind and waves against you and some fouling on both the bottom and the prop you need all the hp you can get. We have the 75 hp TMD22, and sometimes wished we had the 105 hp Yanmar.
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good evening Paul,

In the 5 years I owned NIKIMAT, I replaced twice the turbo.
According to the 2 different mechanics, it was not reparable, so put a new one.
Things I did not do, was to push to 90% of power every 10 hours…

According to the latest diesel mechanic (Diesel of America in Fort Lauderdale, FL - which ripped me off of over $8000) you need the turbo. Personally I doubt that.
As my engine has provided me 2250 rpm (without working turbo).

If you can not exceed 2000 rpm, you might want to check if your propeller is clean, this will have a tremendous effect on your rpm.

Good luck to you.

Sincerely, Alexandre
NIKIMAT




--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 9/19/17, pwschofield@live.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 4:25 PM


 









Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a
thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had
with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I
had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear
that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were
confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  
So now I look at my options.  My
current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many
sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective
brain.  
Has anyone had any
experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off
of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?
 
Does anyone know a source
for a new turbo?  
And if
you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that
I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me
preface the question with a couple observations.  1. 
Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of
associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat
this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to
Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well
and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot
exceed 2000rpm.  
So
here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing
the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot
or two?  
OK, putting on my
Kevlar underwear.  
Turbo
part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120
PaulSM215SV
Trillium


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Jean-Pierre's MacBook Air <jgermain@...>
 

Hello Paul,

I had this issue twice on 2 different TMD22.  In each case, the turbo was rebuilt as it was not seized badly. Make it a point to give your engine an Italian tune up often. I run the engine at least 30-40 minutes at near Max power every 10 hours or so.  I make a note of it in the ship’s log too. 

When leaving the boat for a long period, remove the exhaust tube entirely and spray wd 40 into the turbo.  With a small wooden piece, spin it.  LEAVE THE EXHAUST OFF.  The cause of the seizure is salt water condensation in the turbo.

Your turbo is not Perkins.  You have a Volvo and Volvo changed enough things to make you tear your hair out.  Don’t ask….

Good luck

Jean-Pierre Germain
Eleuthera, SM007

On 19 Sep 2017, at 17:25, pwschofield@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  


So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  


Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  


Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  


And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  


So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  


OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  


Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120


Paul

SM215

SV Trillium






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

paul schofield <pwschofield@...>
 

Thank you Mark.  The running high RPMs periodically is something I’ve always done on previous boats for the exact reason you mention.  Wasn’t sure though if that practice was turbo related or over-all engine related. 

 

The one internet source I’ve found which I haven’t verified through phone contact, is over $1800.  Probably $2000 after tax and freight.

 

Still searching.

 

Paul

 

Sent from Mail for Windows 10

 

From: 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 6:01 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Paul,

 

Do a Google search for a local shop that rebuilds turbos (are you in the USA?). If it is too badly corroded it  will not be repairable and you will have to get a new one. Also, Try Google Maps for a local shop. You can talk to just about any marine or car mechanic for a reference to a shop. Or you can mail it to someone like: http://www.certifiedturbo.com/

 

Rebuilding is usually about half the price of a new one.

 

I would imagine the marine Volvo dealer will have your turbo in stock and can quote you a price. Prepare for a shock!

 

As to you last question, if you continue to always run the engine at low rpms you will slowly kill it. You will experience massive carbon buildup and the long term repair will be …. well…. you’ll be thinking about buying a new engine or a complete rebuild. Besides, your fuel economy will suck and we’ll all be able to see you because of the black smoke you are blowing out J

 

When making long runs under power at a continual speed, the engine should be taken to full power for one or two minutes every hour. This will blow out the carbon and keep your engine clean inside. This is probably in your engine manual.

 

Hope this helps

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 5:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  

 

So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  

 

Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  

 

Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  

 

And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  

 

So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  

 

OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  

 

Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120

 

Paul

SM215

SV Trillium

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

Mark Erdos
 

Paul,

 

Do a Google search for a local shop that rebuilds turbos (are you in the USA?). If it is too badly corroded it  will not be repairable and you will have to get a new one. Also, Try Google Maps for a local shop. You can talk to just about any marine or car mechanic for a reference to a shop. Or you can mail it to someone like: http://www.certifiedturbo.com/

 

Rebuilding is usually about half the price of a new one.

 

I would imagine the marine Volvo dealer will have your turbo in stock and can quote you a price. Prepare for a shock!

 

As to you last question, if you continue to always run the engine at low rpms you will slowly kill it. You will experience massive carbon buildup and the long term repair will be …. well…. you’ll be thinking about buying a new engine or a complete rebuild. Besides, your fuel economy will suck and we’ll all be able to see you because of the black smoke you are blowing out J

 

When making long runs under power at a continual speed, the engine should be taken to full power for one or two minutes every hour. This will blow out the carbon and keep your engine clean inside. This is probably in your engine manual.

 

Hope this helps

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Grenada

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2017 5:26 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Turbo Rebuild

 

 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  

 

So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  

 

Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  

 

Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  

 

And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  

 

So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  

 

OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  

 

Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120

 

Paul

SM215

SV Trillium

 

 


Turbo Rebuild

pwschofield@...
 

Hello everyone.  Lately there has been a thread regarding RPMs.  This is a problem that I've had with our Volvo since we purchased the boat a year ago.  I had always feared it was the turbo since I never could hear that telltale turbo whine.  Well today, my suspicions were confirmed.  The turbo is seized solid.  


So now I look at my options.  My current web search doesn't seem to be yielding many sources, so I turn to the group to pick your collective brain.  


Has anyone had any experience with or know someone who has rebuilt a turbo off of the TMD22?   Is rebuilding a turbo economical?  


Does anyone know a source for a new turbo?  


And if you'll indulge me, I'll ask a third question that I'm sure will solicit some colorful comments.  Let me preface the question with a couple observations.  1.  Turbo chargers in a marine environment seem to have a lot of associated problems.  2.  I've been running the boat this last year including motoring from Ft. Lauderdale to Brunswick, GA in a head sea, and the boat seems to run well and I can achieve 6+ knots with no problem except I cannot exceed 2000rpm.  


So here's my questions.  What is the downside to removing the turbo altogether, short of a few horsepower and a knot or two?  


OK, putting on my Kevlar underwear.  


Turbo part number reference: Perkins p/n 2674A120


Paul

SM215

SV Trillium




Re: Raymarine or B&G

greatketch@...
 

Paul

I stayed with B&G brand instruments.

I think it is important to remember that B&G is no longer the independent company doing it's own thing the way it used to be.  For some time now it has been just one more brand in the Navico stable of products.  It is the brand name used to sell to sailboat owners the same products that Lawrence sells to fisherman, and Simrad sells to powerboaters.

Why I stayed with B&G:  I was used to them.  I had them on my old boat, and back when I made that selection, a long time ago, I felt that the B&G line was better suited to a cruising sailboat.  

The original equipment installed on any of the Super Marmus is dated enough that you really will have very little benefit in connecting them to a current Raymarine as opposed to another brand.

In a modern network, pretty much everything talks on the same protocol, even if they use different plugs.  On our boat we have a Raymarine AIS that came with the boat that we connected into our NMEA2000 network with a simple adapter, and the B&G MFD understands it just fine.  With a little work, our original Autohelm works side by side with our new B&G AC42 autopilot, and they both share the use of either Raymarine drive.

There are some things that Navico clearly does better, and some things that Raymarine does better.  I am pretty sure either will work for anybody.

A very few times I have had to use the Navico/B&G tech service to sort out a problem. Invariably, the knowledge of the phone support staff was truly exceptional.  And that isn't something I say very often.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD

---In amelyachtowners@..., <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote :

Hello!

We thinking of replace the old B&G system, the ultrasonic speed sensor got smashed when we grounded.

The B&G system is old and probably anyhow on the end of it's lifespan.

We have a Raymarine plotter just two years old (The old Garmin was more user friendly) , we are very pleases with our old Autohelm Autopilot, but need redundancy so we will planning to install the Raymarine EV 400, and keep the two original drive units, keep the old control head and computes as spare.

To us it make sense to use Raymarine i the rest of the instrumentation wind speed depth etc.

Hopefully we do not need to adress his issues any more during our ownership of Kerpa, so we like to do the right thing.

You who have this set up, which I guess there are a few, are you satisfied with the Raymarine equipment's?

You who choose to stay with B&G what was the main reason for that?


Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259 Mill Creek next stop St Michels





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Antigua November

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

HI Mike,

I plan to go to Hampton at the end of October and depart from there.
I will be happy meeting you.
Do you keep your boat in Rock Hall marina?
Write me SONSEV52  on gml.

Vladimir
202 258 1916


On Sep 19, 2017 04:52, "Mike Ondra mdondra@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Vladimir. 
We too plan to be traveling to Antigua in November departing from the Chesapeake around November 5. What will be your point of departure?
Mike Ondra
Aletes SM#240
Rock Hall, MD

On Sep 19, 2017, at 3:15 AM, Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Alex,

As it stands now, we plan sailing trip to Antigua in November with Salty Dawg s
If it goes forward we can bring something to you from US take you to Antigua.
You can contact me sonsev52 that is gml.

SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"
Vladimir Sonsev
Tel/Text: 202 258 1916


On Sep 18, 2017 8:26 AM, "Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Good morning Paul,

Thank you for your email.

I think Hurricane Maria is too far from Sint Maarten to have any effect, but I feel for Dominica and may be south of Guadeloupe.

I have LOTS of spare parts.
The only things I did not save were the rudder zinc because of their weight/price ratio and the water maker filter because of their volume/price ratio.

Once I am done replying all the encouragement message I received on Facebook (Amel NIKIMAT) and post of the hurricane preparation and evacuation, I will start to take pictures and describe what I have.

Hope we meet and glad you are safe in Grenada!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 9/17/17, pstas2003 <no_reply@...> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amfa domestic watrer pump.wired backwards from the factory.
To: amelyachtowners@...m
Date: Sunday, September 17, 2017, 9:25 PM


 









Alex,

Glad to hear
things are getting better for you.  Hoping that Maria will
turn out to be a dud.

I
know I am late to the party but I would be very interested
in taking that domestic water pump off your hands should
things with prior inquiries fail to come to fruition.  I
would also like to let you know that I would be interested
in any other spares you may be looking to dispose of.

All the best,

Paul Stascavage
SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn
Cruising Grenada

www.RitaKathryn.com








Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Amel sharki

smiles bernard
 

Thanks for this really helpful info Roger
On my old boat (30ft!) I installed a removable inner forestay and used a hank on 80% gib on that poled out to windward

It worked a treat but I do like the idea of the system you describe. 
How big is the sail on the facnor compared to the main genoa?
Do you use a dyneema halyard?
Do you attach to the bow roller?

Many thanks in advance for any info

All the best
Miles



On 19 Sep 2017, at 16:50, hanoah64@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Miles,
The Sharki was intended to fly twin head sails off the same furler extrusion. I didn't like that approach so I set up a Facnor Code Zero type furler in front of my main Profurl furler. This allowed me fly twin head sails poled out...and the option of furling just one. I had a light weight sail made in South Africa that works well on the Facnor.
In the video the pole that's set up,....well, I probaly jibbed earlier and didn't bother taking it down.
When a squall comes up the Facnor sail, in its furled configuration needs to be lowered to the deck. This requires going forward, lowering the Spectra halyard and securing the furled sail on deck. If you leave the Facnor up in an intense squall, even with the doubled Spectra halyard as tight as possible, the unit will surge back and forth like it wants to take down your rig. Can be worrying.
If I run the risk of getting exhausted some times I ignore the poles and just fall off a few degrees.
Also, I use the Hydrovane exclusively, and have broached under twin head sails. So when it blows hard I am just as happy with a single jib, furled so nothing is chafing, and just off the wind enough so the vane can handle it.
Roger


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Iridium Go Feedback

Porter McRoberts
 

Completely agree. 
Used outside external antenna fine but inside use an external. We connected with an adaptor to the existing iridium satellite phone antenna. 

That said. It usually takes 2-4 attempts to get a good connection. Voice calls scratchy and I'd say we achieve 50% information penetrance. Does anyone else have similar experiences?  Texting highly effective and reliable. 

Always appreciated

Porter McRoberts

54- hull152.  

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Sep 19, 2017, at 11:44 AM, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We have used the Iridium Go for about 2 years, and love it. Connections are fairly reliable with the external antenna, but a bit frustrating without it. Spend the extra $300 for the external antenna, and you will be happy you did. 

Regards,

Aloha SM72
Santa Marta, Columbia

On Sep 19, 2017, at 09:29, SV Garulfo svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi all,

To those of you using Iridium Go, did you find that it was necessary to get the Antenna?
Would love to hear about your user experience.

Many thanks

Thomas & Soraya


Garulfo 
Amel 54 #122
Cruising Menorca, Spain



Re: Amel sharki

hanoah64@...
 

Miles,

We should also mention the Mizzen Stay Sail. If you are heading not dead down wind, but, off a little, (with or without pole), and the jib is setting nicely, but the main sail blocks the jib. This is when you furl the main and set the MSS. The MSS is a great sail, when you are off the wind does not block the jib, and can be set and taken down from the cockpit. Flying the genoa together with the MSS is like sailing with two jibs. Really fun. Cheers, Roger


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Swivel head

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Allan, as I said since then I have been told that. However the unit never failed again so it did no harm and it would seem the grease stopped the salt penetrating again. BUT the expert advice is no grease. 

Regards

Danny

On 19 September 2017 at 20:53 "divanz620@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I would never ever put grease in anything like that. All it will do is hold on to salt and dirt and amplify any problems.
Best to just thoroughly rinse with fresh water, again and again......

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437

 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Tangier Marina

Ron Hynes <riffhynes@...>
 

I stayed there in May. Surprised new marina is still not open as it looked
​just about ready
 in May. 

As most everywhere around the Med, the swell can get
​"​
interesting
​"​
.
​  Naturally, it all depends on the direction it's running.  The pilot books are very helpful.

Be prepared and patient with
​bureaucracy
 beyond
​what I doubt you've ever experienced before
.  It's all in how you
​react
. We thought it was funny
​ and were constantly giggling​
. Another cruiser raft
​e​
​d​
along side us
​resisted
 the authorities
​at every turn ​
and was told to leave. 

It seems the two major authorities, the police and customs are each vying to be most important. We had a minor engine problem and decided to stay another night. Fine said the police captain who I had some rapport with. An hour or so later, the chunky little customs guy is doing his rounds and spots us and goes non-linear. You must come with me immediately to
​my
 office
​that
 
​was
 at least a quarter of a mile
​ away​
. Once there he shuffle
​d​
papers for 10 minutes or so then tells
​me
 he is going to hold the ships registration papers and that I must return at 0900 to get stamped out and get my papers returned. Naturally, at 0900 there were no customs officials to
​deal
 with, so in desperation I went to the police captain who personally escorted me through the
​unfathomable
 procedure.  We had perhaps a half hour together and he told me of their plans to make Tanger a cruising destination with their new marina and the commercial development planned for the area. In turn I tried to politely tell him the entire 
​check in
 process needs to be revamped as most cruisers aren't going to spend 90 minutes
​or so ​
processing.
​But t​
hey just don't get it!
​  He said its very difficult to control smuggling, etc. without the procedures they follow.  ​I asked if they intended to move their offices as the new marina is even further.  He said no; boat captains would simply have to go further!

​All in all, we enjoyed ourselves immensely.  Wandering around the old city and the Kasbah is an experience.​  I enjoyed the food and the night time views were spectacular.  One of my all-time cruising highlights!  Fuel is even less expensive than Gibraltar although it has to be "arranged" for delivery through a middle man.

​We were moored along side a commercial wharf and I sustained some damage to my rubbing strake from an iron ladder I hadn't adequately fendered.  There is no electric or water.  We paid 25 Euros per might but I think this was negotiable.​

​My advice...don't miss it!​


Ron Hynes
​Swan Song, Amel Meltem currently in the Canaries​


On Sep 19, 2017, at 2:06 PM, SV Garulfo svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...om> wrote:

 

Hello,

We are thinking of stopping by Tangier Morocco later this season, and we were wondering if anyone has been there recently and could provide feedback on port/Marina facilities.
We have read the noonsite info and also know that the new Marina is not yet open.
Just wondering if anyone has experienced the tide in the old port and could report back on their stay there.

Thanks for your input.

Best Wishes,

Thomas & Soraya


Garulfo 
Amel 54 #122
Cruising Menorca, Spain


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amfa domestic watrer pump.wired backwards from the factory.

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good morning Vladimir,

Lost power last night, I think this is from the little wind we had from Hurricane Marina, probably a short somewhere in the lines… so running on generator and little time to reply…
Thanks for offering, but I am good, I have everything.
But thanks very much for offering!!!
Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 9/19/17, Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@gmail.com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amfa domestic watrer pump.wired backwards from the factory.
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, September 19, 2017, 2:15 AM


 









Alex,
As it stands now, we plan sailing trip to
Antigua in November with Salty Dawg s

If it goes forward we can bring something to you from US
take you to Antigua.

You can contact me sonsev52 that is gml.
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"

Vladimir Sonsev

Tel/Text: 202 258 1916

On Sep 18, 2017 8:26 AM,
"Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@rocketmail.com
[amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:















 









Good morning Paul,



Thank you for your email.



I think Hurricane Maria is too far from Sint Maarten to have
any effect, but I feel for Dominica and may be south of
Guadeloupe.



I have LOTS of spare parts.

The only things I did not save were the rudder zinc because
of their weight/price ratio and the water maker filter
because of their volume/price ratio.



Once I am done replying all the encouragement message I
received on Facebook (Amel NIKIMAT) and post of the
hurricane preparation and evacuation, I will start to take
pictures and describe what I have.



Hope we meet and glad you are safe in Grenada!

Sincerely, Alexandre



------------------------------ --------------

On Sun, 9/17/17, pstas2003 <no_reply@yahoogroups.com>
wrote:



Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amfa domestic watrer
pump.wired backwards from the factory.

To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.
com

Date: Sunday, September 17, 2017, 9:25 PM





 



















Alex,



Glad to hear

things are getting better for you.  Hoping that Maria
will

turn out to be a dud.



I

know I am late to the party but I would be very
interested

in taking that domestic water pump off your hands should

things with prior inquiries fail to come to fruition. 
I

would also like to let you know that I would be
interested

in any other spares you may be looking to dispose of.



All the best,



Paul Stascavage

SM #466 - s/v Rita Kathryn

Cruising Grenada



www.RitaKathryn.com


Re: Genacker

Paul Osterberg
 

David
That will give approx 17 m, and with a foot of 12.5 m gives a sail area of 95 Sqm.
looks big in length but rather small in area, but does 95 sqm looks reasonable for  a genacker or asymmetrical spinnacker as i think it's also called. for a SM?
Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259