Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Jeppe Jonsson
 

Dear Rédouan
Thanks, sounds easy, if you know what you are doing.
My SM is currently in the water and winterized for the winter.
I hope Amel can help me with calculations or line-drawings.
Thanks again
Kind Regards
Jeppe, SM464


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Rédouan Assar <red1assar@...>
 

Once your boat is out of the water it is relatively easy to make the linesplan with a theodolite. You then plot them and interpolate the volume between areas of each cross section. If you have a software like AutoCAD it would be even simpler.

It is a nice winter evening project to do if you have the boat out of the water.  I shall be back to the boat in January and if I can get hold of a theodolite in Portimao, I might do it just to bring my naval architect spirit back and get the SM linesplan!

Redouan

On 29 Nov 2017, at 10:58, jej@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Dear Redouan
You are absolutely right. The International Tonnage Certificate is a virtual measure based on the volume of the ship. And yes it is expensive to get the measurer to make the line-drawings again and calculate the volume that is one of the basic parameteres of the tonnage calculation. I will try my luck with at Amel, if there is no Irish or Swedish registered SM with the needed numbers or calculations or line-drawings.
Thanks for your answer.
Kind Regards
Jeppe, SM464
_/_/)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Jeppe Jonsson
 

Dear Redouan
You are absolutely right. The International Tonnage Certificate is a virtual measure based on the volume of the ship. And yes it is expensive to get the measurer to make the line-drawings again and calculate the volume that is one of the basic parameteres of the tonnage calculation. I will try my luck with at Amel, if there is no Irish or Swedish registered SM with the needed numbers or calculations or line-drawings.
Thanks for your answer.
Kind Regards
Jeppe, SM464
_/_/)


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Rédouan Assar <red1assar@...>
 

Hello, 

From my humble experience with tonnage calculations when designing and registering fishing vessels I believe the tonnage is linked to the volume of the boat, not its weight and is referring to ancient cargoes of barils or ‘tonneau’ in french.

I recommend that you ask amel as they can easily give you this from the linesplan or you need to spend some time out of the water with a theodolite and pick up the hull lines to calculate the volume. You then use the class formulae to get the tonnage value required by your specific country of registry. 

It is interesting that it is required for Sailing boat of this size, usually in Europe it is for commercial vessels above 24m, hence many fishermen asking for 23.95m boats!

Redouan

On 29 Nov 2017, at 08:42, seagasm@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Don't get confused with Tonnes (metric) and Tons (imperial). Tonne is an alternate spelling used to describe a metric ton. It is almost never used in American English, but it is widely used outside of the United States. Again, a tonne, also known as a metric ton, is a unit of measurement equal to 1,000 kilograms. A tonne is larger than a U.S. ton.

Best Regards
Barry & Robyn
Tradewinds III SM # 171


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

That's why I asked if it was US tons. A tonne and an imperial ton are very close. US tons, lighter. Like US gallons.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 29 Nov 2017 18:42, "seagasm@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Don't get confused with Tonnes (metric) and Tons (imperial). Tonne is an alternate spelling used to describe a metric ton. It is almost never used in American English, but it is widely used outside of the United States. Again, a tonne, also known as a metric ton, is a unit of measurement equal to 1,000 kilograms. A tonne is larger than a U.S. ton.

Best Regards
Barry & Robyn
Tradewinds III SM # 171


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

seagasm@...
 

Don't get confused with Tonnes (metric) and Tons (imperial). Tonne is an alternate spelling used to describe a metric ton. It is almost never used in American English, but it is widely used outside of the United States. Again, a tonne, also known as a metric ton, is a unit of measurement equal to 1,000 kilograms. A tonne is larger than a U.S. ton.

Best Regards
Barry & Robyn
Tradewinds III SM # 171


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Follow on from my previous. That is way more than Amel specs.
Danny
Sm 299
Ocean Pearl

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 29 Nov 2017 18:29, "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Kimberlites stated tonnage on the USA Documentation is 25 net tons and 28 gross  tons.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 4:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

 

 

Hi, 

On the travel lift scales Ocean Pearl is 18 tonnes loaded, if the scales are correct.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 29 November 2017 at 09:21 "Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Jeppe,

First congratulations on become the new owner of SM2K #464.
Must be one of the last one commissioned!

On my British Registry both “Gross” and “Net” Tonnage showed 27.03 Tons (76.49 Cubic Meres).
Quite frankly I don’t know if these number are accurate, but if it helps you I can email you the copy of that certificate.

Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 11/28/17, jej@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 1:41 PM


 









Dear SaoleileI have just become the owner
of SM464 and I also need to produce the calculations leading
to the gross/net  tonnage, so that the official measure can
make the International certificate of
tonnage.Have you recieved any info which can
help?Kind RegardsJeppe, SM464




 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

eric freedman
 

I am not sure,

The numbers came from Amel when she was made.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, November 29, 2017 12:39 AM
To: 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

 

 

That would be US tons?

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 29 Nov 2017 18:29, "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Kimberlites stated tonnage on the USA Documentation is 25 net tons and 28 gross  tons.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 4:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

 

 

Hi, 

On the travel lift scales Ocean Pearl is 18 tonnes loaded, if the scales are correct.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 29 November 2017 at 09:21 "Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Jeppe,

First congratulations on become the new owner of SM2K #464.
Must be one of the last one commissioned!

On my British Registry both “Gross” and “Net” Tonnage showed 27.03 Tons (76.49 Cubic Meres).
Quite frankly I don’t know if these number are accurate, but if it helps you I can email you the copy of that certificate.

Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 11/28/17, jej@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 1:41 PM


 









Dear SaoleileI have just become the owner
of SM464 and I also need to produce the calculations leading
to the gross/net  tonnage, so that the official measure can
make the International certificate of
tonnage.Have you recieved any info which can
help?Kind RegardsJeppe, SM464





 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

That would be US tons?

Sent from my Vodafone Smart

On 29 Nov 2017 18:29, "'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Kimberlites stated tonnage on the USA Documentation is 25 net tons and 28 gross  tons.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 4:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

 

 

Hi, 

On the travel lift scales Ocean Pearl is 18 tonnes loaded, if the scales are correct.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 29 November 2017 at 09:21 "Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Jeppe,

First congratulations on become the new owner of SM2K #464.
Must be one of the last one commissioned!

On my British Registry both “Gross” and “Net” Tonnage showed 27.03 Tons (76.49 Cubic Meres).
Quite frankly I don’t know if these number are accurate, but if it helps you I can email you the copy of that certificate.

Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 11/28/17, jej@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 1:41 PM


 









Dear SaoleileI have just become the owner
of SM464 and I also need to produce the calculations leading
to the gross/net  tonnage, so that the official measure can
make the International certificate of
tonnage.Have you recieved any info which can
help?Kind RegardsJeppe, SM464




 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

eric freedman
 

Kimberlites stated tonnage on the USA Documentation is 25 net tons and 28 gross  tons.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, November 28, 2017 4:47 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

 

 

Hi, 

On the travel lift scales Ocean Pearl is 18 tonnes loaded, if the scales are correct.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 29 November 2017 at 09:21 "Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Jeppe,

First congratulations on become the new owner of SM2K #464.
Must be one of the last one commissioned!

On my British Registry both “Gross” and “Net” Tonnage showed 27.03 Tons (76.49 Cubic Meres).
Quite frankly I don’t know if these number are accurate, but if it helps you I can email you the copy of that certificate.

Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 11/28/17, jej@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 1:41 PM


 









Dear SaoleileI have just become the owner
of SM464 and I also need to produce the calculations leading
to the gross/net  tonnage, so that the official measure can
make the International certificate of
tonnage.Have you recieved any info which can
help?Kind RegardsJeppe, SM464




 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Carrying spare rigging ?

smiles bernard
 

its just dawned on me that both the terminals in the picture i uploaded would work with Peters suggested option of a wire 'tail' section and a swaged eye fitting plus some bulldog clamps or the dyneema soft shackle option Bill explained

I'll double check whats aloft when i'm next onboard in a few weeks!

All the best

Miles

On Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 9:49:08 PM GMT, 'smilesbernard@...' smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

thanks all!
yes i have been wondering about the dyneema option. It does seem like a good one
Peter's idea about the wire clamps is a good one - i took this setup with me last time i went long distance but it only really helps with a wire failure at deck level
after crossing the atlantic in my previous old 30fter my brand new aft lower on the windward side had begun to fray but right at the swagged mast fitting to wire junction. So i could not repair it. luckily i carried old rigging spares and had a spare mast swage fitting so a local rigger could make a replacement.

My current rig is from 2012 and was apparently replaced by an Amel experienced rigger in S france. I'm therefore hopeful it'll be ok for a N atlantic circuit.....

the question in my mind is always the mast fitting side of things.... thats the harder part.
At a push i suppose one could loop a dyneema temporary stay over the opposite spreader if there was a problem with the lower shrouds or attach it to a cotterpin at the mast head?


thanks for all the thoughts - very much appreciated

btw i found these spares onboard -  my lower shroud mast terminals look like the  cup and ball fitting on the right of the attached photo which is new to me. I might see if there are any staylok etc options . . . .
I presume the fitting on the left will make sense once i have climbed to the mast head!

Thanks all!

Fair winds

Miles

On Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 4:47:09 PM GMT, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Miles,


Dyneema is the way to go for emergency replacement rigging.  It is stronger than you need, you can carry 100 feet of it in a tiny little space (Unlike wire!)  It doesn't care if it sits in water or even oil. Just throw it in the bilge and forget about it until you need it.  It is ridiculously easy to splice, and it is way stronger than you need.

You do need to do some thinking ahead of time about how you would attach it to the mast, spreaders, and chainplates but you can do some very creative things with homemade soft shackles.  It is very rare that a rigging wire fails in the run of the wire, it almost always the terminal hardware that fails so you can not count on having that to attach to. 

Size the dyneema not based on strength (that would be too stretchy) but rather on (approximately) matching the stretch of the SS wire it is replacing.  A rough rule of thumb is two times the diameter of the stainless wire.  These guys have a lot of fittings and know-how on dyneema rigging: http://www.colligomarine.com

My old boat (a 40 foot cruising ketch) actually had an all dyneema rig.  People laughed, it is supposed to be a race boat thing, but getting rid of several hundred pounds of weight up high in the rig made a huge difference in the boat's performance to windward.

I am not sure what you mean when you write, "aft lowers seem to take a lot of working on ocean crossings." If you can see them moving around (working?) then they are MUCH too loose.  In a properly tuned rig some of the tension will come off the leeward wires in a stiff breeze, but if they get loose enough they are moving around, that's a problem.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., <smilesbernard@...> wrote :

Hello there

I'd value this groups thoughts on carrying spare rigging on long journeys - to allow for repairs on passage or in remote locations.

What supplies do you carry ?

My 1985 isomat masted (single spreader) maramu is pretty new to me and I've yet to see the masthead and the rigging terminals up there but the aft lowers have a ball and cup system that then locates into he spreader -to- mast attachment. In my experience aft lowers seem to take a lot of working on ocean crossings I was going to see about sourcing a spare to allow basic at sea repairs.

Anyway it'd be great to hear people's approach!

I wonder people dyneema based options for a 'get me home' jury rig and any mast / turnbuckle attachments these require?

All the best

Miles
Maramu 1985




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Quantity and Type of Primary Rode

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mark,

on our primary anchor we have 100 meters of 10 mm chain plus spliced to it a further 100 meters of nylon anchor rode, I think 25mm. To achieve a splice that goes through the entry to the hause pipe I had to splice into two chain links. In deeper water or strong winds it is not unusual to utilise all the chain and some nylon. Our second anchor (stowed in the port forward deck locker) we have 50 meters of 10 mm chain and 80 meters of nylon anchor rode. In addition we have a significant length of 20 mm nylon rode attached to our sea anchor which can be utilised.

Regards

Danny 

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 29 November 20Hi17 at 10:01 "isaac_02906@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hello All,


I believe I have a solid idea of the chain vs rope, BBB vs G40 and a lot vs a little compromises associated with anchor rode.  I would like to know what you actually carry and if you wished you carried something different or are happy with your choice.  I know we will be cruising the Bahamas and Caribbean, but beyond those areas is possible and I would like to be prepared for beyond....so basically, what would you carry for world cruising on an Amel SM?


Mark Isaac

SM #391

Ft. Lauderdale

 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi, 

On the travel lift scales Ocean Pearl is 18 tonnes loaded, if the scales are correct.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 29 November 2017 at 09:21 "Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello Jeppe,

First congratulations on become the new owner of SM2K #464.
Must be one of the last one commissioned!

On my British Registry both “Gross” and “Net” Tonnage showed 27.03 Tons (76.49 Cubic Meres).
Quite frankly I don’t know if these number are accurate, but if it helps you I can email you the copy of that certificate.

Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Tue, 11/28/17, jej@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 1:41 PM


 









Dear SaoleileI have just become the owner
of SM464 and I also need to produce the calculations leading
to the gross/net  tonnage, so that the official measure can
make the International certificate of
tonnage.Have you recieved any info which can
help?Kind RegardsJeppe, SM464





 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Carrying spare rigging ?

smiles bernard
 

thanks all!
yes i have been wondering about the dyneema option. It does seem like a good one
Peter's idea about the wire clamps is a good one - i took this setup with me last time i went long distance but it only really helps with a wire failure at deck level
after crossing the atlantic in my previous old 30fter my brand new aft lower on the windward side had begun to fray but right at the swagged mast fitting to wire junction. So i could not repair it. luckily i carried old rigging spares and had a spare mast swage fitting so a local rigger could make a replacement.

My current rig is from 2012 and was apparently replaced by an Amel experienced rigger in S france. I'm therefore hopeful it'll be ok for a N atlantic circuit.....

the question in my mind is always the mast fitting side of things.... thats the harder part.
At a push i suppose one could loop a dyneema temporary stay over the opposite spreader if there was a problem with the lower shrouds or attach it to a cotterpin at the mast head?


thanks for all the thoughts - very much appreciated

btw i found these spares onboard -  my lower shroud mast terminals look like the  cup and ball fitting on the right of the attached photo which is new to me. I might see if there are any staylok etc options . . . .
I presume the fitting on the left will make sense once i have climbed to the mast head!

Thanks all!

Fair winds

Miles

On Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 4:47:09 PM GMT, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Miles,


Dyneema is the way to go for emergency replacement rigging.  It is stronger than you need, you can carry 100 feet of it in a tiny little space (Unlike wire!)  It doesn't care if it sits in water or even oil. Just throw it in the bilge and forget about it until you need it.  It is ridiculously easy to splice, and it is way stronger than you need.

You do need to do some thinking ahead of time about how you would attach it to the mast, spreaders, and chainplates but you can do some very creative things with homemade soft shackles.  It is very rare that a rigging wire fails in the run of the wire, it almost always the terminal hardware that fails so you can not count on having that to attach to. 

Size the dyneema not based on strength (that would be too stretchy) but rather on (approximately) matching the stretch of the SS wire it is replacing.  A rough rule of thumb is two times the diameter of the stainless wire.  These guys have a lot of fittings and know-how on dyneema rigging: http://www.colligomarine.com

My old boat (a 40 foot cruising ketch) actually had an all dyneema rig.  People laughed, it is supposed to be a race boat thing, but getting rid of several hundred pounds of weight up high in the rig made a huge difference in the boat's performance to windward.

I am not sure what you mean when you write, "aft lowers seem to take a lot of working on ocean crossings." If you can see them moving around (working?) then they are MUCH too loose.  In a properly tuned rig some of the tension will come off the leeward wires in a stiff breeze, but if they get loose enough they are moving around, that's a problem.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Hello there

I'd value this groups thoughts on carrying spare rigging on long journeys - to allow for repairs on passage or in remote locations.

What supplies do you carry ?

My 1985 isomat masted (single spreader) maramu is pretty new to me and I've yet to see the masthead and the rigging terminals up there but the aft lowers have a ball and cup system that then locates into he spreader -to- mast attachment. In my experience aft lowers seem to take a lot of working on ocean crossings I was going to see about sourcing a spare to allow basic at sea repairs.

Anyway it'd be great to hear people's approach!

I wonder people dyneema based options for a 'get me home' jury rig and any mast / turnbuckle attachments these require?

All the best

Miles
Maramu 1985




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Carrying spare rigging ?

Peter Forbes
 

A bulldog clip in English English is a hoop with threaded ends and a bar across the ends and on each thread is a nut and washer all in stainless. As someone commented a wire rope clamp type thing.

Yes, I bridged the broken strands and took the load like that. The ends were swaged on eyes rather than turnbuckles( I think I used the wrong term in the original post. 

As Bill Kinney (I think says - and he seems a wise fellow) dyneema is another solution which is very flexible. Somehow I thought that the situation when I discovered a strand break might not be that kind in weather terms and my solution was very simple and easy to apply although I had to go up to the first cross trees. I also had dyneema rope up the front and back of each mast which I could use. This could help recover a man overboard as well -we had a deplorable blanket type arrangement for MoB recovery and the dyneema external halyard. We never had that problem thank goodness.

There are many solutions but that was mine in two layers.

Best wishes

Peter

Peter Forbes
00447836 209730

On 28 Nov 2017, at 12:47, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Miles,


Dyneema is the way to go for emergency replacement rigging.  It is stronger than you need, you can carry 100 feet of it in a tiny little space (Unlike wire!)  It doesn't care if it sits in water or even oil. Just throw it in the bilge and forget about it until you need it.  It is ridiculously easy to splice, and it is way stronger than you need.

You do need to do some thinking ahead of time about how you would attach it to the mast, spreaders, and chainplates but you can do some very creative things with homemade soft shackles.  It is very rare that a rigging wire fails in the run of the wire, it almost always the terminal hardware that fails so you can not count on having that to attach to. 

Size the dyneema not based on strength (that would be too stretchy) but rather on (approximately) matching the stretch of the SS wire it is replacing.  A rough rule of thumb is two times the diameter of the stainless wire.  These guys have a lot of fittings and know-how on dyneema rigging: http://www.colligomarine.com

My old boat (a 40 foot cruising ketch) actually had an all dyneema rig.  People laughed, it is supposed to be a race boat thing, but getting rid of several hundred pounds of weight up high in the rig made a huge difference in the boat's performance to windward.

I am not sure what you mean when you write, "aft lowers seem to take a lot of working on ocean crossings." If you can see them moving around (working?) then they are MUCH too loose.  In a properly tuned rig some of the tension will come off the leeward wires in a stiff breeze, but if they get loose enough they are moving around, that's a problem.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Hello there

I'd value this groups thoughts on carrying spare rigging on long journeys - to allow for repairs on passage or in remote locations.

What supplies do you carry ?

My 1985 isomat masted (single spreader) maramu is pretty new to me and I've yet to see the masthead and the rigging terminals up there but the aft lowers have a ball and cup system that then locates into he spreader -to- mast attachment. In my experience aft lowers seem to take a lot of working on ocean crossings I was going to see about sourcing a spare to allow basic at sea repairs.

Anyway it'd be great to hear people's approach!

I wonder people dyneema based options for a 'get me home' jury rig and any mast / turnbuckle attachments these require?

All the best

Miles
Maramu 1985




Re: Quantity and Type of Primary Rode

greatketch@...
 

Our boat has been on two circumnavigations (so far!) with 60 meters of G40, and an additional 100 meters of line.  

Cruising this boat in the Caribbean and US East coast we haven't yet used all the chain.  Anchorages in the Pacific tend to be deeper, and more is better.

That's what we have...  If I was equipping the boat myself from scratch I'd go with 80, maybe even as much as 100 meters of chain and groan a lot about the excess weight... until I really needed it!

Bill Kinney
Sm160, Harmonie
Fort Lauderdale, FL


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Quantity and Type of Primary Rode

Jean-Pierre Germain <jgermain@...>
 

I have 100 meters of 10mm G40.  Add 50 meters of rode. 

You will be glad to have lots very soon after you begin cruising 

Jean-Pierre Germain
SY ELEUTHERA, SM007
Panama


On 28 Nov 2017, at 16:01, isaac_02906@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello All,


I believe I have a solid idea of the chain vs rope, BBB vs G40 and a lot vs a little compromises associated with anchor rode.  I would like to know what you actually carry and if you wished you carried something different or are happy with your choice.  I know we will be cruising the Bahamas and Caribbean, but beyond those areas is possible and I would like to be prepared for beyond....so basically, what would you carry for world cruising on an Amel SM?


Mark Isaac

SM #391

Ft. Lauderdale


Quantity and Type of Primary Rode

Mark Isaac
 

Hello All,


I believe I have a solid idea of the chain vs rope, BBB vs G40 and a lot vs a little compromises associated with anchor rode.  I would like to know what you actually carry and if you wished you carried something different or are happy with your choice.  I know we will be cruising the Bahamas and Caribbean, but beyond those areas is possible and I would like to be prepared for beyond....so basically, what would you carry for world cruising on an Amel SM?


Mark Isaac

SM #391

Ft. Lauderdale


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Jeppe Jonsson
 

Dear Alexandre
Thanks, however I expect that your document is not based on the Internatonal Tonnage Certificate and related calculation, since the British Registry does not demand this when the ship is less than 24m. Therefore your Tonnage is based on the simple approximate formula:
 length x width x debth x 0.16 = tonnage

Rhumb Runner was also British, however as the Irish also the Danish Registry is very demanding above 15m.

Otherwise I am very interesser in the document if it includes the relevant volumens used for the detailleddet calculation.

Kind Regards
Jeppe , email:  jej at byg.dtu.dk


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Hello Jeppe,

First congratulations on become the new owner of SM2K #464.
Must be one of the last one commissioned!

On my British Registry both “Gross” and “Net” Tonnage showed 27.03 Tons (76.49 Cubic Meres).
Quite frankly I don’t know if these number are accurate, but if it helps you I can email you the copy of that certificate.

Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Tue, 11/28/17, jej@byg.dtu.dk [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Tonnage
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Date: Tuesday, November 28, 2017, 1:41 PM


 









Dear SaoleileI have just become the owner
of SM464 and I also need to produce the calculations leading
to the gross/net  tonnage, so that the official measure can
make the International certificate of
tonnage.Have you recieved any info which can
help?Kind RegardsJeppe, SM464