Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

Courtney Gorman
 

I for one am forced to sail on a schedule.   I will not leave unless the window is big enough but, I willing to burn a lot of fuel if necessary. I love to sail and prefer NOT to burn any fuel except for the generator BUT when I have to get back to work so I can afford to sail I get back to work. 
I love the Idea of extra fuel but for now will follow Joel's orders and not change my Boat for a full year. 
By the way I love all the discussion in this group it is a safe place to say what you feel 
Thanks for that!
Cheers and Merry Christmas 
Courtney 
Trippin'



Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone

-------- Original message --------
From: "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 12/23/17 7:25 PM (GMT-05:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

Eric,


It's not a question of "wussiness", or "correctness" or any other kind of value judgement.  It's just that different people use their boats differently.  If everybody used their boat in exactly the same way, then we'd all have exactly the same boat, and wouldn't that be a boring world?

We have certainly found ourselves in situations where we NEEDED to be [someplace@sometime] and the engine was required to get there.  We try (and usually manage) to avoid such situations. Other people do not have that luxury/desire and there is no reason they should feel I think I am superior to them because of it.

I try really hard (but don't always succeed) to incorporate my rational for a recommendation so people can evaluate if it applies to their personnel situation. Unless I feel really strongly about a sa fety matter, I always try to say "I would..." and avoid "You should...". 


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

James Alton
 

Bill,

  Well put!  I admire your desire to sail as much as possible with your boat.   Happy Holidays to you and the other Amel owners!

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Dec 23, 2017, at 8:25 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Eric,


It's not a question of "wussiness", or "correctness" or any other kind of value judgement.  It's just that different people use their boats differently.  If everybody used their boat in exactly the same way, then we'd all have exactly the same boat, and wouldn't that be a boring world?

We have certainly found ourselves in situations where we NEEDED to be [someplace@sometime] and the engine was required to get there.  We try (and usually manage) to avoid such situations. Other people do not have that luxury/desire and there is no reason they should feel I think I am superior to them because of it.

I try really hard (but don't always succeed) to incorporate my rational for a recommendation so people can evaluate if it applies to their personnel situation. Unless I feel really strongly about a sa fety matter, I always try to say "I would..." and avoid "You should...". 


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL



Re: Nauta tank installation.

greatketch@...
 

Eric,

It's not a question of "wussiness", or "correctness" or any other kind of value judgement.  It's just that different people use their boats differently.  If everybody used their boat in exactly the same way, then we'd all have exactly the same boat, and wouldn't that be a boring world?

We have certainly found ourselves in situations where we NEEDED to be [someplace@sometime] and the engine was required to get there.  We try (and usually manage) to avoid such situations. Other people do not have that luxury/desire and there is no reason they should feel I think I am superior to them because of it.

I try really hard (but don't always succeed) to incorporate my rational for a recommendation so people can evaluate if it applies to their personnel situation. Unless I feel really strongly about a safety matter, I always try to say "I would..." and avoid "You should...". 


Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nauta tank installation.

eric freedman
 

James,

On my Tartan 37 years ago, I  literally motored from Bermuda to Long Island. Even with a code 0 sail there was absolutely no wind to sail.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, December 23, 2017 8:40 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nauta tank installation.

 

 

EriC- I think others would agree that you are NOT a wuss!...

Thanks for the detail on this. I’m thinking of having a spare Nauta tank for the passage north to New England. 

 

James


On Dec 23, 2017, at 1:25 AM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Our Nauta Tank installation(s)

I have 6 pad eyes through bolted into my port locker for a 50+ gallon Nauta tank. With the corners  attached  to the pad eyes with carabineers and with the 2 strap also attached, the tank is very solid when full.

The tank runs from the outboard side of the port locker to the inboard side of the port locker-Just Fits.

Across the middle of the port locker is a board and the tank sits against that board.

 

 

There are 2 versions of the tank. I bought the one with the fitting attached.. It is also coated with  nylon like a good wetsuit and is not prone to abrasion. Over the last 15 years I have tried many ways to fill the tank.

 

The solution if found  is to use just one 5/8 inch hose hooked to the tank then to  a Jabsco vane puppy pump then another hose that is long and runs from the pump  to the fuel fill. In the middle I wired a 2 way DPDT switch for in and out of the fuel.

When I  had Kimberlite built they installed a 24 volt watertight outlet to the left side of the vertical control of the bow thruster.

 

To fill the tank we use a 6 gallon bucket that we have on board. We  fill it continuously filling the bucket and running the pump. When the tank is about ¾ full we “ burp the tank” . I reverse the pump and someone vigorously steps on the tank numerous times. It is amazing how much air comes out into the ½ full bucket.. We do this twice more while we fill the tank until the tank looks pregnant with no air inside and 50+ gallons inside.

 

The fuel does not slosh around as there is no air and no space for the fuel to slosh.

 

When we need the entire contents of the tank, we reverse the pump and drain it completely, We then remove that tank and lift it up centering the drain above the rest of the tank and drain the last drop of fuel. The tank then looks like it is vacuum sealed.

We then fold it up , put it in a strong bag and put in the locker.

 

We made 2 very long nonstop trips , so I added another Nauta tank.

We lashed and tied it to the aft cabin top and filled it the same way. Needless to say

We really tied it down to the grab rails and mizzen mast. We also cable tied the straps so they would not loosen. It did not move an inch.

The first fuel we used was from that tank.

 

In both cases we came in with a full main tank and some fuel in the aluminum life raft locker tanks.

It is nice to have 330 gallons of fuel on board.

With just the Nauta tank in the port locker we were 2 degrees to port.

 

Ok I’m a wuss.  Unfortunately some of my crew have plane reservation and work so we are sometimes forced to motor.

I hate it but it is necessary.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 6:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

James,

 

I used a Nauta flexible tank, not for fuel but as a holding tank on my old boat.  

 

Properly installed and protected from chafe they work great.  It can be tough securing them properly, and because they are flexible, it is impossible to stop the liquid contents from sloshing, so you need to be sure you don't make them so big, or put them in a such a place, that they can have an adverse effect on the stability of the boat.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Key West, Florida.



---In amelyachtowners@..., <jamescromie@...> wrote :

Has anyone used the collapsible auxiliary fuel containers that are available?  They seem like a nice option for economizing in space when not needed.. 

 

James

sm 347

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Nauta tank installation.

James Cromie
 

EriC- I think others would agree that you are NOT a wuss!...
Thanks for the detail on this. I’m thinking of having a spare Nauta tank for the passage north to New England. 

James


On Dec 23, 2017, at 1:25 AM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Our Nauta Tank installation(s)

I have 6 pad eyes through bolted into my port locker for a 50+ gallon Nauta tank. With the corners  attached  to the pad eyes with carabineers and with the 2 strap also attached, the tank is very solid when full.

The tank runs from the outboard side of the port locker to the inboard side of the port locker-Just Fits.

Across the middle of the port locker is a board and the tank sits against that board.

 

 

There are 2 versions of the tank. I bought the one with the fitting attached. It is also coated with  nylon like a good wetsuit and is not prone to abrasion. Over the last 15 years I have tried many ways to fill the tank.

 

The solution if found  is to use just one 5/8 inch hose hooked to the tank then to  a Jabsco vane puppy pump then another hose that is long and runs from the pump  to the fuel fill. In the middle I wired a 2 way DPDT switch for in and out of the fuel.

When I  had Kimberlite built they installed a 24 volt watertight outlet to the left side of the vertical control of the bow thruster.

 

To fill the tank we use a 6 gallon bucket that we have on board. We  fill it continuously filling the bucket and running the pump. When the tank is about ¾ full we “ burp the tank” . I reverse the pump and someone vigorously steps on the tank numerous times. It is amazing how much air comes out into the ½ full bucket.. We do this twice more while we fill the tank until the tank looks pregnant with no air inside and 50+ gallons inside.

 

The fuel does not slosh around as there is no air and no space for the fuel to slosh.

 

When we need the entire contents of the tank, we reverse the pump and drain it completely, We then remove that tank and lift it up centering the drain above the rest of the tank and drain the last drop of fuel. The tank then looks like it is vacuum sealed.

We then fold it up , put it in a strong bag and put in the locker.

 

We made 2 very long nonstop trips , so I added another Nauta tank.

We lashed and tied it to the aft cabin top and filled it the same way. Needless to say

We really tied it down to the grab rails and mizzen mast. We also cable tied the straps so they would not loosen. It did not move an inch.

The first fuel we used was from that tank.

 

In both cases we came in with a full main tank and some fuel in the aluminum life raft locker tanks.

It is nice to have 330 gallons of fuel on board.

With just the Nauta tank in the port locker we were 2 degrees to port.

 

Ok I’m a wuss.  Unfortunately some of my crew have plane reservation and work so we are sometimes forced to motor.

I hate it but it is necessary.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 6:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

James,

 

I used a Nauta flexible tank, not for fuel but as a holding tank on my old boat.  

 

Properly installed and protected from chafe they work great.  It can be tough securing them properly, and because they are flexible, it is impossible to stop the liquid contents from sloshing, so you need to be sure you don't make them so big, or put them in a such a place, that they can have an adverse effect on the stability of the boat.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Key West, Florida.



---In amelyachtowners@..., <jamescromie@...> wrote :

Has anyone used the collapsible auxiliary fuel containers that are available?  They seem like a nice option for economizing in space when not needed.. 

 

James

sm 347

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, The big lockers on the port side with additional fuel , tools ,etc. only adds to the list. Anything that is not plumb and level draws the attention of my carpenter's eye , and may bother me more than most. I also believe that I detect a small difference in performance hard on the wind , depending on tack . In the scheme of things , not a big deal.
Merry Christmas Everyone,
Pat & Diane
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Fri, Dec 22, 2017 7:32 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 
Pat,

In my paperwork that has traveled with the boat since she was delivered, there is a drawing  labeled "Super Maramu, Hull #1" that shows the batteries installed across the front of the engine room.  If Hull #1 was actually initially assembled that way, the first time she hit the water I'll bet the batteries were relocated pretty quickly!

Ignoring interior cabinet work, the biggest permanent asymmetry in weight distribution is the generator and the batteries. Nine G31 batteries just don't add up to one Onan 6.5KW genset. Newer boats that have 13 batteries probably have less of an issue with this.

When we took delivery of our boat, she was essentially empty of all stores.  She had a list of about 1 degree to port, although she came very close to level when the fuel tank was topped off.. So my guess, is that's the w ay she came. 

With so much easily accessible storage on the port side (the liferaft locker, and the cockpit locker) it's really hard to keep from making that worse when the boat is your one and only home that has to hold everything.  But we try. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Bill , I also have a list to port of maybe one or two degrees ,I can see ,feel it , I could never figure why. Amel would have certainly balanced things out in the design . While you have the generator to port , you have a fuel and batteries to starboard . I was concerned that some how my particular boat was mis formed , or my mast not centered , I took measurements . Do you think our boats came out of the factory with a list or is there another explanation.
Merry Christmas to all,
Pat SM#123




Nauta tank installation.

eric freedman
 

Our Nauta Tank installation(s)

I have 6 pad eyes through bolted into my port locker for a 50+ gallon Nauta tank. With the corners  attached  to the pad eyes with carabineers and with the 2 strap also attached, the tank is very solid when full.

The tank runs from the outboard side of the port locker to the inboard side of the port locker-Just Fits.

Across the middle of the port locker is a board and the tank sits against that board.

 

 

There are 2 versions of the tank. I bought the one with the fitting attached. It is also coated with  nylon like a good wetsuit and is not prone to abrasion. Over the last 15 years I have tried many ways to fill the tank.

 

The solution if found  is to use just one 5/8 inch hose hooked to the tank then to  a Jabsco vane puppy pump then another hose that is long and runs from the pump  to the fuel fill. In the middle I wired a 2 way DPDT switch for in and out of the fuel.

When I  had Kimberlite built they installed a 24 volt watertight outlet to the left side of the vertical control of the bow thruster.

 

To fill the tank we use a 6 gallon bucket that we have on board. We  fill it continuously filling the bucket and running the pump. When the tank is about ¾ full we “ burp the tank” . I reverse the pump and someone vigorously steps on the tank numerous times. It is amazing how much air comes out into the ½ full bucket.. We do this twice more while we fill the tank until the tank looks pregnant with no air inside and 50+ gallons inside.

 

The fuel does not slosh around as there is no air and no space for the fuel to slosh.

 

When we need the entire contents of the tank, we reverse the pump and drain it completely, We then remove that tank and lift it up centering the drain above the rest of the tank and drain the last drop of fuel. The tank then looks like it is vacuum sealed.

We then fold it up , put it in a strong bag and put in the locker.

 

We made 2 very long nonstop trips , so I added another Nauta tank.

We lashed and tied it to the aft cabin top and filled it the same way. Needless to say

We really tied it down to the grab rails and mizzen mast. We also cable tied the straps so they would not loosen. It did not move an inch.

The first fuel we used was from that tank.

 

In both cases we came in with a full main tank and some fuel in the aluminum life raft locker tanks.

It is nice to have 330 gallons of fuel on board.

With just the Nauta tank in the port locker we were 2 degrees to port.

 

Ok I’m a wuss.  Unfortunately some of my crew have plane reservation and work so we are sometimes forced to motor.

I hate it but it is necessary.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 6:45 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

James,

 

I used a Nauta flexible tank, not for fuel but as a holding tank on my old boat.  

 

Properly installed and protected from chafe they work great.  It can be tough securing them properly, and because they are flexible, it is impossible to stop the liquid contents from sloshing, so you need to be sure you don't make them so big, or put them in a such a place, that they can have an adverse effect on the stability of the boat.

 

Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Key West, Florida.



---In amelyachtowners@..., <jamescromie@...> wrote :

Has anyone used the collapsible auxiliary fuel containers that are available?  They seem like a nice option for economizing in space when not needed. 

 

James

sm 347

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

Stephen Davis
 

At least through hull #72, the batteries were installed in the engine room, but most have been modified to put the batteries under the pilot berth. I’m curious to know when Amel changed the location, and maybe Olivier can answer this question. 

Steve Davis
Aloha SM72
Shelter Bay, Panama

On Dec 22, 2017, at 20:37, john.biohead@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Bill, Pat, and Thomas,

 I have a 1990 (#37) SM.  My batteries are located under the pilot berth, but it looks like there is formed into the structure an area for batteries in the aft  part of the engine room.  On my hull it appears to have never been utilized except for the starting battery.  The main battery disconnects and bus bar are located adjacent to this area.  My boat has no list....at least not on the inclinometer...I can't perceive a list either if anyone trusts my eyes.  Bill I do keep the main tank full, and store 4 22 liter jerry cans in the port cockpit locker.  The life raft locker has only a life-raft and floating "ditch barrel."

During my boat searching I do seem to recall running across an early SM with a small battery bank in the engine room rather than under the pilot berth, and it did have a genset.


What to make of all of this?  Who knows.  ...well Olivier probably does.

John Clark
SV Annie  SM 37
St. Augustine


Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

John Clark
 

Hi Bill, Pat, and Thomas,
 I have a 1990 (#37) SM.  My batteries are located under the pilot berth, but it looks like there is formed into the structure an area for batteries in the aft  part of the engine room.  On my hull it appears to have never been utilized except for the starting battery.  The main battery disconnects and bus bar are located adjacent to this area.  My boat has no list....at least not on the inclinometer...I can't perceive a list either if anyone trusts my eyes.  Bill I do keep the main tank full, and store 4 22 liter jerry cans in the port cockpit locker.  The life raft locker has only a life-raft and floating "ditch barrel."

During my boat searching I do seem to recall running across an early SM with a small battery bank in the engine room rather than under the pilot berth, and it did have a genset.


What to make of all of this?  Who knows.  ...well Olivier probably does.

John Clark
SV Annie  SM 37
St. Augustine


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

greatketch@...
 

Pat,

In my paperwork that has traveled with the boat since she was delivered, there is a drawing  labeled "Super Maramu, Hull #1" that shows the batteries installed across the front of the engine room.  If Hull #1 was actually initially assembled that way, the first time she hit the water I'll bet the batteries were relocated pretty quickly!

Ignoring interior cabinet work, the biggest permanent asymmetry in weight distribution is the generator and the batteries. Nine G31 batteries just don't add up to one Onan 6.5KW genset. Newer boats that have 13 batteries probably have less of an issue with this.

When we took delivery of our boat, she was essentially empty of all stores.  She had a list of about 1 degree to port, although she came very close to level when the fuel tank was topped off.. So my guess, is that's the way she came. 

With so much easily accessible storage on the port side (the liferaft locker, and the cockpit locker) it's really hard to keep from making that worse when the boat is your one and only home that has to hold everything.  But we try. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailw32@...> wrote :

Bill , I also have a list to port of maybe one or two degrees ,I can see ,feel it , I could never figure why. Amel would have certainly balanced things out in the design . While you have the generator to port , you have a fuel and batteries to starboard . I was concerned that some how my particular boat was mis formed , or my mast not centered , I took measurements . Do you think our boats came out of the factory with a list or is there another explanation.
Merry Christmas to all,
Pat SM#123




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

greatketch@...
 

James,

I used a Nauta flexible tank, not for fuel but as a holding tank on my old boat.  

Properly installed and protected from chafe they work great.  It can be tough securing them properly, and because they are flexible, it is impossible to stop the liquid contents from sloshing, so you need to be sure you don't make them so big, or put them in a such a place, that they can have an adverse effect on the stability of the boat.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, Florida.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <jamescromie@...> wrote :

Has anyone used the collapsible auxiliary fuel containers that are available?  They seem like a nice option for economizing in space when not needed. 

James
sm 347



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins M 4.154 repairs

christian alby <calbyy@...>
 

Hi there Joelthanks for the tip anywaybearings replaced on the crankshaft; standard sizes as requested by the workshop who took measurements & found the crankshatf to be within specs.the camshaft is worn out (must have been running without oïl in the past).will keep on nursing the engine so as I can spare until 2020, then open it up again & control condition before taking decision on continuing or replacing with new.
christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - SC de Tenerife

Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80

Le ‎vendredi‎ ‎22‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎17‎:‎00‎:‎29‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> a écrit :

 





On Dec 22, 2017, at 8:17 AM, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


More than likely your problem is the crankshaft bearings and the connecting rod bearings clearances are too large. As the engine warms the expansion of components causes the clearances to increase even more and hence the oil pressure to go down.

 

The prognosis for this situation is not good. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news…

 

Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY 

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups..com [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 4:04 AM
To: James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins M 4.154 repairs

 

Christian Alby,
 First thanks for letting me know that your buzzer apparently comes on at 1 bar, that is something that I was wondering about and could not find the data online.      Ok, so your oil pressure at 1500 RPM is 3.2 bar.  The Perkins specifications are saying the the oil pressure at full throttle RPM should be between 2.1 and 4.2 bar so since I assume that cruise RPM is 1500 or higher your engine would be operating well within the allowed design specifications currently.  I personally would not be overly concerned with the oil pressure being a bit low at idle since the engine is not loaded at that time.   If the oil pressure remains stable and does not drop much over time, I would think that it should be ok for a while.  Normally however a new or a newly built engine should hit the highest pressure shown in the specifications  (which in your case would be 4.2 bar) which would be the setting for the pressure relief valve in the oil pump.  When this is happening, it tells you that the pump is supplying more oil than the engine can use at the max oil pressure so the balance of the oil is returned to the oil pan via the relief valve.  The excess amount of oil being pumped is a really good thing because as the engine wears and the clearances open up, the proper oil pressure can be maintained for a much longer period.  Since your engine is not reaching the higher pressure, it means that as any wear occurs  the pressures will drop rather than remaining stable which will likely lead to shorter useable engine life.   In your previous email, you stated that the bearings had been replaced but you did not say which ones..  Were the Camshaft, connecting rod and main bearings all replaced?  The rocker arm and bearings might have been ok but were these checked to be sure?   Was the crankshaft and camshaft measured and verified to be within allowable tolerances?   Hopefully all of the journals were smoothed up to remove any sharp edges.  If all of this work was done and done correctly then you should have a tight engine and the scored oil pump might well be the culprit.  If some of the bearings were not replaced or there was excess wear in any of the parts creating out of spec clearances, that might be the cause of the lower than expected oil pressure rather than the oil pump.  If this were my engine and I knew that the engine had been properly rebuilt other than the scored oil pump I would certainly be inclined to change or at least see about rebuilding the original pump at a good machine shop if no replacement parts were found.   Did you look on Ebay for replacement oil pump parts?  I have seen recent listings for pumps that are supposed to be for the 4-154 but have not verified if those parts would fit our engines.
   Just one more thing.  If it were me, I would continue to be on the look out for any evidence of diesel getting back into the oil..  While you feel sure that the lift pump was the cause of your problem,  it is possible that the injection pump could be leaking some as well.  Once your engine is broken in, you might be able to up the idle oil pressure a bit with the engine warm by switching to a synthetic oil which does not thin out as much when hot.  Correcting the cause of the low oil pressure would certainly be the best solution but I also understand the need to use our boats.   
Best of luck,
JamesSV Sueño

  

Hi there James

 

Starting oïl pressure (cold engine) reads now 3 bars with 1300 rpm (goes up soon as engine starts - no time lag, good sign that pump is working)

goes down to 2..8 bars when warming up to 70°C

 

idling at 700 rpm when warm at 70°C drops down to 1 bar - sets on the warning beeper

changed setting on engine to run idling at 850 rpm - oïl pressure goes up to 1.2 bars (no more warning beeper - a rest for our ears)

 

when accelerating to 1500 rpm oïl pressure runs up to 3.2 - again immediate, no time lag)

 

oïl pressure gauge is reading; was on zero when first started & cooling hoses were inverted. Went up to reading when corrected.. No clue on correctness of reading as no calibration done.

 

However did the good old check on oïl pressure to unscrew the oïl filter & got a good shower, followed by unscreing the pressure gauge & watching the closest I know to a Blow-out on an oïl rig.

 

I did not find a replacement oïl pump for the engine & fitted the 'old scored' one back in; still looking & searching now with oïl pumps manufacturers as I have seen similar designs, but different sizes on the net. Intent is to find one to be available by early 2020 latest to allow for dismantling of engine (again) & refitting a new or reconditionend pump.

 

Guess I will try & stretch the life of my 4..154 to get some retunr on Investment for the repairs done here in Tenerife..

 

fair winds

 

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - in SC de Tenerife (ETD 24/12 to Cabo Verde) 

 

Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80

 

 

Le ‎jeudi‎ ‎21‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎19‎:‎35‎:‎16‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> a écrit : 

 

 

  

Christian Alby,

 

   Thanks for the initial update on your rebuilt Perkins.  The Perkins 4-154 manual that I just checked is showing the normal oil pressure to be between 30-60 PSI or about 2.1- 4.2 bar at “maximum engine speed”.  They do not seem to list an idling oil pressure.   What was the initial oil pressure when the engine was first started and cold?  How is the oil pressure at your normal cruising RPM?  Is there any chance that your oil pressure gauge is not reading correctly?   I am really happy that the engine seems to be running so well for you.   Were you unable to find a replacement oil pump for your engine?  

 

Best,

 

James

SV Sueño

Maramu #220  

 


On Dec 21, 2017, at 5:30 AM, christian alby calbyy@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

James

will do an update when returning to home port in 2019

Just to complete results of trial run, oïl pressure went down to 1 bar at 700 rpm after 3 hrs running (cooling maintained at 70°C).

Engine purring nicely, no leaks.

I book it to the ol pump condition (scored  innards).

Added Wynn's Supercharge to thicken oïl & oïl pressure went up to 1.2 bar at 700 Rpm; much better but temporary solution.

Thinking of adding one oïl pump piggy-back on engine (oïl cooling hoses) either driven by pulley or electric. Will pursue.

 

Fair winds

 

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - SC de Tenerife

 

Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80

 

 

Le ‎mercredi‎ ‎20‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎10‎:‎18‎:‎26‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> a écrit :

 

 

 

christian alby,

 

    Thanks for taking the time to update us on your freshly rebuilt 4-154 along with verifying the cause of the failure.  I hope that the engine provides you many years of good service.  If not too much trouble, could you do another update in 1-2 years on how the engine has held up?

 

Thanks,

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 


On Dec 20, 2017, at 4:54 AM, calbyy@yahoo..fr [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks to all Amel sailors who assisted me find parts for my 1982 Perkins M 4.154.

Engine is rebuilt now with new pistons, liners, bearings ... Including a brand new starter to replace the one burnt by the workshop electrician who tried to run faster by hooking my 'old faithfull' 12 volts starter on 2 batteries in series at 24 Volts !

Engine on board 19/12; hooked up & running same day at 17:00 (lost time on drive end bolts offset by 1/4 turn - lift engine & rotate whell -, then oïl cooler hoses inverted, no return = no oïl on pressure gauge).

 

the cause of the fault was definetly the diesel lift pump diaphragm; 63 US$ Worth of spare, Worth changing on engines which did not run for over a year or so. Check them often.

 

Otherwise I can only recommend UK & USA suppliers who responded & supplied replacement parts; And Tenerife workshop 'Precision T.' who did a perfect job on the mechanical part; Just keep electricians away from our installations, not their best show of experience.

 

We shall sail away on 24/12 to continue our round trip of South Atlantic.

 

fair winds to all 

 

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 1982 now (not for long) in SC de Tenerife


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re-rigging and mast step

Willem Kroes
 

Hi Tom,

 

On my SM2k, I bought early spring, there is also a staysail rigging installed. Mr. Olivier Beaute criticized the engineering when he surveyed the boat and this was redone properly this summer.

 

But I am confused about the correct sheeting of the staysail. Where to attach the sheeting blocks on deck? I have seen the arrangement on a 54, but the stays of that boat are totally different positioned

 

Did you have already some experience with this? May be some pictures?

 

Kind regards,

 

Willem Kroes

 

SM2k #351 “Kavanga” now on dry standing in Combarro, Spain

 

 

 

 

Van: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] Namens thomas.kleman
Verzonden: donderdag 21 december 2017 16:44
Aan: amelyachtowners@...
Onderwerp: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re-rigging and mast step

 

 

I can second the comments here regarding Caribe Greement (the Amel rigger in Martinique). Philipe (owner) and Gaetan were great. We replaced all the standing rigging and added a staysail per Amel's specs including the backstay rigging. The work was done very professionally......and the total was about $10,000 for the rigging and another $6,000 for the staysail rig installation. We bought the actual staysail from North Sails in Martinique for around $2,000. Philipe and Gaetan seem to do quite a bit of work on Amels and they both love these boats (they also stock everything you would need)......Philipe told me he never sees an Amel come in with an actual rig failure as the components are of super high quality out of the factory. He's 53 and still climbs masts every day, so I guess he'd know.

 

Tom Kleman

SV L'ORIENT

SM2K #422


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

eric freedman
 

James,

We also use nauta fuel tanks . they are 50 gallons each.

Fair Winds

 

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 7:01 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

Has anyone used the collapsible auxiliary fuel containers that are available?  They seem like a nice option for economizing in space when not needed. 

 

James

sm 347


On Dec 21, 2017, at 1:23 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Tom,

I don’t notice any major list to port with the 70 gallons in the liferaft locker, possibly a degree or two.

Additionally the fuel in the tanks is not a permanent condition as is the batteries.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of thomas.kleman
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2017 10:31 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

Hey Eric- I've been toying around with the idea of repurposing the life-raft locker in this way.. One non-scientific data point that has given me pause is that when I last changed batteries, I had all 13 DT-31 batteries on the port side of my boat outside the cockpit waiting to be taken off. I noticed (or at least I perceived) a slight list of my boat to port. I wondered if 300 liters of fuel in the locker would create a similar issue. Have you noticed this ? Confession- I've done no calculations relating to the relative weights, the position of those weights, etc............one of those possible boat projects that sits idling in front of the first speed bump it encounters.

 

Tom Kleman

SV L'ORIENT

SM2K #422

Currently in Antigua 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins M 4.154 repairs

James Alton
 

On Dec 22, 2017, at 8:17 AM, 'Joel Potter' jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


More than likely your problem is the crankshaft bearings and the connecting rod bearings clearances are too large. As the engine warms the expansion of components causes the clearances to increase even more and hence the oil pressure to go down.



The prognosis for this situation is not good. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news…



Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell







From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups..com [mailto:amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners@...>]
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 4:04 AM
To: James Alton lokiyawl2@... <mailto:lokiyawl2@...> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners@...>>
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins M 4.154 repairs


Christian Alby,

First thanks for letting me know that your buzzer apparently comes on at 1 bar, that is something that I was wondering about and could not find the data online.

Ok, so your oil pressure at 1500 RPM is 3.2 bar. The Perkins specifications are saying the the oil pressure at full throttle RPM should be between 2.1 and 4.2 bar so since I assume that cruise RPM is 1500 or higher your engine would be operating well within the allowed design specifications currently. I personally would not be overly concerned with the oil pressure being a bit low at idle since the engine is not loaded at that time. If the oil pressure remains stable and does not drop much over time, I would think that it should be ok for a while. Normally however a new or a newly built engine should hit the highest pressure shown in the specifications (which in your case would be 4.2 bar) which would be the setting for the pressure relief valve in the oil pump. When this is happening, it tells you that the pump is supplying more oil than the engine can use at the max oil pressure so the balance of the oil is returned to the oil pan via the relief valve. The excess amount of oil being pumped is a really good thing because as the engine wears and the clearances open up, the proper oil pressure can be maintained for a much longer period. Since your engine is not reaching the higher pressure, it means that as any wear occurs the pressures will drop rather than remaining stable which will likely lead to shorter useable engine life. In your previous email, you stated that the bearings had been replaced but you did not say which ones. Were the Camshaft, connecting rod and main bearings all replaced? The rocker arm and bearings might have been ok but were these checked to be sure? Was the crankshaft and camshaft measured and verified to be within allowable tolerances? Hopefully all of the journals were smoothed up to remove any sharp edges. If all of this work was done and done correctly then you should have a tight engine and the scored oil pump might well be the culprit. If some of the bearings were not replaced or there was excess wear in any of the parts creating out of spec clearances, that might be the cause of the lower than expected oil pressure rather than the oil pump. If this were my engine and I knew that the engine had been properly rebuilt other than the scored oil pump I would certainly be inclined to change or at least see about rebuilding the original pump at a good machine shop if no replacement parts were found. Did you look on Ebay for replacement oil pump parts? I have seen recent listings for pumps that are supposed to be for the 4-154 but have not verified if those parts would fit our engines.

Just one more thing. If it were me, I would continue to be on the look out for any evidence of diesel getting back into the oil. While you feel sure that the lift pump was the cause of your problem, it is possible that the injection pump could be leaking some as well. Once your engine is broken in, you might be able to up the idle oil pressure a bit with the engine warm by switching to a synthetic oil which does not thin out as much when hot. Correcting the cause of the low oil pressure would certainly be the best solution but I also understand the need to use our boats.

Best of luck,

James
SV Sueño


Hi there James



Starting oïl pressure (cold engine) reads now 3 bars with 1300 rpm (goes up soon as engine starts - no time lag, good sign that pump is working)

goes down to 2.8 bars when warming up to 70°C



idling at 700 rpm when warm at 70°C drops down to 1 bar - sets on the warning beeper

changed setting on engine to run idling at 850 rpm - oïl pressure goes up to 1.2 bars (no more warning beeper - a rest for our ears)



when accelerating to 1500 rpm oïl pressure runs up to 3.2 - again immediate, no time lag)



oïl pressure gauge is reading; was on zero when first started & cooling hoses were inverted. Went up to reading when corrected.. No clue on correctness of reading as no calibration done.



However did the good old check on oïl pressure to unscrew the oïl filter & got a good shower, followed by unscreing the pressure gauge & watching the closest I know to a Blow-out on an oïl rig.



I did not find a replacement oïl pump for the engine & fitted the 'old scored' one back in; still looking & searching now with oïl pumps manufacturers as I have seen similar designs, but different sizes on the net. Intent is to find one to be available by early 2020 latest to allow for dismantling of engine (again) & refitting a new or reconditionend pump.



Guess I will try & stretch the life of my 4..154 to get some retunr on Investment for the repairs done here in Tenerife..



fair winds



christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - in SC de Tenerife (ETD 24/12 to Cabo Verde)



Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80





Le ‎jeudi‎ ‎21‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎19‎:‎35‎:‎16‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... <mailto:lokiyawl2@...> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> a écrit :







Christian Alby,



Thanks for the initial update on your rebuilt Perkins. The Perkins 4-154 manual that I just checked is showing the normal oil pressure to be between 30-60 PSI or about 2.1- 4.2 bar at “maximum engine speed”. They do not seem to list an idling oil pressure. What was the initial oil pressure when the engine was first started and cold? How is the oil pressure at your normal cruising RPM? Is there any chance that your oil pressure gauge is not reading correctly? I am really happy that the engine seems to be running so well for you. Were you unable to find a replacement oil pump for your engine?



Best,



James

SV Sueño

Maramu #220



On Dec 21, 2017, at 5:30 AM, christian alby calbyy@... <mailto:calbyy@...> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> wrote:





James

will do an update when returning to home port in 2019

Just to complete results of trial run, oïl pressure went down to 1 bar at 700 rpm after 3 hrs running (cooling maintained at 70°C).

Engine purring nicely, no leaks.

I book it to the ol pump condition (scored innards).

Added Wynn's Supercharge to thicken oïl & oïl pressure went up to 1.2 bar at 700 Rpm; much better but temporary solution.

Thinking of adding one oïl pump piggy-back on engine (oïl cooling hoses) either driven by pulley or electric. Will pursue.



Fair winds



christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - SC de Tenerife



Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80





Le ‎mercredi‎ ‎20‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎10‎:‎18‎:‎26‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... <mailto:lokiyawl2@...> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners@...>> a écrit :







christian alby,



Thanks for taking the time to update us on your freshly rebuilt 4-154 along with verifying the cause of the failure. I hope that the engine provides you many years of good service. If not too much trouble, could you do another update in 1-2 years on how the engine has held up?



Thanks,



James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220



On Dec 20, 2017, at 4:54 AM, calbyy@yahoo..fr <mailto:calbyy@...> [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... <mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups..com>> wrote:





Thanks to all Amel sailors who assisted me find parts for my 1982 Perkins M 4.154.

Engine is rebuilt now with new pistons, liners, bearings ... Including a brand new starter to replace the one burnt by the workshop electrician who tried to run faster by hooking my 'old faithfull' 12 volts starter on 2 batteries in series at 24 Volts !

Engine on board 19/12; hooked up & running same day at 17:00 (lost time on drive end bolts offset by 1/4 turn - lift engine & rotate whell -, then oïl cooler hoses inverted, no return = no oïl on pressure gauge).



the cause of the fault was definetly the diesel lift pump diaphragm; 63 US$ Worth of spare, Worth changing on engines which did not run for over a year or so. Check them often.



Otherwise I can only recommend UK & USA suppliers who responded & supplied replacement parts; And Tenerife workshop 'Precision T.' who did a perfect job on the mechanical part; Just keep electricians away from our installations, not their best show of experience.



We shall sail away on 24/12 to continue our round trip of South Atlantic.



fair winds to all



christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 1982 now (not for long) in SC de Tenerife










Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

Thomas Peacock
 

In the deeper, somewhat less reliable, parts of my memory, I recall having read on this forum several years ago that the SM was originally designed without a generator. However, as actual production neared, the decision was made to install a generator, which had to be placed on the port side of the boat, hence the roughly 1 degree list. Every SM I have been on has had that “feature”. 

Tom Peacock
SM #240 Aletes
Falmouth Harbour, Antigua


On Dec 22, 2017, at 8:29 AM, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Bill , I also have a list to port of maybe one or two degrees ,I can see ,feel it , I could never figure why. Amel would have certainly balanced things out in the design . While you have the generator to port , you have a fuel and batteries to starboard . I was concerned that some how my particular boat was mis formed , or my mast not centered , I took measurements . Do you think our boats came out of the factory with a list or is there another explanation.

Merry Christmas to all,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Fri, Dec 22, 2017 12:29 am
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

Tom,

300 liters of diesel would weigh about 640 lbs, Thirteen G31 batteries at about 75 lbs per would weigh between 900 and 1000 lbs.

Just another data point for you as you decide what to do...

I get the distinct impression I am a minority on this, but I personally would skip this project--unless you motor a lot. A Super Maramu has a range with the installed tanks of about 1000 miles.  Much more twice than my previous boat and I never felt the need for more fuel in that one.  I don't think I have ever motor-sailed our Amel, but others seem to do this quite a bit. We c ruise full time, and buy fuel about four times a year.  For us, cutting out one fuel stop every 12 months just doesn't come close to justifying the project.

The liferaft locker does double duty on our boat, holding the raft and other things. I would need to make space in other places for them, and it's not worth it to me.  Also, we have the older boat with only 9 batteries, so we start out with a list to port from the weight of the generator on that side. I consider that list important, but maybe that's because I would rather sail in 4 or 5 knots of wind than listen to the motor...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie



---In amelyachtowners@..., &l t;kimberlite@...> wrote :
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of thomas.kleman
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2017 10:31 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks
 
 
Hey Eric- I've been toying around with the idea of repurposing the life-raft locker in this way. One non-scientific data point that has given me pause is that when I last changed batteries, I had all 13 DT-31 batteries on the port side of my boat outside the cockpit waiting to be taken off. I noticed (or at least I perceived) a slight list of my boat to port. I wondered if 300 liters of fuel in the locker would create a similar issue. Have you noticed this ? Confession- I've done no calculations relating to the relative weights, the position of those weights, etc............one of those possible boat projects that sits idling in front of the first speed bump it encounters.
 
Tom Kleman
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K #422
Currently in Antigua 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill , I also have a list to port of maybe one or two degrees ,I can see ,feel it , I could never figure why. Amel would have certainly balanced things out in the design . While you have the generator to port , you have a fuel and batteries to starboard . I was concerned that some how my particular boat was mis formed , or my mast not centered , I took measurements . Do you think our boats came out of the factory with a list or is there another explanation.
Merry Christmas to all,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Fri, Dec 22, 2017 12:29 am
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

Tom,

300 liters of diesel would weigh about 640 lbs, Thirteen G31 batteries at about 75 lbs per would weigh between 900 and 1000 lbs.

Just another data point for you as you decide what to do...

I get the distinct impression I am a minority on this, but I personally would skip this project--unless you motor a lot. A Super Maramu has a range with the installed tanks of about 1000 miles.  Much more twice than my previous boat and I never felt the need for more fuel in that one.  I don't think I have ever motor-sailed our Amel, but others seem to do this quite a bit. We c ruise full time, and buy fuel about four times a year.  For us, cutting out one fuel stop every 12 months just doesn't come close to justifying the project.

The liferaft locker does double duty on our boat, holding the raft and other things. I would need to make space in other places for them, and it's not worth it to me.  Also, we have the older boat with only 9 batteries, so we start out with a list to port from the weight of the generator on that side. I consider that list important, but maybe that's because I would rather sail in 4 or 5 knots of wind than listen to the motor...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie



---In amelyachtowners@..., &l t;kimberlite@...> wrote :
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of thomas.kleman
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2017 10:31 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks
 
 
Hey Eric- I've been toying around with the idea of repurposing the life-raft locker in this way. One non-scientific data point that has given me pause is that when I last changed batteries, I had all 13 DT-31 batteries on the port side of my boat outside the cockpit waiting to be taken off. I noticed (or at least I perceived) a slight list of my boat to port. I wondered if 300 liters of fuel in the locker would create a similar issue. Have you noticed this ? Confession- I've done no calculations relating to the relative weights, the position of those weights, etc............one of those possible boat projects that sits idling in front of the first speed bump it encounters.
 
Tom Kleman
SV L'ORIENT
SM2K #422
Currently in Antigua 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins M 4.154 repairs

amelforme
 

More than likely your problem is the crankshaft bearings and the connecting rod bearings clearances are too large. As the engine warms the expansion of components causes the clearances to increase even more and hence the oil pressure to go down.

 

The prognosis for this situation is not good. Sorry to be the bearer of bad news…

 

Joel

Joel F. Potter/Cruising Yacht Specialist LLC

THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

954 462 5869 office

954 812 2485 cell

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, December 22, 2017 4:04 AM
To: James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners]
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins M 4.154 repairs

 

 

Hi there James

 

Starting oïl pressure (cold engine) reads now 3 bars with 1300 rpm (goes up soon as engine starts - no time lag, good sign that pump is working)

goes down to 2.8 bars when warming up to 70°C

 

idling at 700 rpm when warm at 70°C drops down to 1 bar - sets on the warning beeper

changed setting on engine to run idling at 850 rpm - oïl pressure goes up to 1.2 bars (no more warning beeper - a rest for our ears)

 

when accelerating to 1500 rpm oïl pressure runs up to 3.2 - again immediate, no time lag)

 

oïl pressure gauge is reading; was on zero when first started & cooling hoses were inverted. Went up to reading when corrected. No clue on correctness of reading as no calibration done.

 

However did the good old check on oïl pressure to unscrew the oïl filter & got a good shower, followed by unscreing the pressure gauge & watching the closest I know to a Blow-out on an oïl rig.

 

I did not find a replacement oïl pump for the engine & fitted the 'old scored' one back in; still looking & searching now with oïl pumps manufacturers as I have seen similar designs, but different sizes on the net. Intent is to find one to be available by early 2020 latest to allow for dismantling of engine (again) & refitting a new or reconditionend pump.

 

Guess I will try & stretch the life of my 4.154 to get some retunr on Investment for the repairs done here in Tenerife.

 

fair winds

 

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - in SC de Tenerife (ETD 24/12 to Cabo Verde) 

 

Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80

 

 

Le ‎jeudi‎ ‎21‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎19‎:‎35‎:‎16‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> a écrit :

 

 

 

Christian Alby,

 

   Thanks for the initial update on your rebuilt Perkins.  The Perkins 4-154 manual that I just checked is showing the normal oil pressure to be between 30-60 PSI or about 2.1- 4.2 bar at “maximum engine speed”.  They do not seem to list an idling oil pressure.   What was the initial oil pressure when the engine was first started and cold?  How is the oil pressure at your normal cruising RPM?  Is there any chance that your oil pressure gauge is not reading correctly?   I am really happy that the engine seems to be running so well for you.   Were you unable to find a replacement oil pump for your engine?  

 

Best,

 

James

SV Sueño

Maramu #220  

 

On Dec 21, 2017, at 5:30 AM, christian alby calbyy@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

James

will do an update when returning to home port in 2019

Just to complete results of trial run, oïl pressure went down to 1 bar at 700 rpm after 3 hrs running (cooling maintained at 70°C).

Engine purring nicely, no leaks.

I book it to the ol pump condition (scored  innards).

Added Wynn's Supercharge to thicken oïl & oïl pressure went up to 1.2 bar at 700 Rpm; much better but temporary solution.

Thinking of adding one oïl pump piggy-back on engine (oïl cooling hoses) either driven by pulley or electric. Will pursue.

 

Fair winds

 

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - SC de Tenerife

 

Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80

 

 

Le ‎mercredi‎ ‎20‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎10‎:‎18‎:‎26‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> a écrit :

 

 

 

christian alby,

 

    Thanks for taking the time to update us on your freshly rebuilt 4-154 along with verifying the cause of the failure.  I hope that the engine provides you many years of good service.  If not too much trouble, could you do another update in 1-2 years on how the engine has held up?

 

Thanks,

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Dec 20, 2017, at 4:54 AM, calbyy@yahoo..fr [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Thanks to all Amel sailors who assisted me find parts for my 1982 Perkins M 4.154.

Engine is rebuilt now with new pistons, liners, bearings ... Including a brand new starter to replace the one burnt by the workshop electrician who tried to run faster by hooking my 'old faithfull' 12 volts starter on 2 batteries in series at 24 Volts !

Engine on board 19/12; hooked up & running same day at 17:00 (lost time on drive end bolts offset by 1/4 turn - lift engine & rotate whell -, then oïl cooler hoses inverted, no return = no oïl on pressure gauge).

 

the cause of the fault was definetly the diesel lift pump diaphragm; 63 US$ Worth of spare, Worth changing on engines which did not run for over a year or so. Check them often.

 

Otherwise I can only recommend UK & USA suppliers who responded & supplied replacement parts; And Tenerife workshop 'Precision T.' who did a perfect job on the mechanical part; Just keep electricians away from our installations, not their best show of experience.

 

We shall sail away on 24/12 to continue our round trip of South Atlantic.

 

fair winds to all 

 

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 1982 now (not for long) in SC de Tenerife 

 

 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

James Cromie
 

Has anyone used the collapsible auxiliary fuel containers that are available?  They seem like a nice option for economizing in space when not needed. 

James
sm 347


On Dec 21, 2017, at 1:23 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Tom,

I don’t notice any major list to port with the 70 gallons in the liferaft locker, possibly a degree or two.

Additionally the fuel in the tanks is not a permanent condition as is the batteries.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of thomas.kleman
Sent: Thursday, December 21, 2017 10:31 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Auxiliary fuel tanks

 

 

Hey Eric- I've been toying around with the idea of repurposing the life-raft locker in this way. One non-scientific data point that has given me pause is that when I last changed batteries, I had all 13 DT-31 batteries on the port side of my boat outside the cockpit waiting to be taken off. I noticed (or at least I perceived) a slight list of my boat to port. I wondered if 300 liters of fuel in the locker would create a similar issue. Have you noticed this ? Confession- I've done no calculations relating to the relative weights, the position of those weights, etc............one of those possible boat projects that sits idling in front of the first speed bump it encounters.

 

Tom Kleman

SV L'ORIENT

SM2K #422

Currently in Antigua 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Perkins M 4.154 repairs

christian alby <calbyy@...>
 

Hi there James

Starting oïl pressure (cold engine) reads now 3 bars with 1300 rpm (goes up soon as engine starts - no time lag, good sign that pump is working)
goes down to 2.8 bars when warming up to 70°C

idling at 700 rpm when warm at 70°C drops down to 1 bar - sets on the warning beeper
changed setting on engine to run idling at 850 rpm - oïl pressure goes up to 1.2 bars (no more warning beeper - a rest for our ears)

when accelerating to 1500 rpm oïl pressure runs up to 3.2 - again immediate, no time lag)

oïl pressure gauge is reading; was on zero when first started & cooling hoses were inverted. Went up to reading when corrected. No clue on correctness of reading as no calibration done.

However did the good old check on oïl pressure to unscrew the oïl filter & got a good shower, followed by unscreing the pressure gauge & watching the closest I know to a Blow-out on an oïl rig.

I did not find a replacement oïl pump for the engine & fitted the 'old scored' one back in; still looking & searching now with oïl pumps manufacturers as I have seen similar designs, but different sizes on the net. Intent is to find one to be available by early 2020 latest to allow for dismantling of engine (again) & refitting a new or reconditionend pump.

Guess I will try & stretch the life of my 4.154 to get some retunr on Investment for the repairs done here in Tenerife.

fair winds

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - in SC de Tenerife (ETD 24/12 to Cabo Verde) 

Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80


Le ‎jeudi‎ ‎21‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎19‎:‎35‎:‎16‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] a écrit :


 

Christian Alby,


   Thanks for the initial update on your rebuilt Perkins.  The Perkins 4-154 manual that I just checked is showing the normal oil pressure to be between 30-60 PSI or about 2.1- 4.2 bar at “maximum engine speed”.  They do not seem to list an idling oil pressure.   What was the initial oil pressure when the engine was first started and cold?  How is the oil pressure at your normal cruising RPM?  Is there any chance that your oil pressure gauge is not reading correctly?   I am really happy that the engine seems to be running so well for you.   Were you unable to find a replacement oil pump for your engine?  

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220  

On Dec 21, 2017, at 5:30 AM, christian alby calbyy@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


James
will do an update when returning to home port in 2019
Just to complete results of trial run, oïl pressure went down to 1 bar at 700 rpm after 3 hrs running (cooling maintained at 70°C).
Engine purring nicely, no leaks.
I book it to the ol pump condition (scored  innards).
Added Wynn's Supercharge to thicken oïl & oïl pressure went up to 1.2 bar at 700 Rpm; much better but temporary solution.
Thinking of adding one oïl pump piggy-back on engine (oïl cooling hoses) either driven by pulley or electric. Will pursue.

Fair winds

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 116 - SC de Tenerife

Christian Alby - France home fixe +33 (0)5 34 39 06 02 home Internet +33 (0)9 60 37 22 72 mobile +33 (0)6 42 69 07 80


Le ‎mercredi‎ ‎20‎ ‎décembre‎ ‎2017‎ ‎10‎:‎18‎:‎26‎ ‎GMT, James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> a écrit :


 

christian alby,


    Thanks for taking the time to update us on your freshly rebuilt 4-154 along with verifying the cause of the failure.  I hope that the engine provides you many years of good service.  If not too much trouble, could you do another update in 1-2 years on how the engine has held up?

Thanks,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Dec 20, 2017, at 4:54 AM, calbyy@yahoo..fr [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Thanks to all Amel sailors who assisted me find parts for my 1982 Perkins M 4.154.
Engine is rebuilt now with new pistons, liners, bearings ... Including a brand new starter to replace the one burnt by the workshop electrician who tried to run faster by hooking my 'old faithfull' 12 volts starter on 2 batteries in series at 24 Volts !
Engine on board 19/12; hooked up & running same day at 17:00 (lost time on drive end bolts offset by 1/4 turn - lift engine & rotate whell -, then oïl cooler hoses inverted, no return = no oïl on pressure gauge).

the cause of the fault was definetly the diesel lift pump diaphragm; 63 US$ Worth of spare, Worth changing on engines which did not run for over a year or so. Check them often.

Otherwise I can only recommend UK & USA suppliers who responded & supplied replacement parts; And Tenerife workshop 'Precision T.' who did a perfect job on the mechanical part; Just keep electricians away from our installations, not their best show of experience.

We shall sail away on 24/12 to continue our round trip of South Atlantic.

fair winds to all 

christian alby - Désirade VIII - Maramu 1982 now (not for long) in SC de Tenerife