Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

greatketch@...
 

Bill,

I am not sure where we disagree.  

You seem to accept that that backward flow through the AC circuit is possible.  If it was not possible, why have the check valve?  They only have one purpose:  stopping reverse flow.  

If water can flow backward, then it would not be long before the hose was empty and air was being sucked into the sea water circuit.  Must be: because the discharge end of the hose is above the water line.

I can not address the toilet pump.  My boat doesn't have one, I have never seen that setup, so I don't know what kind of pump it is or the piping details, or if there is a check valve. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL





---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

B Kinney, 

I believe you are incorrect.

The engine and the generator have seperate connections to the Sea Chest which are "superior" to the saltwater manifold connection. In other words, the saltwater manifold is connected higher than the engine or generator....the only way that either the generator or the engine would suck air through the AC water pump is if the sea chest is clogged or turned OFF. If it is, either the engine or the generator would suck water/air through everything including the toilet saltwater siphon break. However, before any of this would happen the vacuum alarm switch (circa about year 2000) would be activated, energising the alarm and light.

Like I said, I do not know exactly why it is there, but I have several theories.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

B Kinney, 

I believe you are incorrect.

The engine and the generator have seperate connections to the Sea Chest which are "superior" to the saltwater manifold connection. In other words, the saltwater manifold is connected higher than the engine or generator....the only way that either the generator or the engine would suck air through the AC water pump is if the sea chest is clogged or turned OFF. If it is, either the engine or the generator would suck water/air through everything including the toilet saltwater siphon break. However, before any of this would happen the vacuum alarm switch (circa about year 2000) would be activated, energising the alarm and light.

Like I said, I do not know exactly why it is there, but I have several theories.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

On Tue, Dec 26, 2017 at 6:40 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,


Those are exactly the valves I was referring to. My boat has two of them, one for each of the separate AC cooling pumps.  The check valves are there so that the genset and engine can't suck air back through the AC pump.  

If the only possibility was to back flow water, you might be able to skip it, but if you follow the AC cooling water line far enough it exits the boat at, or just above, the water line.  If you flow backwards though it, you will pretty soon pull air into the seawater manifold.  This is most likely if the seachest strainer is a "little bit" clogged, but can not be ruled out at any time. Centrifugal pumps offer no resistance to back flow of either air or water if they are not running. The need for a check valve is independent of the specifics of the Calpeda pump, it is needed for any centrifugal pump.

A check valve is not needed on the engine and genset raw water cooling circuits because those are positive displacement pumps and significant back flow is not possible (assuming all the vanes are on the impeller!) 

A failed open check valve on the AC pumps would be something to look for in case of a mysterious or occasional overheating or if there is frequent impeller failure on the genset or main engine that can't be traced to other causes.

On any plumbing system that uses a single source (the seachest) teed to multiple users some means of backflow prevention is required.  Either positive displacement pumps or check valves are needed on each circuit, or you will pull air back into the suction of the running pumps.

Bill Kinney
SM1690, Harmonie
Key West, FL



---In amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com, wrote :


Duane, & B Kinney,

The check-valve Duane is referring to is on the output line of the Amel installed Calpeda AC Impeller Pump. This valve keeps unpressurized water from flowing back into the pump and sea chest when the pump is OFF. I am not sure why it is installed, but I have several theories.

Duane,

Each of those March pumps I have seen installed on an Amel is a victim of rust. That particular pump is not really marinized for saltwater installations. If you use that pump, keep a watchful eye for rust. As you probably know, the toilet flush water-siphon break system is above the A/C pump on a SM. You may be very careful to keep saltwater off of that pump, but will get drops from the siphon-break.

Best,




--


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

greatketch@...
 

Bill,

Those are exactly the valves I was referring to. My boat has two of them, one for each of the separate AC cooling pumps.  The check valves are there so that the genset and engine can't suck air back through the AC pump.  

If the only possibility was to back flow water, you might be able to skip it, but if you follow the AC cooling water line far enough it exits the boat at, or just above, the water line.  If you flow backwards though it, you will pretty soon pull air into the seawater manifold.  This is most likely if the seachest strainer is a "little bit" clogged, but can not be ruled out at any time. Centrifugal pumps offer no resistance to back flow of either air or water if they are not running. The need for a check valve is independent of the specifics of the Calpeda pump, it is needed for any centrifugal pump.

A check valve is not needed on the engine and genset raw water cooling circuits because those are positive displacement pumps and significant back flow is not possible (assuming all the vanes are on the impeller!) 

A failed open check valve on the AC pumps would be something to look for in case of a mysterious or occasional overheating or if there is frequent impeller failure on the genset or main engine that can't be traced to other causes.

On any plumbing system that uses a single source (the seachest) teed to multiple users some means of backflow prevention is required.  Either positive displacement pumps or check valves are needed on each circuit, or you will pull air back into the suction of the running pumps.

Bill Kinney
SM1690, Harmonie
Key West, FL



---In amelyachtowners@..., <yahoogroups@...> wrote :

Duane, & B Kinney,

The check-valve Duane is referring to is on the output line of the Amel installed Calpeda AC Impeller Pump. This valve keeps unpressurized water from flowing back into the pump and sea chest when the pump is OFF. I am not sure why it is installed, but I have several theories.

Duane,

Each of those March pumps I have seen installed on an Amel is a victim of rust. That particular pump is not really marinized for saltwater installations. If you use that pump, keep a watchful eye for rust. As you probably know, the toilet flush water-siphon break system is above the A/C pump on a SM. You may be very careful to keep saltwater off of that pump, but will get drops from the siphon-break.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

Bill & Judy Rouse <yahoogroups@...>
 

Duane, & B Kinney,

The check-valve Duane is referring to is on the output line of the Amel installed Calpeda AC Impeller Pump. This valve keeps unpressurized water from flowing back into the pump and sea chest when the pump is OFF. I am not sure why it is installed, but I have several theories.

Duane,

Each of those March pumps I have seen installed on an Amel is a victim of rust. That particular pump is not really marinized for saltwater installations. If you use that pump, keep a watchful eye for rust. As you probably know, the toilet flush water-siphon break system is above the A/C pump on a SM. You may be very careful to keep saltwater off of that pump, but will get drops from the siphon-break.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

Duane Siegfri
 

Bill,

Thanks for the information!  I just wasn't sure what the downside of not having one is.

Happy holidays!
Duane


Re: Hurth Transmissions freewheeling folding prop

John Clark
 

Ian, I agree.  I haven't noticed any great lack of performance, except maybe in very light wind.  We are at hull speed rather easily at 15 kts, at 10 kts we can pretty much hold 5-6 kts at most points of sail.  This is while the shaft alternator is carrying all electrical loads.  We added solar shortly after purchasing the boat and no run the generator for maybe an hour every day in the morning.  If we are not on the boat, I turn off the inverters and the solar array holds the batteries near full charge and keeps the three refrigerator/freezers running.   We could probably not run the generator every day but it makes the morning easier (hot water, coffee, microwave, dish washer...)


Re: Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

greatketch@...
 

Duane,

The Marco pump has a built in check valve, you do not need to add another one.

Check valves are required on the centrifugal AC pumps. If there is no check valve when another pump (engine, genset, toilet) pulls water from the sea chest is is possible for water, and then air, to back flow through the AC pump and then with air in the system, everything goes wrong.

This is the downside of having a common seachest supplier multiple raw water users.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailor63109@...> wrote :

Merry Christmas all!


I'm replacing some of the engine room pumps, and I'm wondering if I need a backflow preventer?


I've installed a Marco gear pump (UP3/E) for the fresh water system.  It doesn't run unless a faucet is opened so it doesn't seem to need one.  (By the way, this is a noisy pump, you don't need a red light on the panel to know it's running).


I also have installed a March AC-5C-MD pump to replace the airconditioning pump.  What's the reason Amel put a backflow preventer on the orginal centrifugal pump?   Would backflow damage a centrifugal pump?


By the way, this pump has a lot of openings around the rotor so I'm making a cover for it for when there is anything wet happening in the engine room.  They make a sealed version of this pump but it's twice the cost.


Thanks,

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477


Pump Replacement and backflow preventers

Duane Siegfri
 

Merry Christmas all!


I'm replacing some of the engine room pumps, and I'm wondering if I need a backflow preventer?


I've installed a Marco gear pump (UP3/E) for the fresh water system.  It doesn't run unless a faucet is opened so it doesn't seem to need one.  (By the way, this is a noisy pump, you don't need a red light on the panel to know it's running).


I also have installed a March AC-5C-MD pump to replace the airconditioning pump.  What's the reason Amel put a backflow preventer on the orginal centrifugal pump?   Would backflow damage a centrifugal pump?


By the way, this pump has a lot of openings around the rotor so I'm making a cover for it for when there is anything wet happening in the engine room.  They make a sealed version of this pump but it's twice the cost.


Thanks,

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

greatketch@...
 

We don't have any trouble with the bilge smell in the boat, for two reasons.  

We are not terribly fussy about what goes down the drain, but we do always was dishes with the strainer in the drain.  We also have a sink trap that catches other "chunks" under the sink in the galley. I wouldn't say we were any more careful about this than we would be in home without a garbage grinder.

We also have "U" traps made of three elbows and tubing where the drains empty into the sump.  Always full of water, they prevent the backup of any engine room odors into the cabin.

Bleach is something I don't use on the boat at all.  It is just too corrosive to too many things.

I clean the sump when it looks like it has accumulated enough "gunk" to need it.  It's not very often it needs it. I look whenever I am in the engine room, but I don't have the cleaning on my routine maintenance schedule.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Aquarius Tour

Chuck_Kim_Joy
 

Thank you both for sharing a bit of your life. Great video and one I can share with my family until I can make my own. Very generous for you to produce and share. Sail safely and enjoy your time together. We look forward to viewing some more YouTube videos. Hopefully we will cross paths some day. 

Chuck and Kim 
s/V Joy 
SM2K #388


On Dec 25, 2017, at 7:16 AM, SAMET GOLGECI finikeyachting@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 


AHOY My Friends;
Wishing you all magical Happy Holidays and smooth sailing!
May you sail right through a Merry Christmas into a Happy New Year 2018.
🤶☃️☃️☃️ 🍾🍾🍾 🥂


(Please excuse typos, this was written on my mobile)

Saygilarimizla / Best Regards / Mit Freundliche Grusse;
 
 
Samet Golgeci
Managing Owner
Finike Yachting Agency
 
Mobile      : +90 542 657 43 03 (Whatsapp Available)
Web         : www.finikeyachting.com
E-mail      : finikeyachting@...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Transitlog Renewals + Check in & out procedures for Turkey + Brokerage
Yacht Guardianage including technical services and maintenance
Real Estate consultancy including organise house repairs + Maintenance
Supervising vacant property + Fresh Provisions & Supplies + Duty Free Diesel
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

2017-12-25 16:42 GMT+03:00 Ken Powers sailingaquarius@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:
 

Happy Holidays Amel Owners!

We have owned Aquarius for just about a year now, and would like to thank all of the ALL of you for your emails and comments because Z and I have learned so much for these emails.  The learning curve is big when buying your first boat, especially if your first boat is 53 feet.....  THANKS!

We have a tour of Aquarius at:




Merry Christmas!

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K #262
Currently in Panama Shelter Ban Marina 





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

greatketch@...
 


Steve,

I would not carry extra fuel for the trip you describe. With modern weather forecasts and routing there is no reason you should need to motor for a thousand miles on this trip, even if you are impatient. Having said that, you might need to wait for two weeks or more in Panama for the weather forecast to be suitable for a departure.  If you need to get underway on a schedule, you might need more fuel.

I haven't done the Panama to Hawaii trip (next year!) but I have done San Diego to Hawaii, and Hawaii to San Francisco and burned nothing--other than for harbor maneuvering.  We did sit becalmed and rolling for most of 24 hours in between the coastal winds and the trades on the way west.  I think that day we covered 10 miles...

One of the interesting exercises I do when running my weather routing is to run it with and without the option of motoring turned on. I seem to always find it makes a lot less difference in final arrival time than I expect.

There are times when I might pile on extra fuel.  If I was spending a lot of time in a place where fuel was either not conveniently available, or insanely expensive, or if I was going to be doing a lot of fishing (that's when we do burn much of our dinosaur juice).

Bill Kinney
SM160,  Harmonie
Key West, FL

---In amelyachtowners@..., <flyboyscd@...> wrote :

It seems their is no correct answer to how much fuel to carry. Like many here have voiced, I hate to motor and love to sail. With that said, every passage has its own challenges, and most of us would rather be prepared for any eventuality. The one thing I’m not prepared to do is roll around for weeks in the ITCZ while waiting for wind, as I’d prefer to quickly get to the wind, and then enjoy a great sail to our destination. 

We will be departing Panama in a couple of weeks, and embarking on a nearly 5000 nm journey to Hawaii. We tried to find a longer distance between 2 points of land, but this was the best we could do for now. If you have never looked at this route, it poses some unique problems in the first 1500+ miles. You have to deal with the ITCZ and some other phenomena which can create a huge area of little or no wind before you get to the area of NE trades which will carry you swiftly to Hawaii. I’ve  spoke to one sailor who took 48 days enroute on his Hans Christian 43. We hope to make the trip in 28 to 30 days with our swift SM, and some extra fuel in case I can’t find a way to keep us in some wind early on. In our case we will use a 37 gallon Nauta bladder secured just behind the fuel cap on the aft deck, and 5 twenty liter jerry cans in the life raft locker.  We have a valise life raft which lives on the floor at the nav station when on passage. 

We have never carried extra diesel on any passage prior to this, but it seemed  smart this time, and we are happy with the choice. Happy to hear what the rest of you think. Should we take less or more extra diesel?  How about you Bill K...would you take any extra?

If any one is interested in tracking our progress, you see where we are at http://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/Aloha      We expect to depart from the Las Perlas Islands on 8 January, or slightly thereafter. Also, if anyone is planning a trip to Hawaii, we would love to meet you, and will also be serving as the Ocean Cruising Club Port Captain for Hawaii for the year in the islands prior to moving on to the South Pacific. 

Seasons Greetings,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM72
Shelter Bay, Panama


Re: Weigh carrying capacity of SM

greatketch@...
 

Kent,

I suspect when you describe your boat's current waterline status you are looking at the painted waterline on the hull.  That is not the waterline as drawn for the boat on her design drawings.  

When we picked up Harmonie she was almost empty of gear.  I saw the painted waterline was significantly higher at the bow then the stern. About 3 inches if my memory is correct.  This struck me as very odd for an unloaded boat.  So I measured the distance from the water to the gunwale at bow and stern and compared to the architects drawing.  She was spot on her correct fore and aft trim as per the drawing.

Take away lesson:  The painted waterline is not necessarily where she should sit!  If you were to load our boat until the water at the bow was even with the painted line, you would have water at the top of the bowthruster well, and maybe over it!  Note that I have NOT done this measurement on ANY other Amel.  It is possible it only applies to #160.  Amel might have changed the painted waterlines at other times, or a previous owner might have changed yours!  

I do not know if Amel painted the waterline higher at the bow on our boat as an aesthetic thing, or just got it wrong, but it's definitely not where the boat should sit in the water.

As for how much you can carry...

A Super Maramu has a LWL of 41.3 feet, a Waterline Beam of about 14.5 feet...
A SM has a LWL Area of (very roughly) 0.67 *41.3* 14.5 ~ 400 sq feet
So to sink her a extra inch overall will take 400 * 5.33 ~ 2,100 lbs or close to one ton. 
That's actually a pretty conservative number for a SM because as she settles deeper her LWL becomes a bit longer. 

So how deep you can take her...  I don't have a good answer.  

If loaded so the heavy stuff was down as low as possible and not concentrated at the ends of the boat, I'd guess two inches (two tons) would be a conservative number.  

Carrying that much weight as "deck cargo" would certainly reduce the stability of the boat. But I have no idea if it would be dangerous because I don't know her designed center of gravity or metacentric height.  For a real answer I think you'll have to talk to a naval architect, or ask Amel.

Honestly, my suggestion would be to take the money you would spend on the fuel for that trip and donate it to have the material shipped commercially to the nearest working port.  

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Key West, FL


---In amelyachtowners@..., <karkauai@...> wrote :

Hi all.
We are going to carry supplies to Caribbean from Ft Lauderdale to hurricane stricken islands this winter. I'm wondering how much weight I can take on safely. Loaded with all our supplies and provisions, Kristy sits about 1 1/2 inches above the original waterline in the stern, and 4 inches above waterline at the bow.

Can I load her to that waterline? If I go above it, the engine and generator exhausts will be below the water. That doesn't seem like a good idea. If that is ok, what other considerations are important if I load her another inch or more above the waterline?

I was going to carry one pallet (40" x 40" x48") on the foreword cabintop and another one or two broken down below decks as carrying capacity allows. I don't know the weight of the pallets yet.

Any thoughts?

Thanks andMerry Christmas!
Kent
SM 243
Kristy


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

Jean-Pierre's MacBook Air <jgermain@...>
 

Hi Gang,

The main ingredient to keeping your AMEL sweet smelling is not to let any”ingredient” go down the galley sinks.

You must become a fanatic of food remains removal from all dishes to be washed.  My 30 year old boat (almost) is always sweet smelling because I am a food waste nazi.. never any bit of food waste in the sinks.

I clean out my bilges by adding a small quantity of bleach to a white wash during washing machine operation.  I also only use liquid shower gels.

“Cleanliness is next to Godliness”….

Merry Christmas


Jean-Pierre Germain
SY Eleuthera, SM007,
Panama




On 25 Dec 2017, at 12:22, 'dancarlson367@...' dancarlson367@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi all,  reviewing this past thread on bilge maintenance.


I am wondering if anyone has tried one of the enzymatic drain maintenance products?


My dad used to be a big fan of one of these products at his home, but I did not experiment with it much.  I believe it is supposed to be friendly to plumbing.  

Always looking for ideas to extend the grey water sump/bilge cleaning cycle.

Thanks and regards, Dan Carlson, SM #387, sv BeBe .



 

Hi everyone.  I have put into the bilge one waterglass of vinegar per week recently.  It has definitely reduced the smell in the engine room and there is no appreciable smell anymore in the cabins.  So this seems the way to go although I suspect I have to increase the dosage if the outside temperatures are in the 30s vs the low 20s now.  Many thanks again everyone for the great help!  Joerg


Joerg Esdorn
Kincsem
Amel 55 no. 53
Currently in Zakinthos, Greece




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Bilge maintenance

Dan Carlson
 

Hi all,  reviewing this past thread on bilge maintenance.

I am wondering if anyone has tried one of the enzymatic drain maintenance products?


My dad used to be a big fan of one of these products at his home, but I did not experiment with it much.  I believe it is supposed to be friendly to plumbing.  

Always looking for ideas to extend the grey water sump/bilge cleaning cycle.

Thanks and regards, Dan Carlson, SM #387, sv BeBe .



On Wed, Oct 11, 2017 at 2:56 AM, jhe1313@... [amelyachtowners]
 

Hi everyone.  I have put into the bilge one waterglass of vinegar per week recently.  It has definitely reduced the smell in the engine room and there is no appreciable smell anymore in the cabins.  So this seems the way to go although I suspect I have to increase the dosage if the outside temperatures are in the 30s vs the low 20s now.  Many thanks again everyone for the great help!  Joerg


Joerg Esdorn
Kincsem
Amel 55 no. 53
Currently in Zakinthos, Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

Jean-Pierre's MacBook Air <jgermain@...>
 

I am following this thread too.  

Y Yacht proposed 60% more than my present policy…

Guess I’m not going there…


Jean-PIerre Germain
SY Eleuthera, SM007



On 25 Dec 2017, at 07:28, Vladimir Sonsev sonsev52@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Please provide contact info or your  Y Yacht an English based insurance broker.
MI contact:
Sonsev52 at Gmail

Vladimir
SM345 "LIGE IS GOOD"

On Dec 21, 2017 01:03, "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Paul, If you have trouble contacting Georgetown Marina , they just closed until after the New Years and Nick who will be doing the work on your boat left a couple of days ago for New Zealand and will return in three weeks. I am glad things work out with your insurance.

Happy Holidays,
Pat & Diane
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, Dec 20, 2017 1:41 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

 
It has been a few posts concerning Insurance. This is our experience
We hit an underwater breakwater this summer which resulted in rather high cost for the repair. It is not until you have a claim one know if one could trust and recommend the insurer. Today we got the go ahead from the insurer to repair our SM Kerpa. We have had Oliver Beauté to inspect the damage, and Kerpa will be repaired according to his instructions.  All communication with the insurance company has been very prompt and correct. Our Insurer is Y Yacht an English based insurance broker with rather reasonable rates.
 
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259
 





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Aquarius Tour

SAMET GOLGECI
 


AHOY My Friends;
Wishing you all magical Happy Holidays and smooth sailing!
May you sail right through a Merry Christmas into a Happy New Year 2018.
🤶☃️☃️☃️ 🍾🍾🍾 🥂


(Please excuse typos, this was written on my mobile)

Saygilarimizla / Best Regards / Mit Freundliche Grusse;
 
 
Samet Golgeci
Managing Owner
Finike Yachting Agency
 
Mobile      : +90 542 657 43 03 (Whatsapp Available)
Web         : www.finikeyachting.com
E-mail      : finikeyachting@...
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Transitlog Renewals + Check in & out procedures for Turkey + Brokerage
Yacht Guardianage including technical services and maintenance
Real Estate consultancy including organise house repairs + Maintenance
Supervising vacant property + Fresh Provisions & Supplies + Duty Free Diesel
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 

2017-12-25 16:42 GMT+03:00 Ken Powers sailingaquarius@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Happy Holidays Amel Owners!

We have owned Aquarius for just about a year now, and would like to thank all of the ALL of you for your emails and comments because Z and I have learned so much for these emails.  The learning curve is big when buying your first boat, especially if your first boat is 53 feet.....  THANKS!

We have a tour of Aquarius at:




Merry Christmas!

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K #262
Currently in Panama Shelter Ban Marina 





Aquarius Tour

Ken Powers <sailingaquarius@...>
 

Happy Holidays Amel Owners!

We have owned Aquarius for just about a year now, and would like to thank all of the ALL of you for your emails and comments because Z and I have learned so much for these emails.  The learning curve is big when buying your first boat, especially if your first boat is 53 feet.....  THANKS!

We have a tour of Aquarius at:




Merry Christmas!

Ken Powers
Aquarius SM2K #262
Currently in Panama Shelter Ban Marina 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

Please provide contact info or your  Y Yacht an English based insurance broker.
MI contact:
Sonsev52 at Gmail

Vladimir
SM345 "LIGE IS GOOD"

On Dec 21, 2017 01:03, "Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Paul, If you have trouble contacting Georgetown Marina , they just closed until after the New Years and Nick who will be doing the work on your boat left a couple of days ago for New Zealand and will return in three weeks. I am glad things work out with your insurance.

Happy Holidays,
Pat & Diane
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wed, Dec 20, 2017 1:41 pm
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Insurance

 
It has been a few posts concerning Insurance. This is our experience
We hit an underwater breakwater this summer which resulted in rather high cost for the repair. It is not until you have a claim one know if one could trust and recommend the insurer. Today we got the go ahead from the insurer to repair our SM Kerpa. We have had Oliver Beauté to inspect the damage, and Kerpa will be repaired according to his instructions.  All communication with the insurance company has been very prompt and correct. Our Insurer is Y Yacht an English based insurance broker with rather reasonable rates.
 
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

eric freedman
 

Next you could try the route of the Clipper race from China to California 5700 miles.

Fair Winds on your amazing passage.

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 12:34 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

 

It seems their is no correct answer to how much fuel to carry. Like many here have voiced, I hate to motor and love to sail. With that said, every passage has its own challenges, and most of us would rather be prepared for any eventuality. The one thing I’m not prepared to do is roll around for weeks in the ITCZ while waiting for wind, as I’d prefer to quickly get to the wind, and then enjoy a great sail to our destination. 

 

We will be departing Panama in a couple of weeks, and embarking on a nearly 5000 nm journey to Hawaii. We tried to find a longer distance between 2 points of land, but this was the best we could do for now. If you have never looked at this route, it poses some unique problems in the first 1500+ miles. You have to deal with the ITCZ and some other phenomena which can create a huge area of little or no wind before you get to the area of NE trades which will carry you swiftly to Hawaii. I’ve  spoke to one sailor who took 48 days enroute on his Hans Christian 43. We hope to make the trip in 28 to 30 days with our swift SM, and some extra fuel in case I can’t find a way to keep us in some wind early on. In our case we will use a 37 gallon Nauta bladder secured just behind the fuel cap on the aft deck, and 5 twenty liter jerry cans in the life raft locker.  We have a valise life raft which lives on the floor at the nav station when on passage. 

 

We have never carried extra diesel on any passage prior to this, but it seemed  smart this time, and we are happy with the choice. Happy to hear what the rest of you think. Should we take less or more extra diesel?  How about you Bill K...would you take any extra?

 

If any one is interested in tracking our progress, you see where we are at http://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/Aloha      We expect to depart from the Las Perlas Islands on 8 January, or slightly thereafter. Also, if anyone is planning a trip to Hawaii, we would love to meet you, and will also be serving as the Ocean Cruising Club Port Captain for Hawaii for the year in the islands prior to moving on to the South Pacific. 

 

Seasons Greetings,

 

Steve and Liz Davis

Aloha SM72

Shelter Bay, Panama


On Dec 24, 2017, at 11:56, 'Bill & Judy Rouse' yahoogroups@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

 

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

 

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

 

I hope this helps you make your plans.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Extra fuel

eric freedman
 

I forgot to mention 10 additional trips from to or from the Long Island  to S. America or the  Caribe in my Tartan 37 with 450 liters of fuel on board. The Tartan would go to weather much better than out Amels.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 6:20 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Extra fuel

 

 

We had three occasions when we used more than 600 liters of fuel.

 

One was a big mistake, sailing from Colombia to Guadeloupe. The trade winds were  particularly strong and we has 30 knots average on the nose for 9 days. The Arc world going the other way did it in 4 days.

 

Another was this fall from Long Island non-stop to Martinique, again strong wind on the nose 12 of wind and 2 days of sailing.. I could have stopped in Bermuda, but it seems like when you pull into Bermuda you are stuck there for days.   

 

The other time was when we had to sail to almost 54  degrees West to get around a huge storm on our way to the Caribbean. This is the storm where Triple Stars lost a crew member.

 

We almost used 600 liters a 4th  time when we were in a hurricane for 36 hours. Herb the weather forecaster told us to divert to Bermuda after the Hurricane at maximum speed. There were 2 more storms of 50 knots coming at us. We beat both storms and continued onto the Caribe without stopping in Bermuda, even though we were looking at the spit buoy off of Bermuda when Herb said to keep going.

 

I have made many trips over 2000 miles and a few over 3000 and have never used up the main tank.

This last trip marked our 35th trip either to or from Ny  to the Caribe or S. America

 

From Puerto Mogan, Grand Canaria to Guadeloupe we used 300 liters, from Long island to Santa Marta Colombia we use 250 liters.

Sometimes we have to run the A/C in addition to the Engine when it is terribly hot below,

Also we use the diesel heater when it is very cold, even though it uses a tiny amount of diesel.

 

However in the 78,000 miles we have sailed it was always nice to have the extra fuel.

 

I think of my very good friend Eric Forsyth in his home made 42 foot West Sail 42.

He has logged over 300,000 miles, and CCA blue water  medal recipient.  We communicate often when he is at sea. One year after  enduring a hurricane south of the Falklands, having his boat holed, losing his electronics, and steering, he headed to Cape town. When he fixed the boat he headed to Caribbean to meet for out birthdays. I read his agonizing reports of making 3-15 miles a day for almost 2 weeks while crossing the equator. I am sure  he  would have liked to have more fuel. He was 82 years old at that time.

He just left his boat in Portugal after sailing from Long Island, to come home for Christmas age 85.

 

 

His book is a great one about his 50 years of sailing https://www.amazon.com/Inexplicable-Attraction-Fifty-Years-Sailing/dp/0692839259

It’s a great read. He Is now 85 years old.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, December 24, 2017 11:57 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Nauta tank installation.

 

 

I am sure that there is a lot of experience in this Group that the "new-to-Amel" Super Maramus and 54 owners would like to hear regarding onboard fuel. When I was new to this Group, I could not get experienced answers on how much is enough fuel.

 

I bought 10 each 18.9 liter jerry jugs and filled them for each ocean crossing. They added about 300nm to my about 1,000nm range on the Super Maramu (600 liter tank). BTW, the 54 fuel tank is 900 liters and should provide a minimum of 1,300 miles while motoring without carrying extra fuel.

 

My experience around the world is that we never touched the 10 jugs (189 extra liters) and the most that we used on any passage was 400 liters in an isolated case with almost no wind between Panama and the Galapagos. Had we been more experienced, we may have picked a better departure date. During our two 3,000 passages we used about 250 liters each.

 

I hope this helps you make your plans.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970