Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Shield Wire in NMEA 2000 Backbone

 

Duane,

I don't have a direct answer to your question, but here is some information for you that may be helpful.

Shields are normally connected to the metal case of the devices that are connected by the NEMA wire, but, as you know, many device cases are not metal.

I would never connect a shield to a battery negative and never connect a shield to a case where the case is connected to negative because that negative cable will conduct RF from any device connected to the battery bank.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sun, Apr 1, 2018, 11:40 sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Where do you terminate shield wires in general?  Since they are supposed to go to ground, it seems logical that you would connect them to the battery negative, but I'm  really just guessing.  


Appreciate your input.

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat re-charging

John Clark
 

Mohammad,
  I was going to write a respose based on recharging my unit but this is way better.  One point I would add is that if one is not using a set of refrigeration gauges to make sure to connect the 134 can to the low pressure side.  This is the suction side of compressor and will likely be cool or cold.

John
SV Annie. SM37
Great Guana Cay Exuma.

On Sat, Mar 31, 2018, 6:51 PM 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Paul;
 
The following is an article that I had run into when I was debugging an issue with our refrigerator. It is on Coastal Climate Control's website. As mentioned on the forum, they seem to be proficient in what they do and therefore I would consider the source reliable.
 

R134a Recharge Guidelines

 

R124a cannisterThere is much talk and discussion in certain forums about how to determine the correct refrigerant charge level for a capillary tube refrigeration system, but there is only one, simple method that will result in the perfect charge in a Frigoboast system; the frost-line method. Pressures and current draw can be monitored to confirm that these are within expected limits, but there is no better way to guage the refrigerant level than with the frost-line method.

Frigoboat R134a charge guidelines

General
The following is intended to be a guide for a boat operator with average mechanical skills. It will describe what symptoms to look for in a correctly charged Frigoboat system so that an evaluation can be made as to whether service is required. No refrigerant gauges are necessary for this evaluation, and their use is required only for major repairs and for evacuating the system.

Warning!
Never use, or allow a technician to use, anything other than pure refrigerant R134a in a Frigoboat system. Cans of refrigerant R134a with additives must never be used, nor must stand-alone additives be introduced into the system. These additives include but are not limited to: leak detecting fluid, leak stopper, dye, extra oil, conditioner, etc. Serious damage can result from the use of such products, which are designed for use only in auto air conditioning systems.

Symptoms of correct and incorrect charge

Correctly charged system
The Frigoboat systems are capillary tube systems, and require a precise refrigerant charge to work at maximum efficiency. Too much or too little refrigerant will result in a systems that will have some cooling effect, but will not be working to it’s full potential. In a Frigoboat system, the temperature of the evaporator is directly related to the amount of refrigerant in the system. There should be enough refrigerant in the system so that the last of the liquid is evaporating back to a vapor at the very end of the evaporator, and just as it enters the suction tube back to the compressor. After running for a time, there should be a slight coating of frost all over the surface of the evaporator, and there should be no condensation or frost on the exposed section of copper tube back to the compressor, and no condensation on the compressor itself. If the system has been installed correctly, the short length of insulation supplied with the system should be positioned on the copper tube starting where it exits the refrigerated box. No other insulation is required, and any extra that has been installed will only cause the system to run at less than maximum efficiency and may conceal symptoms of an overcharge. This short length of insulation is installed to prevent any condensation that may occur as the cold tube leaves the refrigerated box and is exposed to hot, humid air. In a properly charged system, there should be a “tinny, gurgling” sound from the evaporator.

Slightly undercharged system
If there is too little refrigerant in the system, it will have evaporated back to a vapor before it reaches the end of the evaporator. Some of the surface will have a coating of frost, but from the point where the refrigerant has turned all to vapor, the surface will be cold and sweating. The frost begins at end of the capillary tube, where the liquid refrigerant is fed into the evaporator. The evaporator will probably sound the same as a properly charged system.

Seriously undercharged system
If the system is seriously undercharged, the refrigerant may exist in the system only as a vapor, and so there will be no frosting on the evaporator, just a slight sweating and coldness to the touch. In this condition there will probably be a constant hissing sound from the evaporator. This sound is important in identifying if the system is undercharged or overcharged.

Slightly overcharged system
Too much refrigerant in the system will result in liquid still evaporating back to a gas past the end of the evaporator and inside the tubing going back to the compressor. This means that there is still some of the refrigeration process going on inside the tubing, and there will be a build-up of frost or ice on the exposed section. If additional insulation has been added, it may be concealing this symptom and should be removed. The evaporator may appear and sound normal, but will be at a higher temperature than desired, resulting in longer than expected run times.

Seriously overcharged system
If so much refrigerant exists in the system that it raises the temperature of the evaporator above 32 deg F, the surface will only be sweating and cold to the touch, resembling an undercharged condition. But the copper lines leading back to the compressor, and maybe even the compressor itself, will also be cold and sweating, and there will probably be a sound similar to a mountain stream coming from the evaporator. This is a potentially damaging condition as liquid can reach the compressor where it can damage the valves, since refrigeration compressors are designed to compress gas only.

 
 
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad and Aty
B&B Kokomo
Amel 54 #099
 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 31, 2018 3:14 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat re-charging

 

Hi all,

Would anyone know where I can find an idiots guide to re-charging a friogboat fridge whcih uses R134A refrigerant?

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator pump not working

 

Paul,

That posting about 2 each 30mfd was me, but it was for a Dessalator 160. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sat, Mar 31, 2018, 19:15 brass.ring@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Mohammad,


I removed the two capacitors on the high-pressure pump and measured their capacitance.  The first was 18mfd and the second measured 25mfd.  I assumed they should have been 30mfd each.  I replaced them with two new 30mfd and the pump started.  Subsequently, I looked through the owners group data and found a reference to 2-30mfd for the high-pressure pump.  I believe the posting was from Bill Rouse, however I went back to find the data to give proper credit and cannot find it again.

 

With those two large capacitors on your high-pressure pump you may want to check the amp draw and verify it is within the nameplate rating on the motor.  Thanks for your earlier reply.

Mark Mueller
A 54 – 68, Brass Ring
Fort Lauderdale



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Rescueing method of casualty (Person Over Board)

 

Of course, I didn't say it, and I should have to be absolutely clear, but when lifting a person who is unable to swim or be pulled to the swim ladder, the mizzen boom should be held in place with the mizzen preventer (with the boom at about 150 degrees, relative) until such time the lifted person is ready to be brought completely on board. 

Although I have never experienced an actual distressed person rescue in this manner, I have tried it in practice situations. The weight of the person will swing the boom even in calm seas.

Of course there are other unstated details like securing the bitter end of the halyard. I didn't intend my words to be a step-by-step procedure.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Sat, Mar 31, 2018, 17:33 greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Lifting horizontally???  


I hear the logic and understand the physiology, but that really has to be balanced against the extra time, and complexity of lifting someone horizontally--which is virtually impossible with the number of crew and equipment normally available on cruising sailboats.  The number of victims who are in that narrow band where they will experience a dramatically better outcome ONLY because they were lifted horizontally, is really small.

If this is really the RYA's standard recommendation for routine MOB recovery, in my opinion, it is unrealistic and impractical--no matter how valid its theoretical benefits. I'd expect better, and more practical, advice from them.

Think about this. It is way more complex than just lifting someone with two lines...  if you attach one at the chest, where to you attach the other?  How ma ny people does this take to rig and execute?

In any man-overboard situation, rapid recovery will trump perfect technique--every time.

Any halyard on an Amel is capable of lifting someone out of the water, and any of the winches, manual or electric, will give enough power to lift someone two or three meters.

I have had the valuable experience of participating in an organized evaluation of man-overboard recovery techniques as the "volunteer" in the water who had to be lifted into the boat by a variety of techniques.  It is not easy with a short handed crew and a victim who might not be able to offer much assistance themselves.  

If there is only one person left on board, I would not recommend using the mizzen boom as a lifting crane unless the victim is alert and fully functional.  The danger is if the boat is rolling at all, a person hanging off t he end of the boom will swing wildly from side to side, unless they can hold on to something, or someone is on deck can restrain the boom's swing. Maybe you could rig something up, but that would just take more time.The person at the winch in the cockpit is also out of visual and easy auditory contact with the victim.  

It really is an easy ride up out of the water on any mast top halyard in a lifesling, or even just in a bowline.  Just remember, have the victim face in toward the boat so the lifting halyard is between their head and the hull.  This was an important lesson learned, if the victim is face out, the back of his head bangs against the hull as he is lifted.  Unless someone is there at the rail to hold them, do not lift them all the way over the liferails with the halyard, even in calm conditions they will pendulum around wildly.

SOOO much depends on the conditions, the strength and number of re maining crew, and especially the condition of the victim.  Are they conscious?  Hypothermic?  Wearing a lifejacket?  A harness?  Are they panicked?  

We found a lifesling to be a valuable tool to lift someone.  It was easy to get into, even for a victim with restricted mobility, and was simple for the crew onboard to reach and attach to.

If there are two crew left aboard, it might be best to use a mizzen halyard to lift/slide a marginally conscious person up the slope of the reverse transom, if the boat is not pitching too badly.

If there is one person left onboard, and the victim in the water is incapable of helping in any meaningful way, there are no sure-fire solutions in rough conditions.  It is a situation I hope I never have to deal with.

Finally... most inflatable lifevests have a serious design flaw.  When inflated it is imposs ible for the rescue crew or the victim to attach a line to the lifting harness because the attachment point is buried and inaccessible below the inflated bladders.  With many of them, there is no provision AT ALL for snagging the person in the water with a boathook to hold them alongside. 

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Moraine Cay, Abacos, Bahamas


Shield Wire in NMEA 2000 Backbone

Duane Siegfri
 

Where do you terminate shield wires in general?  Since they are supposed to go to ground, it seems logical that you would connect them to the battery negative, but I'm  really just guessing.  


Appreciate your input.

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] where do you store your tools?

eric freedman
 

Hi Kent,

Yes it is in the forward hanging locker. When I had Kimberlite made I had Amel

put  shelves in the back of both hanging lockers.  I put the bigger things on those shelves, torque wrenches,

sander, grinder etc. Also, under the tool box there is a space to fit my canister vacuum cleaner.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 01, 2018 11:58 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] where do you store your tools?

 

 

Eric, your tool cabinet looks like it's in the forward hanging locker?  Beautiful...and it's forward and starboard to help with trim.  Brilliant!

Kent

SM 243

Kristy

Kent Robertson

S/V Kristy

Panama cell: +507-61171896

USA cell: 828-234-6819


On Mar 31, 2018, at 12:57 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/photos/albums/1140528980

 

I believe this is the absolute best way to store tools.

I also has Amel add a drawer under the lowest step. I use this for everyday tools.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

Hi all,

I'm wondering where you store all your tools.  I feel like most of us are very handy, so we must have a lot of them.  I use many of my tools on a near-daily basis, so I like to keep them easily accessible.  I've filled both of the drawers beneath the starboard settee, and I still have more tools that need homes!  Is there some awesome storage place I haven't thought of?  Where do you keep yours?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

SM 233 Iteration

Boston, MA, USA

 


Re: where do you store your tools?

Duane Siegfri
 

Eric,

You're giving all of us a bad case of the envies!!

What a great way to store the tools, and beautiful to boot!

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] where do you store your tools?

karkauai
 

Eric, your tool cabinet looks like it's in the forward hanging locker?  Beautiful...and it's forward and starboard to help with trim.  Brilliant!
Kent
SM 243
Kristy

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
Panama cell: +507-61171896
USA cell: 828-234-6819

On Mar 31, 2018, at 12:57 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/photos/albums/1140528980

 

I believe this is the absolute best way to store tools.

I also has Amel add a drawer under the lowest step. I use this for everyday tools.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

Hi all,

I'm wondering where you store all your tools.  I feel like most of us are very handy, so we must have a lot of them.  I use many of my tools on a near-daily basis, so I like to keep them easily accessible.  I've filled both of the drawers beneath the starboard settee, and I still have more tools that need homes!  Is there some awesome storage place I haven't thought of?  Where do you keep yours?

 

Thanks,

Ryan

SM 233 Iteration

Boston, MA, USA

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Just a bit off topic, but worth saying...

Brent Cameron
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Just a bit off topic, but worth saying...

karkauai
 

Amen, Bill.  With rare exceptions, we treat each other with dignity, respect, and humor.  We are a "family" with far fewer personality issues than most families.  When meeting other owners in person, I find them all to just my kind of folks.  I too am grateful to be a part of this exceptional community.
Kent
SM243
Kristy
Key West heading N to St Michaels MD in a week or so


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator replacement

Willem Kroes
 

Hi Rink,

 

I have the same problem. Not that the alternator is not working, but I want a spare one and also a smart external regulator that is programmed for my new Lithium Iron Phosphate batteries.

 

I also asked the Amel community, but there was no reaction.

 

Next week I will go to my boat in NW Spain (at dry standing there at the moment), driving my own car with a new dinghy (WalkerBay Rid) on the trailer. I will stay there one week and will bring the alternator with me back to the Netherlands. Early May I will go back to the boat by plane and bring the alternator with me and may be also the new one. So by the end of April I certainly know what model will fit. One other thing is also important. Lots of alternators are case grounded and what you need in the Amel is an isolated alternator, because the engine only has a ground connection at the moment of starting and that of stopping (therefore there are diodes installed in the wiring of the starter). With a case grounded alternator you will make the specific electric wiring in the Amel more or less worthless.

 

Kind regards,

 

Willem Kroes

 

SM# 351 KAVANGA

 

Van: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...>
Verzonden: maandag 12 februari 2018 17:29
Aan: amelyachtowners@...
Onderwerp: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator replacement

 

 

The 24V alternator on my Yanmar 4JH3TE engine (2001) needs replacement. I can't decipher the model and make of it.

Does anyone recently replaced it and /or have a recommendation for this?

I am currently in Greece (Lefkada) and the local repair shop is struggling with it.

 

Many thanks

Rink de Haan

SY Razor's Edge

Amel SM2K #330


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM Keel bolts

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Eric and Mike,

We replaced ours with a 3mm copper strap bent to Bill Rouse's dimensions...it needs to last...

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

ngtnewington Newington
 

I agree with Jean, and have done a few miles (two circumnavigations plus).
In addition the ballast ratio is a mere 27% unladen with cruising gear.  Fully loaded she will be down to 25% or less.
So I fear that Amel are moving their focus from the true voyaging market to the mass market.

Nick (Amelia #54)


On 1 Apr 2018, at 10:46, 'Jean Boucharlat' jean.boucharlat@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Dear All,

 

This is my take on the new Amel 50:

 

I am yet to read the article in Yachting World but would agree very much with everything Pip Hare is reported to have said. She is an extremely competent and courageous sailor but, unfortunately, she is not the right person to assess a cruising boat.

 

As to my credentials: over the years I have owned 4 boats, two of them bought ne w from Amel, a Maramu in October 1981 and a SM in July 1998. Both were the best boats I ever owned or sailed on and I am a great fan of the Amel philosophy. The basic tenet of this philosophy is that a boat should take good care of whoever is on board. This breaks down into two components, at sea, be safe and reasonably comfortable, at anchor, be comfortable and relatively easy to maintain and, in both situations be, as much as possible, not dependent on shore facilities.

 

Now, twice I went to La Rochelle to be given a tour of the new 50 and I came out saying to the yard management that I would not buy one. I agree that she is very well built, like all past Amels, and she is more “modern” in many respects than her predecessors, but, in reality, she is a luxurious Beneteau, good for extended week-end sailing but not much more. Why? Here are my gripes:

 

1) Rig: she is a singlesticker, not a good choice for any cruising boat over 45 feet. One loses too much in terms of versatility of sail combinations. On top of it she has a self-tacking staysail. Ridiculous!

 

2) Cockpit: not one single locker in the cockpit, where the SM had 3. When at sea if one needs a rope, a shackle, a bucket, a block, anything, one has to fetch them from the lazarette. Unacceptable! Henri Amel was adamant that anyone could sail his boats without ever having to leave the safety of the cockpit.

 

3) Hull shape: in line with current architects thinking (could it be a fad?), the 50 has a very wide stern and two side rudders. No skegs, very exposed both to flotsam and to submerged lines particularly in Med style marina moorings. Also, maneuverability in reverse suffers considerably even with a bow-thruster.

 

4) Layout:

- Cabins: too many of them, on a 50 footer you don’t need 3 cabins and you certainly do not need two of them with centerline berths. Here again, Henri Amel considered that his boats should not be dormitories but should accommodate, on any tack, about 3 people sleeping plus one on watch. On the 50, at sea, only the rear cabin center berth can realistically be used. Do you want to have to sleep there with anyone else than your wife or girl friend?

- Saloon: wide and beautiful at anchor, wide and treacherous at sea. Not one single handhold to help you keep your balance.

- Kitchen: now located in the passageway to the rear cabin. This does away with the most comfortable berth at sea, puts the cook in a hot and stuffy area at a distance from the cockpit and makes for an athwart-ships drawer-fridge that will not open on port tack and will spill all of its contents on starboard tack.

- Sump: was unpleasant but relatively easy to access on Maramu’s and SM’s, became more awkward on the 54 and is well nigh impossible on the 50. Quite a few issues looming do wn there in the dark!

 

OK, so I am an old curmudgeon, but I loved my Amel’s, admired the yard and made friends with many terrific people there . Over the past 10 years, starting with the 55, sadly I have seen the yard drifting away from the principles established by Henri Amel. I consider this a terrible loss to the cruising community as I do not know of any other yard in the world building any boat coming close to the concept ant the quality of the Amel’s of the past.

 

Requiescat in pace,

 

Jean Boucharlat

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: samedi 31 mars 2018 13:45
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

 

 

Hi All,

 

 There is a great review of the Amel 50 in April's Yachting World--she's on the front cover as well.

 

The reviewer is Pip Hare. We first met Pip in Piriapolis , Uruguay, where she had sailed two handed in The Shed,  an Oyster 37 which had seen better days. She decided to do the OSTAR, the single-handed transatlantic race, so she sailed back singlehanded from Uruguay to UK and set off on the race. Somewhere to the west of Ireland a lower shroud parted. Mast swaying,  she nursed the boat back to a bay on the south cost of Ireland where her father rowed out to her with a new stay. She wasn't allowed shore assistance beyond that ,so she had to rerig the boat herself . She set off in pursuit of her class who by now had 2-3 days lead on her. She overhauled most of them.

 Pip went on to compete  successfully in those crazy 30 footers which the French love, on races like the Route du Rhum and is probably at her happiest single handed in mid-Atlantic up to her waist in cold sea water, in the dark,  in the cockpit having just broached while trying to maintain 17 knots when her competitors have eased back to 10.

 

 So, you might wonder what on earth she would make of the Amel 50.  It was December,  dark, wet and windy off La Rochelle. She confesses that did feel overdressed sitting in the cockpit in her salopettes and seaboots ( remember them ?) with warmth rising from the saloon together with the aroma of bread and fresh coffee...

 

 Her conclusion:  " I can't sit on the fence about the Amel 50; it's a brilliant boat.........I arrived with some heavy preconceptions, perhaps about as much as the kind of sailor I am as the kind of boat I would be sailing. I was treated to the full Amel experience.... but if you take away the fine food, endless expressos and crisp white bed linen, the Amel still shines. It sails well, it is beautifully built and it made me smile. I left surprised and ever so slightly in love & quot;

 

 Praise indeed ! I think the La Rochelle yard is going to be very busy.

 

 Ian and Judy,

 Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM Keel bolts

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Eric,


 Great minds think alike-- I have also used a strip 1/8" thick and am going to join it to the existing top half which is in good condition.


Wish I had your retriever on board--just hope I won't need it. Lots of Ducktape should do the trick


Ian



From: amelyachtowners@... on behalf of 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: 31 March 2018 17:44:36
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM Keel bolts
 


Hi Ian,

I know there Is a drawing of the bonding strap is somewhere in the photos or possibly the files section of the Amel website.

 

I made mine out of a very thick wide piece of copper plate probably thicker than 1/8 of an inch.

To save a lot of soldering, I cut the top of the old bonding strap off and

soldered and bolted the old top of the plate, with wires attached, to the new strap. You need a torch to do this.

 

I do recall I used a 30 mm socket to remove the nut. However I do not remember the diameter of the bolt. It was at least 25 mm.

 

I used a large socket wrench with a number of extensions attached to remove and replace the nut. I taped the extensions together so they would not separate while working with the nut. Once the nut was removed I used a grabber tool to recover the nut.

 

It looks like this- https://www.homedepot.com/p/GrabEasy-Grabber-and-Retriever-PF0401/202505170.

You need a long one. It has come in handy over the years to recover other stuff dropped into the bilge.

 

To replace the nut I just put some masking tape over the edges of the nut and the socket. It was rather easy.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Saturday, March 31, 2018 1:06 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM Keel bolts

 

 

Hi Ian,

 

Just completed the job in Port Grimaud.

 

On hull 461 we required a 30mm “deep reach” socket to undo the keel bolt.

 

The hole in the copper strip we used was 2mm diameter.

 

We had our strip made up in UK for £120 including all the drilling, bending and delivery.

 

If you are in UK give me a call and I’ll talk you through our experience.  You should have our card somewhere.

 

Regards

 

Mike

 

Solitude

SM2K 461


On 31 Mar 2018, at 16:32, Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 Hi all,

 

Does anyone know the diameter of the keel bolt in the grey water bilge in the engine room of an SM ? I am making up the copper strip that bolts on to the aft bolt but I'm not on board and don't know how big to make the hole on the copper strip.

 

     Ian and Judy,

 Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM Keel bolts

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Mike,


 Yes, I did spot that 2mm was on the small side! I have left your phone number on the boat. Can you send it to me at   penazen@... ?


Ian




From: amelyachtowners@...
Sent: 31 March 2018 17:31:26
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] SM Keel bolts
 


Hi Ian,

Hole size should read 22mm

On 31 Mar 2018, at 18:05, Mike Johnson mike.k.johnson@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Ian,

Just completed the job in Port Grimaud.

On hull 461 we required a 30mm “deep reach” socket to undo the keel bolt.

The hole in the copper strip we used was 2mm diameter.

We had our strip made up in UK for £120 including all the drilling, bending and delivery.

If you are in UK give me a call and I’ll talk you through our experience.  You should have our card somewhere.

Regards

Mike

Solitude
SM2K 461

On 31 Mar 2018, at 16:32, Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 Hi all,


Does anyone know the diameter of the keel bolt in the grey water bilge in the engine room of an SM ? I am making up the copper strip that bolts on to the aft bolt but I'm not on board and don't know how big to make the hole on the copper strip.


     Ian and Judy,

 Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

Jean Boucharlat
 

Dear All,

 

This is my take on the new Amel 50:

 

I am yet to read the article in Yachting World but would agree very much with everything Pip Hare is reported to have said. She is an extremely competent and courageous sailor but, unfortunately, she is not the right person to assess a cruising boat.

 

As to my credentials: over the years I have owned 4 boats, two of them bought new from Amel, a Maramu in October 1981 and a SM in July 1998. Both were the best boats I ever owned or sailed on and I am a great fan of the Amel philosophy. The basic tenet of this philosophy is that a boat should take good care of whoever is on board. This breaks down into two components, at sea, be safe and reasonably comfortable, at anchor, be comfortable and relatively easy to maintain and, in both situations be, as much as possible, not dependent on shore facilities.

 

Now, twice I went to La Rochelle to be given a tour of the new 50 and I came out saying to the yard management that I would not buy one. I agree that she is very well built, like all past Amels, and she is more “modern” in many respects than her predecessors, but, in reality, she is a luxurious Beneteau, good for extended week-end sailing but not much more. Why? Here are my gripes:

 

1) Rig: she is a singlesticker, not a good choice for any cruising boat over 45 feet. One loses too much in terms of versatility of sail combinations. On top of it she has a self-tacking staysail. Ridiculous!

 

2) Cockpit: not one single locker in the cockpit, where the SM had 3. When at sea if one needs a rope, a shackle, a bucket, a block, anything, one has to fetch them from the lazarette. Unacceptable! Henri Amel was adamant that anyone could sail his boats without ever having to leave the safety of the cockpit.

 

3) Hull shape: in line with current architects thinking (could it be a fad?), the 50 has a very wide stern and two side rudders. No skegs, very exposed both to flotsam and to submerged lines particularly in Med style marina moorings. Also, maneuverability in reverse suffers considerably even with a bow-thruster.

 

4) Layout:

- Cabins: too many of them, on a 50 footer you don’t need 3 cabins and you certainly do not need two of them with centerline berths. Here again, Henri Amel considered that his boats should not be dormitories but should accommodate, on any tack, about 3 people sleeping plus one on watch. On the 50, at sea, only the rear cabin center berth can realistically be used. Do you want to have to sleep there with anyone else than your wife or girl friend?

- Saloon: wide and beautiful at anchor, wide and treacherous at sea. Not one single handhold to help you keep your balance.

- Kitchen: now located in the passageway to the rear cabin. This does away with the most comfortable berth at sea, puts the cook in a hot and stuffy area at a distance from the cockpit and makes for an athwart-ships drawer-fridge that will not open on port tack and will spill all of its contents on starboard tack.

- Sump: was unpleasant but relatively easy to access on Maramu’s and SM’s, became more awkward on the 54 and is well nigh impossible on the 50. Quite a few issues looming down there in the dark!

 

OK, so I am an old curmudgeon, but I loved my Amel’s, admired the yard and made friends with many terrific people there . Over the past 10 years, starting with the 55, sadly I have seen the yard drifting away from the principles established by Henri Amel. I consider this a terrible loss to the cruising community as I do not know of any other yard in the world building any boat coming close to the concept ant the quality of the Amel’s of the past.

 

Requiescat in pace,

 

Jean Boucharlat

 

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: samedi 31 mars 2018 13:45
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

 

 

Hi All,

 

 There is a great review of the Amel 50 in April's Yachting World--she's on the front cover as well.

 

The reviewer is Pip Hare. We first met Pip in Piriapolis , Uruguay, where she had sailed two handed in The Shed,  an Oyster 37 which had seen better days. She decided to do the OSTAR, the single-handed transatlantic race, so she sailed back singlehanded from Uruguay to UK and set off on the race. Somewhere to the west of Ireland a lower shroud parted. Mast swaying,  she nursed the boat back to a bay on the south cost of Ireland where her father rowed out to her with a new stay. She wasn't allowed shore assistance beyond that ,so she had to rerig the boat herself . She set off in pursuit of her class who by now had 2-3 days lead on her. She overhauled most of them.

 Pip went on to compete  successfully in those crazy 30 footers which the French love, on races like the Route du Rhum and is probably at her happiest single handed in mid-Atlantic up to her waist in cold sea water, in the dark,  in the cockpit having just broached while trying to maintain 17 knots when her competitors have eased back to 10.

 

 So, you might wonder what on earth she would make of the Amel 50.  It was December,  dark, wet and windy off La Rochelle. She confesses that did feel overdressed sitting in the cockpit in her salopettes and seaboots ( remember them ?) with warmth rising from the saloon together with the aroma of bread and fresh coffee...

 

 Her conclusion:  " I can't sit on the fence about the Amel 50; it's a brilliant boat.........I arrived with some heavy preconceptions, perhaps about as much as the kind of sailor I am as the kind of boat I would be sailing. I was treated to the full Amel experience.... but if you take away the fine food, endless expressos and crisp white bed linen, the Amel still shines. It sails well, it is beautifully built and it made me smile. I left surprised and ever so slightly in love "

 

 Praise indeed ! I think the La Rochelle yard is going to be very busy.

 

 Ian and Judy,

 Pen Azen, SM 302, Preveza, Greece


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat re-charging

Mark & Debbie Mueller
 

The low pressure tap connects to the compressor case directly.  Mine is located on the dome of the compressor. 

Mark Mueller
A54 - 68, Brass Ring
Ft. Lauderdale


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -

tfortner1975
 

Hi Warren,

We are checking into the Marina today and will have a look around this evening if you’re about. 

On Mar 23, 2018, at 3:37 PM, 'Warren Traill' trailz@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks Trevor. It would be very interesting to meet you. We will be on the hardstand at Rebak from March 31st to April 10th.

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups..com]
Sent: Friday, 23 March 2018 3:21 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -

 

 

Hello Warren,

 

Just checked out today and plan on departing tomorrow for Langkawi.  We should be down there in a couple days. I’ll keep an eye out for you and look forward to meeting up. 

 

Email is: sviris1990 at gmail 

 

Trevor 

SV Iris, SN027

Ao Chalong Bay, Phuket


On Mar 23, 2018, at 1:18 PM, 'Warren Traill' trailz@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Trevor. We are on our Sharki #15. We’ve been cruising West coast Thailand/Langkawi for some time. We are also considering the east rally and will be at Rebak next week. Are you guys in that area?

Cheers,

Warren and Zetta

Manon2

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 21 March 2018 4:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -

 

 

Hello Eric,

 

Congratulations on the little one! 

 

Our daughter was born in July (in the UK) last year and arrived on the boat 2 months later (in Phuket).  

 

We’ve been living full time and traveling coastal. We are about to do the Passage to the East Rally which heads down the Straight to Singapore and then over to Borneo.  

 

As you can imagine my wife has had some concerns with an infant on a boat. 

 

I’m sure you’ve thought of most of these items but here is a quick list that has affected us. 

 

- It is pretty much child proof already (no low sockets, locking doors and cabinets, rounded edges etc. 

- We are in a Santorin so the berthing might be different. Our aft cabin had a small cushioned section with a leeboard on the starboard side.  I relocated it a foot more inboard and now my kid has her own bed in our cabin with all sides protecting her from rolling out - she’s now a week shy of 8 months and pulling herself over them so we are getting two Lee cloths sown up.  One for her bed and the other for the bunk in the saloon.  You might opt for the pilot bunk though. 

- We bought a Salus Infant Vest for her once she was 6 months. She uses this to chill in the water with us.  A great vest for kids as no matter how they enter the water they end up face up.  I’ve tested it well and am positive it works. 

- In the tender we strap her in a chest harness to one of us.. We are both competent swimmers and while she is attached our only role is to look after her. No other tender duties. Not that we couldn’t but even a simple task of tying up to the dock is not worth it. A slip of the foot in the wet dinghy, you’d fall forward and crush her. So we just play it safe and make sure there is always positive control. 

- We don’t have as much space as an SM so we opted for a small umbrella type stroller. We would prefer something larger that would recline back so she could sleep / nap when we are off the boat. 

- Welcome to single handling everything.  That kid is a non stop attention taker.  Not by choice, it’s just an infant that poops by itself.  That’s the only thing it does on its own. Everything else is on us. So one of us is off boat duty and on kid duty.  So night passages are almost a no go for us at the moment.  As neither one of us gets an ‘off watch’ time to sleep ourselves. So we plan our passages accordingly. 

- Car seat.  We have a quality seat that gets strapped down in the saloon and she gets strapped in it should the weather get bad or I absolutely need a hand with something. We do not strap her to us and try to multi task the boat duties. 

- A hammock in the shade of the cockpit for naps and such. So she isn’t always down below by herself. 

- A small portable chair that sets on a seat.  Like a high chair, minus the legs.  

- Food and nappies.  Plan well.  We are in Southeast Asia and trying to find things my wife is happy with is time consuming and costly when we do find some imported items.  I suppose this is dependent on your location though.  

- Shots. If you’re electing to get shots for the kid plan out the locations.  As the shots are given based on the age of the kid. 

- Passport right away for foreign travel

- Ro Sham Bo sunglasses for infants (when she leaves them on). 

- A large umbrella for tender travel. 

 

Good luck and enjoy. 

 

Trevor

Iris, SN 027

Phuket

 

 


On Mar 12, 2018, at 7:25 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Good morning Eric,

First of all congratulations for little Nolan coming this June !!!

I love the Bahamas.
Just like you I work so internet is important to me.

One of my favorite place is Port Lucaya in Grand Bahama because of the reasonable monthly marina rate, access to groceries and other infrastructure, etc.
In 2014 I spent 4 months in Port Lucaya Marina / Yacht Club and paid $600/month.
In 2015 I spent 3 months in Taino Beach (also in Port Lucaya) which became my favorite and paid $540/month.
Because of their huge pool with a some shallow area, I am certain you, Viki and especially little Nolan will love this place!
I can look for pictures to send you.
The beach 3 minutes walk away from the marina, they are places to walk, lay down, etc.
They also loan you towels for a $10 deposit and you can exchange them as often as you want, which you will realize is a considerable saving on laundry/generator time especially with the little one!..
I used my bicycle to go grocery shopping, but they have a bus going twice a week. In the super market you will find groceries as well as baby supplies.
I can not imagine a better place for you and your family.
Regarding the draft, you will have to wait almost “mid tide” to enter/leave the Bell Channel.
Port Lucaya is only 90 NM from Miami/Fort Lauderdale, so less than a day trip should you need to go. They i also an international airport.

Later in I also suggest you spend 1 months in Great Harbor Cay in the Berry Island. It is an overnight trip from Grand Bahama.
I was there in low season so the price was $540/month, the prices are higher now, but I think you can negotiate and you get a discount with Active Captain.
Surprisingly the internet was the best I have seen in the Bahamas.
There was no issue to enter the channel even at low tide..
The beach was 20 minutes walk from the marina. They loan you bicycle if you don’t have any, the water is clearest I have seen.
There was no real grocery store some come prepared, therefore the fishermen come back every afternoon with 250 to 250 lobsters and sell you “tail only” for $10/lbs. Sailing along the coast is excellent for fishing!

As Nolan grows up (but wait him to be tall enough for all the ride), then a stop in Atlantis is a must. Not sure who will like the place the most Nolan or dad! But it is quite expensive per day. Nassau is an overnight trip from the Berry Island.
There is no worry for the draft. Atlantis is also very protected from Hurricane.

Hope that helps, please feel free to contact me directly if you want pictures of the places.

Enjoy your trip!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 3/11/18, ericmeury@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, March 11, 2018, 11:18 PM


 









Hello amel family.
Viki and I are expecting (this is
why the boat is on the hard right now) our first little crew
member    
Nolan
(insert middle name)  Meury will be arriving this
June.  
Our plan is
to spend November and December around Stuart Florida as
Nolan will be signed up for infant water survival classes
there.  Then we are thinking of heading the bahamas for a
month and then back to GA where we will keep the boat for
the next hurricane season..
I have two requirements for the
bahamas...
1.  Some place that has access
to mobile internet or awesome wifi as i still have to work m
start up (www.pascalworkflow.com) and my tax
practice.  
2.  Some place that we don't
have to worry about draft (marsh harbor or Georgetown? -
other ideas)

Also would love some Amel specific
or non amel specific for those that have had their baby on
board.
Thanks
again





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat re-charging

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Paul;

If I recall correctly, the amount of refrigerant is extremely hard to adjust in the field. This was due to the small amount of refrigerant in the unit. Again, if memory serves, the article said that it needs to be done in a very controlled "lab" type environment at the factory.

The main take was, Do not allow any "A/C expert" add refrigerant in the field.

Respectfully;


Mohammad

On Mar 31, 2018, at 5:22 PM, sharongbrown@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Mohammed,

Thanks. I have in fact comae across this and it does seem like a good diagnostic guide but it does not tell me how much refrigerant to put in.

Cheers,
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat re-charging

ya_fohi
 

Thanks Bill. I did finally find some instructions here

https://www.sailmagazine.com/diy/recharge-your-refrigerator-2

Only thing is that this is for a Danfoss system. I just need to identify the low pressure connection on my Frigoboat system.

Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98