Date   

Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Duane Siegfri
 

Ryan,

One other thing I wanted to add: never use any hardware on the end of the halyard to attach yourself.  Always tie a figure 8 knot that leaves a bight on the end of the line.  You can leave the hardware on the bitter end, just down attach to it.  Use a locking carabiner meant for climbing to attach the bight to your harness/bosuns chair. 

Using the hardware on the end of a halyard leaves too many failure points, the shackle, the knot attaching the shackle, and there may be wear in the line where the line bears on the shackle.  Use a figure 8 tied in a bight instead.  

There are many videos on Youtube showing how to tie a figure 8 in a bight for climbing.

Duane


Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Duane Siegfri
 

Ryan,

I'll second the "don't use the external halyard" advice.

I have had one external halyard block fail in my 28 years of sailing, it rained down plastic and metal all over the deck.  Luckily no one was on it, only the dinghy and it was still over the side.

You should always have a safety line as well.  I use another halyard that I fix in place (a static line), and then use a Prusik loop to a separate carabiner.  To be a true safety, the carabiner should be attached to a separate harness other than what the dynamic (hauling) line is attached to.  Also, if the dynamic line were to fail, how would you get down?  You've used all the halyards so rescue is going to be complicated and may take a long time.

I bring along a descender so I could get down without help if I had to.  You might check out the Petzyl Grigri 2.  You can clip it on to the static line and then lower yourself with it.  There is a good Youtube video, search for "Mast climbing with a grigri by allen edwards".

Be safe!
Duane


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator replacement

Rink De Haan
 

Thanks Bill. I’ll check availability in Europe.
Check: is 175 AMP not too much for a 75HP Yanmar?

Regards
Rink
SM2K #330 Razor’s Edge
Lefkas Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: Monday, April 2, 2018 8:51:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Alternator replacement
 
 

Rink,

This is what you need:
Leece-Neville 175 amp voltage alternator Model no. 8SC3009ZA Regulator Model 8RL3021 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970


On Mon, Feb 12, 2018 at 10:29 AM, Rink de Haan rinkdehaan@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

The 24V alternator on my Yanmar 4JH3TE engine (2001) needs replacement. I can't decipher the model and make of it.
Does anyone recently replaced it and /or have a recommendation for this?
I am currently in Greece (Lefkada) and the local repair shop is struggling with it.

Many thanks
Rink de Haan
SY Razor's Edge
Amel SM2K #330





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Ryan,

I can answer your last question personally. To go up the mizzen I unfurl and drop the mizzen sail and use that internal halyard. On Ocean Pearl it is a full length halyard. I have an aversion to using external halyards to pull people up masts, its a long way down.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 04 April 2018 at 05:21 "Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi all,
I'm refreshing much of my running rigging, and I just did a deep-dive into the halyards on mizzen and I'm confused by the numbers I'm seeing in that running rigging spreadsheet we've all seen.  It lists the mizzen ballooner halyard as 28m, and I've estimated the mizzen utility halyard (the one that goes to the spreaders; it doesn't seem to be in the spreadsheet) at 15m.  I haven't found anything more detailed than the spreadsheet by searching this group's archives.

The ballooner halyard seems like a fine length for its intended purpose, given the mizzen's height of 14m above DWL, but there doesn't seem to be enough extra to lead it to the block on the end of the mizzen boom and then down to the water to lift something (or someone, as has been discussed in the other thread going on).  Does anyone have a suggestion for a more practical length on this halyard, or is the listed length good for this purpose?

Likewise, my estimate for my utility halyard seems too short to use the mizzen boom as a lift; how long is yours?

And finally, if you wanted to climb to the top of the mizzenmast, how would you clip on?  The ballooner halyard is the natural choice, but I don't feel comfortable using only a single halyard.  Given that the mizzensail halyard requires an extension, I don't think it would be safe to use that either, as then you're trusting the extension attachment (some stitched twine and electrical tape, in my case).  Thoughts?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

 


 


Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Paul Osterberg
 

Ryan
We use the mizzen halyard, but it is cumbersome as you have to take down the mizzen first. I have ordered a Block with a center hole through the sheave, available from several manufacturer I will use that for the balloner halyard and attache it with a normal shackle but also with a dyneema loop through the block sheave, that will give me an extra security if the block or Shackle fail the halyard will still be held up by the dyneema loop.
As extra security one can have a sling around the mast .
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM #259


lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Ryan Meador
 

Hi all,
I'm refreshing much of my running rigging, and I just did a deep-dive into the halyards on mizzen and I'm confused by the numbers I'm seeing in that running rigging spreadsheet we've all seen.  It lists the mizzen ballooner halyard as 28m, and I've estimated the mizzen utility halyard (the one that goes to the spreaders; it doesn't seem to be in the spreadsheet) at 15m.  I haven't found anything more detailed than the spreadsheet by searching this group's archives.

The ballooner halyard seems like a fine length for its intended purpose, given the mizzen's height of 14m above DWL, but there doesn't seem to be enough extra to lead it to the block on the end of the mizzen boom and then down to the water to lift something (or someone, as has been discussed in the other thread going on).  Does anyone have a suggestion for a more practical length on this halyard, or is the listed length good for this purpose?

Likewise, my estimate for my utility halyard seems too short to use the mizzen boom as a lift; how long is yours?

And finally, if you wanted to climb to the top of the mizzenmast, how would you clip on?  The ballooner halyard is the natural choice, but I don't feel comfortable using only a single halyard.  Given that the mizzensail halyard requires an extension, I don't think it would be safe to use that either, as then you're trusting the extension attachment (some stitched twine and electrical tape, in my case).  Thoughts?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


Re: Costa Rica

mfmcgovern@...
 

Jeff,

I have not sailed this stretch of water but as James said, SV Totem just did it.  You can see their track here:  http://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/Totem

Here is their description of the strategy they employed for this trip:

It's called the "one foot on the beach" strategy. Holding close to shore, as little as 1/4 mile off, effectively reduces the fetch required to make waves. Waves form from wind over distance - fetch refers to how much distance. No fetch, no waves. It does come with some risk: fishing nets and long lines, imprecise charts, and small boat traffic require attentiveness and daylight travel only. This will be a motorboat ride only - no sailing. Papagayos and other "gap winds" come in pulses. So can be sitting at 20 knots for 1/2 hour and then without warning gust over 40 or 50 knots. Even reefed the risk of boat-handling drama so close to the beach makes it imprudent. At the end of the day we anchor for the night - and always anchor like there will be 50 knots of wind, because sometimes there will be!

You can see from their track that they made landfall in southern Mexico so the strategy apparently worked!  Hope this helps.

Mark
SM #440 Cara
Deale, MD
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: PredictWind

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi Pat,

We used PW for routing with 54 polars and found them very optimistic. Maybe we are conservative sailors but we had to set the polar ratio to 80% to get realistic times. 

As far as the weather forecast is concerned, it's very similar to other software, we found. It mostly uses the same grib sources, so not too surprising, I guess. Windy shows better accuracy in the Caribbean, especially to understand the wind shifts in the channels and in the leeway of the islands. 

Thomas
Garulfo
A54 #122
Cruising Saint Martin, FWI



On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 at 11:07, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Pat,

I agree that PW isn't always spot on.  I look at Passageweather.com and windyty.com as well as PW before a passage.  There is often at least one outlier but a pretty good sense of what is going to happen can be gleaned from all that info.  The timing of wind shifts can be 12+hrs off, and wind speeds can be 10kts off (either way), but so far I haven't wished I'd waited for another window.  If even one model was predicting 30+kts, I'd either wait or call Chris Parker.

Hi to Diane!

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Costa Rica

James Studdart
 

Hi Jeff,
The well known cruising yacht “Totem” is doing this at the moment. They have blog and most likely will write up the experience as they go or just after.

Cheers,
James.

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 03:22 jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Good Morning Amelians,

I was wondering if anyone has run up the Pacific coast up to Costa Rica after transiting the PC?

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


Re: Introduction and Finding Furling Motor Parts (Amel 54)

cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...>
 

Great, thanks! Exactly what I was looking for.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: PredictWind

karkauai
 

Hi Pat,

I agree that PW isn't always spot on.  I look at Passageweather.com and windyty.com as well as PW before a passage.  There is often at least one outlier but a pretty good sense of what is going to happen can be gleaned from all that info.  The timing of wind shifts can be 12+hrs off, and wind speeds can be 10kts off (either way), but so far I haven't wished I'd waited for another window.  If even one model was predicting 30+kts, I'd either wait or call Chris Parker.

Hi to Diane!

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

Ian Townsend
 

Though it may be a different market, we should all be hopeful that AMEL succeeds with this new design. Both for their sake and ours. They are good people who deserve respect and continued success . Too many good yards have gone away. And we rely on them (as well as each other) to help keep us current owners stay out here enjoying la belle vie.

Ian
S/V Loca Lola II 
SM153

On Apr 3, 2018, at 9:48 AM, steve b stevect@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi All,
          Having spent some time visiting the Amel factory last week and looking at the production of the Amel 50, all i can add is the dedication and attention to detail is still extremely evident.

Everyone we met and talked to were extremely proud of the new Amel 50, yes time will tell how this yacht will perform and hold up to the rigors of ocean crossings etc

 I am most certainly not as qualified as some of you to agree or disagree with regards to the  performance and design of this yacht, however Technology moves on as do designs  but  the commitment, and passion, and use of quality materials, attention to detail were evident throughout our visit.

Good luck to all the Amel  staff a bold move and one which i hope pays off and ensures the future of Amel.

Stevect

And a big thanks to Jean-jacques  for taking the time out to show us around.a highlight of our trip.

On Tuesday, 3 April 2018, 14:32:49 SAST, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 

Thank you Ian and Judy for the heads up about the review.

I read Hare's article and appreciated her point of view.  She mentions the weaknesses of the design: high windage, required reliance on the bowthruster, defective passageway to the forward cabins while underway (which the company claims to have addressed in builds posterior to the hull sailed), and incomplete views of the sails, despite the pillarless windshield design and supplied cockpit roof hatches.

All boats are an exercise in compromises.

She also goes over the joys of it all:  the superior performance under all wind conditions, the riches of sailplan options, the joys of the enclosed cockpit, the ease of maintenance, the design details so the kitchen can be used in either tack, the trademark 5-star hotel experience, etc.

We haven't yet sailed the 50, though we did sail the 55 a few years ago.  My take is that these boats are what an updated Amel is supposed to look, perform, and work like.  Put another way: the 64, 55, and 50 are modern versions of what the Santorin Ketch and other Amels once were, decades ago.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K Nr. 350 (2002)
Underway, Crete to Sicily


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

Steve Bell s/y Dusk SM378
 

Hi All,
          Having spent some time visiting the Amel factory last week and looking at the production of the Amel 50, all i can add is the dedication and attention to detail is still extremely evident.

Everyone we met and talked to were extremely proud of the new Amel 50, yes time will tell how this yacht will perform and hold up to the rigors of ocean crossings etc

 I am most certainly not as qualified as some of you to agree or disagree with regards to the  performance and design of this yacht, however Technology moves on as do designs  but  the commitment, and passion, and use of quality materials, attention to detail were evident throughout our visit.

Good luck to all the Amel  staff a bold move and one which i hope pays off and ensures the future of Amel.

Stevect

And a big thanks to Jean-jacques  for taking the time out to show us around.a highlight of our trip.

On Tuesday, 3 April 2018, 14:32:49 SAST, svperegrinus@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Thank you Ian and Judy for the heads up about the review.

I read Hare's article and appreciated her point of view.  She mentions the weaknesses of the design: high windage, required reliance on the bowthruster, defective passageway to the forward cabins while underway (which the company claims to have addressed in builds posterior to the hull sailed), and incomplete views of the sails, despite the pillarless windshield design and supplied cockpit roof hatches.

All boats are an exercise in compromises.

She also goes over the joys of it all:  the superior performance under all wind conditions, the riches of sailplan options, the joys of the enclosed cockpit, the ease of maintenance, the design details so the kitchen can be used in either tack, the trademark 5-star hotel experience, etc.

We haven't yet sailed the 50, though we did sail the 55 a few years ago.  My take is that these boats are what an updated Amel is supposed to look, perform, and work like.  Put another way: the 64, 55, and 50 are modern versions of what the Santorin Ketch and other Amels once were, decades ago.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K Nr. 350 (2002)
Underway, Crete to Sicily


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] PredictWind

Brent Cameron
 


Re: PredictWind

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

There is a setting that you can use instead of actual polars where you more or less tell it how fast your boat goes under certain conditions.  Sort of the kid's version of the polars.  It's called "Sail", as opposed to "Predefined," which is where you find the '54.  We use "Sail".  It is what PW recommends for "cruising boats."

Since PW is not very accurate at all in the Med, what we do is we simply re-run and re-download the Weather Routing every few hours.  It's only usually like a 10K download: almost nothing.  Evidently you need to be under cellular range, or to have SSB or sat.  We have Iridium GO!

Peregrinus
SM2K #350 (2002)
Underway, Crete to Sicily



---In amelyachtowners@..., <sailw32@...> wrote :

I know many owners have PredictWind, a couple questions. Have you made passages following their routes, have they proved accurate. They  suggested using the 54's polars as they do not have it for the SM . Would they be similar enough to use for polars for the SM ? 

Thanks,

Pat SM#123


Re: PredictWind

Paul Osterberg
 

We use PW together with IGo very user friendly and good service. The problem I have is that you get 4 different forecasts, if I ask someone for an advice or opinion I want a straight answer, not four different. One can argue if three out of four show similar result thrust the three. I have at several occasions found that not to be true. Often when looking around you it does not blow as the PW routing forecast, then trusting the routing to send you to another point where the wind most likely is not what it is forecasted we tried but stoped very quick with that. When we make a longer crossing we set course so that our boat sails well and comfortable if the course is 20 or even 25 degree of corse we do not bother to much, sooner or later condition will give oss a cource that take us comfortable towards our destination. the forecast  we take for what it is an forecast, it gives the main direction and an aproximation of wind strength certainly very valuable and important for avoiding bad weather.

Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259


Costa Rica

JEFFREY KRAUS
 

Good Morning Amelians,

I was wondering if anyone has run up the Pacific coast up to Costa Rica after transiting the PC?

Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


PredictWind

Patrick McAneny
 

I know many owners have PredictWind, a couple questions. Have you made passages following their routes, have they proved accurate. They  suggested using the 54's polars as they do not have it for the SM . Would they be similar enough to use for polars for the SM ? 

Thanks,

Pat SM#123


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Amel 50 review

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

Thank you Ian and Judy for the heads up about the review.

I read Hare's article and appreciated her point of view.  She mentions the weaknesses of the design: high windage, required reliance on the bowthruster, defective passageway to the forward cabins while underway (which the company claims to have addressed in builds posterior to the hull sailed), and incomplete views of the sails, despite the pillarless windshield design and supplied cockpit roof hatches.

All boats are an exercise in compromises.

She also goes over the joys of it all:  the superior performance under all wind conditions, the riches of sailplan options, the joys of the enclosed cockpit, the ease of maintenance, the design details so the kitchen can be used in either tack, the trademark 5-star hotel experience, etc.

We haven't yet sailed the 50, though we did sail the 55 a few years ago.  My take is that these boats are what an updated Amel is supposed to look, perform, and work like.  Put another way: the 64, 55, and 50 are modern versions of what the Santorin Ketch and other Amels once were, decades ago.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K Nr. 350 (2002)
Underway, Crete to Sicily


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Oceanair Skyscreen

Paul Osterberg
 

This is the products we use keep mosquitoes out, it have even keep  some rats to stay In the cockpit, a few times we have found droppings from rats in the cockpit.


It is mesh fabric kept in place by lead weights type shotguns less

Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259

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