Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

James Alton
 

Ian,

   I am really glad to hear that your son was not injured when the 14mm halyard snapped.   I agree that  having a backup method of support when going aloft is a really good practice.  Normally it is just the wife and I  so I worry about her having to handle two separate halyards potentially increasing the odds of an accident.  Especially with a rolling boat, I think that staying focused on a single line could end up being safer than trying to handle two when short handed.  With three people it is of course quite simple to do and I do employ the second halyard. When it is just the two of us, I normally tie myself off to various points on the mast on the way up/ or slide a loop up the mast as appropriate for the particular spar as my backup.  I also go on the assumption that my wife could accidentally slip at any time so also keep a good grip on whatever is handy.  I maintain a good hold until she confirms that I have been tied off.  She has never slipped and neither have I but it only takes once to ruin your entire day….  

    I have never had a halyard break before but I am pretty careful about early replacement, good splices etc.  Even just basic Dacron sat-set in 14mm has a breaking strength of 11,700 pounds so I am normally much more concerned about the metal bits,  especially if they are stainless.  I have seen so many failures in stainless that often occurred at minimal loading in metal without obvious cracks.   The example I gave of the unused spinnaker block failing under light loading in my previous post was just one example.   With line, I feel pretty confident of the approximate strength after doing an inspection looking for chafe points etc. which I try to always do before going aloft.   I always tie across shackles and other hardware whenever possible to give me a backup as was suggested in an earlier post on this forum..very good advice IMO.  I also use either bronze or galvanized steel shackles on my bosun chair to attached the halyard rather than stainless.   One other thing that I always do before being hoisted, is to bounce as hard as possible in the bosuns chair before going up the mast which if nothing else makes me feel better about being aloft. (grin)  There are after all concealed attachments, stitching etc. in the bosuns chair itself to be concerned about as well and if they are going to break, better while I am down low..     Stay safe everyone and thanks for the discussion.  

Best,

James

SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Apr 4, 2018, at 9:56 PM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi James,
A climbing background always helps to think through a good backup system. When my son was 16 he went up the mast on a Jeaneau Sunfizz 40. It was an in mast 14mm halliard and it snapped as he was being lowered. He’s 42 now, thankfully as he was holding the intermediate stays and was just above the spreaders. It doesn’t matter if the halliard is in mast or external, you need a backup. 
Two handed I often go up the mast on two separate halliards tied down tight on a pair of jumars. I always have a long thin line with me in case I forget something and have to lower a line to have sent up in a plastic bag.
Simple message is don’t rely on a single rope, and always have a way to get something sent up to you if you get stuck. A single rope haul is prone to all sorts of problems.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Ian Park
 

Hi James,
A climbing background always helps to think through a good backup system. When my son was 16 he went up the mast on a Jeaneau Sunfizz 40. It was an in mast 14mm halliard and it snapped as he was being lowered. He’s 42 now, thankfully as he was holding the intermediate stays and was just above the spreaders. It doesn’t matter if the halliard is in mast or external, you need a backup.
Two handed I often go up the mast on two separate halliards tied down tight on a pair of jumars. I always have a long thin line with me in case I forget something and have to lower a line to have sent up in a plastic bag.
Simple message is don’t rely on a single rope, and always have a way to get something sent up to you if you get stuck. A single rope haul is prone to all sorts of problems.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

James Cromie
 

Whenever I go up the mast, I trail a static line attached to my harness that I can fix to the mast if I need to descend in the case of some problem that mandates coming off the winch system.  (deck hand incapacitated, mechanical failure of primary system, etc.)
For descending, one can use a munter hitch (or in my case, I keep a belay device always attached on my harness).  A munter hitch can be made without any additional hardware or devices except a carabiner (use locking) to attach to your harness.  This hitch is commonly used in mountain rescue scenarios.  

 It is important to always have a method of ascending / descending independently as a fall back plan.  

James
Soteria 
SM2K 347



On Apr 3, 2018, at 6:36 PM, Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


I prefer to use two halyards, both of them for hauling (no static line).  I don't see the advantage of using a static line vs just putting the prussik around the mast, so I use the line the way a halyard is meant to be used.  If both halyards are reasonably tight, it also greatly reduces the shock loading on the remaining one if one fails.  If one of the halyards is internal, I'm not terribly worried about the other being external (like on the mainmast).  But I don't have that option on the mizzenmast, unless I do as Danny did and have a full-length mizzen halyard made up (and drop the sail).  Surely, Henri Amel had a solution to this problem?  Or was he just comfortable going up on a single, external halyard?  I like Paul's idea of a dyneema loop through the shackle... that takes out one failure mode, though still leaves the possibility of the rope failing (or being let go).

On the lone occasion I've had to go up a mast on a single (internal) halyard, I used a prussik-like knot as a fall arrester.  It seems to be pretty safe (it can definitely take my weight dropping from the max distance I'd be before moving the knot), but if you actually need to use it, you're now stuck up there... I don't have a good solution for that.  I hope the local fire department does (and I'm at the dock)!  Or maybe the Coast Guard could send a helicopter? :D

Duane, thank you for the reminder about the figure-8 knot to tie onto the halyard.  I shouldn't have used the phrase "clip on".

Does anyone have recommended lengths for the ballooner and utility halyards that differ from what I wrote in my first message?  Should I just add a few meters to each?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 5:45 PM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

If I can’t use two halliards to ascend the mast I take two long loops of either tape or 8mm rope. A Prussik loop round the mast can be pushed up but holds under the tension of a fall. The second one is to attach above the spreaders so you never rely on just one attachment.
Prussik loops were used in climbing before ascenders were invented, but they do work around the dimension of a mast. Also useful as a foot loop to stand in if you want to get above the height of the mast to work.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96





Re: My first bow thruster service...

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Bill,

I'm also servicing my bow thruster for the first time. Wondering how yours went and whether you decided to use RTV everywhere? 

I'm also trying to figure out what the proper size is for the o-rings. Parts lists I've seen show 78 x 3 mm and 40 x 2.5 mm. Are the 78 and 40 the inner or outer diameters?

Also, any advice on where to find the 10mm neoprene seals? We're currently in the Fort Lauderdale area. Was thinking of getting a 10mm sheet and cutting seals from that.

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy SM#23


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine / cdrive adjustments?

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine / cdrive adjustments?

snw7tgmcrs6nmg5mdg55r3xpowhzm3kjxc2uqysc@...
 

Hello Phil!

During our circum navigation I had to install a new engine here in New Zealand. Now I do have a vibration on idle speed and on 1800 rpm. It doesn’t matter if the boat is in gear or out of gear.
Please could you explain how I can adjust or find out the right height of the c-drive? Unfortunately Amel didn’t answer my questions about that.

Thank you very much for your kind answer.

Greetings from Coromandel.

Hannes

SN 106 Cayenne


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

eric freedman
 

Bill,

Thanks.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 1:19 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Eric,

 


Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

 

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 11:39 AM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Colin,

What is a p79?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 10:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Hi Duane

 

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.

 

Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The u nit works perfectly like that.

 

Cheers

 

Colin - SV Island Pearl II

sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos

 

 

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill,

 

Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah



 

--

Colin Streeter

0411 016 445

 


Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Duane Siegfri
 

Ian,

I hadn't tried to tie a prusik around the mast, good idea!

One other way to tie yourself on to the dynamic line (the one going to a winch) is to tie a figure 8 with a three foot tail, put the tail thru the attachment point on your harness/bosuns chair, then take the tail and tie a "follow-on" figure 8 where the tail traces the lines of the figure 8 and you wind up with a figure 8 with a bight.  This way you don't need a carabiner.

Duane


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

Eric,


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 11:39 AM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Colin,

What is a p79?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 10:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Hi Duane

 

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.

 

Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The u nit works perfectly like that.

 

Cheers

 

Colin - SV Island Pearl II

sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos

 

 

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Bill,

 

Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah



 

--

Colin Streeter

0411 016 445



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

eric freedman
 

Hi Colin,

What is a p79?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 10:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Hi Duane

 

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.

 

Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The unit works perfectly like that.

 

Cheers

 

Colin - SV Island Pearl II

sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos

 

 

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill,

 

Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah



 

--

Colin Streeter

0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Duane

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.
 
Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The unit works perfectly like that.

Cheers

Colin - SV Island Pearl II
sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos



On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,


Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

 

Ryan,

Good points. I think two lines can be better than one line and a static line except in the situation where you only have a total of two crew members: 1 to go up and 1 to hoist.

And, the one thing most people don't think about is how to lower using only the static line with a person locked to the line with a weight activated cam cleat locked to the static line.

Don't forget that it is easy to drop the mizzen sail and use that mast-enclosed halyard. 

Regardless of the method used, be sure to think about everything, including what to do if an electric winch begins to runaway.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Tue, Apr 3, 2018, 17:58 James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Danny,


   I will second your concerns about using external halyards,  I avoid them as well and this started  even before the incident described to follow:  I once had the swivel of a spinnaker halyard part offshore which didn’t surprise me that much.  What did surprise me was that I replaced the broken block with an identical block that had been stored for some number of years in a drawer on the boat.  The block was still in it’s original packaging so unused, vintage unknown as this was a delivery job so not my boat.  The replacement block broke in exactly the same place when I tied off the spinnaker halyard with just a bit of tension added by hand.  The break was rusty and it looked like crevice corrosion of the stainless.  Thanks for bringing this danger to the attention of other Amelians.

Best,

James

SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Apr 3, 2018, at 1:34 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Ryan,

I can answer your last question personally. To go up the mizzen I unfurl and drop the mizzen sail and use that internal halyard. On Ocean Pearl it is a full length halyard. I have an aversion to using external halyards to pull people up masts, its a long way down.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 04 April 2018 at 05:21 "Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi all,
I'm refreshing much of my running rigging, and I just did a deep-dive into the halyards on mizzen and I'm confused by the numbers I'm seeing in that running rigging spreadsheet we've all seen.  It lists the mizzen ballooner halyard as 28m, and I've estimated the mizzen utility halyard (the one that goe s to the spreaders; it doesn't seem to be in the spreadsheet) at 15m.  I haven't found anything more detailed than the spreadsheet by searching this group's archives.

The ballooner halyard seems like a fine length for its intended purpose, given the mizzen's height of 14m above DWL, but there doesn't seem to be enough extra to lead it to the block on the end of the mizzen boom and then down to the water to lift something (or someone, as has been discussed in the other thread going on).  Does anyone have a suggestion for a more practical length on this halyard, or is the listed length good for this purpose?

Likewise, my estimate for my utility halyard seems too short to use the mizzen boom as a lift; how long is yours?

And finally, if you wanted to climb to the top of the mizzenmast, how would you clip on?  The ballooner halyard is the natural choice, but I don't feel comfortable using only a single halyard.  Given that the mizzensail halyard requires an extension, I don't think it would be safe to use that either, as then you're trusting the extension attachment (some stitched twine and electrical tape, in my case).  Thoughts?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

 


 




Spare Parts list / outside bulbs for SM2K

olaf_renos@...
 


Hello SM2K owners,

 

As some of you already knows I bought some weeks ago a SM2K.

 

Now I would like to know the required spare parts. Would you pls share your spare parts list with me to get a feeling what parts are required.

 

I also would like to know which bulbs () are installed/used outside (Watt, Size etc.), e.g. for the navigation light, anchor lights, deck light etc. Does anyone of you have list of all the bulbs?

 

Thanks so much in advance


Olaf

S/V Sayonara II, SM2K 392

currently in Martinique



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: PredictWind

Patrick McAneny
 

Colin, That is the kind of experience with it I was looking for. Their support seems good , I have not signed up yet but they offered  me the professional version to use for a couple of weeks to familiarize myself with it, problem is I am sitting in my office sailing routes vicariously .
Thanks,
Pat SM#123


-----Original Message-----
From: Sailing Island Pearl colin.d.streeter@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Apr 3, 2018 3:53 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: PredictWind

 
We use the PW professional package with ocean currents included, and have found this excellent in crossing the North Indian Ocean from Thailand to Maldives. In particular it was spot on for ocean currents and pretty good on winds, and we run an update every day via the IridiumGo to ensure that we are always in the best possible currents and wind.

Agree with the 80% ratio of the Amel 54 Polars. That has been what we ended up dialing it down to as well. At first I was annoyed that the Amel 54 appeared so much faster!!! ......but then realised this is based on best speed and sail plan always ...... and of course we are mere cruisers, sailing cautiously always to ensure our aging sails get us all the way around the world!.

We are not sure we can afford the PW professional package cost all the way around the world, (and certainly turned it off in Asia for 6 months when not doing ocean crossings) but this software has been a game changer for us and particularly worthwhile the cost for the Indian Ocean crossing so far. From Maldives we sail this month for Chagos, then on to Rodriguez, Mauritius, Madagascar and down to Cape Town etc.., so are very please to have the full PW package working on board.

Cheers
Colin - Island Pearl II - SM#332 - Maldives

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 2:35 AM, 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Hi Pat,

We used PW for routing with 54 polars and found them very optimistic. Maybe we are conservative sailors but we had to set the polar ratio to 80% to get realistic times. 

As far as the weather forecast is concerned, it's very similar to other software, we found. It mostly uses the same grib sources, so not too surprising, I guess. Windy shows better accuracy in the Caribbean, especially to understand the wind shifts in the channels and in the leeway of the islands. 

Thomas
Garulfo
A54 #122
Cruising Saint Martin, FWI



On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 at 11:07, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 
Hi Pat,

I agree that PW isn't always spot on.  I look at Passageweather.com and windyty.com as well as PW before a passage.  There is often at least one outlier but a pretty good sense of what is going to happen can be gleaned from all that info.  The timing of wind shifts can be 12+hrs off, and wind speeds can be 10kts off (either way), but so far I haven't wished I'd waited for another window.  If even one model was predicting 30+kts, I'd either wait or call Chris Parker.

Hi to Diane!

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

James Alton
 

Danny,

   I will second your concerns about using external halyards,  I avoid them as well and this started  even before the incident described to follow:  I once had the swivel of a spinnaker halyard part offshore which didn’t surprise me that much.  What did surprise me was that I replaced the broken block with an identical block that had been stored for some number of years in a drawer on the boat.  The block was still in it’s original packaging so unused, vintage unknown as this was a delivery job so not my boat.  The replacement block broke in exactly the same place when I tied off the spinnaker halyard with just a bit of tension added by hand.  The break was rusty and it looked like crevice corrosion of the stainless.  Thanks for bringing this danger to the attention of other Amelians.

Best,

James

SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Apr 3, 2018, at 1:34 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Ryan,

I can answer your last question personally. To go up the mizzen I unfurl and drop the mizzen sail and use that internal halyard. On Ocean Pearl it is a full length halyard. I have an aversion to using external halyards to pull people up masts, its a long way down.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 04 April 2018 at 05:21 "Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi all,
I'm refreshing much of my running rigging, and I just did a deep-dive into the halyards on mizzen and I'm confused by the numbers I'm seeing in that running rigging spreadsheet we've all seen.  It lists the mizzen ballooner halyard as 28m, and I've estimated the mizzen utility halyard (the one that goe s to the spreaders; it doesn't seem to be in the spreadsheet) at 15m.  I haven't found anything more detailed than the spreadsheet by searching this group's archives.

The ballooner halyard seems like a fine length for its intended purpose, given the mizzen's height of 14m above DWL, but there doesn't seem to be enough extra to lead it to the block on the end of the mizzen boom and then down to the water to lift something (or someone, as has been discussed in the other thread going on).  Does anyone have a suggestion for a more practical length on this halyard, or is the listed length good for this purpose?

Likewise, my estimate for my utility halyard seems too short to use the mizzen boom as a lift; how long is yours?

And finally, if you wanted to climb to the top of the mizzenmast, how would you clip on?  The ballooner halyard is the natural choice, but I don't feel comfortable using only a single halyard.  Given that the mizzensail halyard requires an extension, I don't think it would be safe to use that either, as then you're trusting the extension attachment (some stitched twine and electrical tape, in my case).  Thoughts?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

 


 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Ryan Meador
 

I prefer to use two halyards, both of them for hauling (no static line).  I don't see the advantage of using a static line vs just putting the prussik around the mast, so I use the line the way a halyard is meant to be used.  If both halyards are reasonably tight, it also greatly reduces the shock loading on the remaining one if one fails.  If one of the halyards is internal, I'm not terribly worried about the other being external (like on the mainmast).  But I don't have that option on the mizzenmast, unless I do as Danny did and have a full-length mizzen halyard made up (and drop the sail).  Surely, Henri Amel had a solution to this problem?  Or was he just comfortable going up on a single, external halyard?  I like Paul's idea of a dyneema loop through the shackle... that takes out one failure mode, though still leaves the possibility of the rope failing (or being let go).

On the lone occasion I've had to go up a mast on a single (internal) halyard, I used a prussik-like knot as a fall arrester.  It seems to be pretty safe (it can definitely take my weight dropping from the max distance I'd be before moving the knot), but if you actually need to use it, you're now stuck up there... I don't have a good solution for that.  I hope the local fire department does (and I'm at the dock)!  Or maybe the Coast Guard could send a helicopter? :D

Duane, thank you for the reminder about the figure-8 knot to tie onto the halyard.  I shouldn't have used the phrase "clip on".

Does anyone have recommended lengths for the ballooner and utility halyards that differ from what I wrote in my first message?  Should I just add a few meters to each?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 5:45 PM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

If I can’t use two halliards to ascend the mast I take two long loops of either tape or 8mm rope. A Prussik loop round the mast can be pushed up but holds under the tension of a fall. The second one is to attach above the spreaders so you never rely on just one attachment.
Prussik loops were used in climbing before ascenders were invented, but they do work around the dimension of a mast. Also useful as a foot loop to stand in if you want to get above the height of the mast to work.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96



Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Ian Park
 

If I can’t use two halliards to ascend the mast I take two long loops of either tape or 8mm rope. A Prussik loop round the mast can be pushed up but holds under the tension of a fall. The second one is to attach above the spreaders so you never rely on just one attachment.
Prussik loops were used in climbing before ascenders were invented, but they do work around the dimension of a mast. Also useful as a foot loop to stand in if you want to get above the height of the mast to work.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96


Re: Just a bit off topic, but worth saying...

John Clark
 

Welcome aboard Brent.  I was in your shoes just 18 months ago.  You will not regret buying an Amel.  Hope to meet you somewhere in the world!  (note not many owners forums can say that and mean it. )

John Clark
SV Annie SM 37
Cave Cay, en-
route to Georgetown Exuma.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <brentcameron61@...> wrote :

At the risk of sounding sappy, if there was one thing I sometimes wish this forum had, it was a like button for posts like Bill’s - although they can certainly be abused so maybe not and instead I’ll pile on to Bill’s excellent message.

You Amel owners (and I’ve had the pleasure of sailing with a few of you and meeting a few more in person) are a truly EXCEPTIONAL group of individuals. The spirit in which you help each other and offer “corrective guidance” in a respectful manner is inspiring and makes me want to become one of you even more. Since I retired last spring, I’ve ruthlessly reduced my emails by at least two orders of magnitude and while I’ve followed lots of groups on various topics on a regular basis over the years, this is the ONLY one that I still allow to send me emails on a daily basis because 1) I almost always learn something interesting that I file away for the future, 2) it’s almost never acrimonious and it’s wonderful to watch you folks pass out your hard earned lessons so generously even if the question has been asked and answered a dozen times before and 3) while there may be a moderator, that function is never needed. Who ever is doing it is doing a fantastic job because it seems to me that when someone strays outside the lines a little bit someone else will inevitably show up with some gentle suggestion - often with a good bit of humour - to redirect the discussion. I usually end up chuckling at how well it was handled. No egos stroked or bruised. Nobody strays from the purpose into other more inflammatory topics. I’ve watched you graciously bring new owners into your community and offer lots of helpful advice as well as tolerate lurkers like myself who want to join your community as well.

It’s really something to see - you’ve all built something really valuable to the Amel brand here. I think you’re by far their biggest asset. As a potential owner I’d say it’s one of the top things pushing me into buying my own Amel - knowing that if I got in to trouble or didn’t understand something that within a few hours that I’d have lots of helpful solutions as at least one of you had probably seen the problem before. This could be scary when you are sinking a substantial portion of your life’s savings into an asset that can literally sink you.

I haven’t met most of you yet but I know that I want to see you all out there soon. Thank you for creating such a gem of invaluable information and in such a way that is a pleasure to follow. I appreciate being able to learn and live vicariously from all of you more than you’d ever guess. I hope to be returning the favour soon.

Brent Cameron
Future SM Owner, long time admirer.


On Mar 29, 2018, 9:56 PM -0400, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>, wrote:
 

Every once in a while I am lead into into temptation and I look at other sailing related forums on the web. I read a dozen threads--and am horrified.  Every time I come back here and am thankful that the Amel owners who participate here are NOT LIKE THAT.


ALL the other forums are full of posturing, foolishness, stupidity, trolls and just plain evil nastiness.  Even the ones that are heavily moderated are "places" that make my skin crawl just to visit.  


They really make me appreciate the community we have here.  I like that I can ask, and answer, questions like I was sitting across from any of you with a beer in hand, and if we disagree we can do so with a smile.


Thank you--everybody.


Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Foxtown, Little Abaco, Bahamas






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: PredictWind

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

We use the PW professional package with ocean currents included, and have found this excellent in crossing the North Indian Ocean from Thailand to Maldives. In particular it was spot on for ocean currents and pretty good on winds, and we run an update every day via the IridiumGo to ensure that we are always in the best possible currents and wind.

Agree with the 80% ratio of the Amel 54 Polars. That has been what we ended up dialing it down to as well. At first I was annoyed that the Amel 54 appeared so much faster!!! ......but then realised this is based on best speed and sail plan always ...... and of course we are mere cruisers, sailing cautiously always to ensure our aging sails get us all the way around the world!.

We are not sure we can afford the PW professional package cost all the way around the world, (and certainly turned it off in Asia for 6 months when not doing ocean crossings) but this software has been a game changer for us and particularly worthwhile the cost for the Indian Ocean crossing so far. From Maldives we sail this month for Chagos, then on to Rodriguez, Mauritius, Madagascar and down to Cape Town etc.., so are very please to have the full PW package working on board.

Cheers
Colin - Island Pearl II - SM#332 - Maldives

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 2:35 AM, 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Pat,

We used PW for routing with 54 polars and found them very optimistic. Maybe we are conservative sailors but we had to set the polar ratio to 80% to get realistic times. 

As far as the weather forecast is concerned, it's very similar to other software, we found. It mostly uses the same grib sources, so not too surprising, I guess. Windy shows better accuracy in the Caribbean, especially to understand the wind shifts in the channels and in the leeway of the islands. 

Thomas
Garulfo
A54 #122
Cruising Saint Martin, FWI



On Tue, 3 Apr 2018 at 11:07, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi Pat,

I agree that PW isn't always spot on.  I look at Passageweather.com and windyty.com as well as PW before a passage.  There is often at least one outlier but a pretty good sense of what is going to happen can be gleaned from all that info.  The timing of wind shifts can be 12+hrs off, and wind speeds can be 10kts off (either way), but so far I haven't wished I'd waited for another window.  If even one model was predicting 30+kts, I'd either wait or call Chris Parker.

Hi to Diane!

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: Oceanair Skyscreen

Duane Siegfri
 

The aft cabin hatch is a bit tough because there is not much space above the hatch for the screen frame.  The Oceanair frame is wider on the sides with the rollers so you want them vertical, and the narrower sides horizontal (at the top and bottom).

After reviewing the Oceanair site, they don't have one that will fit the aft cabin.  The Lewmar 50 is the right size, but the wider frame (2.5") will have to be at the top and bottom and there isn't room for it there.  If you go with a 20x20 it will hang down 5.5" below the bottom of the hatch.

They noted the Lewmar 60 would work for the main and forward cabins, and they recommended ordering them with seals.  I pasted their email below.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477

Thank you for your inquiry.  The seal is a rubber “gasket” seal that runs between the hatch and the headliner to block out any light that might finds its way through this space.  We usually recommend using a gasket.

 

Also looking at your order form if the measurements you have provided are for the aperture (the opening for the hatch) the first hatch would be a SRS-60-(Color (B) for beige or (W) for white)-RP.  This is a standard size Skyscreen for a Lewmar 60 hatch.

 

The second size is very close in size to our SRS-50-(Color (B) for beige or (W) for white)-RP.  This is the standard size for a Lewmar 50 hatch. 

 

We could always have a hatch screen made to order to the exact size, but that would cost significantly

 

If the standard sizes work for you please place an order with one of our following online dealers who will be more than happy to help you place an order.