Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Galapagos and Marquesas out of season. Pluses and minuses.

James Cromie
 

Porter - Some on this forum, including myself, will be very interested to hear what you find out when you apply for your visas in Panama. We would like to pursue a similar itinerary eventually. 

Thank you for the posts. 
James
Soteria 
SM 347


On Apr 3, 2018, at 8:17 AM, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thank you Steve. All excellent points. 

I think we’ll know if we get the visa while in Panama, If not. We’ll then delay on the American continent. 
We’ve also considered the gambier islands for part of the time as well. Less rolly. Further south and outside the cyclone belt. Less heat. 
So it seems. 

Thanks for your thoughtful reply!

Porter


Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Mar 30, 2018, at 11:16 AM, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Porter,

I wish I had good answers, but instead have some questions. 

Are you fairly certain a 1 year visa is possible? Rene is Dutch, and his wife is Canadian. I wonder if he was able to get his wife a 1 yr visa due to the fact that he is an EU citizen. I had always heard the long stay visa for Americans was only 6 months instead of the standard 3 we normally get. I’ve also read that after the 2 visits required to the French embassy for the long stay Visa, it is not always granted on the spot, and you may not know if you actually have one until arriving in French Polynesia.  

I’d be a bit hesitant to rely on historic cyclone patterns when on the edge of the cyclone belt, as the weather patterns seem to be changing a bit as the ocean temps are rising. It also seems like a very long time to spend in the Marquesas, and would expect the off season part is going to be seriously hot, humid, and squally. 

We just sailed from Panama to Hawaii instead of our previously planned trip to FP this year to help out with my ill 94 year old father, and hope to Be headed that way via the Line islands in the 2019 season. Good luck with getting it all figured out, and let us all know what you discover. 

Regards,

Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
KoOlina, Hawaii

On Mar 30, 2018, at 04:30, Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I very much appreciate all the thoughtful insights in every regard, and so I propose these technical questions.

We are heavily considering a transit of the Canal in June.
We've had extensive discussions with Rene of Island Water World in St. Martin (who some may know) and others who argue for the Pacific approach outlined below.

It is based on 3 assumptions:

1. A US citizen can get a 1 year visa for French Polynesia in Panama at the French consulate there.
2. Entering Equador on the mainland, one can get an extended cruising permit with exit through the Galapagos with minimal fees over an extended time-period.
 and the third:

3. The Marquesas are outside the cyclone zone and should be considered a reasonable all weather destination.

Based on the above, and a fair amount of research on the web etc.  We are considering a transit in June, July.
Heading south along the west coast of S America, leaving the boat in Ecuador for an inland experience, then Galapagos and Marquesas late part of this year.  Early start on the westward cruising of the pacific in march/April 2019 toward New Zealand or Torres Straits.

Noting, while the Marquesas are on the cusp of cyclone territory, their location does not completely exclude them from circular storms, what storm options would we have with good intel.  We have and use iridium and predict wind a-lot with excellent outcomes for the past year. 

What thoughts, considerations, concerns and or advice might you have for this concept?

Very much appreciated!


Porter McRoberts
S/V Ibis: Amel 54-#152
Martinique









Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: My first bow thruster service...

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good morning Mike,

For your first time, you might want to look at this illustration:
http://www.nikimat.com/bow_thruster_overhaul.html

I purchase the neoprene seal from Amel, they were quite cheap 2.52 Euro each.
Note: on the illustration I actually forgot to picture putting back the neoprene seals on the bow thruster’s foot.
You should also change the Nylon screw at every service (2 years), also cheap 0.48 Euro each (need 6).
Always good to have a spare propeller, hub, stainless pin (if you loose the propeller, you might find it, but not the pin).
Here are some info:
http://www.nikimat.com/spare_parts_bow_thruster.html

Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Wed, 4/4/18, @svtrilogy53 [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: My first bow thruster service...
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Wednesday, April 4, 2018, 6:44 PM


 









Hi Bill,
I'm also servicing my bow
thruster for the first time. Wondering how yours went and
whether you decided to use RTV everywhere? 
I'm also trying to figure out
what the proper size is for the o-rings. Parts lists
I've seen show 78
x 3 mm and 40
x 2.5 mm. Are the 78 and 40 the inner or outer
diameters?
Also,
any advice on where to find the 10mm neoprene seals?
We're currently in the Fort Lauderdale area. Was
thinking of getting a 10mm sheet and cutting seals from
that.
Thanks,MikeSV
Trilogy SM#23


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Mark Erdos
 

Is this anonymous posting a real person or spam on the group? Either way it is a very expensive way of getting up the mast with a lot of failure points.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Guadeloupe

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, April 5, 2018 2:14 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

 

 

I use the Mastlift from Swiss Tec. See here:
https://www.swi-tec.de/en/108-mast-ascension


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Costa Rica

JEFFREY KRAUS
 


Stanchion Base Plate Mounting Screws

amelliahona <no_reply@...>
 

Can anyone tell me the length, size and thread pitch of the countersunk-hex head screws that mount the lifeline stanchions to their imbedded threaded backplates?  They are metric, I presume, and undoubtedly stainless steel.  Not on the boat at the moment or I would check for myself.


Thanks, 


Gary S. Silver

s/v Liahona

Amel SM 2000 Hull # 335


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

carcodespam@...
 

I use the Mastlift from Swiss Tec. See here:
https://www.swi-tec.de/en/108-mast-ascension


: [Amel Yacht Owners] Spare Parts list /

eric freedman
 

 

Hi Olaf,

The spares you have on board  depend how much offshore sailing you will be doing.

I sail about 80 % offshore.

I have Raymarine instruments so they might be different than what you need.

 

I have the following:

autopilot course computer

rudder reference transducer

fluxgate compass

wind instrument and mast anemometer

depth instrument

spare GPS system

spare VHF system and hand pieces.

2 vhf antennas mast mounted, I use one for the AIS but I can use a splitter if one goes out

2 autopilots one on the rudder stock and one behind the wheel

3 multi instruments that read all the boats instruments a remote hand held autopilot controller that I can plug in if needed which also displays all the boats data a second autopilot control head mounted at the nav station.

 

That are the spares for mounted electronics that I recall.

 

With respect to boat spares. I have every motor and pump used on the boat except for the bow thruster Motor. I keep that spare as well as a complete bow thruster at home.

 

I have every part for both the genset and engine, all hoses, gaskets, and senders on board.

Fan belts, spare of all 3 alternators, starter motors etc etc.

Basically if it can be changed by me I have it.

I also have a large inventory of fasteners, switches, plumbing components, hoses, rudder nut and packing, Wire, stove spares, refrigeration spares, and too many more  things to mention.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 6:17 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Spare Parts list / outside bulbs for SM2K

 

 

 

Hello SM2K owners,

 

As some of you already knows I bought some weeks ago a SM2K.

 

Now I would like to know the required spare parts. Would you pls share your spare parts list with me to get a feeling what parts are required.

 

I also would like to know which bulbs () are installed/used outside (Watt, Size etc.), e.g. for the navigation light, anchor lights, deck light etc. Does anyone of you have list of all the bulbs?

 

Thanks so much in advance

 

Olaf

S/V Sayonara II, SM2K 392

currently in Martinique

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

James Alton
 

Ian,

   I am really glad to hear that your son was not injured when the 14mm halyard snapped.   I agree that  having a backup method of support when going aloft is a really good practice.  Normally it is just the wife and I  so I worry about her having to handle two separate halyards potentially increasing the odds of an accident.  Especially with a rolling boat, I think that staying focused on a single line could end up being safer than trying to handle two when short handed.  With three people it is of course quite simple to do and I do employ the second halyard. When it is just the two of us, I normally tie myself off to various points on the mast on the way up/ or slide a loop up the mast as appropriate for the particular spar as my backup.  I also go on the assumption that my wife could accidentally slip at any time so also keep a good grip on whatever is handy.  I maintain a good hold until she confirms that I have been tied off.  She has never slipped and neither have I but it only takes once to ruin your entire day….  

    I have never had a halyard break before but I am pretty careful about early replacement, good splices etc.  Even just basic Dacron sat-set in 14mm has a breaking strength of 11,700 pounds so I am normally much more concerned about the metal bits,  especially if they are stainless.  I have seen so many failures in stainless that often occurred at minimal loading in metal without obvious cracks.   The example I gave of the unused spinnaker block failing under light loading in my previous post was just one example.   With line, I feel pretty confident of the approximate strength after doing an inspection looking for chafe points etc. which I try to always do before going aloft.   I always tie across shackles and other hardware whenever possible to give me a backup as was suggested in an earlier post on this forum..very good advice IMO.  I also use either bronze or galvanized steel shackles on my bosun chair to attached the halyard rather than stainless.   One other thing that I always do before being hoisted, is to bounce as hard as possible in the bosuns chair before going up the mast which if nothing else makes me feel better about being aloft. (grin)  There are after all concealed attachments, stitching etc. in the bosuns chair itself to be concerned about as well and if they are going to break, better while I am down low..     Stay safe everyone and thanks for the discussion.  

Best,

James

SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Apr 4, 2018, at 9:56 PM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi James,
A climbing background always helps to think through a good backup system. When my son was 16 he went up the mast on a Jeaneau Sunfizz 40. It was an in mast 14mm halliard and it snapped as he was being lowered. He’s 42 now, thankfully as he was holding the intermediate stays and was just above the spreaders. It doesn’t matter if the halliard is in mast or external, you need a backup. 
Two handed I often go up the mast on two separate halliards tied down tight on a pair of jumars. I always have a long thin line with me in case I forget something and have to lower a line to have sent up in a plastic bag.
Simple message is don’t rely on a single rope, and always have a way to get something sent up to you if you get stuck. A single rope haul is prone to all sorts of problems.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Ian Park
 

Hi James,
A climbing background always helps to think through a good backup system. When my son was 16 he went up the mast on a Jeaneau Sunfizz 40. It was an in mast 14mm halliard and it snapped as he was being lowered. He’s 42 now, thankfully as he was holding the intermediate stays and was just above the spreaders. It doesn’t matter if the halliard is in mast or external, you need a backup.
Two handed I often go up the mast on two separate halliards tied down tight on a pair of jumars. I always have a long thin line with me in case I forget something and have to lower a line to have sent up in a plastic bag.
Simple message is don’t rely on a single rope, and always have a way to get something sent up to you if you get stuck. A single rope haul is prone to all sorts of problems.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

James Cromie
 

Whenever I go up the mast, I trail a static line attached to my harness that I can fix to the mast if I need to descend in the case of some problem that mandates coming off the winch system.  (deck hand incapacitated, mechanical failure of primary system, etc.)
For descending, one can use a munter hitch (or in my case, I keep a belay device always attached on my harness).  A munter hitch can be made without any additional hardware or devices except a carabiner (use locking) to attach to your harness.  This hitch is commonly used in mountain rescue scenarios.  

 It is important to always have a method of ascending / descending independently as a fall back plan.  

James
Soteria 
SM2K 347



On Apr 3, 2018, at 6:36 PM, Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


I prefer to use two halyards, both of them for hauling (no static line).  I don't see the advantage of using a static line vs just putting the prussik around the mast, so I use the line the way a halyard is meant to be used.  If both halyards are reasonably tight, it also greatly reduces the shock loading on the remaining one if one fails.  If one of the halyards is internal, I'm not terribly worried about the other being external (like on the mainmast).  But I don't have that option on the mizzenmast, unless I do as Danny did and have a full-length mizzen halyard made up (and drop the sail).  Surely, Henri Amel had a solution to this problem?  Or was he just comfortable going up on a single, external halyard?  I like Paul's idea of a dyneema loop through the shackle... that takes out one failure mode, though still leaves the possibility of the rope failing (or being let go).

On the lone occasion I've had to go up a mast on a single (internal) halyard, I used a prussik-like knot as a fall arrester.  It seems to be pretty safe (it can definitely take my weight dropping from the max distance I'd be before moving the knot), but if you actually need to use it, you're now stuck up there... I don't have a good solution for that.  I hope the local fire department does (and I'm at the dock)!  Or maybe the Coast Guard could send a helicopter? :D

Duane, thank you for the reminder about the figure-8 knot to tie onto the halyard.  I shouldn't have used the phrase "clip on".

Does anyone have recommended lengths for the ballooner and utility halyards that differ from what I wrote in my first message?  Should I just add a few meters to each?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 5:45 PM, Ian parkianj@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

If I can’t use two halliards to ascend the mast I take two long loops of either tape or 8mm rope. A Prussik loop round the mast can be pushed up but holds under the tension of a fall. The second one is to attach above the spreaders so you never rely on just one attachment.
Prussik loops were used in climbing before ascenders were invented, but they do work around the dimension of a mast. Also useful as a foot loop to stand in if you want to get above the height of the mast to work.

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN 96





Re: My first bow thruster service...

Mike Longcor (SV Trilogy)
 

Hi Bill,

I'm also servicing my bow thruster for the first time. Wondering how yours went and whether you decided to use RTV everywhere? 

I'm also trying to figure out what the proper size is for the o-rings. Parts lists I've seen show 78 x 3 mm and 40 x 2.5 mm. Are the 78 and 40 the inner or outer diameters?

Also, any advice on where to find the 10mm neoprene seals? We're currently in the Fort Lauderdale area. Was thinking of getting a 10mm sheet and cutting seals from that.

Thanks,
Mike
SV Trilogy SM#23


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine / cdrive adjustments?

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] engine / cdrive adjustments?

snw7tgmcrs6nmg5mdg55r3xpowhzm3kjxc2uqysc@...
 

Hello Phil!

During our circum navigation I had to install a new engine here in New Zealand. Now I do have a vibration on idle speed and on 1800 rpm. It doesn’t matter if the boat is in gear or out of gear.
Please could you explain how I can adjust or find out the right height of the c-drive? Unfortunately Amel didn’t answer my questions about that.

Thank you very much for your kind answer.

Greetings from Coromandel.

Hannes

SN 106 Cayenne


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

eric freedman
 

Bill,

Thanks.

Fair Winds

Eric

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 1:19 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Eric,

 


Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

 

 

 

 

 

On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 11:39 AM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Colin,

What is a p79?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 10:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Hi Duane

 

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.

 

Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The u nit works perfectly like that.

 

Cheers

 

Colin - SV Island Pearl II

sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos

 

 

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill,

 

Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah



 

--

Colin Streeter

0411 016 445

 


Re: lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

Duane Siegfri
 

Ian,

I hadn't tried to tie a prusik around the mast, good idea!

One other way to tie yourself on to the dynamic line (the one going to a winch) is to tie a figure 8 with a three foot tail, put the tail thru the attachment point on your harness/bosuns chair, then take the tail and tie a "follow-on" figure 8 where the tail traces the lines of the figure 8 and you wind up with a figure 8 with a bight.  This way you don't need a carabiner.

Duane


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

Eric,


Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Wed, Apr 4, 2018 at 11:39 AM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Colin,

What is a p79?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 10:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Hi Duane

 

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.

 

Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The u nit works perfectly like that.

 

Cheers

 

Colin - SV Island Pearl II

sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos

 

 

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

 

Bill,

 

Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah



 

--

Colin Streeter

0411 016 445



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

eric freedman
 

Hi Colin,

What is a p79?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 04, 2018 10:47 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

 

 

Hi Duane

 

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.

 

Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The unit works perfectly like that.

 

Cheers

 

Colin - SV Island Pearl II

sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos

 

 

 

On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill,

 

Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah



 

--

Colin Streeter

0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Airmar P79 Installation

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Hi Duane

We placed a P79 in the fwd cabin, right up front under the floor - off centre to the Stbd side as an extra backup (and/or early warning which travelling slowly fwd into shallower water as it is about 2m fwd of the one outside the front heads). It is normally switched off, as it makes a clicking noise in the front cabin when on.
 
Anyhow, to get to the point, we simply sanded the gelcoat a little to smoothen it off totally, not to remove any of it. The unit works perfectly like that.

Cheers

Colin - SV Island Pearl II
sm #332 Maldives, soon to head for Chagos



On Tue, Apr 3, 2018 at 11:15 AM, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,


Thanks.  I would bet it is paint, why brush on gelcoat?  and then it has to come off.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477

"Everything is harder on a boat" - Noah




--
Colin Streeter
0411 016 445


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] lifting with mizzen boom, climbing mizzen, and halyard lengths

 

Ryan,

Good points. I think two lines can be better than one line and a static line except in the situation where you only have a total of two crew members: 1 to go up and 1 to hoist.

And, the one thing most people don't think about is how to lower using only the static line with a person locked to the line with a weight activated cam cleat locked to the static line.

Don't forget that it is easy to drop the mizzen sail and use that mast-enclosed halyard. 

Regardless of the method used, be sure to think about everything, including what to do if an electric winch begins to runaway.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Tue, Apr 3, 2018, 17:58 James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Danny,


   I will second your concerns about using external halyards,  I avoid them as well and this started  even before the incident described to follow:  I once had the swivel of a spinnaker halyard part offshore which didn’t surprise me that much.  What did surprise me was that I replaced the broken block with an identical block that had been stored for some number of years in a drawer on the boat.  The block was still in it’s original packaging so unused, vintage unknown as this was a delivery job so not my boat.  The replacement block broke in exactly the same place when I tied off the spinnaker halyard with just a bit of tension added by hand.  The break was rusty and it looked like crevice corrosion of the stainless.  Thanks for bringing this danger to the attention of other Amelians.

Best,

James

SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Apr 3, 2018, at 1:34 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Ryan,

I can answer your last question personally. To go up the mizzen I unfurl and drop the mizzen sail and use that internal halyard. On Ocean Pearl it is a full length halyard. I have an aversion to using external halyards to pull people up masts, its a long way down.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 04 April 2018 at 05:21 "Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi all,
I'm refreshing much of my running rigging, and I just did a deep-dive into the halyards on mizzen and I'm confused by the numbers I'm seeing in that running rigging spreadsheet we've all seen.  It lists the mizzen ballooner halyard as 28m, and I've estimated the mizzen utility halyard (the one that goe s to the spreaders; it doesn't seem to be in the spreadsheet) at 15m.  I haven't found anything more detailed than the spreadsheet by searching this group's archives.

The ballooner halyard seems like a fine length for its intended purpose, given the mizzen's height of 14m above DWL, but there doesn't seem to be enough extra to lead it to the block on the end of the mizzen boom and then down to the water to lift something (or someone, as has been discussed in the other thread going on).  Does anyone have a suggestion for a more practical length on this halyard, or is the listed length good for this purpose?

Likewise, my estimate for my utility halyard seems too short to use the mizzen boom as a lift; how long is yours?

And finally, if you wanted to climb to the top of the mizzenmast, how would you clip on?  The ballooner halyard is the natural choice, but I don't feel comfortable using only a single halyard.  Given that the mizzensail halyard requires an extension, I don't think it would be safe to use that either, as then you're trusting the extension attachment (some stitched twine and electrical tape, in my case).  Thoughts?

Thanks,
Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

 


 




Spare Parts list / outside bulbs for SM2K

olaf_renos@...
 


Hello SM2K owners,

 

As some of you already knows I bought some weeks ago a SM2K.

 

Now I would like to know the required spare parts. Would you pls share your spare parts list with me to get a feeling what parts are required.

 

I also would like to know which bulbs () are installed/used outside (Watt, Size etc.), e.g. for the navigation light, anchor lights, deck light etc. Does anyone of you have list of all the bulbs?

 

Thanks so much in advance


Olaf

S/V Sayonara II, SM2K 392

currently in Martinique