Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] satellite service providers

karkauai
 

I've used Satellite Phones Direct for several years and they have always been helpful and timely in their response.  Talk to Jennifer or Victor at (770) 449-6826.  They are located in Norcross, Georgia, USA in greater Atlanta area.


Kent
Kristy
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Batteries [1 Attachment]

 

Den,

One more thing. I have seen what I think is this same battery under numerous brand names. I suspect the country of origin is China, but I cannot be sure. EFFEKTA is a manufacturer of uninterruptible power supplies (UPS) and I believe the main reason for this battery is as a component in their UPS. I am always wary of this kind of situation, but I also understand your issue with having to find batteries in Croatia. I had to find them in Montenegro. I had to buy starting batteries which had a much shorter life than deep cycle batteries. Although I could not find any information as to the type of battery, I believe it is AGM. I am sure that you know that you may have to change the charging parameters of your 220VAC battery chargers and your engine mounted 24VDC alternator.

From their website (earlier, I said Dutch): "EFFEKTA has been successfully working in the UPS market for over 22 years. Over the years, our company has come to epitomise reliability and quality and we are now one of the leading UPS manufacturers in Germany."

BTW, I urged my client to try to find something else.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 3:28 PM, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Bill Rouse included below]

Den,

I was just looking at these Dutch EFFEKTA batteries for a 54 client. Please review the following chart...the B12-120S is 171mm wide. The photo you posted is of the B12-120S.

It is true that the B12-120 is 177mm wide. Where did you get your width?


Also, Brochure attached directly to your email


On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 2:54 PM, delborn@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
 

Hi Everyone,


I need to replace my batteries and have been offered a replacement in Croatia that is 175 wide whereas my present batteries are 170 wide. As I'm not on the boat I cannot check whether they will fit.

Could a 54 member, who is on their boat, please measure the available space for the 8 batteries fitted along the side of the boat. I don't think I would have a problem with the 4 next to the walk way.


Den and Julie

Aventura

54-113 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Batteries

 

Den,

I was just looking at these Dutch EFFEKTA batteries for a 54 client. Please review the following chart...the B12-120S is 171mm wide. The photo you posted is of the B12-120S.

It is true that the B12-120 is 177mm wide. Where did you get your width?


Also, Brochure attached directly to your email

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 2:54 PM, delborn@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Everyone,


I need to replace my batteries and have been offered a replacement in Croatia that is 175 wide whereas my present batteries are 170 wide. As I'm not on the boat I cannot check whether they will fit.

Could a 54 member, who is on their boat, please measure the available space for the 8 batteries fitted along the side of the boat. I don't think I would have a problem with the 4 next to the walk way.


Den and Julie

Aventura

54-113 



satellite service providers

James Cromie
 

Hello Amel owners - 


This is a off-topic for Amel-specific issues, but I'd like to ask for recommendations regarding service providers for satellite communication.  

I have used BlueCosmo for my Iridium Go, and I have been dissatisfied with the service.  I would not use this provider in the future.  


I appreciate the input of anyone willing to give some advice!


James

Soteria SM347



Batteries

Denis Elborn
 

Hi Everyone,


I need to replace my batteries and have been offered a replacement in Croatia that is 175 wide whereas my present batteries are 170 wide. As I'm not on the boat I cannot check whether they will fit.

Could a 54 member, who is on their boat, please measure the available space for the 8 batteries fitted along the side of the boat. I don't think I would have a problem with the 4 next to the walk way.


Den and Julie

Aventura

54-113 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

 

I have a question for all users of an inner staysail on a SM:

Do you also have and use running backstays and do you use them when sailing with your inner foresail a/k/a Trinkette? 

Since the mainmast is not designed to take a significant load where the inner foresail will mount, I assume that the safe course of action is to do the same thing Amel did with the 54 and add running backstays from the mast attachment point of the added inner staysail. 

I would really hate to see someone buy a used SM which has an inner foresail which was "rigged" by the previous owner, but the owner chose not to rig running backstays. Replacing masts and rigging can be costly.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970





On Mon, Apr 9, 2018 at 2:25 PM, Paul Cooper paul.cooper74@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Awesome!  That's what I'm talking about.  Good first-hand information!  Thanks so much Peter, Paul and Mohammad.  Very helpful.

Best regards,
Paul C.

On Monday, April 9, 2018, 3:43:23 AM MDT, osterberg..paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


 

Paul


Hello!

My thoughts about stay sail.

We did invest in a stay sail, unfortunately the equipment we got was substandard and shape of sail very poor. However we have numerus times encounter conditions when we wish it had worked better. In The Mediterranean wind was often 25 to 30 knots true and “of course” up wind, in The Caribbean we had a lot of up wind sailing between the islands, the same going up from The Bahamas to The Chesapeake bay.  our new Genoa does not furl very well a fot or two, if we furl more the shape is not very good and we lose height. When true wind approaching +25 knots, we do not fancy going up wind but unfortunately, we have had much more of that then expected, so we will in connection with changing of our standing rig when in Le Marine, make sure we get a proper installation of our stay sail, alternatively invest in a smaller Genoa the 130% that has been discussed recently on the forum. BUT the engine in the SM is definitely the Genoa, I say up to 22-24 knots apparent wind a furled Genoa gives much higher speed and VMG then a stay sail, first at higher wind strengths one has a benefit of a stay sail. Concerning tacking we do not find it a problem with the stay sail, even before installing the stay sail we found it easier to tack when partly furling the Genoa, now we have to furl it a little bit more. I found it very rare that we do “short” tacking, I guess the shortest period between tacks on very rare occasions are 15 minutes, we often go several hours on the same tack so if we are forced to furl the Genoa at that time is a very minor obstacle. More of a obstacle is when taking down the Balooner, as one should do that with the wind forward of the beam the ballooner does blow in to the furled stay sail and the friction at high wind make it difficult to take down the balooner, however by furling the twin head sails and unfurl them so that the ballooner are in the wind shade of the Genoa one can relatively easy take down the ballooner.


Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


  




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

Paul Cooper <paul.cooper74@...>
 

Awesome!  That's what I'm talking about.  Good first-hand information!  Thanks so much Peter, Paul and Mohammad.  Very helpful.

Best regards,
Paul C.

On Monday, April 9, 2018, 3:43:23 AM MDT, osterberg.paul.l@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Paul


Hello!

My thoughts about stay sail.

We did invest in a stay sail, unfortunately the equipment we got was substandard and shape of sail very poor. However we have numerus times encounter conditions when we wish it had worked better. In The Mediterranean wind was often 25 to 30 knots true and “of course” up wind, in The Caribbean we had a lot of up wind sailing between the islands, the same going up from The Bahamas to The Chesapeake bay.  our new Genoa does not furl very well a fot or two, if we furl more the shape is not very good and we lose height. When true wind approaching +25 knots, we do not fancy going up wind but unfortunately, we have had much more of that then expected, so we will in connection with changing of our standing rig when in Le Marine, make sure we get a proper installation of our stay sail, alternatively invest in a smaller Genoa the 130% that has been discussed recently on the forum. BUT the engine in the SM is definitely the Genoa, I say up to 22-24 knots apparent wind a furled Genoa gives much higher speed and VMG then a stay sail, first at higher wind strengths one has a benefit of a stay sail. Concerning tacking we do not find it a problem with the stay sail, even before installing the stay sail we found it easier to tack when partly furling the Genoa, now we have to furl it a little bit more. I found it very rare that we do “short” tacking, I guess the shortest period between tacks on very rare occasions are 15 minutes, we often go several hours on the same tack so if we are forced to furl the Genoa at that time is a very minor obstacle. More of a obstacle is when taking down the Balooner, as one should do that with the wind forward of the beam the ballooner does blow in to the furled stay sail and the friction at high wind make it difficult to take down the balooner, however by furling the twin head sails and unfurl them so that the ballooner are in the wind shade of the Genoa one can relatively easy take down the ballooner.


Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


  



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] silicone for ealing genoa tracks

Ryan Meador
 

That stuff is amazing for sealing hatch glass to the hatch frame.  I imagine it would work very well on the genoa track too.  It's easier to find if you search for SCS2000; the 2002 variant is the same stuff, but in white.  I think 2003 is black.

Ryan
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Thu, Apr 5, 2018 at 3:25 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I just got off the phone with general electric silicone division technical support..

I spoke with them about plugging the holes in the genoa track.

 

They recommended GE SCS2002 sealant—reading the data sheet-looks like this is the stuff.

 

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -

Warren Traill
 

Hi Trevor. How’s the passage south going? There’s plenty of changeable wind in Rebak. How is it for you guys?

Cheers,

Warren

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, 1 April 2018 2:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -

 

 

Hi Warren,

 

We are checking into the Marina today and will have a look around this evening if you’re about. 


On Mar 23, 2018, at 3:37 PM, 'Warren Traill' trailz@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks Trevor. It would be very interesting to meet you. We will be on the hardstand at Rebak from March 31st to April 10th..

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@yahoogroups..com]
Sent: Friday, 23 March 2018 3:21 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -

 

 

Hello Warren,

 

Just checked out today and plan on departing tomorrow for Langkawi.  We should be down there in a couple days. I’ll keep an eye out for you and look forward to meeting up. 

 

Email is: sviris1990 at gmail 

 

Trevor 

SV Iris, SN027

Ao Chalong Bay, Phuket


On Mar 23, 2018, at 1:18 PM, 'Warren Traill' trailz@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Trevor. We are on our Sharki #15. We’ve been cruising West coast Thailand/Langkawi for some time. We are also considering the east rally and will be at Rebak next week. Are you guys in that area?

Cheers,

Warren and Zetta

Manon2

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, 21 March 2018 4:24 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -

 

 

Hello Eric,

 

Congratulations on the little one! 

 

Our daughter was born in July (in the UK) last year and arrived on the boat 2 months later (in Phuket).  

 

We’ve been living full time and traveling coastal. We are about to do the Passage to the East Rally which heads down the Straight to Singapore and then over to Borneo.  

 

As you can imagine my wife has had some concerns with an infant on a boat. 

 

I’m sure you’ve thought of most of these items but here is a quick list that has affected us. 

 

- It is pretty much child proof already (no low sockets, locking doors and cabinets, rounded edges etc. 

- We are in a Santorin so the berthing might be different. Our aft cabin had a small cushioned section with a leeboard on the starboard side.  I relocated it a foot more inboard and now my kid has her own bed in our cabin with all sides protecting her from rolling out - she’s now a week shy of 8 months and pulling herself over them so we are getting two Lee cloths sown up.  One for her bed and the other for the bunk in the saloon.  You might opt for the pilot bunk though. 

- We bought a Salus Infant Vest for her once she was 6 months. She uses this to chill in the water with us.  A great vest for kids as no matter how they enter the water they end up face up.  I’ve tested it well and am positive it works. 

- In the tender we strap her in a chest harness to one of us.. We are both competent swimmers and while she is attached our only role is to look after her. No other tender duties. Not that we couldn’t but even a simple task of tying up to the dock is not worth it. A slip of the foot in the wet dinghy, you’d fall forward and crush her. So we just play it safe and make sure there is always positive control.. 

- We don’t have as much space as an SM so we opted for a small umbrella type stroller. We would prefer something larger that would recline back so she could sleep / nap when we are off the boat. 

- Welcome to single handling everything.  That kid is a non stop attention taker.  Not by choice, it’s just an infant that poops by itself.  That’s the only thing it does on its own. Everything else is on us. So one of us is off boat duty and on kid duty.  So night passages are almost a no go for us at the moment.  As neither one of us gets an ‘off watch’ time to sleep ourselves. So we plan our passages accordingly. 

- Car seat.  We have a quality seat that gets strapped down in the saloon and she gets strapped in it should the weather get bad or I absolutely need a hand with something. We do not strap her to us and try to multi task the boat duties. 

- A hammock in the shade of the cockpit for naps and such. So she isn’t always down below by herself. 

- A small portable chair that sets on a seat.  Like a high chair, minus the legs.  

- Food and nappies.  Plan well.  We are in Southeast Asia and trying to find things my wife is happy with is time consuming and costly when we do find some imported items.  I suppose this is dependent on your location though.  

- Shots. If you’re electing to get shots for the kid plan out the locations.  As the shots are given based on the age of the kid. 

- Passport right away for foreign travel

- Ro Sham Bo sunglasses for infants (when she leaves them on). 

- A large umbrella for tender travel. 

 

Good luck and enjoy. 

 

Trevor

Iris, SN 027

Phuket

 

 


On Mar 12, 2018, at 7:25 PM, Alexandre Uster von Baar uster@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Good morning Eric,

First of all congratulations for little Nolan coming this June !!!

I love the Bahamas.
Just like you I work so internet is important to me.

One of my favorite place is Port Lucaya in Grand Bahama because of the reasonable monthly marina rate, access to groceries and other infrastructure, etc.
In 2014 I spent 4 months in Port Lucaya Marina / Yacht Club and paid $600/month.
In 2015 I spent 3 months in Taino Beach (also in Port Lucaya) which became my favorite and paid $540/month.
Because of their huge pool with a some shallow area, I am certain you, Viki and especially little Nolan will love this place!
I can look for pictures to send you.
The beach 3 minutes walk away from the marina, they are places to walk, lay down, etc.
They also loan you towels for a $10 deposit and you can exchange them as often as you want, which you will realize is a considerable saving on laundry/generator time especially with the little one!..
I used my bicycle to go grocery shopping, but they have a bus going twice a week. In the super market you will find groceries as well as baby supplies.
I can not imagine a better place for you and your family.
Regarding the draft, you will have to wait almost “mid tide” to enter/leave the Bell Channel.
Port Lucaya is only 90 NM from Miami/Fort Lauderdale, so less than a day trip should you need to go. They i also an international airport.

Later in I also suggest you spend 1 months in Great Harbor Cay in the Berry Island.. It is an overnight trip from Grand Bahama.
I was there in low season so the price was $540/month, the prices are higher now, but I think you can negotiate and you get a discount with Active Captain.
Surprisingly the internet was the best I have seen in the Bahamas.
There was no issue to enter the channel even at low tide..
The beach was 20 minutes walk from the marina. They loan you bicycle if you don’t have any, the water is clearest I have seen.
There was no real grocery store some come prepared, therefore the fishermen come back every afternoon with 250 to 250 lobsters and sell you “tail only” for $10/lbs. Sailing along the coast is excellent for fishing!

As Nolan grows up (but wait him to be tall enough for all the ride), then a stop in Atlantis is a must. Not sure who will like the place the most Nolan or dad! But it is quite expensive per day. Nassau is an overnight trip from the Berry Island.
There is no worry for the draft. Atlantis is also very protected from Hurricane..

Hope that helps, please feel free to contact me directly if you want pictures of the places.

Enjoy your trip!
Sincerely, Alexandre

--------------------------------------------
On Sun, 3/11/18, ericmeury@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Baby on Board and where to go in the Bahamas -
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Sunday, March 11, 2018, 11:18 PM


 









Hello amel family.
Viki and I are expecting (this is
why the boat is on the hard right now) our first little crew
member    
Nolan
(insert middle name)  Meury will be arriving this
June.  
Our plan is
to spend November and December around Stuart Florida as
Nolan will be signed up for infant water survival classes
there.  Then we are thinking of heading the bahamas for a
month and then back to GA where we will keep the boat for
the next hurricane season..
I have two requirements for the
bahamas...
1.  Some place that has access
to mobile internet or awesome wifi as i still have to work m
start up (www.pascalworkflow.com) and my tax
practice.  
2.  Some place that we don't
have to worry about draft (marsh harbor or Georgetown? -
other ideas)

Also would love some Amel specific
or non amel specific for those that have had their baby on
board.
Thanks
again






Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

Paul Osterberg
 

Paul

Hello!

My thoughts about stay sail.

We did invest in a stay sail, unfortunately the equipment we got was substandard and shape of sail very poor. However we have numerus times encounter conditions when we wish it had worked better. In The Mediterranean wind was often 25 to 30 knots true and “of course” up wind, in The Caribbean we had a lot of up wind sailing between the islands, the same going up from The Bahamas to The Chesapeake bay.  our new Genoa does not furl very well a fot or two, if we furl more the shape is not very good and we lose height. When true wind approaching +25 knots, we do not fancy going up wind but unfortunately, we have had much more of that then expected, so we will in connection with changing of our standing rig when in Le Marine, make sure we get a proper installation of our stay sail, alternatively invest in a smaller Genoa the 130% that has been discussed recently on the forum. BUT the engine in the SM is definitely the Genoa, I say up to 22-24 knots apparent wind a furled Genoa gives much higher speed and VMG then a stay sail, first at higher wind strengths one has a benefit of a stay sail. Concerning tacking we do not find it a problem with the stay sail, even before installing the stay sail we found it easier to tack when partly furling the Genoa, now we have to furl it a little bit more. I found it very rare that we do “short” tacking, I guess the shortest period between tacks on very rare occasions are 15 minutes, we often go several hours on the same tack so if we are forced to furl the Genoa at that time is a very minor obstacle. More of a obstacle is when taking down the Balooner, as one should do that with the wind forward of the beam the ballooner does blow in to the furled stay sail and the friction at high wind make it difficult to take down the balooner, however by furling the twin head sails and unfurl them so that the ballooner are in the wind shade of the Genoa one can relatively easy take down the ballooner.


Paul on SY Kerpa SM#259


  



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

Peter Forbes
 

All,

We use our staysail on Carango [Amel 54] a lot and it definitely enables us to point higher. We use it with a 'barber hauler' too to get an even closer turning point closer to the centre line of the yacht. We use the running backstays which are I think vital to balance the pressure on the mast from the staysail.


Peter Forbes
0044 7836 209730
Carango  Sailing Ketch
Amel 54 #035
In Bermuda

On 9 Apr 2018, at 06:49, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Hi Paul;
 
On our 54, we find that the staysail in combination with the Genoa does help us point higher, or at least the boat can stay in the groove at closer wind angles. We have never measured it, so I do not have a great answer for you, but how much higher we can point does depend on the wind strength. The stronger the wind the higher we can point due to the staysail sheeted inboard of the deck and the small size of the sail needing the power to drive the boat up wind. This is not however a significant amount. I  think we are talking anything between 2-5 degrees depending on wind strength.
 
With wind over 30 knots, the staysail has sufficient power to fly alone and very comfortable. Especially if we are close hauled. The heal angle of the boat is significantly reduced, the effect of wind gusts on changing the heal angle is much less and the boat is well balanced and under control. In our opinion the staysail on the 54 is a great asset to have. You can set it in the heavy conditions and not have concerns about the safety of the rig and have sufficient power to approach hull speed in most points of sail, except maybe being close hauled. There have been a couple of occasions I can think of that we have had to slightly furl the staysail for comfort.
 
For us, the staysail is a great asset, that does get used, although not often and usually in winds over 25-30 knots.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0908 Fax
 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Sunday, April 08, 2018 4:43 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

 

Paul, I have a 55 that came with a staysail, it has been used very rarely and in fact never really been needed, it causes more problems being there than it would ever hope to be useful or effective. When I buy another Amel, it won’t have a staysail.


Bob Grey
Renaissance III
55 #25

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Monday, April 9, 2018, 00:34, paul.cooper74@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks to everyone for your thoughtful responses.  My previous boat (a PSC) had a removable inner forestay which I rigged for offshore sailing only.   Used, and loved, it for heavy weather not upwind sailing.  With the single rig, a double-reefed main and staysail combo was perfectly balanced in heavy winds.  I suspect with the ketch rig the advantages would not be so great, which I actually experienced on our friend's SM2K in 40+ kt winds in the med.  No trinkette and no problem.


Bill, thank you for your advice on new ownership.  So much food for thought, I think my brain must be getting obese.

Paul C.




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Paul;
 
On our 54, we find that the staysail in combination with the Genoa does help us point higher, or at least the boat can stay in the groove at closer wind angles. We have never measured it, so I do not have a great answer for you, but how much higher we can point does depend on the wind strength. The stronger the wind the higher we can point due to the staysail sheeted inboard of the deck and the small size of the sail needing the power to drive the boat up wind. This is not however a significant amount. I  think we are talking anything between 2-5 degrees depending on wind strength.
 
With wind over 30 knots, the staysail has sufficient power to fly alone and very comfortable. Especially if we are close hauled. The heal angle of the boat is significantly reduced, the effect of wind gusts on changing the heal angle is much less and the boat is well balanced and under control. In our opinion the staysail on the 54 is a great asset to have. You can set it in the heavy conditions and not have concerns about the safety of the rig and have sufficient power to approach hull speed in most points of sail, except maybe being close hauled. There have been a couple of occasions I can think of that we have had to slightly furl the staysail for comfort.
 
For us, the staysail is a great asset, that does get used, although not often and usually in winds over 25-30 knots.
 
Respectfully;
Mohammad Shirloo
323-633-2222 Cell
310-644-0908 Fax
 



From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 08, 2018 4:43 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

 

Paul, I have a 55 that came with a staysail, it has been used very rarely and in fact never really been needed, it causes more problems being there than it would ever hope to be useful or effective. When I buy another Amel, it won’t have a staysail.


Bob Grey
Renaissance III
55 #25

Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Monday, April 9, 2018, 00:34, paul.cooper74@... [amelyachtowners]

 

Thanks to everyone for your thoughtful responses.  My previous boat (a PSC) had a removable inner forestay which I rigged for offshore sailing only.   Used, and loved, it for heavy weather not upwind sailing.  With the single rig, a double-reefed main and staysail combo was perfectly balanced in heavy winds.  I suspect with the ketch rig the advantages would not be so great, which I actually experienced on our friend's SM2K in 40+ kt winds in the med.  No trinkette and no problem.


Bill, thank you for your advice on new ownership.  So much food for thought, I think my brain must be getting obese.

Paul C.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

Bob Grey
 

Paul, I have a 55 that came with a staysail, it has been used very rarely and in fact never really been needed, it causes more problems being there than it would ever hope to be useful or effective. When I buy another Amel, it won’t have a staysail.

Bob Grey
Renaissance III

On Monday, April 9, 2018, 00:34, paul.cooper74@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Thanks to everyone for your thoughtful responses.  My previous boat (a PSC) had a removable inner forestay which I rigged for offshore sailing only.   Used, and loved, it for heavy weather not upwind sailing.  With the single rig, a double-reefed main and staysail combo was perfectly balanced in heavy winds.  I suspect with the ketch rig the advantages would not be so great, which I actually experienced on our friend's SM2K in 40+ kt winds in the med.  No trinkette and no problem.


Bill, thank you for your advice on new ownership.  So much food for thought, I think my brain must be getting obese.

Paul C.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wind or Water generator

eric freedman
 

Hi David,

How high above the mast head does the wind gen have to be to clear the triadic stay?

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 08, 2018 4:48 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wind or Water generator

 

 

Hi Danny,

Thanks for the concern, and dialogue.  Sorry about the cold-sweats.  I agree, needing to rotate the unit out-of-wind &/or to physically tether the blades due to an operating limitation/requirement, is not a viable option for anything mounted above, say, 2 meters.  That is not the case here.

I am not thinking on doing a mast-climb to lower the wind-turbine at sea or in adverse conditions.

What I am thinking is to lower the unit (or remove the blades) if hauling out, or leaving the boat, for an extended period in a high-wind-prone area/season.  Not just for the survivability of the unit itself, but because of the wind-loads such additions would place on the attachment points, mast, and boat as a whole. Just as one would for solar panels, or other removable deck-ware.  It may be that the insurance company requires the masts to be taken off if secured on-land in the hurricane belt in-season, in which case this aspect becomes moot.

As an aside, in addition to a manual switch that stops/slows the blades (by shorting out the coils), the Rutland 1200 starts to electronically self-limit at wind-speeds above 35 knots (or when charging current is no longer needed). To my mind this is better than simply letting the the blades spin to dump excess current to a resistive load (&/or trying to slow/stop a rotor already exposed to high winds).  I have heard of Rutland 1200 units successfully self-limiting and surviving hurricane-force winds.  On that basis, I reckon that the unit can stay up in all conditions I am likely to encounter at sea.  Of course, as we have seen with IRMA, nothing, not even the masts themselves, can necessarily survive a full-on Cat5 or, more properly, the debris that is often associated with such conditions.

David
Perigee, SM#396
St Maarten




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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wind or Water generator

SV Perigee
 

Hi Danny,

Thanks for the concern, and dialogue.  Sorry about the cold-sweats.  I agree, needing to rotate the unit out-of-wind &/or to physically tether the blades due to an operating limitation/requirement, is not a viable option for anything mounted above, say, 2 meters.  That is not the case here.

I am not thinking on doing a mast-climb to lower the wind-turbine at sea or in adverse conditions.

What I am thinking is to lower the unit (or remove the blades) if hauling out, or leaving the boat, for an extended period in a high-wind-prone area/season.  Not just for the survivability of the unit itself, but because of the wind-loads such additions would place on the attachment points, mast, and boat as a whole. Just as one would for solar panels, or other removable deck-ware.  It may be that the insurance company requires the masts to be taken off if secured on-land in the hurricane belt in-season, in which case this aspect becomes moot.

As an aside, in addition to a manual switch that stops/slows the blades (by shorting out the coils), the Rutland 1200 starts to electronically self-limit at wind-speeds above 35 knots (or when charging current is no longer needed). To my mind this is better than simply letting the the blades spin to dump excess current to a resistive load (&/or trying to slow/stop a rotor already exposed to high winds).  I have heard of Rutland 1200 units successfully self-limiting and surviving hurricane-force winds.  On that basis, I reckon that the unit can stay up in all conditions I am likely to encounter at sea.  Of course, as we have seen with IRMA, nothing, not even the masts themselves, can necessarily survive a full-on Cat5 or, more properly, the debris that is often associated with such conditions.

David
Perigee, SM#396
St Maarten


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] RE: Rebuild genoa furler, yes or no

eric freedman
 

David,

Gaetan’s shop re rigs the boat and does all mast work with the masts up.

They replace the rigging in pairs port and starboard of the same stay. They then move on to the

next pair of stays. I elected to not install the triadic insulators and install a turnbuckle instead. That stay was used for my now extinct weather fax. It also saves $500- by not using the Amel mast insulation kit.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, April 08, 2018 2:04 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] RE: Rebuild genoa furler, yes or no

 

 

Hi Eric,

>>> re: Why are your masts coming off?

When we checked with FKG, they said that when replacing Standing Rigging, they routinely un-step the mast/s.  Easier and quicker that way, also to be able to better rectify anything else that needs to be done up the top, if necessary.

We did a cost comparison with Gaétan in Martinique, with of Caraibe Greement // Caribbean Rigging making up the rigging locally using ACMO parts as you describe.  With FKG, the cost for the actual work was less, but then almost the same when including the cost of the crane (2x$400-).

For the ACMO rigging tax-free from the factory, add a little more due to the EUR1,200- air-freight.  But FKG is having container-loads of masts coming out from France, so we could get our pallet of rigging delivered here to SXM for an add-on coast of only USD250-, covering ground transport from ACMO factory to Z-Spars and some 'administrative' costs.

So, overall, about the same cost-wise to have the ACMO factory rigging exactly to AMEL specs rigging, done in SXM.

When I am up the mast, I can see some corrosion starting under the paint, so now would be a good time to do some cleaning, check the pulleys and sheaves, and so on.  We are upgrading our wind mast-head unit with a NMEA2000 unit. And we are starting to see some problems with radio aerials and lighting - I guess to be expected for a 2003 boat - so I will be running new VHF cables, and replacing those lighting fittings that are starting to deteriorate. 

As part of the 'wait 12 months' philosophy, we are also only now getting around to install our wind generator on the top of the mizzen.  This in particular easier done at waist height, than aloft.

So we elected to un-step the masts, and do everything we can here and now.  But with the forestay and genoa furler left for the AMEL specialists in Martinique.  I will probably get a rig-check and tune in MQ as well, just to be sure everything is as it should be.

Once all the work is done, I will report back to the group about our experience overall with FKG.

Cheers,

David
Perigee, SM#396
St Maarten


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wind or Water generator

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi David, You make me break out in a cold sweat.

If you are mounting a wind generator on top of the mizzen get one that can stay there in all conditions. Imagine you are at sea in building conditions and you get a forecast of wind strength beyond your generators ability. There is no way you will be going up there to get it down. There are many stories out there of wind generators disintegrating and losing blades in high winds. One I heard of recently a blade came off and speared through the deck. The Super Wind unit is one that can stay up there in all conditions for two reasons. The mechanically feathering blades and its very robust design and construction.It also has a stop switch that can be used if a hurricane comes through that exceeds 100 mph. A lot of others have blades that feather by flexing and require to be tethered to stop them in high winds. Not an option at the top of the mast.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 09 April 2018 at 03:28 "David Vogel dbv_au@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Greetings all.

And thanks for the discussion on these topics.

Answering firstly aspects of the wind generator.

I am about to mount our new wind-gen on top of the mizzen.  I was concerned about the weight of a D400 up there.  This siting chosen for best wind speed & clean air, giving maximum output for any given conditions.

I decided upon a Rutland 1200, weighing less than 8kg, vs 17kg for the D400.  Roughly the same power output curve.  Even though this is a relatively new unit (launched 2016), having spoken to owners and listened to installed units, nothing adverse to be heard on either of these fronts. Any support issues have by all accounts been resolved quickly by Marlec UK.

An extra benefit of this unit, is that the included charge controller is a MPPT unit, which also accepts input from up to 500W of solar panels (@24V) - reducing the problems of voltage mis-match than can occur when combining charging sources.  Although this does introduce a single-point-of-failure, having a standard Victron or blue-Sky controller on-hand might alleviate this to some extent.

Another decision point was that the Rutland units puts 'wild' or raw AC down the past, minimising voltage losses that might otherwise be incurred for mounting at the top of the mizzen, compared to a unit that puts out already-rectified DC down the wire.

The unit is a 'maintenance/service free' so, apart from new bearing every 5-7-10 years, hopefully nothing to be done there. 

One downside is that, in the event of needing to fix a broken unit, or in the event of forecast high winds, getting the unit down could be a handful.

Any insights on how to quickly and easily do this (from a bosun's chair and using standard rigging equipment) gratefully accepted.

David
Perigee SM#396
St Maarten
 


On Sunday, 8 April 2018, 9:19, "JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups..com> wrote:


 
 
Thanks Danny.
Greatly appreciated.
Best Regards,
Jeff


On Sun, Apr 08, 2018 at 12:33 AM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 
 
Hi Jeff,
the comments were on this forum a few months ago, probably directed at wind generators in general but he had a D 400 he would have been pleased to dispose of. I did wonder if there was something wrong with his install as he had had trouble getting it to work at all. 
For the replacement in the first instance I communicated with Super Wind in Germany to discuss possible servicing options. They were incredibly helpful sending me detailed annotated drawings and diagrams showing tests and then instructions on dismantling. In the event we found the housing worn from failing bearings. After 9 years continuous service you might expect that. So I went with the replacement. As I had installed the original with a knowledgeable technician I needed no help there. The owners manual provided has quite detailed instructions, clear, concise and understandable. It is a bit of a trick lifting the unit onto the top of the mizzen from the bosuns chair. If you go down this path Ill tell you my method. As to advice, you could do no better than contact Klaus Krieger at Super Wind even if you buy elsewhere although they are happy to ship. You will need the stop switch, two fuses, the controller and the dump elements as well as the generator. I got my originals all at once at the Annapolis  boat show and the extras were usable with the new unit.
Kind Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl


On 08 April 2018 at 13:56 "JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@opt online.net [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
 

Will do.
I'm  surprised at any negative comments on the d400. I've only heard good things. 
I need to educate myself on the different components involved. what dealer did you use, and how was their support in helping on the install?
I thought Ocean Energy's people were extremely knowledgeable and helpful, however they don't offer any wind generating systems, only solar and hydro.
I'm skeptical on the hydro, due to my thoughts previously expressed..
Thanks for answering my questions.
Best Regards,
Jeff

On Sat, Apr 07, 2018 at 08:21 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 
 
Hi Jeff,
Weight: Superwind 11.5 kg D 400 17 kg or 33% heavier. At the top of a mast that is significant. Output. Superwind is rated for 350 watts and the D400 400 watts. I have been happy with the output from my Superwind, I have read on the forum an owners scathing comments about the lack of out put from a D400. Perhaps we had different expectations. As I said before. Not much output below 10 knots apparent, 15 knots quite good, 20 knots plus, terrific. When the batteries are full the Superwind diverts to two heater type elements to absorb the surplus, means you don't have to monitor the battery status. Its whole design is aimed to independent long term operation. The new 353 model is even more robust designed to withstand ice falls. The output is the same. I saw no reason to change. Google them, they have a good web site.
Regards
Danny
On 08 April 2018 at 10:08 "JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
 
Danny,
It helps a lot.. The rail mounting was recommended by someone else, who contacted me directly. Never thought of that, and it makes a lot of sense. Outside the rail wiring isn't a major asthetically disturbing concept. 
I think that the wiring through the locker is also a good idea.
What is the weight comparison between the super wind and the d400? Any idea?
What are the output specs comparatively? Any idea?
A plate to mount the wind generator on top of the mizzen attaching it to the existing extruding plate sounds like an excellent option.  
When I return to the boat later this month, I'm going to envision the options and get a better feel for the actual deployment. 
I greatly appreciate your feedback.
Best Regards,
Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


On Sat, Apr 07, 2018 at 03:44 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 
 
Hi Jeff, The top of the Mizzen has a flat plate on it that extends beyond the extrusion. When we bought Ocean Pearl it had a hole at each corner. We made the mast for the wind generator with a matching plate that we bolted to the top of the mast with a strip of 3mm thick rubber between the two plates. Any wind generator you mount on the top of the mizzen must not need servicing or physical stopping, for obvious reasons. It must be vibration free, some will make the mizzen mast sing, and it must be genuinely quiet.. The D400 was one I looked at closely when we bought ours at the Annapolis boat show. We went around and around looking at all the options. The D400 is very bulky and heavy and I didn't like its clumsy swing to the side feathering in strong winds which is achieved by having a very short tail
Our wind generator is German made Super Wind. It is designed for remote locations and needs no service. I described its feathering and silence in my previous. After 9 years with no need for service at any time the bearings were worn and we replaced it this year. The technology remains the same. I contacted the company in Germany and they could not have been more helpful. We bought the replacement unit from and agent in New Zealand. I posted photos of the mast and month or two back while it was off for the change. Sadly I recently deleted them from my camera.
Solar panels. We have two 130 watt 12 volt panels linked together to give 24 volts, hence just 130 watts. We got them at Island Water world in St Maarten and they provided a clamp system that we used to attach them to the port side rail just aft of the cockpit, about 1/3 in 2/3 out if you get my meaning.Thy sit happily there and are easy to swing up out of harms way when docking.  Because I thought this may be a temporary site I surface ran the wiring down a staunchon across the deck, up and over the coaming and into the big cockpit locker and from there to the batteries via appropriate fuses and a controller. It has worked so well and is so unobtrusive we have left them there for 9 years. A cheap as chips solution and added benefit, works well. The surface mounted wiring is just not noticed so I've left that too I have in the past posted photos.
Hope this helps
Regards
Danny
On 08 April 2018 at 00:33 "JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
 
Danny,
A couple questions if you don't mind.
How did you mount the wind generator? What type is it? Have you heard of the d400, and any thoughts on it? How large, and where did you mount your solar panels?  9 years is a long time, and I have to assume that improvements have been made on the technology of both the wind and solar components. With that said, you seem to have a great combination that have got the job done with flying colors! That is amazing battery life, and speaks to an opitimal generating efficiency. Bravo!
Best Regards,
Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14



On Sat, Apr 07, 2018 at 05:19 AM, simms simms@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 
 
Hi Paul. I'll repeat my thoughts from past posts. We have had for 9 years a super wind generator on top of the mizzen.  mast. There is no vibration and no noise. It cannot be heard.. It has mechanially auto feathering blades and a stop switch which because of the auto feathering never needs to be used in strong winds. It never has to be used because of the sensibilities of night wstch crew or marins neighbours because you cant hear it.
I agree. Under 10 knots apparent wind the charge is slight. 15 knots good. 20 knots plus terrific. We only have 130 watts solar plus the 350 watt wind generator. I like having my bases covered. Sunny and windless ok. Windy and cloudy. Ok. Windy and sunny. Wow. Hiwever it was never my desire to be able to run all my high draw systems on these secondary chargers. I did not want to cross oceeans relying on diesel engines for my electrcity. Mid ocean storms can go for days with heavy cloud cover. Hence the wind gen. If i lost diesel generation i wanted to be able to keep my esential eletronics going. I could live without air con etc. As an aside. In my experience electric auto helms are not big current users. Radar is as are inverters. Auto helms should not be set too finely... A little bit of wandering does no harm and use a lot less juice.
Lastly I attribute the 8 years I got from.my flooded lead acid batteries to the combination of wind generator and solar. I thrashed them at times but mostly that constant charge looked after them
Regards
Danny
AM 299
Ocean Pearl



Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.

-------- Original message --------
From: "'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 7/04/18 01:38 (GMT+12:00)
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wind or Water generator

 
 
Paul,
 
We have an Air Breeze generator.. It is okay, not great.
 
It is one of the quietest systems on the market but can still be a little annoying. One of the best features is it can be turned off and locked with an installed switch.. This is also a big plus when at dock..
 
When on the hook, we turn it on at night. It will add enough charge to the batteries (15+ knts) that we do not have to start the genset in the morning. Solar usually picks up enough after 10am. We run all three refrigeration units, instruments (anchor alarm) and fans at night. During the day, it is off as we have ample solar. In the Caribbean, I can count on one hand the days where our solar set up has not been adequate to charge the batteries and offset our power needs due to cloudy conditions.
 
On overnight passages, it will be on at night unless the person on watch gets tired of hearing it. No matter what, we always seem to have to run the genset for about a hour at night when sailing due to instruments, radar and auto-pilot etc. The wind generator doesn’t produce enough to offset this usage, even in stronger winds.
 
Hope this helps confirm your hesitation on a wind generator.
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Guadeloupe
www.creampuff.us
 
From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, April 6, 2018 6:32 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Wind or Water generator
 
 
We have 850 watt of solar power that covers our need when at anchor, even a partly cloudy day. But during passage at night we need to run the Genset something that take away some of the joy of sailing.
I have been thinking of installing a wind generator as we are going to spend a few seasons in the Caribbean where it is not uncommon with strong wind and cloud days. But hopefully we will also cross the Pacific and I assume more or less following wind and the wind generator will not contribute very much.
Does anyone of you out there have any experience with the Watt and Sea or the Swi-Tec hydro generators. Or any other brand? Pros and cons with hydro generators? For you who have both Hydro and Water generators what would be your first choice?
 
Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 

 
 
 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Upwind with staysail

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Paul, watch for paralysis by analysis. Can be fatal.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl 

On 09 April 2018 at 02:34 "paul.cooper74@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks to everyone for your thoughtful responses.  My previous boat (a PSC) had a removable inner forestay which I rigged for offshore sailing only.   Used, and loved, it for heavy weather not upwind sailing.  With the single rig, a double-reefed main and staysail combo was perfectly balanced in heavy winds.  I suspect with the ketch rig the advantages would not be so great, which I actually experienced on our friend's SM2K in 40+ kt winds in the med.  No trinkette and no problem.


Bill, thank you for your advice on new ownership.  So much food for thought, I think my brain must be getting obese.

Paul C.

 


 


Re: Rebuild genoa furler, yes or no

SV Perigee
 

Hi Eric,

>>> re: Why are your masts coming off?

When we checked with FKG, they said that when replacing Standing Rigging, they routinely un-step the mast/s.  Easier and quicker that way, also to be able to better rectify anything else that needs to be done up the top, if necessary.

We did a cost comparison with Gaétan in Martinique, with of Caraibe Greement // Caribbean Rigging making up the rigging locally using ACMO parts as you describe.  With FKG, the cost for the actual work was less, but then almost the same when including the cost of the crane (2x$400-).

For the ACMO rigging tax-free from the factory, add a little more due to the EUR1,200- air-freight.  But FKG is having container-loads of masts coming out from France, so we could get our pallet of rigging delivered here to SXM for an add-on coast of only USD250-, covering ground transport from ACMO factory to Z-Spars and some 'administrative' costs.

So, overall, about the same cost-wise to have the ACMO factory rigging exactly to AMEL specs rigging, done in SXM.

When I am up the mast, I can see some corrosion starting under the paint, so now would be a good time to do some cleaning, check the pulleys and sheaves, and so on.  We are upgrading our wind mast-head unit with a NMEA2000 unit. And we are starting to see some problems with radio aerials and lighting - I guess to be expected for a 2003 boat - so I will be running new VHF cables, and replacing those lighting fittings that are starting to deteriorate. 

As part of the 'wait 12 months' philosophy, we are also only now getting around to install our wind generator on the top of the mizzen.  This in particular easier done at waist height, than aloft.

So we elected to un-step the masts, and do everything we can here and now.  But with the forestay and genoa furler left for the AMEL specialists in Martinique.  I will probably get a rig-check and tune in MQ as well, just to be sure everything is as it should be.

Once all the work is done, I will report back to the group about our experience overall with FKG.

Cheers,

David
Perigee, SM#396
St Maarten


Re: Bilge alarm - but what happens if ...

SV Perigee
 

>>> but what happens if ...

Good point.