Date   

Flushing the AC system with Barnacle Buster

Mark Erdos
 

Mohammad and Aty,

 

Hope this helps…

 

 

I use barnacle buster to flush the air-conditioning system. As others have mentioned this is basically a phosphoric acid solution. For the engine and genset I prefer to dissemble the heat exchangers and clean the various components away from the engine.   I prefer not to put acid in the strainer to clean the engine/genset as this is all connected to the water-maker.

 

On the 53SM the air-conditioning is cooled by circulating saltwater in one loop to all three units. The aft unit is first in the cooling cycle the forward unit is last. I am uncertain if other Amel models have the same set up. To flush the air-conditioning cooling system: I disconnect the outlet hose from the 220v air-conditioning cooling pump (this is the blue Calpeda pump if you have original equipment).  This would be the INPUT hose to the AC cooling loop. I then disconnect the hose from the through-hull in the forward cabin. This would be the OUTPUT hose of the AC cooling system. I make one continuous loop with a pump and these two ends. I set up a bucket in engine room that will have a hose (with filter) to a 220v water pump (I purchased a continuous run impeller sump pump from a hardware store with water hose connections and a regular water hose to make the loop). The pumps out hookup it is connected to the INPUT hose in the AC loop. Then I run a hose from the OUTPUT through the boat back to the engine room and into the bucket thus completing the loop. I add the Barnacle Buster Concentrate to the bucket according to the instructions and assume there is about 2 gallons of water in the system. Make sure a large fan is running to vent the engine room or place the bucket in the cockpit. It is not good to breathe the fumes. I run the pump for about 4-6 hours and flush the system. The longer the better. The cycle: Bucket – Pump – AC INPUT – AC unit 1 – AC unit 2 – AC unit 3 – AC OUTPUT – Bucket. It is truly amazing what comes out and makes its way to the bucket. I made a mesh filter to catch bits from the return hose so the solids do not re-circulate.  When done, reconnect the hose ends to the through hull and AC cooling pump. Turn on the air-conditioning to flush out any remaining barnacle buster.

 

This is pretty much an all day project and best done when at dock.

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Guadeloupe

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 10:30 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dessalator Operational Question

 

 

Hi Porter;

 

Can you please explain how you run the barnacle buster through the systems. I'm interested in the exact process you use. Also since this is an acid, does any one have any input on the potential down side?

 

Respectfully;

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, April 11, 2018 4:32 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dessalator Operational Question

 

Hi Mark and Debbie. 

 

This is exercised induced angina!  I agree with Mohammad and Aty but also consider that 

in short, could you have calcium build up in the non Volvo raw water side?  I’d disconnect the water maker (mark of cream puffs sage insight) . Run acid (barnacle buster) through the ac/ refrigeration and Onan systems and see what comes out then flush.   I see improvement in our  systems when I run barnacle buster, things get colder more quickly. Use less power. And I also see lots of calcium come out!  

 

Minutes later....

Upon further reflection. I’d really have a close look at the raw water distributer and everything that connects the high pressure pump to the Seachest. 

 

Hope you guys are well. 

 

Porter. 

Ibis 54-152. 

Iles de saintes. 

 

 

 

Excuse the errors.  

Sent from my IPhone 


On Apr 11, 2018, at 1:53 AM, 'Mohammad Shirloo' mshirloo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Brass;

 

Each of the systems you are running together require a healthy source of raw water to run. At the end of the season we run fresh water through all systems. We run each system individually so we can keep up with water demand. We accomplish this by shutting off the main sea water valve, removing the sea chest cover and using a 3/4 inch hose to supply the fresh water. We can run all systems individually with just one 3/4 inch hose at full flow. However, the Volvo running at idle requires more water than the single hose can provide. Therefore we use two hoses and by reducing one down to half flow, we can keep a constant water level in the sea chest.

 

The point being that the Volvo at 1250 RPMs (much more water requirement than at idle), the A/C and water maker running together will require a large flow of raw water. I would start by looking at anything that could restrict this flow. From the raw water valve not opening completely when you turn the valve, a rubber supply hose failure on the inside, a kink in the line, etc. I would also try shutting off the main sea water chest valve, remove the raw water supply to the LP Dessalator pump and turn on the sea water valve to see what kind of flow you are getting to the LP pump.

 

Respectfully;

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2018 7:17 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Dessalator Operational Question

 

 

We have an A54 with a 230v 160 LPH Dessalator, water cooled air conditioning, and a Volvo 110 HP engine. 

 

1) When operating the Onan, water maker, and the Volvo above approximately 1250 RPM the low-pressure gauge on the water maker drops from 20 psi to negative 10” hg, the high-pressure pump starves, and the water maker shuts down.

 

2) When operating the Onan & water maker everything operates correctly IF the air-conditioning is started first.  If the water maker is started before the air conditioner when the water maker is started the low-pressure pump pressure drops and the water maker shuts down due to low-output pressure on the high-pressure pump.

 

All tests were run with a clean sea strainer and a clean raw water intake pipe, it was scrubbed with a round brush that reaches through the hull.

 

What has been your experience?  Any thoughts?  Thanks in advance.

 

Mark & Debbie Mueller

A54 – 68

Brass Ring

Ft. Lauderdale

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

greatketch@...
 

Paul,

If you really can't carry the full genoa in more than 20 knots of APPARENT wind while close hauled, I would imagine there is something rather wrong with that sail's shape.  That should be 14 knots of true wind--or even a little less.  Something seems quite out of order.  That should not be a struggle for an AMEL SM.  Those numbers are far enough outside my experience I do not consider them a valid argument for retro-fitting a staysail.

On our boat, sailing close-hauled, as the wind picks up our first reaction is to furl away the mainsail at 23 knots of apparent wind or so, and carry on with full jib and mizzen.  The first reef into the jib we think about at 26 knots of apparent wind, and the second at 29-31 knots apparent.  Sea conditions also have a lot to do with the exact point at which we reef.

There is a multipart, and complex answer to how we go upwind in stronger winds.  Of course all boats start to lose some pointing ability once they start getting thrown around by waves and strong winds. But the ability to sail away from leeward dangers--even in strong winds--is a key aspect of boat safety.  We have never (yet!) felt like we were over-canvased without an option to make things better. 

It's important to in a discussion like this to be a bit rigorous with numbers.  It is easy for people's expectations to be quite divergent.  I expect in "easy" conditions for our boat's COG to be about 50-55º off the true wind.  We have never had a case where we were not able to have a COG better than 60º off the true wind.

My first comment on upwind performance is an admittedly smart-ass one:  Don't do that!  We will go very far out of our way, and wait a long time to avoid a lengthy beat to windward in 25+ knots.  But of course... stuff happens, and sometimes we are left with no choice.

We have been quite successful in making way working tightly closehauled in true winds of 25+ knots.  Most recently coming south in Buzzards Bay after exiting the Cape Cod Canal. We were making better VMG--much more comfortably--sailing at 58º to the true wind than we could motoring straight into a very nasty, very short, very steep chop. We did not feel at all like we were struggling at the limits of what the boat was  capable of, but higher winds than that, we haven't had the "pleasure" of needing to work upwind in.

Our genoa has a foam padded luff that appears to be well designed because we maintain a reasonable shape as we reef down. Without some way of "bulking up" the luff, sail shape goes all to heck as it is rolled. With a baggy headsail, upwind performance drops dramatically.

For sailing upwind in strong winds, even before you reef, be sure your jib halyard tension is sufficient.  Tightening the halyard counteracts the stretch in the sail that moves the draft back as the wind increases forces on the sail.  A draft too far aft is not immediately obvious to casual observation, but is does have a serious negative impact on your ability to make good progress to windward.  Jib halyard tension is an sailing adjustment, not something to "set and forget." 

For best upwind performance correct adjustment of the jib sheet lead position is critical.  Any  part of the sail from top to bottom that is not pulling evenly is just dragging you sideways. This is very much worth the effort to fuss with and get as close to perfect as you can.

As the genoa reefs, and the sheet lead moves forward, the effective sheeting angle widens a little bit.  That means the sail won't point quite as high, but... it also means the sail generates more power to punch through the bigger waves.

As the winds pick up, the boat's sailing balance needs to be managed. In strong winds, we typically sail with jib and mizzen.  If you try to sail with headsail only, you will likely experience a good deal of leehelm.  That will seriously impede progress to windward, and dragging the rudder through the water offset 10º or 20º will slow the boat down.  We use the mizzen not to generate extra boat speed, but to balance the boat so our helm is either neutral or with a little weather helm. Makes life a lot easier for the autopilot, too.

If we expect to be sailing in strong winds regularly, especially upwind, we have a smaller working jib that we use to replace the genoa.  A "Yankee" style sail with a high cut clew.  Great upwind, not so much downwind.  We used it extensively when we were working our way east in the Caribbean and it was very helpful.

I have always liked sailing a well designed cutter. I spent a fair amount of time sailing a Cabo Rico 38, and it was a sweet sailing boat.  But a cutter is most certainly NOT just a sloop with an extra stay added.  The mast is further back and usually shorter, the main sail is smaller, (usually) the headstay is out on a bowsprit, etc.  Cutters were developed not because they made it easy to carry smaller sails.  They come from the day when all sails were hanked on, so all sail changes were pretty much the same.  They were developed so that a boat could carry a big head sail WAY out in front, yet still be well balanced in strong winds when the mainsail was reefed.  On a well designed cutter, it is a piece of cake to tack even a large genoa with the inner forestay in place, if you know how.

In my opinion, an Amel SM does not make a good cutter.  It does not need staysail to balance as you reduce sail--the ketch rig takes care of it.  The distance between the mast and headstay is too small to fit a proper staysail and still leave room to tack the genoa, and the hull and rig were not designed to carry the loads. 

That was way more than I meant to write...  Sorry to be so long winded...

Bill Kinney
SM160 Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas

 
---In amelyachtowners@..., <osterberg.paul.l@...> wrote :

Hello!

I’m curious how do you without a stay sail go upwind in true wind exceeding 25 knots, with occasional gusts of +30 knots, in reasonable comfort. We go comfortable up wind in 20 knots apparent wind with the full Genoa, but if gusts exceeding 24 knots apparent we are definitely over canvased. therefore we start to furl just before 20 knots apparent wind. When we encounter apparent wind of 30 knots we found very poor up wind performance with the Genoa heavily furled and VMG is very poor.

.

 

Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Jib Halyard Sheave

eric freedman
 

Duane,

The size of the hole in the sheave is probably metric.

I don’t recall where you are but it might be difficult to get it in the USA or English speaking countries.

I believe they are not expensive and I would go with Maud.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, April 13, 2018 8:55 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Jib Halyard Sheave

 

 

Eric,

 

I have not written Maude yet.  I was hoping Mark might be able to inform me of the sizes.  If Mark doesn't have the information, then I'll probably just go up and retrieve the sheaves and axle, bring them down and measure them.  There don't seem to be that many sizes of sheaves, so I may have to order from Maude anyway.

 

That's not so high on my priority list right now though.  I'm about 70% of the way through an all new electronics suite, although right now I'm sitting in a hotel room while the boat is being fumigated.  We have (hopefully "had") a rat on board and after trying to trap him for a month with every conceivable bait we finally went nuclear with fumigation.

 

Duane

Wanderer, SM#477

 

 


"Bird Cage" TV Antenna

Duane Siegfri
 

Just an FYI -


Our TV reception has always been terrible, to the point we don't bother turning it on.  While installing a new masthead wind/weather station I removed it, and disassembled it on deck. After taking off the white plastic shroud I found the guts completely rusted out.  There is a mild steel plate inside that the "bird cage" is connected to, and that plate is then connected to the antenna wire.  With the mild steel plate completely rusted there is no connection, thus no antenna.  After all, it is 12 years old in a marine environment. 


Duane

Wanderer, SM#477


Re: Jib Halyard Sheave

Duane Siegfri
 

Eric,

I have not written Maude yet.  I was hoping Mark might be able to inform me of the sizes.  If Mark doesn't have the information, then I'll probably just go up and retrieve the sheaves and axle, bring them down and measure them.  There don't seem to be that many sizes of sheaves, so I may have to order from Maude anyway.

That's not so high on my priority list right now though.  I'm about 70% of the way through an all new electronics suite, although right now I'm sitting in a hotel room while the boat is being fumigated.  We have (hopefully "had") a rat on board and after trying to trap him for a month with every conceivable bait we finally went nuclear with fumigation.

Duane
Wanderer, SM#477



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

Paul Osterberg
 

Hello!

I’m curious how do you without a stay sail go upwind in true wind exceeding 25 knots, with occasional gusts of +30 knots, in reasonable comfort. We go comfortable up wind in 20 knots apparent wind with the full Genoa, but if gusts exceeding 24 knots apparent we are definitely over canvased. therefore we start to furl just before 20 knots apparent wind. When we encounter apparent wind of 30 knots we found very poor up wind performance with the Genoa heavily furled and VMG is very poor.

.

 

Paul on S/Y Kerpa SM#259


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

James Alton
 

Hi All,

   When first bought my Amel, I was thinking that I might add a staysail.  I liked the idea of having the smaller sail ready to use in higher winds as opposed to using a deeply reefed genoa.  Now that I have just two seasons on my boat, I have pretty much decided to keep the boat as designed.  While a staysail is a great addition to a sloop with respect to balance, the ketch rig really does not need the staysail for balance.  What I have done in place of a staysail is to have a working jib with a foam luff made for my boat which will set on the genoa furler.  This will be for the few  passages that would be to windward or strong winds were expected.  The boat is a joy to tack with the working jib.   For the rest  (most all of the time)  of the time, the original rig with the 150 Genoa seems like the best overall solution.   Those on the board that have advised newbies to sail their Amel as designed for at least a year are giving out some good advice IMO.  So far the only modifications that I have made to my boat are to undo the previous owners modifications.  (grin)

Best,

James

SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Apr 12, 2018, at 1:59 PM, Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi Eric , 

We have sailed nearly 60,000 miles in our SM , including two seasons in the Beagle channel and a rounding of Cape Horn . 
 We have sailed in the south Atlantic in 60 knots . 

We never felt the absence of a staysail . 

Ian and Judy, Pen Azen , SM 302, 
Preveza , Greece 


On 12 Apr 2018, at 20:38, eric@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi Amel-Owners!


For our bluewater-trip we are planning to install a 2nd forestay on our Super Maramu for strong conditions.


We are looking for recommendations and good solutions!? Where can we install it? Any mount-points? How was this made on your boat?

Our ship is from 1989, Nr. 12




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

Good afternoon Eric,

The addition of a Staysail comes often on the forum.

My boat came with one and I wish it was removable.

Here are pictures of how mine was attached.
http://www.nikimat.com/staysail.html
It was “trough” the deck and attached “to” the hull (as opposed to attached “to” the deck which would cause stress then eventually damages).
So if you really want to add one, I would definitely suggest going through the deck and attach it to the hull.

Therefore, as I first mentioned, it should be removable as it is a pain to tack with the staysail on the way.
You have to furl in the Genoa i order to tack and you are going to use the Genoa a lot more than the stay sail.

I think Heinz on Quetzal (SM2K #292) has a brilliant solution, as his “inner forestay” was removable and store near the shroud out of the way.
Another thing I like on Heinz’s vessel is that the inner reaches almost the top (as opposed a the 2nd spreader on my boat), so this way he doesn’t have to use running back stay.

Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Thu, 4/12/18, @gluexpirat [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu
To: amelyachtowners@...
Date: Thursday, April 12, 2018, 12:37 PM


 









Hi Amel-Owners!
For our bluewater-trip we are planning
to install a 2nd forestay on our Super Maramu for strong
conditions.
We are looking for
recommendations and good solutions!? Where can we install
it? Any mount-points? How was this made on your
boat?Our ship is from 1989, Nr. 12


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] 2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Eric , 
We have sailed nearly 60,000 miles in our SM , including two seasons in the Beagle channel and a rounding of Cape Horn . 
 We have sailed in the south Atlantic in 60 knots . 

We never felt the absence of a staysail . 

Ian and Judy, Pen Azen , SM 302, 
Preveza , Greece 


On 12 Apr 2018, at 20:38, eric@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

Hi Amel-Owners!


For our bluewater-trip we are planning to install a 2nd forestay on our Super Maramu for strong conditions.


We are looking for recommendations and good solutions!? Where can we install it? Any mount-points? How was this made on your boat?

Our ship is from 1989, Nr. 12


2nd Forestay on Super Maramu

Eric Merten
 

Hi Amel-Owners!


For our bluewater-trip we are planning to install a 2nd forestay on our Super Maramu for strong conditions.


We are looking for recommendations and good solutions!? Where can we install it? Any mount-points? How was this made on your boat?

Our ship is from 1989, Nr. 12


Re: Onan MDKD Starting Problems

greatketch@...
 

Woody,

I don't have the detailed part number for you, but I can give a clue about what's going on...

These are dual coil solenoids.  They have one large, powerful, high current coil that pulls the solenoid in to it's "activated" position, and a smaller, low power coil, that holds it there.  If the solenoid does not, or can not,  fully activate to its designed position when energized, the large coil stays powered up, trying to move the actuator.  It is not at all designed for continuous duty, and will quickly over heat--as you saw.

Before installing the new solenoid, you'll need to find out WHY the old one wasn't fully actuating.  It is possible that the problem is in the solenoid itself, and a new one will simply fix the problem.  But...if the movement restriction is in the parts the solenoid is trying to move, then the new one will likely burn up on first use...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas


Re: Amel logo

SV Perigee
 

Hi All,

We lowered our main this morning, and measured the horizontal length of our AMEL logo at 100cm, from the tip of the arrow to the rear-most of the feathers.

Yours aye,

David
Perigee, SM#396
St Maarten
  Prepping for replacement of
     our standing rigging


Onan MDKD Starting Problems

alanwood123@...
 

Having coaxed this old gen back to life it's died on me again :/  


Had an electrician bypass the galley switch then the starter solenoid began overheating.  It didn't seem to reach it's full 'pull' so I disconnected it and stopped the generator via the red stop lever).   


Then the solenoid/relay (see pic) began overheating (red hot and smoking after 20 mins) even when gen was only switched on and not even operating.


Now it won't start at all.. even with batteries fully charged from shore power. 


Despite looking in several Onan parts catalogues I can't seem to identify this particular solenoid/relay (if that's what it is - it's got 12v L95 embossed on it.)


Anyone any idea what's going on and/or can identify a part number for this solenoid/relay?  The closest I can seem to find is 307-1617 (K11 Solenoid/Relay) but it looks nothing like it. 


Many Thanks


Woody

#189 SV Haddock


ⒸⓄⓃⓃⒺⒸⓉ
Contributions to the video blog budget greatly appreciated!
Vlogs and mini vlogs from onboard the boat
Photos of the boat, the crew and other sailing families and characters
Updates and photos - as often possible - from the boat




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Comment on an older AMEL that lost it’s ig in a series of squalls

Brent Cameron
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Chain to rode. How do you ?

JOHN HAYES
 

Sure should have been a snig line as we call them here

It's a stainless hook that fits between two chain links spliced on to a rope about 20 mm diameter about 5 el m long   

We are probably talking abd and out the same thing

At sea we  clip into the chain and clear on the big cleat behind the lofrans  at anchor as clip on to the chain under the bow And attach to one of the cleats on the gunnel at the bow so if carries the weight of the chain over the bow thus avoiding chain noise at anchor 

John Hayes

 Nga waka SN 17

Wellington  

On Thu, 12 Apr 2018, 15:21 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners], <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

John,

 

Can you explain the last line please. Are you talking about a snubber line?

 

Finally we use a snug chain as a security back up and also at anchor so the boat swings on rope across the bow fair lead

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Guadeloupe

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Tuesday, April 10, 2018 4:56 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Chain to rode. How do you ?

 

 

My Santorin (Nga Waka) is 1991 and 46 feet so I guess similar to your vessel 

 

On purchase the boat was down in the bow, it transpired that the drain hole was full of dirt and had blocked up!   Draining the locker produced a lift

 

The chain was very rusty so I took it out and replaced it with 120 m of 10 mm Italian made chain, the best quality I could find in NZ at the time 

 

It and the35 kg anchor held fast through the entrails of 3 tropical cyclones at different locations in NZ’s north islands in the past 2 months

 

In practice 100 m of chain might make more sense as the chain is inclined to accumulate under the lofrans in the chain locker, blocking the flow which then necessitates going below removing the inspection plate and flattening the chain so the remainder can drop in

 

Mindful of the condition of the locker I inherited we block the chain and hole under the lofrans with plasticine or modelling clay before heading to sea

 

We also find that removing the inspection port allows the locker and chain to dry

 

Finally we use a snug chain as a security back up and also at anchor so the boat swings on rope across the bow fair lead 

 

Apologies if I’m telling you to suck eggs

 

Best 

 

John Hayes 

 

WELLINGTON NZ

 

 

 

 


On 10/04/2018, at 7:39 PM, smiles bernard smilesbernard@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hello fellow Amelians

Many thanks to all those on the forum who have given their thoughts and experience on anchoring options for my boat
(Currently 50m 12mm chain on older 46ft Maramu and I’m wondering about either adding more length in chain or rode)

I’d really like to hear from those with chain plus rode extension solutions.

what windlass do you have and how do you swap from chain to rode on the windlass when raising and lowering the anchor ?

I spoke to the Lofrans distributor in the uk which ended up raising more questions for me.

He was clear to point out that my Tigres is an all chain windlass the rope capstan is only for independent use and not setup to the allow transfer from chain to rope sections.
He said the chain stripper would cause problems with the rode.
If I want a chain plus rode solution I would need a different windlass.

Any experience most welcome as I’ve only ever had an all chain solution before.

Many thanks

Miles


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] satellite service providers

karkauai
 

Thanks again Steve and Mark. I've been very happy with my Iridium phone, even more so since I added a dedicated permanent antenna.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] satellite service providers

James Cromie
 

Thanks Mark - It’s too bad we didn’t get to catch up more while you were in Martinique. 
Thanks to everyone else for your ongoing thoughtful responses to the various questions posed.

This forum is a real gem. 

-james

On Apr 9, 2018, at 5:28 PM, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


James,

 

We use the company below. I really do not know how they compare to other companies since this is the only Sat-Phone company we have used. We find them very easy to do business with. Everything we do is one line or via email. They are very responsive. 

 

Network Innovations

4950 West Prospect Road

Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309

954-973-3100

954-973-4800

Web: http://www.networkinv.com

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Guadeloupe

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Monday, April 9, 2018 3:59 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] satellite service providers

 

  

Hello Amel owners - 

 

This is a off-topic for Amel-specific issues, but I'd like to ask for recommendations regarding service providers for satellite communication.  

I have used BlueCosmo for my Iridium Go, and I have been dissatisfied with the service.  I would not use this provider in the future.  



I appreciate the input of anyone willing to give some advice!



James

Soteria SM347

 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] satellite service providers

Mark Garver
 

Kent,

If you have the Iridium Extreme, it also has the dedicated SOS button that provides all of the additional information in my previous reply to Bill Kinney. Like the Go! you still have to activate the SOS button on the Extreme, but when in an emergency it is quite simple to simply press the button and hit the life raft. With both the Go! and the Extreme, an attempt will be made via a voice call to your device and text message as well. With the Go! a connected cell phone is required, but with the Extreme as soon as you hit SOS, the message is sent, then the phone also dials out. If for any reason the connection fails, the IERCC will immediately call the device back in an attempt to make contact, all while getting the responsible SAR agency heading to your location.

Hope that helps!

Mark

SM105 S/V It's Good

On Apr 11, 2018, at 01:27 PM, "Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:

 



Actually Kent, it’s not difficult at all. We keep our phones sitting on the nav station where our Go is on its mount, and right next to EPIRB #2 (#1 is already in ditch bag). We would just grab the EPIRB, GO, both phones, and toss them in the ditch bag on the way out.. If you don’t have the 10 seconds it requires to do that, I’m guessing you are having such a bad day, it won’t matter anyway.. 

We really like the unlimited data, texting, and 150 minutes of talk time a month we get at a very reasonable cost. On our recently completed 5000 mile passage to Hawaii, it worked flawlessly, as it has for the previous 3 years. It is really nice to collect lots of weather data twice a day, call Mom and Dad once in a while to reassure them we are fine, txt with friends to pass the time on watch, and not worry about how much data you are using. 

Hope you guys are doing well, and sailing in some beautiful part of the world. 

Aloha,

Steve
Aloha SM 72
KoOlina, Hawaii

On Apr 11, 2018, at 03:06, Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 


Thanks Mark & Bill.  I guess if I had to abandon ship and grabbed my Iridium phone, I could call for help.  Harder if you have to have a phone too.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM 243




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] satellite service providers

Mark Garver
 

Bill,

Good additional information. You do have to register the IridiumGo for the SOS button to go to the group in Texas that monitors SEND devices, who then makes contact with the appropriate Rescue Coordination Center (RCC) or other official SAR agency no matter where you are in the world. That group has prosecuted well over 7,000 rescues in nearly 170 countries from a variety of Satellite Emergency Notification Devices (SEND) as defined by the Radio Technical Commission for Maritime Services (RTCM). The group participates with RCC's around the world and annually hosts a variety of RCC's and other agencies to their facilities in Texas, north of Houston. What is great is that the SOS monitoring service is FREE, the cost of SOS monitoring and SAR coordination is covered by Iridium who pays the group in Texas for the monitoring.

Besides SOS, the company has a sister company that provides SAR memberships and MEDEVAC memberships, and many cruisers utilized the additional membership benefits, such as Rebecca on SV Brickhouse (not an AMEL lol). For instance, the SAR comes in various levels that reimburse the member for out of pocket SAR cots, up to $100k USD. The MEDEVAC is international and covers quite a bit for not a lot of money.

As Bill indicated, the device does have a dedicated SOS button so you can activate it directly from the device itself and your coordinates and other information such as Emergency Contacts, Vessel Type, Vessel Manufacturer, Hull Color, Length, EPIRB registration number, etc. are transmitted immediately to the International Emergency Rescue Coordination Center (IERCC), who immediately contact the responsible search and rescue (SAR) authority, and attempt two-way communication with you if you have your tablet or phone connected to the IridiumGO! to collect additional information about the nature of your emergency.

Lastly, not only is it great for both non-emergency communications and emergency communications, it pairs with my PredictWind Pro, gives me access to emails, other weather services, etc. In my mind it is a must have for a cruising boat, even if you only use the non-emergency features of the device.

Mark

S/V It's Good
SM105 S/V It's Good
Currently Gloucester, VA

On Apr 11, 2018, at 03:26 PM, "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:

 

And, there's more!


The IridiumGo also has a dedicated SOS function.  Even if you did not have access to a phone or tablet the IridiumGo on its own can send a distress call.  Without another device, you would not have two way communication, but you WOULD have a SOS message with location and with confirmation sent that would backup the EPIRB signal with the SAR authorities.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Great Guana Cay, Abacos, Bahamas



Comment on an older AMEL that lost it’s rig in a series of squalls

SV Perigee
 

Greetings all,

PERIGEE was the SM that went to the assistance of the circa late-70s sloop-rigged AMEL (we thought it was an EURO, but now we're not really sure), that lost the top half of it's mast about 350nm north of Antigua in November 2017.  [Reference made by Brent Cameron: Topic "Replacing standing rigging", 03-Jan'18]

The seas in the preceding 24 hours were less then 2m, sustained winds less than 15kt.  Passing squalls bringing higher gusts +10-15kt with confused seas, but not violent.  The evening prior, we saw distant lightning in the vicinity of were the dis-masted vessel would likely have been, but the conditions we experienced were not at all adverse.

The single-handing owner later reported that a shackle at the masthead had lost it's pin, bringing down the stay and then, in a squall, the mast.  The vessel received further fuel from other passers-by, and made it to it's original destination of St Maarten, where we met him and heard more detail.  The mast had by that time been re-built, and the owner has since left in his AMEL to sail the seas.

Hardy boat, hardy owner.

I hope that this update provides some clarity on the matter.

Fair winds,

David
Perigee, SM#396
St Maarten