Date   

Can 220 Voltage Boat Plug Into a 115 Volt 30 Amp Shore Power

pacificcool@...
 

I've just arrived in Fort Lauderdale (after sailing through Albert) and an staying in the Bahia Mar Marina which is a about $100 per day.  I intend to sell Pacific Cool and want to move to one of the private docks that rent for about $650 per month.  My boat is a 220 voltage boat built for a French owner and then bought by me.  But I've never been in the US with hr as I was sailing around the world as soon as I bought her.


I have found a dock that has only 115 regular  house voltage.  The owner tells me that in the past all of the 220 volt boats were able to plug in.  Does anyone know what might happen if I plug into the 115 power outlet?  I have 8 brand new Lifeline AGM batteries and would hate to do something bad to them.  I may be able to use my 370 watts of solar panels and a wind generator to charge the batteries, but that won't allow any AC power on the boat.  I'll turn off all my 24 volt equipment tomorrow and see if there's enough juice to just charge the batteries.  But I'd prefer to have AC power as well.  


Any help appreciated.  My boat is from 1995 and is a 53 foot Super Maramu with a 80 Amp Victron Battery Charger and D400 wind generator with 370 watts of solar panels. 


Bill Shaproski  

S/V Pacific Cool


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Chesapeake Rendezvous

Patrick McAneny
 

Mark, Diane and I sailed to the show every year for the last 35 years. I think we have only driven once. Parking is easier. Look forward to meeting ya, Pat


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Garver mgarver@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Tue, Jun 5, 2018 4:12 pm
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Chesapeake Rendezvous

 
It's Good can do either, but I do like the plan of a "rally" to Annapolis for the Boat Show, that could be fun for sure. Been to the boat show a number of times, but a) never sailed there and b) have only owned our Amel for a bit less than a year. I do like the reactions from people who see her!

Jennifer and I are looking forward to meeting everyone.

Mark
S/V It's Good
Severn River, Gloucester, VA

On Jun 04, 2018, at 03:00 PM, "n33077@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 
S/V Fiasco (Sharki) prefers warmer weather, ergo August date would be the first choice.  Oct dates can also work.

Aras


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Chesapeake Rendezvous

Mark Garver
 

It's Good can do either, but I do like the plan of a "rally" to Annapolis for the Boat Show, that could be fun for sure. Been to the boat show a number of times, but a) never sailed there and b) have only owned our Amel for a bit less than a year. I do like the reactions from people who see her!

Jennifer and I are looking forward to meeting everyone.

Mark
S/V It's Good
Severn River, Gloucester, VA

On Jun 04, 2018, at 03:00 PM, "n33077@... [amelyachtowners]" wrote:

 

S/V Fiasco (Sharki) prefers warmer weather, ergo August date would be the first choice.  Oct dates can also work.

Aras


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Dessalator Duo 160 - AC Motor for High Pressure Pump

Heinz Stutenbaeumer
 

I had the same Problem and I wrote to the factorie. Thiele is the anthers the gave me today. 
Bonjour,

Il vous faut 2 Condensateurs d'accompagnement moteur de 30 microfarads.

Restant à votre disposition.

Bien à vous.

Nicolas Bouffartigue
Secrétariat Dessalator

http://www.dessalator.fr/
tel : +33 (0)4 93 95 04 55 


Faire Winds 
Heinz SM2000 292 Quetzal


Am 04.06.2018 um 21:23 schrieb greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Paul,


If the motor runs at speed after hand starting, you can bet the start capacitor is the most likely cause.  

Unfortunately, I can't help you with the specifications for those, I have the DC only version of the watermaker.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: Cover for mechanical rudder indicator on Steering wheel hub

Steve Leeds
 

3-D printing seems like a very good idea, but I haven't found anyone to do it locally.

Steve
Yacht MACCABEE
Sharki #121


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bimini replacement cost

Heinz Stutenbaeumer
 

We were in Martinique last November and ask for the price. They wanted 2700,00 Euro for it. Incl. 2 windows. I can send you offer iff you give me your Email. 


Faire Winds 
Heinz SM 2000, 292 Quetzal. 


Am 04.06.2018 um 14:16 schrieb 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Roger,

 

We used Nabela to do some upholstery work for us when we were in Grenada last year. They did a very good job.

 

Nabela

Owner: Larry Carter

Phone: 473-444-5460 or 473-535-8299

 

Also, you are not far from Martinique and could get Amel to do the work (they will sub it out but will make sure it is done properly)

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, June 4, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bimini replacement cost

 

 

We are looking to replace our canvas. What should we expect to pay. Does anyone have suggestions as to who would be good? We are in Prickly Bay, Grenada.

Roger Mehan
Surreal SM204


Chesapeake Bay Rendezvous

Patrick McAneny
 

I have heard from several owners regarding what date would be good for them. It appears that early Oct. before the boat show would be good for virtually everyone, and August would not be doable for a few. Actually if in Oct. two additional boats would be able to make it , bringing it up to 14 boats. So even if all don't make it , it should still be a great turn out. 

So this would be the plan: 

Boats would arrive on or before the afternoon on Monday Oct.1 , a casual meet & greet, dinghy about bumming a beer here and there.

Tuesday , we could have a pot luck lunch , last time we hosted it on our boat , it was a bit crowded , this time it looks to be more boats /crew , 7 boats last time, 14 interested this year . So maybe a couple of boats could raft up for lunch this time. 

We would then have dinner at the Crab Claw , its large enough to accommodate large groups, which could easily be 35 plus.

Wednesday would be a free day to mingle or tour the town , with the possibility of a party ashore in the evening , but still to be determined.

Thursday , For those interested in going to Annapolis for the boat show as we are, we could have an informal rally over , normally about a four hour sail . We always just anchor out , but you could get a slip if you reserve one in advance.

That pretty much covers it for now. I will post again by mid August , asking for a head count to make dinner reservations at the Crab Claw .

If most of the boats attend ,as well as a few individuals , including Joel, who just confirmed he is coming , it should be a great turn out and a lot of fun. 

See Ya There,

Pat & Diane,

SM Shenanigans





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

James Alton
 

Bill,

   I did not make the connection of the most important function of the permanent 3 strand boom vang until you pointed out what should have been obvious, thanks!    

   James
   SV Sueño
   Maramu #220

  

On Jun 4, 2018, at 8:54 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I was always a regular reader of Brion Toss' forum.  I was disappointed when it became too much trouble to maintain.  Lots of really good information buried in there.  He is one of the people I have "met" through his writing who I really would like to meet personally. 


Can my boom hit the backstay?  Yes.  But... No.  

YES: The geometry of the rig would allow the boom to hit the back stay. (I just had to go on deck to check.) 

But NO: Amel, having thought of everything, has put a "permanent" vang on the boat.  A length of 3-strand nylon (stretchy!) from the boom to the base of the mast. Its primary purpose is to keep the boom from rising when unfurling the sail. It also prevents the boom from rising high enough to impact the backstay in a jibe.  It is long enough that it has no real effect on sail trim in any normal situation.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA



---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Bill,

   Thanks for your input and advice.  That is a good point about being sure to bring the traveller all of the way to the leeward side when sailing at an angle that could possibly result in a gybe.  

    I am curious about whether the boom on your boat can actually hit the backstay?    Have you tried raising it using the topping lift, then swinging it back and forth to see?   The main boom on my boat clears the backstay even when lifted so that it is perpendicular to the backstay, but not by much!  

   On the subject of shock loads (such as from jibing) and elasticity, I came across this snip from a forum response by Brian Toss whom I feel knows his stuff pretty well.  

"Shock loads are relative to acceleration and elasticity. They can be quantified and included in design load calculations if desired. The short form here is that the materials you are likely to use appropriately are also appropriate for any shock loads, if they are scaled to the design load, times a safety factor. As a counter-example, I've seen main sheets and vangs break gear when owners ill-advisedly replaced Dacron with HM line.

Brian’s complete post can be found at:  http://www.briontoss.com/spartalk/showthread.php?p=5662

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

  




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi, you will note that both the static main-boom Vang and the main and mizzen adjustable preventers are laid nylon rope, the most elastic available. (if used on a swing mooring the allowance for stretch under maximum load is 33% of length) The static vang caused me some mocking amusement when I brought my racing sensitivities to my Amel. Of course I was wrong. Its length is perfect. Because it is attached to a fixed tongue at the base of the mast when the boom moves out to the broad reaching then running position the vang tensions slightly, more the further out the boom goes. Until the sheeting is beyond the traveler it is slack, then when needed it takes up. Who wants to be messing with vang tension. Henri, I again salute you. However whatever your mainsheet is made of it is high risk to gybe with the sheet slack and uncontrolled, you may get away with it sometimes but eventually.......

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl 

On 05 June 2018 at 11:28 "James Alton lokiyawl2@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill,


   Thanks for your input and advice.  That is a good point about being sure to bring the traveller all of the way to the leeward side when sailing at an angle that could possibly result in a gybe.  

    I am curious about whether the boom on your boat can actually hit the backstay?    Have you tried raising it using the topping lift, then swinging it back and forth to see?   The main boom on my boat clears the backstay even when lifted so that it is perpendicular to the backstay, but not by much!  

   On the subject of shock loads (such as from jibing) and elasticity, I came across this snip from a forum response by Brian Toss whom I feel knows his stuff pretty well.  

" Shock loads are relative to acceleration and elasticity. They can be quantified and included in design load calculations if desired. The short form here is that the materials you are likely to use appropriately are also appropriate for any shock loads, if they are scaled to the design load, times a safety factor. As a counter-example, I've seen main sheets and vangs break gear when owners ill-advisedly replaced Dacron with HM line.

Brian’s complete post can be found at:   http://www.briontoss.com/spartalk/showthread.php?p=5662

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

  




On May 30, 2018, at 7:12 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I'll have to think about the gooseneck, and how it changes things...  a good thought...  And I agree the elasticity of the mainsheet can help... but only to a point.  If the mainsheet stretches enough to allow the boom to hit the shrouds, more problems can occur than are solved.


There is another really important piece of the puzzle, that someone else mentioned earlier in this discussion.  The position of the traveler has a huge impact on the amount of damage that can happen in a gybe.  

If the traveler is centered, and the boom is eased out only with the mainsheet, a gybe can be really dangerous.  With that much mainsheet out, the boom can rise when it crosses, when the mainsail goose-wings around the mast.  It can rise enough to actually hit the backstay as it comes across.  If the boom was out touching (or very close to touching) the aft lower shroud, when it comes across i t can impact the aft lower shroud on the other side.  Both of these scenarios are potentially disastrous both to the boom--and the rig itself.

If the traveler is all the way over to the leeward side, then these problems can't happen, or at least are minimized, because the mainsheet is so much shorter, and the boom is stopped halfway across, before it can get really moving.

One of the things I really love about the Amel set up is that the traveler is long enough to actually be really useful as a sail trim tool. When sailing anything upwind of a beam reach, we  adjust the traveler far more often than we do the mainsheet.  If we are sailing downwind, the traveler is always (no exceptions--ever) eased down to the leeward side.

There are aways two parts to preventing damage in an accidental gybe.  First is avoid the gybe in the first place.  A nice idea, but it will happen to e verybody.  The second part is to be sure the boat is set up so damage is avoided or minimized.

Bill Kinney
SM160,   Harmonie
Deltaville, VA, USA

 

 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Chesapeake Rendezvous

VLADIMIR SONSEV
 

We like more October dates.

Vladimir
SM 345 "LIFE IS GOOD"

On Jun 4, 2018 8:39 AM, "sailw32@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

To date ,12 boats have expressed interest in coming to the rendezvous as well as a couple planning on an Amel in the future and Joel. Diane and I have looked at when people are available to attend, and I have a couple of suggestions of possible dates.  I would rather have the decision be made by the attendees, so I am going to suggest two dates and would like for attendees to email me back direct asap the date they would prefer, and majority will rule. 


Later in the summer looks best. 

Option one :  Would be the third week in August , the weekend before Labor Day weekend, Friday 24,25 &26th


Option two: Have it quite later, in early Oct. on  Monday Oct. 1st , 2nd and 3rd, then for those interested in attending the Annapolis Boat Show, we could have a rally departing Thursday sailing over to Annapolis, the show is from Thursday thru Monday (Oct 4-8)


These appear to be the best two options, so would you email me and let me know your preference. Anyone out there that is interested in attending and has not emailed me yet please do, the more the merrier.


Thanks,

Pat & Diane

SM Shenanigans

sailw32@...


Re: Dessalator Duo 160 - AC Motor for High Pressure Pump

greatketch@...
 

Paul,

If the motor runs at speed after hand starting, you can bet the start capacitor is the most likely cause.  

Unfortunately, I can't help you with the specifications for those, I have the DC only version of the watermaker.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

greatketch@...
 

I was always a regular reader of Brion Toss' forum.  I was disappointed when it became too much trouble to maintain.  Lots of really good information buried in there.  He is one of the people I have "met" through his writing who I really would like to meet personally. 

Can my boom hit the backstay?  Yes.  But... No.  

YES: The geometry of the rig would allow the boom to hit the back stay. (I just had to go on deck to check.) 

But NO: Amel, having thought of everything, has put a "permanent" vang on the boat.  A length of 3-strand nylon (stretchy!) from the boom to the base of the mast. Its primary purpose is to keep the boom from rising when unfurling the sail. It also prevents the boom from rising high enough to impact the backstay in a jibe.  It is long enough that it has no real effect on sail trim in any normal situation.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA



---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Bill,

   Thanks for your input and advice.  That is a good point about being sure to bring the traveller all of the way to the leeward side when sailing at an angle that could possibly result in a gybe.  

    I am curious about whether the boom on your boat can actually hit the backstay?    Have you tried raising it using the topping lift, then swinging it back and forth to see?   The main boom on my boat clears the backstay even when lifted so that it is perpendicular to the backstay, but not by much!  

   On the subject of shock loads (such as from jibing) and elasticity, I came across this snip from a forum response by Brian Toss whom I feel knows his stuff pretty well.  

"Shock loads are relative to acceleration and elasticity. They can be quantified and included in design load calculations if desired. The short form here is that the materials you are likely to use appropriately are also appropriate for any shock loads, if they are scaled to the design load, times a safety factor. As a counter-example, I've seen main sheets and vangs break gear when owners ill-advisedly replaced Dacron with HM line.

Brian’s complete post can be found at:  http://www.briontoss.com/spartalk/showthread.php?p=5662

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

  


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Slowing down in increasing winds

James Alton
 

Bill,

   Thanks for your input and advice.  That is a good point about being sure to bring the traveller all of the way to the leeward side when sailing at an angle that could possibly result in a gybe.  

    I am curious about whether the boom on your boat can actually hit the backstay?    Have you tried raising it using the topping lift, then swinging it back and forth to see?   The main boom on my boat clears the backstay even when lifted so that it is perpendicular to the backstay, but not by much!  

   On the subject of shock loads (such as from jibing) and elasticity, I came across this snip from a forum response by Brian Toss whom I feel knows his stuff pretty well.  

"Shock loads are relative to acceleration and elasticity. They can be quantified and included in design load calculations if desired. The short form here is that the materials you are likely to use appropriately are also appropriate for any shock loads, if they are scaled to the design load, times a safety factor. As a counter-example, I've seen main sheets and vangs break gear when owners ill-advisedly replaced Dacron with HM line.

Brian’s complete post can be found at:  http://www.briontoss.com/spartalk/showthread.php?p=5662

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

  




On May 30, 2018, at 7:12 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I'll have to think about the gooseneck, and how it changes things...  a good thought...  And I agree the elasticity of the mainsheet can help... but only to a point.  If the mainsheet stretches enough to allow the boom to hit the shrouds, more problems can occur than are solved.


There is another really important piece of the puzzle, that someone else mentioned earlier in this discussion.  The position of the traveler has a huge impact on the amount of damage that can happen in a gybe.  

If the traveler is centered, and the boom is eased out only with the mainsheet, a gybe can be really dangerous.  With that much mainsheet out, the boom can rise when it crosses, when the mainsail goose-wings around the mast.  It can rise enough to actually hit the backstay as it comes across.  If the boom was out touching (or very close to touching) the aft lower shroud, when it comes across i t can impact the aft lower shroud on the other side.  Both of these scenarios are potentially disastrous both to the boom--and the rig itself.

If the traveler is all the way over to the leeward side, then these problems can't happen, or at least are minimized, because the mainsheet is so much shorter, and the boom is stopped halfway across, before it can get really moving.

One of the things I really love about the Amel set up is that the traveler is long enough to actually be really useful as a sail trim tool. When sailing anything upwind of a beam reach, we  adjust the traveler far more often than we do the mainsheet.  If we are sailing downwind, the traveler is always (no exceptions--ever) eased down to the leeward side.

There are aways two parts to preventing damage in an accidental gybe.  First is avoid the gybe in the first place.  A nice idea, but it will happen to e verybody.  The second part is to be sure the boat is set up so damage is avoided or minimized.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Deltaville, VA, USA



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Cover for mechanical rudder indicator on Steering wheel hub

INUS - BUSCH
 

Steve,
Good idea. I‘m interested in the outcome. 
Dieter
Fal-lera Sharki #135

Von meinem iPhone gesendet

Am 04.06.2018 um 15:38 schrieb yachtmaccabee@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Hi Dieter,

I have looked into having one machined in plastic, or cast in aluminum, both too expensive.  One possibility is home casting in plastic as I have a sample from another boat to work with.  I'll let you know.

Steve,
MACCABEE
Sharki #121


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bimini replacement cost

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hello Roger;

 

We replaced ours for about 900 Euros in Greece. Amel also sells them for the 54 and their quote from the original supplier was 1400 Euros. The one made in Greece was adequate but not to the quality and standard of the original.

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 


From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, June 04, 2018 1:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bimini replacement cost

 

 

We are looking to replace our canvas. What should we expect to pay. Does anyone have suggestions as to who would be good? We are in Prickly Bay, Grenada.

Roger Mehan
Surreal SM204


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Two questions

 

I think your question was directed to me. My suggestion is to buy the March pump that the Climma distributor recommends. If you are in the US, it is Coastal Climate Control. In the EU, it is Veco.

And, I believe with ACs, it is liters/min that is the most important number. 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Mon, Jun 4, 2018, 11:38 brass.ring@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

A couple of follow up questions concerning the Calpeda raw water pump for the A/C units.  You mentioned a March Mag-Drive pump that could be a replacement and better for the Amel bonding system.  Does this have something to do with the pump motor or that the wet end of the pump is magnetically coupled to the motor?

 

The Calpeda pump on my boat is rated at ½ hp while the March is 1/8 hp.  I was also looking at an Iwaka MD-70-R-220 magnetically coupled pump rated at ¼ hp used by other water cooled air conditioner manufacturers.  The head pressures seem to be the major differentiating factor, do you know the Amel/Climma system head pressure target?

 

Thanks in advance for your input.


Mark Mueller

Brass Ring  A54-68

Ft. Lauderdale


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] water squirting from engine vented loop

greatketch@...
 

The first time I saw the "continuous dribble" form of syphon break for an engine was on a Westsail 32 close to 20 years ago.  

It was such an obviously good idea, I chucked the "check valve" syphon break on my own boat and installed a small line from the syphon loop to the cockpit gutter at the helmsman's feet.  It gave immediate visual and auditory confirmation that cooling water was flowing, and that the syphon break was clear.  

When we bought our Amel I was very glad to see they had the same arrangement.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bimini replacement cost

Mark Erdos
 

Roger,

 

We used Nabela to do some upholstery work for us when we were in Grenada last year. They did a very good job.

 

Nabela

Owner: Larry Carter

Phone: 473-444-5460 or 473-535-8299

 

Also, you are not far from Martinique and could get Amel to do the work (they will sub it out but will make sure it is done properly)

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, June 4, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Bimini replacement cost

 

 

We are looking to replace our canvas. What should we expect to pay. Does anyone have suggestions as to who would be good? We are in Prickly Bay, Grenada.

Roger Mehan
Surreal SM204


Bimini replacement cost

Roger Mehan
 

We are looking to replace our canvas. What should we expect to pay. Does anyone have suggestions as to who would be good? We are in Prickly Bay, Grenada.

Roger Mehan
Surreal SM204


Re: Chesapeake Rendezvous

n33077@...
 

S/V Fiasco (Sharki) prefers warmer weather, ergo August date would be the first choice.  Oct dates can also work.

Aras