Date   

Storage in the galley Super Maramu 2000

Elaine Leishman
 


Hi everyone, I am a new member and a new owner of our first yacht, Amel SM hull no. 251. 

Moved onboard a few weeks ago and still unpacking and finding places for our belongings.  I am a keen cook and have quite a large pantry of what I consider essentials and having trouble organising the cupboards in the galley.  Would appreciate any input from the owners out there as to how they have gone about doing it.  The deep, top opening locker in the galley is proving to be the most difficult.  Also has anyone removed the bottle racks to gain extra storage.  Thanks in advance.
Elaine 

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

Stephen Davis
 


Bill,

Thanks for checking, as every scrap of information is helpful at this point. I am curious as to why you new cables would be 2 feet longer than the originals.

Steve


On Sun, Jul 15, 2018 at 12:33 PM greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Steve,


I have been scrolling through the previous owner’s  blog, and can’t find exactly when the cables were replaced.  I’ll guess and say about 2012.  They had trouble with the steering being very stiff, and tracked it down to the cables.  I don’t remember them having any special difficulties installing the new cables.

I have not dug into the details of the differences between the various ultraflex systems, other than to see that it is a complex mix of current, legacy, and obsolete systems!

Bill Kinney
Sm 160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

greatketch@...
 

Steve,

I have been scrolling through the previous owner’s  blog, and can’t find exactly when the cables were replaced.  I’ll guess and say about 2012.  They had trouble with the steering being very stiff, and tracked it down to the cables.  I don’t remember them having any special difficulties installing the new cables.

I have not dug into the details of the differences between the various ultraflex systems, other than to see that it is a complex mix of current, legacy, and obsolete systems!

Bill Kinney
Sm 160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Finally a real forum member

karkauai
 

Congratulations and welcome to the family!  Hope to meet you some day for a beer/wine/rum and get to know you.

Kent 
S/V Kristy
SM 243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

Stephen Davis
 

That is interesting Bill. I wonder if that would be the current replacement for our original cables which are also Ultraflex. Our cables are labeled M41 23FT E12G, which makes them 2 feet shorter than yours. They are an Italian company, but have a USA distributor located in Sarasota, FL. I’ll call them on Monday and see if they have a suitable replacement. 

Do you happen to know why your previous owners chose to replace the cables, and how long ago that was?

Thanks,
Steve


On Jul 15, 2018, at 08:50, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

For what it is worth, our cables were replaced a few years ago by the previous owner.

The embossed part number on the cable is Ultraflex M61Ft25

Ultraflex is an Italian maker of boat steering systems, M61 is one of their rack steering systems, and Ft25 seems to indicate that the length is 25 feet. Odd a European company would measure in feet, but it seems the case.

Bill Kinney
SM 160 Harmonie
Annapolis MD USA


Re: Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

greatketch@...
 

For what it is worth, our cables were replaced a few years ago by the previous owner.

The embossed part number on the cable is Ultraflex M61Ft25

Ultraflex is an Italian maker of boat steering systems, M61 is one of their rack steering systems, and Ft25 seems to indicate that the length is 25 feet. Odd a European company would measure in feet, but it seems the case.

Bill Kinney
SM 160 Harmonie
Annapolis MD USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Finally a real forum member

Mark Erdos
 

Arno,

 

If you stop at Bonaire, be sure to find us and say hello

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Curacao

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Sunday, July 15, 2018 9:03 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Finally a real forum member

 

 

Dear Forum,

 

Last week we had a very succesful survey of our new (to us) 54. The surveyor was very positive and the seatrial went very well. She will be on the hard for a few days now to have Amel work on some minor issues and do all the preventive maintenance to the underwater “stuff”. 

By the end of the month we will pick her up in Martinique and sail her to Curacao (weather permitting). Next we will have her on the hard in Curacao to start the revivial process (cleaning and polishing).

I would like to thank all people involved in this succesful week.

Moreover I want to give special thanks to Alexandere (Nikkimat) as he has been a fantastic support for me during for the last week.

 

Arno

Luna, A54


Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

Stephen Davis
 

Thanks for all the great responses. We felt fairly certain it was an alignment issue early on, as it is difficult  believe the cables could be at fault. After taking the racks out a second time, marking the center tooth carefully on both racks, putting it all back together, and still having the problem, it does not seem possible the alignment could be off.

This is what is leading us to the conclusion the cables could be at fault:

  •  More friction in both directions of steering than I think is normal. I just finished a 3 week trip on a friends SM2000 from Panama to Florida, and found the steering on that boat to be much smoother and easier than ours.
  • With the cables disconnected from the quadrant, and the wheel all the way to port, you can force the wheel a little farther. When you do this, the forward cable extends a bit farther, but the aft able is unmoving, and does not retract any more. as you move the wheel back toward center, the forward cable starts moving back in, and the aft cable stays put for a bit, and then makes an audible clunk, and starts moving.
  • No amount of cable adjustment available at the quadrant is enough to center steering.
I'm frustrated enough at this point after disassembling the steering system twice, that I'm willing to try most anything. If we are able to get cables from Amel, we will install them and see what happens. If anyone has something to try, that we have not yet done, I'm game.

The positive side of all this was to reinforce our opinion about what good boats we have. The emergency steering system is amazing. Other than taking an hour and a half to pull the pieces out, and rig the steering, it hardly slowed us down. The boat is amazingly easy to steer with the tiller, and we all got fairly good at it. You are fairly exposed sitting on the aft coach roof with your legs dangling into the cockpit, and we needed full foul weather gear to have a chance of staying dry. It helped a lot that we have bright new instruments at the helm to see wind and course info at night, as you were sitting a long ways from the display. We usually did 2 hour shifts on the tiller, and sometimes went down to 1 hour in the worst conditions. As you would expect, some of the heaviest conditions we encountered were in the last 1000 miles after steering failure. We completed a little over 5200 miles in 31 days for an average of 6.9 knots, so we are not complaining about anything, and will chalk it up as a great learning experience. The only thing we want for Christmas is to fix our steering.

Thanks again for the advice.

Steve and Liz
Aloha SM72



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Finally a real forum member

 

Arno,

It is good to hear that things went well. Alex is a great guy.

Have fun with your Amel.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be taken when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any referred to mechanical and/or electrical device or system.


On Sun, Jul 15, 2018 at 4:45 PM Porter McRoberts portermcroberts@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Welcome to the forum Arno, and the most profound education I’ve ever had!  You’ve got a great pusher man in Alexandre!  Best of luck. Interested to hear what you find in your new adventure machine. 


Porter
Ibis 54-152

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Jul 15, 2018, at 8:03 AM, arno.luijten@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Dear Forum,


Last week we had a very succesful survey of our new (to us) 54. The surveyor was very positive and the seatrial went very well. She will be on the hard for a few days now to have Amel work on some minor issues and do all the preventive maintenance to the underwater “stuff”. 
By the end of the month we will pick her up in Martinique and sail her to Curacao (weather permitting). Next we will have her on the hard in Curacao to start the revivial process (cleaning and polishing).
I would like to thank all people involved in this succesful week.
Moreover I want to give special thanks to Alexandere (Nikkimat) as he has been a fantastic support for me during for the last week.

Arno
Luna, A54


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Finally a real forum member

Porter McRoberts
 

Welcome to the forum Arno, and the most profound education I’ve ever had!  You’ve got a great pusher man in Alexandre!  Best of luck. Interested to hear what you find in your new adventure machine. 

Porter
Ibis 54-152

Excuse the errors.  
Sent from my IPhone 

On Jul 15, 2018, at 8:03 AM, arno.luijten@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Dear Forum,


Last week we had a very succesful survey of our new (to us) 54. The surveyor was very positive and the seatrial went very well. She will be on the hard for a few days now to have Amel work on some minor issues and do all the preventive maintenance to the underwater “stuff”. 
By the end of the month we will pick her up in Martinique and sail her to Curacao (weather permitting). Next we will have her on the hard in Curacao to start the revivial process (cleaning and polishing).
I would like to thank all people involved in this succesful week.
Moreover I want to give special thanks to Alexandere (Nikkimat) as he has been a fantastic support for me during for the last week.

Arno
Luna, A54


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Finally a real forum member

Courtney Gorman
 

Congratulations and enjoy!
Courtney 
svTrippin
54 #101
Grenada 


On Jul 15, 2018, at 9:03 AM, arno.luijten@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Dear Forum,


Last week we had a very succesful survey of our new (to us) 54. The surveyor was very positive and the seatrial went very well. She will be on the hard for a few days now to have Amel work on some minor issues and do all the preventive maintenance to the underwater “stuff”. 
By the end of the month we will pick her up in Martinique and sail her to Curacao (weather permitting). Next we will have her on the hard in Curacao to start the revivial process (cleaning and polishing).
I would like to thank all people involved in this succesful week.
Moreover I want to give special thanks to Alexandere (Nikkimat) as he has been a fantastic support for me during for the last week.

Arno
Luna, A54


Re: Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

greatketch@...
 

One idea on confirming the alignment:

Disconnect the cables.
Push the rudder hard over to port.
Turn the wheel hard to port.
Re-connect the cables, adjusting at the bulkhead near the rudder if needed, but ONLY if needed.

Now... can you turn all the way to the starboard stop?  Does it still "thump"?

By way of anecdote: The previous owners of our boat had a failure like you describe in the steering rack--losing multiple teeth.  Not long afterwards (a few months?) they had symptoms like you describe that quickly got worse, and required replacing the cables.  I am beginning to think there is a cause and effect.  

I can imagine ways that a bad rack could damage the cable, but for now it is just that--my imagination.  My imagination is not good enough to come up with a way slightly bad cable could damage the rack...

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA



Re: Finally a real forum member

Arno Luijten
 

Dear Forum,

Last week we had a very succesful survey of our new (to us) 54. The surveyor was very positive and the seatrial went very well. She will be on the hard for a few days now to have Amel work on some minor issues and do all the preventive maintenance to the underwater “stuff”. 
By the end of the month we will pick her up in Martinique and sail her to Curacao (weather permitting). Next we will have her on the hard in Curacao to start the revivial process (cleaning and polishing).
I would like to thank all people involved in this succesful week.
Moreover I want to give special thanks to Alexandere (Nikkimat) as he has been a fantastic support for me during for the last week.

Arno
Luna, A54


Re: Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

John Clark
 

Hi Steve,
   Agree with Kent, check alignment before doing the cable replacement.   

FYI:  On my SM #37, the previous owner told me that the steering cables failed while they were in French Polynesia.  Amel initially refused to believe the cables failed but finally sent a technician with replacements from New Caledonia.  Amel reportedly performed the replacement for free. 

            Regards,  John 

SV Annie SM #37
Le Marin 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

Patrick McAneny
 

Steve, My boat is a couple of years newer , but it also did not come with a linear drive. When I looked at a newer model with the linear drive I saw that Amel had modified the aft compartment to accommodate the drive unit. Not willing to cut out stringers, and fabricating a new quadrant , I almost gave up on adding linear drive to my boat. I stood and scratched my head for awhile, and came up with a design/installation that worked out very well . If you decide to add a linear drive,take a look at the photo section under Shenanigans and will see what I did. The linear drive is superior to the rotary and I guess I don't need to tell you that redundancy is a good thing. 
Good Luck,
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Sun, Jul 15, 2018 5:39 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

 
Hey Bill,

I did leave the autopilot completely out of the loop when testing, so that is not the issue. I found it hard to believe the incredibly robust looking steering cables could fail, but we feel like we have eliminated all other possibilities. I’m even wondering if a problem with a cable didn’t lead to premature failure of the rack. I emailed Maude Thursday to see if the cables are available, but have not heard back yet. I’m hoping Olivier may chime in on this one, as I suspect he has more insight into this system than anyone else. Liz and I could probably add a chapter to your book on SM steering rack and pinion replacement after taking it apart twice. The second time was far easier, but it was certainly frustrating to still have steering problems. 

Aloha,

Steve and Liz

On Jul 14, 2018, at 19:44, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@yahoogroups..com> wrote:

 
Steve,

Congratulations to you, Liz, and to Amel. Wow!

I know this may sound nuts, but... I assume that you are going to have to replace the cables, but I wasn't clear if you totally eliminated the autopilot drive motor & clutch. I admit that I cannot believe the fault is anywhere but the offending cable.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sun, Jul 15, 2018, 04:20 flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Seeking knowledgeable input on troubleshooting a steering issue on 1992-vintage SM.
 
Approximately 4000 nm into the 5200 nm passage from Panama to Hawaii, we experienced failure of the wheel steering system. Initial symptoms included intermittent clunking noises coming from the rack and pinion area, intermittent freezing of the steering wheel part of the way through the steering arc when turning in one direction only, but normal steering in the other direction.
 
Although we hand steered as much as possible after the initial symptoms appeared, the symptoms continued to worsen until we had complete failure of the wheel-steering system. SMs of this vintage have only a single, chain-driven rotary-drive autopilot, so we could not use the linear-drive autopilot that newer SMs are blessed with as a back-up steering system. Instead, we rigged the back-up tiller and spent the next 1200 nm out in the weather on the aft coach roof hand steering with the very responsive and robust Amel tiller system.
 
The yacht steered well with the tiller, and we were able to steer through the entire arc of the quadrant, from stop to stop, without resistance. Therefore we suspected the steering issue was unrelated to the rudder or steering quadrant. (The procedure for rigging the tiller requires that you disconnect the steering cables/rods from the quadrant.)
 
Upon landfall in Hawaii, we determined that several of the teeth had been broken out of both of the racks. Maude shipped us a new pair of racks as well as a new steering wheel shaft (the forward section of which incorporates the pinion) so we could replace our entire 26-year-old rack and pinion system.
 
We replaced both racks and the pinion using copious amounts of grease. We made sure to align the pinion in the very center of each rack with no tension on the steering rods / cables during the installation.
 
However, during a test sail, we were disappointed to find that we still have a mild, quiet thunking, primarily perceived through hands on the wheel rather than ears, while steering left using the wheel. Additionally, we are not able to steer through the full arc.
 
When turning starboard using the wheel, we can easily steer to the rudder stop. However, when steering to the port using the wheel, the quadrant arm stops about an inch prior to the rudder stop. While at the wheel, this symptom manifests as only getting 1.2 full turns of the steering wheel when steering to port,while the wheel turns 1.7 turns when turning to the starboard.
 
We feel confident these symptoms are not due to running out of teeth in either of the racks because we disassembled the brand new rack and pinion system, closely examined it, re-assembled it, and reinstalled the whole darned thing a second time to make sure we had not misaligned it. Upon examination, we were able to see that the new pinion had never rolled even close to the end teeth of either of the new racks.
 
We feel confident this symptom is not due to a problem with the rudder itself because, with the steering cables / rods disconnected from the quadrant, we are able to turn the quadrant with our bare hands through the full designed swing of the rudder from rudder stop to rudder stop in a smooth motion.
 
Another clue: We turn the wheel as far port as possible until it stops itself prematurely with the quadrant arm about an inch from the rudder stop. Next,we disconnect the steering cables / rods from the quadrant. Then, we apply significant muscle to the wheel and watch what happens to the exposed ends of the steering cables. The forward-most cable wants to continue to obey the wheel’s command and lengthen its protrusion from the cable sheath. It cannot protrude further, but you can see it trying to do so as you apply pressure to the wheel. However, the aft steering rod /cable,which should be obeying the wheel's command by shortening its protrusion, (moving more of the steering rod back into the sheath), instead refuses to move any more of the protruding rod back into the sheath. While we perform this test,if we place a hand on each of the sheaths while exerting pressure on the wheel at the far left turn position, we can feel a clunking inside of the aft steering cable sheath. We do not feel a similar clunking within the forward cable sheath.
 
Further examination of the visible portion of the steering cables didn't show any signs of wear or tear of the sheathing. The cable run from the racks through the cockpit lazarette, and takes the same smooth gentle pathway it always has. It disappears into a conduit which is glassed into the hull-side interior wall of the life raft locker and continues through a similar glassed-in conduit along the aft bathroom hull-side until finally emerging in the aft stateroom and heading beneath the bed. Beneath the bed, the cables go through a shallow, gentle curve to the spillwell devices that shepherd them through the structural stringer beneath the bed, allowing them to connect at the correct angle to the quadrant arms.
 
Further examination of the function of the misbehaving steering rod / cable while detached from the quadrant but still attached to the rack and pinion shows that,when turning the wheel to starboard,the rod appropriately lengthens, emerging from within the sheath without apparent friction. When turning the wheel left, the fully-protruding rod sucks itself back into the sheath without apparent friction until it suddenly stops a few cm short of where it should stop.
 
If the rod was broken somewhere within the sheath, totally transected, it seems that it might be able to follow the wheel’s command to protrude, but it wouldn’t then be able to follow the wheel’s command to suck itself back into the sheath. If there was some sort of kink or obstruction within the sheath, it seems we would have symptoms of friction with movement of the rod within the sheath in both directions, not just while moving the quadrant-end of the rod back into the sheath.
 
If anyone has experience with similar symptoms,or has knowledge of what is causing this very specific set of symptoms, your input would be greatly appreciated. Olivier, I hope you are reading this I suspect you have more knowledge of this system than all of us combined.
 
Thanks in advance for your input.
 
Steve and Liz Davis World Record Holders for Tiller steering an SM:)
Aloha SM72
Ko Olina, Hawaii


Re: Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

John Clark
 

Hi Steve,
   Agree with Kent, check alignment before doing the cable replacement.   

FYI:  On my SM #37, the previous owner told me that the steering cables failed while they were in French Polynesia.  Amel initially refused to believe the cables failed but finally sent a technician with replacements from New Caledonia.  Amel reportedly performed the replacement for free. 

            Regards,  John 

SV Annie SM #37
Le Marin 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

karkauai
 

Bet you were exhausted by the time you reached HI.  Sorry to hear you had that experience , but glad to hear the tiller works as advertised.

For what it’s worth, Kristy SM243 has exactly 1.5 turns of the wheel to each rudder stop.  It sounds like your wheel turns a full 3 turns from one side to the other.  Could it still be an alignment issue?

If you disconnect the cable at both ends, can you manually run it all the way in and out?  Any “thump”?

Glad you got back OK, Steve.

Malama mai ka’i nui loa lawe, ko’u ho’aloha.

Kent
S/V Kristy
SM243


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

Stephen Davis
 

Hey Bill,

I did leave the autopilot completely out of the loop when testing, so that is not the issue. I found it hard to believe the incredibly robust looking steering cables could fail, but we feel like we have eliminated all other possibilities. I’m even wondering if a problem with a cable didn’t lead to premature failure of the rack. I emailed Maude Thursday to see if the cables are available, but have not heard back yet. I’m hoping Olivier may chime in on this one, as I suspect he has more insight into this system than anyone else. Liz and I could probably add a chapter to your book on SM steering rack and pinion replacement after taking it apart twice. The second time was far easier, but it was certainly frustrating to still have steering problems. 

Aloha,

Steve and Liz

On Jul 14, 2018, at 19:44, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Steve,

Congratulations to you, Liz, and to Amel. Wow!

I know this may sound nuts, but... I assume that you are going to have to replace the cables, but I wasn't clear if you totally eliminated the autopilot drive motor & clutch. I admit that I cannot believe the fault is anywhere but the offending cable.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sun, Jul 15, 2018, 04:20 flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 


Seeking knowledgeable input on troubleshooting a steering issue on 1992-vintage SM.

 

Approximately 4000 nm into the 5200 nm passage from Panama to Hawaii, we experienced failure of the wheel steering system. Initial symptoms included intermittent clunking noises coming from the rack and pinion area, intermittent freezing of the steering wheel part of the way through the steering arc when turning in one direction only, but normal steering in the other direction.

 

Although we hand steered as much as possible after the initial symptoms appeared, the symptoms continued to worsen until we had complete failure of the wheel-steering system. SMs of this vintage have only a single, chain-driven rotary-drive autopilot, so we could not use the linear-drive autopilot that newer SMs are blessed with as a back-up steering system. Instead, we rigged the back-up tiller and spent the next 1200 nm out in the weather on the aft coach roof hand steering with the very responsive and robust Amel tiller system.

 

The yacht steered well with the tiller, and we were able to steer through the entire arc of the quadrant, from stop to stop, without resistance. Therefore we suspected the steering issue was unrelated to the rudder or steering quadrant. (The procedure for rigging the tiller requires that you disconnect the steering cables/rods from the quadrant.)

 

Upon landfall in Hawaii, we determined that several of the teeth had been broken out of both of the racks. Maude shipped us a new pair of racks as well as a new steering wheel shaft (the forward section of which incorporates the pinion) so we could replace our entire 26-year-old rack and pinion system.

 

We replaced both racks and the pinion using copious amounts of grease. We made sure to align the pinion in the very center of each rack with no tension on the steering rods / cables during the installation.

 

However, during a test sail, we were disappointed to find that we still have a mild, quiet thunking, primarily perceived through hands on the wheel rather than ears, while steering left using the wheel. Additionally, we are not able to steer through the full arc.

 

When turning starboard using the wheel, we can easily steer to the rudder stop. However, when steering to the port using the wheel, the quadrant arm stops about an inch prior to the rudder stop. While at the wheel, this symptom manifests as only getting 1.2 full turns of the steering wheel when steering to port,while the wheel turns 1.7 turns when turning to the starboard.

 

We feel confident these symptoms are not due to running out of teeth in either of the racks because we disassembled the brand new rack and pinion system, closely examined it, re-assembled it, and reinstalled the whole darned thing a second time to make sure we had not misaligned it. Upon examination, we were able to see that the new pinion had never rolled even close to the end teeth of either of the new racks.

 

We feel confident this symptom is not due to a problem with the rudder itself because, with the steering cables / rods disconnected from the quadrant, we are able to turn the quadrant with our bare hands through the full designed swing of the rudder from rudder stop to rudder stop in a smooth motion.

 

Another clue: We turn the wheel as far port as possible until it stops itself prematurely with the quadrant arm about an inch from the rudder stop. Next,we disconnect the steering cables / rods from the quadrant. Then, we apply significant muscle to the wheel and watch what happens to the exposed ends of the steering cables. The forward-most cable wants to continue to obey the wheel’s command and lengthen its protrusion from the cable sheath. It cannot protrude further, but you can see it trying to do so as you apply pressure to the wheel. However, the aft steering rod /cable,which should be obeying the wheel's command by shortening its protrusion, (moving more of the steering rod back into the sheath), instead refuses to move any more of the protruding rod back into the sheath. While we perform this test,if we place a hand on each of the sheaths while exerting pressure on the wheel at the far left turn position, we can feel a clunking inside of the aft steering cable sheath. We do not feel a similar clunking within the forward cable sheath.

 

Further examination of the visible portion of the steering cables didn't show any signs of wear or tear of the sheathing. The cable run from the racks through the cockpit lazarette, and takes the same smooth gentle pathway it always has. It disappears into a conduit which is glassed into the hull-side interior wall of the life raft locker and continues through a similar glassed-in conduit along the aft bathroom hull-side until finally emerging in the aft stateroom and heading beneath the bed. Beneath the bed, the cables go through a shallow, gentle curve to the spillwell devices that shepherd them through the structural stringer beneath the bed, allowing them to connect at the correct angle to the quadrant arms.

 

Further examination of the function of the misbehaving steering rod / cable while detached from the quadrant but still attached to the rack and pinion shows that,when turning the wheel to starboard,the rod appropriately lengthens, emerging from within the sheath without apparent friction. When turning the wheel left, the fully-protruding rod sucks itself back into the sheath without apparent friction until it suddenly stops a few cm short of where it should stop.

 

If the rod was broken somewhere within the sheath, totally transected, it seems that it might be able to follow the wheel’s command to protrude, but it wouldn’t then be able to follow the wheel’s command to suck itself back into the sheath. If there was some sort of kink or obstruction within the sheath, it seems we would have symptoms of friction with movement of the rod within the sheath in both directions, not just while moving the quadrant-end of the rod back into the sheath.

 

If anyone has experience with similar symptoms,or has knowledge of what is causing this very specific set of symptoms, your input would be greatly appreciated. Olivier, I hope you are reading this I suspect you have more knowledge of this system than all of us combined.

 

Thanks in advance for your input.

 

Steve and Liz Davis World Record Holders for Tiller steering an SM:)

Aloha SM72

Ko Olina, Hawaii



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on 1992 SM72 "Aloha"

 

Steve,

Congratulations to you, Liz, and to Amel. Wow!

I know this may sound nuts, but... I assume that you are going to have to replace the cables, but I wasn't clear if you totally eliminated the autopilot drive motor & clutch. I admit that I cannot believe the fault is anywhere but the offending cable.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970


On Sun, Jul 15, 2018, 04:20 flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 


Seeking knowledgeable input on troubleshooting a steering issue on 1992-vintage SM.

 

Approximately 4000 nm into the 5200 nm passage from Panama to Hawaii, we experienced failure of the wheel steering system. Initial symptoms included intermittent clunking noises coming from the rack and pinion area, intermittent freezing of the steering wheel part of the way through the steering arc when turning in one direction only, but normal steering in the other direction.

 

Although we hand steered as much as possible after the initial symptoms appeared, the symptoms continued to worsen until we had complete failure of the wheel-steering system. SMs of this vintage have only a single, chain-driven rotary-drive autopilot, so we could not use the linear-drive autopilot that newer SMs are blessed with as a back-up steering system. Instead, we rigged the back-up tiller and spent the next 1200 nm out in the weather on the aft coach roof hand steering with the very responsive and robust Amel tiller system.

 

The yacht steered well with the tiller, and we were able to steer through the entire arc of the quadrant, from stop to stop, without resistance. Therefore we suspected the steering issue was unrelated to the rudder or steering quadrant. (The procedure for rigging the tiller requires that you disconnect the steering cables/rods from the quadrant.)

 

Upon landfall in Hawaii, we determined that several of the teeth had been broken out of both of the racks. Maude shipped us a new pair of racks as well as a new steering wheel shaft (the forward section of which incorporates the pinion) so we could replace our entire 26-year-old rack and pinion system.

 

We replaced both racks and the pinion using copious amounts of grease. We made sure to align the pinion in the very center of each rack with no tension on the steering rods / cables during the installation.

 

However, during a test sail, we were disappointed to find that we still have a mild, quiet thunking, primarily perceived through hands on the wheel rather than ears, while steering left using the wheel. Additionally, we are not able to steer through the full arc.

 

When turning starboard using the wheel, we can easily steer to the rudder stop. However, when steering to the port using the wheel, the quadrant arm stops about an inch prior to the rudder stop. While at the wheel, this symptom manifests as only getting 1.2 full turns of the steering wheel when steering to port,while the wheel turns 1.7 turns when turning to the starboard.

 

We feel confident these symptoms are not due to running out of teeth in either of the racks because we disassembled the brand new rack and pinion system, closely examined it, re-assembled it, and reinstalled the whole darned thing a second time to make sure we had not misaligned it. Upon examination, we were able to see that the new pinion had never rolled even close to the end teeth of either of the new racks.

 

We feel confident this symptom is not due to a problem with the rudder itself because, with the steering cables / rods disconnected from the quadrant, we are able to turn the quadrant with our bare hands through the full designed swing of the rudder from rudder stop to rudder stop in a smooth motion.

 

Another clue: We turn the wheel as far port as possible until it stops itself prematurely with the quadrant arm about an inch from the rudder stop. Next,we disconnect the steering cables / rods from the quadrant. Then, we apply significant muscle to the wheel and watch what happens to the exposed ends of the steering cables. The forward-most cable wants to continue to obey the wheel’s command and lengthen its protrusion from the cable sheath. It cannot protrude further, but you can see it trying to do so as you apply pressure to the wheel. However, the aft steering rod /cable,which should be obeying the wheel's command by shortening its protrusion, (moving more of the steering rod back into the sheath), instead refuses to move any more of the protruding rod back into the sheath. While we perform this test,if we place a hand on each of the sheaths while exerting pressure on the wheel at the far left turn position, we can feel a clunking inside of the aft steering cable sheath. We do not feel a similar clunking within the forward cable sheath.

 

Further examination of the visible portion of the steering cables didn't show any signs of wear or tear of the sheathing. The cable run from the racks through the cockpit lazarette, and takes the same smooth gentle pathway it always has. It disappears into a conduit which is glassed into the hull-side interior wall of the life raft locker and continues through a similar glassed-in conduit along the aft bathroom hull-side until finally emerging in the aft stateroom and heading beneath the bed. Beneath the bed, the cables go through a shallow, gentle curve to the spillwell devices that shepherd them through the structural stringer beneath the bed, allowing them to connect at the correct angle to the quadrant arms.

 

Further examination of the function of the misbehaving steering rod / cable while detached from the quadrant but still attached to the rack and pinion shows that,when turning the wheel to starboard,the rod appropriately lengthens, emerging from within the sheath without apparent friction. When turning the wheel left, the fully-protruding rod sucks itself back into the sheath without apparent friction until it suddenly stops a few cm short of where it should stop.

 

If the rod was broken somewhere within the sheath, totally transected, it seems that it might be able to follow the wheel’s command to protrude, but it wouldn’t then be able to follow the wheel’s command to suck itself back into the sheath. If there was some sort of kink or obstruction within the sheath, it seems we would have symptoms of friction with movement of the rod within the sheath in both directions, not just while moving the quadrant-end of the rod back into the sheath.

 

If anyone has experience with similar symptoms,or has knowledge of what is causing this very specific set of symptoms, your input would be greatly appreciated. Olivier, I hope you are reading this I suspect you have more knowledge of this system than all of us combined.

 

Thanks in advance for your input.

 

Steve and Liz Davis World Record Holders for Tiller steering an SM:)

Aloha SM72

Ko Olina, Hawaii



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Genoa electric furling gears

Kostas Ioannidis <kostas_ioannidis@...>
 

Dear Duane,
Sorry I didn’t reply but I wasn’t very sure how to do that...and we’ve had guests on board.......


On Tuesday, July 10, 2018, 3:40:03 PM GMT+3, sailor63109@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:


 

Kostas,


Could you post the plans Maude sends you in the files section?  As time goes on Amel will be less and less likely to stock them and the plans will help a lot.

Much appreciated,
Duane
Wanderer, SM#477