Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

Alan Leslie
 

Hello all,
We are members of OCC since 2016.
Never been to a meeting but encountered fellow members in ports in the Pacific and always enjoyed their company.
Met Port Officers who have been extremely helpful in tracking down services like riggers, refrigeration mechanics.
I've written articles that have been published in the magazine ....
I like it and definitely think it's worthwhile
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Elongated hole on conical coupling

Alan Leslie
 

Hi Craig

They were not "loose" but I could take up about a sixth of a turn on each.

Nyloc nuts, washer, no Loctite...I might do that.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437
Bound for Vanuatu


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Mark,

Liz and I have been members of the OCC for about a year and a half. We are also the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and have enjoyed helping some other members with some logistics for planning a trip to Hawaii. We found the Port Officer for the Caribbean side of Panama to be a big help when we transited Panama. OCC has Port Officers In most of the world you plan on visiting, and I think you will find them a useful resource. Bottom line is that we feel membership is well worth the meager cost. 

Let me know if you need any more info, or if we can be off assistance if you decide to join. 

Aloha,

Steve and Liz
OCC Hawaii Port Officers
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii

On Aug 3, 2018, at 07:27, 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Ian,

 

Thank you so much for the feedback.

 

Cindy will say I need no encouragement to go and knock on another boat (Amel or otherwise). I am that pest in the anchorage who will introduce himself.

 

Do you think the OCC group will be of use beyond the Panama canal and west?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2018 9:40 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Hi  Mark,

 

 We have been members since our qualifying trip in 1981.  The OCC is a virtual club in the sense that it doesn't have a clubhouse and its 2000 odd members  ( maybe more now) are scattered across the globe. It produces a newsletter every 6 months or so and a 200 odd page journal twice a year with cruising stories from members.

 

 The choice of 1,000 miles between points is obviously an arbitrary one, as is the size of the boat, but they were chosen by the originator of the club over 50 years ago and have served well. It puts the O in OCC.

 

 You will now find port officers in most countries,  a voluntary role often filled by someone who has swallowed the hook but still wants to be involved in the cruising world. We have used them to good effect in finding stores, reliable technicians etc in new ports.

 

 Like any club member, when you see an OCC burgee in an anchorage it's irresistible to meet them for a beer and in contrast to almost every other  club they might come from one of 20 or more different countries.

 

I am sorry that the rules suggested to you  that the OCC is bureaucratic---it's very far from that. Amongst its members you will find some of the most adventurous and free spirited folk afloat, some of whose whose achievements will amaze  you.   Rallies where boats sail together  are a rare feature in the club. Normally an OCC rally has meant meeting in an anchorage for a drink, rather than a cruise in company. I suspect that a significant majority of OCC members prefer to do  their own thing , occasionally meeting to share their experiences.

 

 Sharing experiences is what the OCC is all about. There is a small  number of dinners or BBQ's or whatever held  each year in different countries, particularly but not only the UK and US East coast, but I suspect that most members only ever meet other members in a cockpit somewhere. On one extraordinary day we were one of 4 OCC boats who met in Caleta Beaulieu in the Beagle Channel. We all knew each other but it was pure chance that we all happened to be close by  at the same time. 

 

  Arguably,  OCC membership really comes into its own not in the Med or Caribbean , which are socially crowded places, but in some far flung anchorage  where you least expect to see another boat , but there is  yacht with an OCC burgee at her port spreaders.  You make friends for life like that--just as you would if you came across another Amel in such circumstances.

 

 Fair winds,

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 03 August 2018 12:33:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Steve,

 

Interesting to see you are OCC Port Officers.

 

A couple of months ago I looked into joining the OCC but really struggled to see the value. The forum seem light and I assumed it was because of lack of members. Some of the subjects hadn’t been posted in since last year.

 

I had a hard time with the qualifications that sort of appeared a bit snobby to me such as “must have completed a non-stop ocean passage between two ports, where the distance between the ports is not less than 1,000 nautical miles measured by the shortest practical Great Circle route, as skipper or member of the crew in a vessel of not more than 70ft (21.3 m) LOA I scratched my head and wondered why you couldn’t join if you had done a 999 mile passage on a 71’ yacht J  - or - An Associate Member must have made a clear commitment to achieve the qualifying passage in a realistic and reasonable time-scale. The time allowed is at the discretion of the General Committee and shall take account of all the circumstances of each individual applicant, but it shall not normally exceed three years. Anyway this really sort of put me off.

 

We reconsidered joining when we looked at joining the Suzie Too OCC rally. But our golden rule of sailing on our own schedule prevented us from doing so.. We are heading in the same direction as the Suzie Too but will not go as far north of Panama.

 

Sorry for the long-winded note but I am wondering if you have found the membership beneficial and to what extent do you use it? Any other OCC members, please chime in.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage... When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion.. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] espar heater

Ryan Meador
 

Hi James,

I had an Espar D5 Airtronic on my previous boat, a Gulfstar 37.  I lived aboard with that heater through 7 Boston winters.  It's a really great heater.  I had it installed by Ocean Options in Tiverton, RI, which should be very close to you.  They do excellent work, and you're going to want to get to know them even if you don't use them for the installation because they are the local repair and parts source.

These heaters can be somewhat finicky when it comes to their fuel and air supplies.  The fuel pump should be calibrated with your specific heater, something that I think you'll have to get Ocean Options to do.  I also had a problem with my heater coking up a lot which was eventually resolved by lengthening the air intake hose, thus providing a more stable flow of air... not something I would have thought to try, but the Ocean Options guys figured it out.  Also, their usual installation draws air from inside the boat for combustion, which creates negative pressure inside the cabin and thus draws in a little fresh air from outside.  I think this is significant for keeping the boat dry in the winter.

Expect a blower motor to last about 3-4 winters if you're living aboard full time and leave it running (I'd turn it down to the lowest setting when leaving for work in the morning, but leave it running so the pipes don't freeze).  You'll want to get it professionally cleaned every summer.  Even with the cleaning, you may find the glow plug and fuel screen coke up over the course of a winter and you need to replace it yourself -- get spares.  It runs a lot cleaner with kerosene than diesel.  On my old boat, I'd bring kerosene in jerry cans and dump them into the main fuel tank all winter, then in spring switch back to diesel so by the time I was ready to start the engine, there wasn't any kerosene left in the system.  On an Amel, I think you might not want to do that... the tank is much larger and you may actually want to operate the generator during the winter if the power goes out.  The tank might even be big enough to last you all winter long without refueling!  I burned about a gallon per day averaged over the winter.  The Amel, being significantly larger, may take more fuel.  Really, the D5 seems like it's too small for this boat, but it's what Amel chose.  Perhaps they didn't have full time New England liveaboard use in mind when they designed the system.  You want the heater to be big enough that it spends most of its time on "low".

Last winter, I heated my (new to me) Amel with the built-in electric heat supplemented with two space heaters.  It was quite comfortable, even on the coldest days.  I did have to take care not to exceed the power rating of the shore power cord.

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA



On Fri, Aug 3, 2018 at 2:59 AM jamescromie@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I am writing the group to ask for advice regarding installation of an Espar diesel heater which I plan to install on my Amel Super Maramu, hull #347.  I have acquired the various components, along with a D5 24V Diesel Espar heater.  


Though the heater comes with an installation kit including insulated exhaust tubing and hull fitting, I note that Amel installed heaters have a rigid stainless steel exhaust tube and associated fiberglass exhaust shroud.  

I have inquired of Amel in La Rochelle, and they no longer carry these parts, nor did they have a drawing of the shroud.  

I'd like to as the following of the group:

-Do any of you have tips / advice on installing the heater?
-Any recommendations for installation experts in New England or Annapolis area?
   (I have already reached out to Peter of Helm Yacht on Long Island)
-What was used for the exhaust fittings?
-Did you do the installation yourself? 
-Any other advice on the use or care / maintenance of the heater system?

Thank you so much for your input!

James
SV Soteria
Amel SM2K, Portsmouth, RI


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

Mark Erdos
 

Ian,

 

Thank you so much for the feedback.

 

Cindy will say I need no encouragement to go and knock on another boat (Amel or otherwise). I am that pest in the anchorage who will introduce himself.

 

Do you think the OCC group will be of use beyond the Panama canal and west?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Friday, August 3, 2018 9:40 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Hi  Mark,

 

 We have been members since our qualifying trip in 1981.  The OCC is a virtual club in the sense that it doesn't have a clubhouse and its 2000 odd members  ( maybe more now) are scattered across the globe. It produces a newsletter every 6 months or so and a 200 odd page journal twice a year with cruising stories from members.

 

 The choice of 1,000 miles between points is obviously an arbitrary one, as is the size of the boat, but they were chosen by the originator of the club over 50 years ago and have served well. It puts the O in OCC.

 

 You will now find port officers in most countries,  a voluntary role often filled by someone who has swallowed the hook but still wants to be involved in the cruising world. We have used them to good effect in finding stores, reliable technicians etc in new ports.

 

 Like any club member, when you see an OCC burgee in an anchorage it's irresistible to meet them for a beer and in contrast to almost every other  club they might come from one of 20 or more different countries.

 

I am sorry that the rules suggested to you  that the OCC is bureaucratic---it's very far from that. Amongst its members you will find some of the most adventurous and free spirited folk afloat, some of whose whose achievements will amaze  you.   Rallies where boats sail together  are a rare feature in the club. Normally an OCC rally has meant meeting in an anchorage for a drink, rather than a cruise in company. I suspect that a significant majority of OCC members prefer to do  their own thing , occasionally meeting to share their experiences.

 

 Sharing experiences is what the OCC is all about. There is a small  number of dinners or BBQ's or whatever held  each year in different countries, particularly but not only the UK and US East coast, but I suspect that most members only ever meet other members in a cockpit somewhere. On one extraordinary day we were one of 4 OCC boats who met in Caleta Beaulieu in the Beagle Channel. We all knew each other but it was pure chance that we all happened to be close by  at the same time. 

 

  Arguably,  OCC membership really comes into its own not in the Med or Caribbean , which are socially crowded places, but in some far flung anchorage  where you least expect to see another boat , but there is  yacht with an OCC burgee at her port spreaders.  You make friends for life like that--just as you would if you came across another Amel in such circumstances.

 

 Fair winds,

 

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... on behalf of 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: 03 August 2018 12:33:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

 

 

Steve,

 

Interesting to see you are OCC Port Officers.

 

A couple of months ago I looked into joining the OCC but really struggled to see the value. The forum seem light and I assumed it was because of lack of members. Some of the subjects hadn’t been posted in since last year.

 

I had a hard time with the qualifications that sort of appeared a bit snobby to me such as “must have completed a non-stop ocean passage between two ports, where the distance between the ports is not less than 1,000 nautical miles measured by the shortest practical Great Circle route, as skipper or member of the crew in a vessel of not more than 70ft (21.3 m) LOA I scratched my head and wondered why you couldn’t join if you had done a 999 mile passage on a 71’ yacht J  - or - An Associate Member must have made a clear commitment to achieve the qualifying passage in a realistic and reasonable time-scale. The time allowed is at the discretion of the General Committee and shall take account of all the circumstances of each individual applicant, but it shall not normally exceed three years. Anyway this really sort of put me off.

 

We reconsidered joining when we looked at joining the Suzie Too OCC rally. But our golden rule of sailing on our own schedule prevented us from doing so.. We are heading in the same direction as the Suzie Too but will not go as far north of Panama.

 

Sorry for the long-winded note but I am wondering if you have found the membership beneficial and to what extent do you use it? Any other OCC members, please chime in.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage... When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion.. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

Ian Park
 

Ian and Judy
Not sure where this thread started, but I am writing to endorse your comments. We have been members for 5 years now, attended two AGMs and other formal gatherings and local get together.
It is a great way to meet like minded folk. Spot the Flying Fish flag and just knock on the hull!!
We were on the OCC Azores Rally in June and it certainly wasn’t cruising in company (apart from those on the SSB net). All 50 plus boats met for the first time on arrival at Horta. Without exception everyone thought the rally was exceptional - organisation and fun.
There are members from all over the world but main centres in Europe (around UK) and USA.
The Port Officers have been tremendous help wherever you go.
There are a few Amel owner members.

Ian and Linda

Ocean Hobo SN 96


Re: Elongated hole on conical coupling

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Alan,
100 hours seems way too short. What do the bolts have on them? (Regular nuts, with or without split/lock washers and flat washers, Nylocs, Loctite ?)

My orignal Amel installarion had bolts with a small diameter L shaped rod welded to each bolt head, that went into the adjacent (extra) hole on the Vetus dampner housing and that prevented rotation when tightening the nuts - very handy. It then used flat washers and lock washers on the nut end and a conventional nut (not nylock). They never loosened.

Over the years I've switched to just nylocs and have had no loosening now for the 500 hours since I last pulled the engine, at which time it was still tight from the engine pull before that.

Cheers, Craig SN68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <divanz620@...> wrote :

This would be very useful to know about if / when it happens.
I just tightened all four bolts...they had loosened slightly over the last couple of months, not even 100 hrs of motoring since the last tightening session. 
What do others get in terms of hours ??
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi  Mark,


 We have been members since our qualifying trip in 1981.  The OCC is a virtual club in the sense that it doesn't have a clubhouse and its 2000 odd members  ( maybe more now) are scattered across the globe. It produces a newsletter every 6 months or so and a 200 odd page journal twice a year with cruising stories from members.


 The choice of 1,000 miles between points is obviously an arbitrary one, as is the size of the boat, but they were chosen by the originator of the club over 50 years ago and have served well. It puts the O in OCC.


 You will now find port officers in most countries,  a voluntary role often filled by someone who has swallowed the hook but still wants to be involved in the cruising world. We have used them to good effect in finding stores, reliable technicians etc in new ports.


 Like any club member, when you see an OCC burgee in an anchorage it's irresistible to meet them for a beer and in contrast to almost every other  club they might come from one of 20 or more different countries.


I am sorry that the rules suggested to you  that the OCC is bureaucratic---it's very far from that. Amongst its members you will find some of the most adventurous and free spirited folk afloat, some of whose whose achievements will amaze  you.   Rallies where boats sail together  are a rare feature in the club. Normally an OCC rally has meant meeting in an anchorage for a drink, rather than a cruise in company. I suspect that a significant majority of OCC members prefer to do  their own thing , occasionally meeting to share their experiences.


 Sharing experiences is what the OCC is all about. There is a small  number of dinners or BBQ's or whatever held  each year in different countries, particularly but not only the UK and US East coast, but I suspect that most members only ever meet other members in a cockpit somewhere. On one extraordinary day we were one of 4 OCC boats who met in Caleta Beaulieu in the Beagle Channel. We all knew each other but it was pure chance that we all happened to be close by  at the same time. 


  Arguably,  OCC membership really comes into its own not in the Med or Caribbean , which are socially crowded places, but in some far flung anchorage  where you least expect to see another boat , but there is  yacht with an OCC burgee at her port spreaders.  You make friends for life like that--just as you would if you came across another Amel in such circumstances.


 Fair winds,


 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302, Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... on behalf of 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: 03 August 2018 12:33:46
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] OCC
 


Steve,

 

Interesting to see you are OCC Port Officers.

 

A couple of months ago I looked into joining the OCC but really struggled to see the value. The forum seem light and I assumed it was because of lack of members. Some of the subjects hadn’t been posted in since last year.

 

I had a hard time with the qualifications that sort of appeared a bit snobby to me such as “must have completed a non-stop ocean passage between two ports, where the distance between the ports is not less than 1,000 nautical miles measured by the shortest practical Great Circle route, as skipper or member of the crew in a vessel of not more than 70ft (21.3 m) LOA I scratched my head and wondered why you couldn’t join if you had done a 999 mile passage on a 71’ yacht J  - or - An Associate Member must have made a clear commitment to achieve the qualifying passage in a realistic and reasonable time-scale. The time allowed is at the discretion of the General Committee and shall take account of all the circumstances of each individual applicant, but it shall not normally exceed three years. Anyway this really sort of put me off.

 

We reconsidered joining when we looked at joining the Suzie Too OCC rally. But our golden rule of sailing on our own schedule prevented us from doing so. We are heading in the same direction as the Suzie Too but will not go as far north of Panama.

 

Sorry for the long-winded note but I am wondering if you have found the membership beneficial and to what extent do you use it? Any other OCC members, please chime in.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage.. When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii




OCC

Mark Erdos
 

Steve,

 

Interesting to see you are OCC Port Officers.

 

A couple of months ago I looked into joining the OCC but really struggled to see the value. The forum seem light and I assumed it was because of lack of members. Some of the subjects hadn’t been posted in since last year.

 

I had a hard time with the qualifications that sort of appeared a bit snobby to me such as “must have completed a non-stop ocean passage between two ports, where the distance between the ports is not less than 1,000 nautical miles measured by the shortest practical Great Circle route, as skipper or member of the crew in a vessel of not more than 70ft (21.3 m) LOA I scratched my head and wondered why you couldn’t join if you had done a 999 mile passage on a 71’ yacht J  - or - An Associate Member must have made a clear commitment to achieve the qualifying passage in a realistic and reasonable time-scale. The time allowed is at the discretion of the General Committee and shall take account of all the circumstances of each individual applicant, but it shall not normally exceed three years. Anyway this really sort of put me off.

 

We reconsidered joining when we looked at joining the Suzie Too OCC rally. But our golden rule of sailing on our own schedule prevented us from doing so. We are heading in the same direction as the Suzie Too but will not go as far north of Panama.

 

Sorry for the long-winded note but I am wondering if you have found the membership beneficial and to what extent do you use it? Any other OCC members, please chime in.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 1, 2018 2:51 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage.. When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii


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Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

James Alton
 

Bill,

   That is exactly the information that I was looking for!  Thanks so much for your help in reposting this.  I have added this to my permanent Amel files under “Steering System" for future reference.

   Bill,  I also caught your recent  helpful comment about the need to check fasteners in the steering system for tightness in another thread on coupling bolts.   I will be going through the whole steering system just in case some or all of the play that I am noticing might be due to loose fasteners rather than the need for an adjustment in the cable.  I have found that doing preemptive maintenance generally tends to work better for me than to wait for a failure.  Besides the fact that I can often improve the performance of a system, I also get a chance to learn how things are put together and perhaps notice other items that need attention on the boat.  Sometimes I will find seized fasteners or perhaps even break something in the process of making an adjustement which can cause a temporary new problem but I much prefer to encounter these little speed bumps in Port with access to more resources!   

Best,

James
SV Sueño
Maramu #220



On Aug 2, 2018, at 7:05 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

James,


Here is some more good information on the adjustment of the Amel steering system from Olivier in response to a question I posted some time ago...

The steering system doesn't need any lubrication, except where you see the steel rods at the end of the cables. These rods enter a tube and you need to keep them greasy.
There shouldn't be too much slack in the cables...What too much means is when you turn the wheel and the rudder shaft doesn't turn after 5 cm (2 inches) on the wheel's circumference, then you have too much slack in the cables.
Then, you need to ti ghten the cables ' housings (just like on a bike brake's cable).
This happens in the aft cabin. You first undo the big hex nuts that secure the housings to the threaded tubes.
Then you turn both tubes clockwise (when you face them looking towards portside). To know how much you turn, carve a little mark on each tube.
Start with one turn on each tube, then try to turn the wheel and watch when the rudder shaft starts to turn. if you can still turn 10 cm before the rudder shaft moves, you still have too much slack. Then turn each tube half a turn and check again.
Don't forget to tighten the HEX nuts at the end of the operation.
You're right to mention that with a loose cable system, the pilot rotary drive is working half the time for nothing.
If you really tighten the housings too much, you will feel it when you turn the wheel, it will be harder.

Good luck.

Olivier
Hope that blast from the past answers your question.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Lights on the 24volt controllpanel

Arthur Sundqvist
 

Thank you this Will help...
Arthur
Vista. SM 435

Skickat från min iPhone

30 juli 2018 kl. 07:01 skrev divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>:

 

Arthur, is it the 2 red lamps on the 24 V panel...one for the bilge pump and the other for the alternator alarm (bottom left side)?...there is also a green for the water pump?

If so, the replacement lamps are available from Maud at Amel....if you send her a photograph of the lamp you want the globe for, she will know which it is.
To get the dead ones out you need a small diameter plastic/silicone tube that you can push on to the lamp globe and then pull it out...the globe has just two straight pins.
The lamps that others have just mentioned are the really small amber and red ones for the nav lights, freezer etc....they can be removed just by pushing in them from the front panel.
dab 5200 means use a very small amount of 5200 sealant to hold the small lamp in place...this only applies to the really small ones 
Trust this helps
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


espar heater

James Cromie
 

I am writing the group to ask for advice regarding installation of an Espar diesel heater which I plan to install on my Amel Super Maramu, hull #347.  I have acquired the various components, along with a D5 24V Diesel Espar heater.  

Though the heater comes with an installation kit including insulated exhaust tubing and hull fitting, I note that Amel installed heaters have a rigid stainless steel exhaust tube and associated fiberglass exhaust shroud.  

I have inquired of Amel in La Rochelle, and they no longer carry these parts, nor did they have a drawing of the shroud.  

I'd like to as the following of the group:

-Do any of you have tips / advice on installing the heater?
-Any recommendations for installation experts in New England or Annapolis area?
   (I have already reached out to Peter of Helm Yacht on Long Island)
-What was used for the exhaust fittings?
-Did you do the installation yourself? 
-Any other advice on the use or care / maintenance of the heater system?

Thank you so much for your input!

James
SV Soteria
Amel SM2K, Portsmouth, RI


Re: Elongated hole on conical coupling

Alan Leslie
 

This would be very useful to know about if / when it happens.
I just tightened all four bolts...they had loosened slightly over the last couple of months, not even 100 hrs of motoring since the last tightening session. 
What do others get in terms of hours ??
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

greatketch@...
 

James,

Here is some more good information on the adjustment of the Amel steering system from Olivier in response to a question I posted some time ago...

The steering system doesn't need any lubrication, except where you see the steel rods at the end of the cables. These rods enter a tube and you need to keep them greasy.
There shouldn't be too much slack in the cables...What too much means is when you turn the wheel and the rudder shaft doesn't turn after 5 cm (2 inches) on the wheel's circumference, then you have too much slack in the cables.
Then, you need to tighten the cables ' housings (just like on a bike brake's cable).
This happens in the aft cabin. You first undo the big hex nuts that secure the housings to the threaded tubes.
Then you turn both tubes clockwise (when you face them looking towards portside). To know how much you turn, carve a little mark on each tube.
Start with one turn on each tube, then try to turn the wheel and watch when the rudder shaft starts to turn. if you can still turn 10 cm before the rudder shaft moves, you still have too much slack. Then turn each tube half a turn and check again.
Don't forget to tighten the HEX nuts at the end of the operation.
You're right to mention that with a loose cable system, the pilot rotary drive is working half the time for nothing.
If you really tighten the housings too much, you will feel it when you turn the wheel, it will be harder.

Good luck.

Olivier
Hope that blast from the past answers your question.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

James Alton
 

Hello All,

   A lot of good information here on the Amel steering system, thanks for all that have contributed.  I was wondering if anyone could comment on whether the cables or any other parts of the steering system require  adjustment over time?  The steering on my boat is feather lite such that the wheel wants to turn back and forth at the dock due to even slight movements due to wave action.  The action in both directions is also perfectly smooth and light.  There is however a  slight amount of play in the system and I am wondering what is considered normal?  I have not measured the amount of play but would estimate that if the wheel is locked that the rudder can be moved back and forth at the trailing edge perhaps 1/4”.  Part of this play appears to be in the lower bearing but most seems to be in the cables and perhaps the rack and pinion.  The system appears to be original so would now be 31 years old but the boat was lightly used.  Any information on adjustments (if any) to the steering system would be appreciated.

Thanks,

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Aug 2, 2018, at 3:07 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


Thanks for this detailed description Steve,

I would suggest though that your problem with the rack and pinion was a direct result of the cable failure. The seriously increased load caused by the failed cable caused that. So I agree, if there is stiffness in the steering check the cables first, and do it sooner than later and replace them before more damage is done. Then it is much less likely the rack and pinion will fail and I doubt if preventative replacement is necessary.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl.


On 02 August 2018 at 06:51 "flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote: 

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken t eeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect. 

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage.. When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction. 

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement o f all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end piec es from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them. 

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendati on is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together. 

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing. 

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii


 


 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Safety deposit box in aft head of Super maramu

Alan Leslie
 

A good friend told me that to remove the safe is quite simple.
Lift up the carpet in the floor and there are two nuts, undo these, et voila, the safe is free.
The bolts however are glassed into the shelf and not so easy to remove.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Steering Failure on “Aloha” SM72

Stephen Davis
 

Hi Danny,

I tend to agree that the friction in the steering cable was a major contributing factor to losing teeth in the racks. With that said, the boat was almost 26 years old at the time, and metal fatigue in the racks could have easily have been a factor as well. With 20/20 hindsight, I should have replaced the steering with the major refit we did on the boat after we bought her. Live and learn!!

Regards,

Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72

On Aug 2, 2018, at 09:07, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for this detailed description Steve,

I would suggest though that your problem with the rack and pinion was a direct result of the cable failure. The seriously increased load caused by the failed cable caused that. So I agree, if there is stiffness in the steering check the cables first, and do it sooner than later and replace them before more damage is done. Then it is much less likely the rack and pinion will fail and I doubt if preventative replacement is necessary.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl.


On 02 August 2018 at 06:51 "flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I want to thank everyone who helped diagnose our steering problems, and let you all know the final outcome. After our complete steering failure from Panama to Hawaii due to broken teeth in both steering racks, we assumed that replacement of both racks and pinion/steering shaft would resolve the problem, but that proved not to be the case. We have now replaced both steering cables, and our steering perfect.

When we removed the steering cables from the boat and racks, we found that one cable worked smoothly by hand, and the other was nearly impossible to move. We inspected the bad cable externally, and found no sign of any damage.. When I get time, I’ll attempt to cut the sheath off the cable, and determine what actually failed. Once the new cables were installed in the boat, the steering was smoother than it has ever been, and we have the required 1.5 turns in each direction.

When we first replaced the racks and pinion, I couldn’t imagine we had a problem with the cables, as they look incredibly robust. We learned a lesson on this one, and if anyone suspects a problem with their steering, I’d recommend replacement of all components. The cables and racks are made by Ultraflex of Italy, and can be supplied by Amel for about $1200 plus shipping. That price also includes a new pinion. Our pinion was in serviceable condition, but we did not want to mate the
new racks with a slightly worn pinion. If you have an older hull number like ours, you will probably find the original Ultraflex cables are M41 23 FT, and the new cables supplied will be M61 25FT. They appear to be the same cables except the new ones are 2’ longer and have a different style adjustment nut near the quadrant. I suspect sometime not to long after hull 72, Amel decided that a 2’ longer cable made for a slightly smoother cable run. Also, the end pieces that screw onto the cables and then insert into the racks were originally of a plastic material. At some point in production, Amel started manufacturing a metal end piece, and changing them out in the racks supplied by Ultraflex. We were able to buy the end pieces from Amel for about $50 each, and replace the ones provided with our new racks. If you have an older SM with the plastic end pieces, it would not be a bad idea to change them.

We could not find a lot of good information on the forum regarding how to take the steering apart. The first time we changed the racks and pinion was a bit of a learning curve. By the third time we completely removed the steering from the boat to change the cables, we were fairly good at it. It is not a bad job once you know what you are doing, and we could now easily remove the entire steering system from the boat and reinstall in a day. Removing the cables requires at least 2 people. I’ll try and write something up and post it when I have time. Anyone with a fairly old hull number that has seen a lot of sea miles should consider replacing their steering. We had convinced ourselves the steering would last forever, but learned the hard way, that is not the case. My other recommendation is while on a nice day sail, rig your emergency steering, and see how it works. You will find the boat actually fun to steer with the tiller, and it would be nice to know you have all the parts available, and know how to put it together.

On another note, Liz and I are the OCC Port Officers for Hawaii, and for anyone considering sailing here, please contact us, and we can provide you some useful information. Thanks again for the help in diagnosing our problem, and now we are going sailing.

Best Regards,

Steve and Liz Davis
Aloha SM 72
Ko Olina, Hawaii