Date   

FW: [Amel Yacht Owners] Looking for suggestions on galley refrigerator

eric freedman
 

 

 

From: sailormon [mailto:kimberlite@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 9:58 PM
To: 'sailormon'
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Looking for suggestions on galley refrigerator

 

Hi,

We spend most of the winter in St Maarten or south.

We have never had a problem with the reefer.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: sailormon [mailto:kimberlite@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 9:57 PM
To: 'amelyachtowners@...'
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] Looking for suggestions on galley refrigerator

 

There was a piece of foam near the air intake for the compressor coil it degrade and caused the reefer to overheat.

Possibly you have the same problem.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of thomas.kleman
Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2018 4:36 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Looking for suggestions on galley refrigerator

 

 

Hello- I own SM2K #422. The galley refrigerator seems incapable of getting to 47 degrees F, even when it has been defrosted. OK I'm in Bonaire where it's hot right now but........I've done the best I can on the door seal and have insulated the evaporator connection behind the unit pretty well.

 

In the settee units, I have lined the interior of both of them with Kevothermal vacuum insulated panels (R value of this stuff is 60 for 1 inch....it comes thinner as well). This isn't practical for the galley refrigerator because the outside fits too tightly in its place and the inside has too many irregularities to build a vacuum insulated panel mosaic.

 

I don't want to replace it.........it works and having a new unit wouldn't be great aesthetically (and getting the wood panel off the old unit to remedy that looks difficult).

 

I've considered increasing the size of the evaporator.......even though re-siting the evaporator drip tray and drain is likewise kind of a pain.........

 

So I'm in the "scratching my head" place right now considering solutions. I was wondering if anyone had done anything creative.


Windlass SM 2000

Alin Misescu
 

Hello to all Amel owners. 
I own a SM 2000, Wanderer hull number 283, launched in 2000.
Can someone give me  information about the windlass?, type, size etc
My boat is through the process of being put into charter and my surveyor wants to know this.... Thank you. All the best .


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: re caulking of stanchion base

James Cromie
 

How would you compare this to Never Seez.  They are very different materials with different purposes, and I would want to know when one would use one or the other of these antiseize / anti-corrosion compounds.  

James

On Aug 8, 2018, at 10:14 PM, 'sailormon' kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


I have personally rebuilt 3 sailboats from the through hulls up.

I Used Duralac on all of them. It is far superior to tefgel as it is much more . It is a paste and not a gel/..

 

Duralac is an anti-corrosive jointing compound for use between joints of dissimilar metals.. It is in the form of a tough, flexible, yellow paste with low moisture permeability, and contains barium chromate in an inert filler matrix. The barium chromate is only very slightly soluble in water, so it remains in the joint, even in the presence of a considerable flow of water. It has a long useful life because it only becomes active in the presence of conditions which promote corrosion. 
• Indispensable for the effective sealing of joints between dissimilar metals --- even very active magnesium alloys 
• Effective at preventing corrosion at stress contact points in similar metals, such as rivets in masts 
• Protects metals in contact with non-metallic materials such as wood, resins, rubber, etc. 
• Especially useful in saltwater environments which exacerbate corrosive processes 
• Conforms to specification DTD 369B
.

 

It remains “waterproof “ and has worked well on my newest boat for the last 16 years.

I visited a boat I rebuilt 20 years ago and helped the owner do some maintenance. The bolts with Duralac came out like new.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/saddington-consultants-plus-duralac-anti-corrosion-jointing-compound

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] 
Sent: Monday, August 06, 2018 5:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: re caulking of stanchion base

 

  

Bill,

 

  Thanks so much for sharing your project of removing and resealing the stanchion bases and fastenings.  Your reasons for doing this project echo my own and despite limited sailing time due to the Schengen visa limitations, I will be soon removing as many of the stanchion bolts as I can on my own boat and resealing them since I consider this project to be very high on the list.  It is very encouraging to me that you have been able to remove all but one bolt so far,  I suspect you are using a good technique.    Do you know if the bolts on Haramonie might have been removed and resealed before or do you think that they are original?   I am glad to hear that you are replacing all of the bolts with the most corrosion resistant ones that you can find,  money well spent!  May I ask what size bolt and thread count were used on your boat?

    

    I do have one question that has been troubling me regarding this project.  Without a doubt, using a product like Tef-gel will make future removal of the bolts much easier and I want to do the same.  I am however wondering if the Tef-gel will be enough to keep water from working it’s way down the threads, into the holes and eventually corroding the embedded steel?  In an ideal world, perhaps we could have the Tef-Gel only on the area of the bolt that rides on the threads of the embedded steel and a really good sealant to exclude the water on the part of the bolt that passes through the fibreglass.  Carefully applying the Tef-Gel to only the embedded threaded portion and using sealant on the bolt itself is something that I was wondering about.   I am not sure that it would work well since any Tef-gel contamination of the fibreglass surface would probably ruin the sealant bond/seal.  Do you feel that the Tef-Gel will provide an adequate seal on it’s own to keep water from reaching the embedded steel and is this something that you have also pondered?

 

Best,

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

  

 

  

On Aug 6, 2018, at 4:26 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Paul,

 

What a timely question!  I am in the process of doing exactly that. I have an impact wrench with a flat blade screwdriver bit that has been the only way most of these bolts come out.  It is VITAL that the bit fit the screws very closely.

 

When we bought Harmonie we were told that pulling these screws and re-seating them after treating with Tef-Gel should be a once in ten-year project on any Amel.  If it is done often it is easy..  If not... it is a miserable project.

 

Rust at the base of the stanchions can come from three sources.

 

On Harmonie there is no bedding compound between the flat part of the stanchion base and the fiberglass gunwale.  This means that there is a fairly large flat area of stainless steel that is mostly excluded from the oxygen in the air that protects it from corrosion, but where water can creep in and get rust started.  This is the least critical rust issue. I see it on each of the stanchions I have removed so far, even on those that showed no visible rust stains around them before removal.

 

The bolts themselves can corrode on the underside of the head.  Again, a place where water can get to, but has limited access to air.  The problem with this is it can significantly weaken the bolt.  I have seen stainless bolts with this kind of corrosion where the head literally fell off.  So far I have found one bolt like this.  The head twisted off when I put torque on it to remove.  I am in the process now of drilling it out for removal.. Not my idea of fun.

 

The last possible source of rust staining is the most serious, and is the real reason for making this a routine maintenance project.  When water finds its way down into the threads of the bolts it begins to corrode the steel plate that Amel set into the fiberglass. The resulting rust irresistibly expands and will destroy the fiberglass around it in a very slow motion explosion. This requires a complex, and expensive repair.

 

The impact wrench has been successful at removing the bolts so far (except the one that broke!)  After removal the heads are beat up enough that I am replacing them with the most corrosion resistant machine screws I can find--of 316L stainless. 

 

The rail has a joint about a meter forward of the aft corner.  Once you get the rear two stanchions unbolted, that piece can be removed. (The stanchion all the way back on the transom is through bolted, not in a tapped hole.)

 

Once you get a few stanchions unbolted, you will have enough "wiggle room" to lift each of the stanchion bases up, clean them up, and get some caulking under them.  Since the stainless screws are going to be threaded into steel backing plates, they should be generously treated with Tef-Gel or whatever  brand of anti-corrosion thread lubricant is your favorite.  Then all will be better for another decade!



Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD, USA





 

 

 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: re caulking of stanchion base

James Alton
 

Mark,

   I had the same results in my search for data as well.  I am thinking that if both the Phillips and the slotted are able to provide enough torque to shear of the bolt that it doesn’t matter too much about which design can provide the most torque.  I think that in the case of installing fasteners in an application where they are likely to seize at some point that using a drive that will allow the application of enough torque to match the strength of the fastener to be something to consider.  Clamping a specimen into a vice and attempting to twist off the head might be one way to conduct this test.  

  It sounds like you know how to deal with stubborn fasteners in steel.  Heat is an invaluable tool in fastener removal in my experience and fortunately there is a cool (no pun intended) way to utilize heat to remove fasteners from fibreglass and wood without damage.  The tool uses inductive heating which creates eddy currents when in close proximity to metals, especially ferrous ones though you can tune it to work well on non ferrous.  To give you some idea of the potential, I was in a real pickle on a huge refastening job which required removal and replacement of more than 6000 #16 x 2 1/2” bronze slotted wood screws.  Initial testing revealed that 50% of the fasteners were breaking off right at the planking to frame interface or the heads were splitting when the torque was applied.  It is a really bad thing to just drill new holes in a wooden boat structurally so I got a really expensive induction tool that allowed me to remove (amazing to me) 100% of the remaining fastenings with no breakages saving the customer a ton of money and new #18 bronze screws went right into the old holes.  The heating tool does not directly affect wood or fibreglass for that matter but the metal can be heated to any temperature you want including glowing bright orange which is not a good idea for a fastener embedded in wood or fibreglass. (grin)  The unit I have allows you to dial down or up the power to exactly what you need and because the field reaches in a ways, the fastener gets heated for it’s whole length in a matter of seconds.  Most marine caulks and resins soften with the application of heat and I have had great luck removing stubborn fasteners using this method.  I am hoping it will work as well on the stuck screws that I expect to find in my stanchions etc.   Here is one example of the induction heating tool  Mine is a bit more advanced but works on the same principles.  https://boltbusterinc.com/kit/

  Thanks for the suggestion on the impact driver.

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Aug 8, 2018, at 12:32 PM, mfmcgovern@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

James,


I found a lot of anecdotes and very little hard data.  I actually did find one study that while it did NOT support the claim that Phillips Head allows more torque transfer, it did conclude the ratio of axial effort to torque transfer was better with Phillips head:  https://epublications.marquette.edu/cgi/viewcontent.cgi?article=1226&context=theses_open

My main "tip" from the automotive words is to use some kind of anti-seize if you ever have plans to remove the fastener.  

Otherwise, "Heat it and Beat it" is the name of the game.  Heat being the best if you can use it.  Unfortunately, on a boat there's usually too much plastic, fiberglass or wood around to really use it a lot.  However, a MAPP Gas torch was invaluable to me in getting the clutch cones off my bone dry (and slightly bent) windlass shaft. No amount of prying would move them.  Last, use an Impact Driver vs a regular electric drill when trying to remove any fasteners you think might cause you trouble.

Mark McGovern
SM 440 Cara
Deale, MD USA      
 


---In amelyachtowners@..., <lokiyawl2@...> wrote :

Mark,

   Thanks for your input.  I am really curious to know if you found any data confirming that the Phillips head can transfer more torque to the screw than a slotted head because I would really like to know!   I have generally had worse luck with removing old Phillips screws than slotted but that could be the tools and or technique.  If you have learned any tricks l would be interested to know. 
     Without a doubt the slotted head fastener can be the most difficult to deal with in regards to slippage since there is nothing there to keep the centering.  Also the slot width seems to vary and the available tools seldom fit properly which is critical as Bill K. also states to successfully avoid slippage when applying high torque.  Proper fit usually requires me to grind a fatter tool down.   Finally, the shape of the tool tip is very critical.  Many of the tips I buy are tapered which will cause the tool to cam out of the slot.  What you want is a tip that is actually slightly undercut in that the very end/ tip of the tool is slightly thicker than the part of the tool that would otherwise contact the top of the screw head.  You want to put the pressure on the very bottom of the screw slot, not the top or else the pressure tends to open the slot creating the dreaded Vee shape that wants to cam out.  The bottom edges of the tool should be sharp which seems to cause the tool to bite into the fastener eliminating slippage and allowing the maximum torque to be applied.   I also like to apply a very slight undercut to the bottom face of the tool tip which helps to insure that the tips of the tool are fully engaged.  If you follow all of these steps I think that you will find that the tip will lock into the screw slot quite well so long as the screw itself has the original square slot.  If the screw slot has become Veed in shape due to using an improper tip, corrosion or slippage, carefully reshaping the slot with a dremel, or a tiny sharp file can often restore the slot.  This ability to recover the slotted head shape and potentially the maximum torque for another try at removal is unique I believe to the slotted head as compared to the center drive type fasteners.    I have recut a lot of slotted screw heads and often cut the slot a bit deeper in the process.  

    In the Automotive world I believe that you have another factor that makes the slotted fastener difficult to deal with.  It seems that  corrosion of steel slotted fasteners tends to round off the sharp edges of the slot.  Add that to a bit of oil and they can be almost impossible to remove!

Best,

James Alton
SV Sueño
Maramu #220

On Aug 8, 2018, at 9:08 AM, mfmcgovern@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

I work in automotive and have dealt with my share of seized fasteners.  Which bolt head type is "best" is an age-old question and one that does not really seem to have a definitive, scientific answer.  Here's a pretty good run-down of most of the available options:  https://www.wiha.com/en/screw-head-types/


In reality, the four head types that you can find relatively easy in 316 Stainless Steel in the sizes we would use on an Amel are:

1. Slot Head 
2.  Phillips Head
3.  Socket Head/Allen Head (internal hex)
< div>4.  Hex Head (external hex)

In my experience, Slot Head is by far the worst choice in terms of both the amount of torque you can apply and in keeping the tool on the fastener head.  However, it is available in the most sizes/lengths and is usually the cheapest option.  

Phillips Head will let you apply the most torque to the screw head.  However, you have to be able to apply a good bit of axial force (pushing the screwdriver down into the screw head) in order to avoid the screwdriver slipping out.  

Socket Head/Allen Head/Hex Head is a good choice when you have limited access to the screw head and you can't apply a lot of axial force.  However, you cannot apply a lot of torque to the head before stripping it out.  Socket Head/Allen head are "prettier" and come in a flat head version which can sit flush in countersunk holes like the ones in the SM stanchion bases that we are talking about in this thread.

www.mcmaster.com and www.grainger.com are two good places to find 316 Stainless Steel fasteners in the USA.  


Mark McGovern
SM 440 Cara
Deale, MD USA





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Raising the waterline aft on SM

eric freedman
 

The orange stripe is gelcoat. We just sanded it and painted over it.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 08, 2018 12:38 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Raising the waterline aft on SM

 

 

The SM original orange stripe is painted-on gelcoat.

 

Best,

 

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  
http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

 

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be taken when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any referred to mechanical and/or electrical device or system.

 

 

On Wed, Aug 8, 2018 at 2:13 AM divanz620@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

We did the same.

Just raised the antifoul up to the, in our case, red stripe. It is all paint on ours, no vinyl stripping required.

Some have laser lined it and lifted the waterline gradually from bow to stern.

We considered that, but in the end it was quicker and easier just to lift the whole waterline.

Sure its a bit high ate the bow, but so what, NO MORE SCRUBBING !!

It was well worth it

Good luck

Cheers

Alan

Elyse SM437

Port Vila


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: re caulking of stanchion base

eric freedman
 

I have personally rebuilt 3 sailboats from the through hulls up.

I Used Duralac on all of them. It is far superior to tefgel as it is much more . It is a paste and not a gel/.

 

Duralac is an anti-corrosive jointing compound for use between joints of dissimilar metals. It is in the form of a tough, flexible, yellow paste with low moisture permeability, and contains barium chromate in an inert filler matrix. The barium chromate is only very slightly soluble in water, so it remains in the joint, even in the presence of a considerable flow of water. It has a long useful life because it only becomes active in the presence of conditions which promote corrosion. 
• Indispensable for the effective sealing of joints between dissimilar metals --- even very active magnesium alloys 
• Effective at preventing corrosion at stress contact points in similar metals, such as rivets in masts 
• Protects metals in contact with non-metallic materials such as wood, resins, rubber, etc. 
• Especially useful in saltwater environments which exacerbate corrosive processes 
• Conforms to specification DTD 369B
.

 

It remains “waterproof “ and has worked well on my newest boat for the last 16 years.

I visited a boat I rebuilt 20 years ago and helped the owner do some maintenance. The bolts with Duralac came out like new.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

https://www.fisheriessupply.com/saddington-consultants-plus-duralac-anti-corrosion-jointing-compound

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Monday, August 06, 2018 5:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: re caulking of stanchion base

 

 

Bill,

 

  Thanks so much for sharing your project of removing and resealing the stanchion bases and fastenings.  Your reasons for doing this project echo my own and despite limited sailing time due to the Schengen visa limitations, I will be soon removing as many of the stanchion bolts as I can on my own boat and resealing them since I consider this project to be very high on the list.  It is very encouraging to me that you have been able to remove all but one bolt so far,  I suspect you are using a good technique.    Do you know if the bolts on Haramonie might have been removed and resealed before or do you think that they are original?   I am glad to hear that you are replacing all of the bolts with the most corrosion resistant ones that you can find,  money well spent!  May I ask what size bolt and thread count were used on your boat?

    

    I do have one question that has been troubling me regarding this project.  Without a doubt, using a product like Tef-gel will make future removal of the bolts much easier and I want to do the same.  I am however wondering if the Tef-gel will be enough to keep water from working it’s way down the threads, into the holes and eventually corroding the embedded steel?  In an ideal world, perhaps we could have the Tef-Gel only on the area of the bolt that rides on the threads of the embedded steel and a really good sealant to exclude the water on the part of the bolt that passes through the fibreglass.  Carefully applying the Tef-Gel to only the embedded threaded portion and using sealant on the bolt itself is something that I was wondering about.   I am not sure that it would work well since any Tef-gel contamination of the fibreglass surface would probably ruin the sealant bond/seal.  Do you feel that the Tef-Gel will provide an adequate seal on it’s own to keep water from reaching the embedded steel and is this something that you have also pondered?

 

Best,

 

James Alton

SV Sueño

Maramu #220

 

  

 

  

On Aug 6, 2018, at 4:26 PM, greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Paul,

 

What a timely question!  I am in the process of doing exactly that. I have an impact wrench with a flat blade screwdriver bit that has been the only way most of these bolts come out.  It is VITAL that the bit fit the screws very closely.

 

When we bought Harmonie we were told that pulling these screws and re-seating them after treating with Tef-Gel should be a once in ten-year project on any Amel.  If it is done often it is easy.  If not... it is a miserable project.

 

Rust at the base of the stanchions can come from three sources.

 

On Harmonie there is no bedding compound between the flat part of the stanchion base and the fiberglass gunwale.  This means that there is a fairly large flat area of stainless steel that is mostly excluded from the oxygen in the air that protects it from corrosion, but where water can creep in and get rust started.  This is the least critical rust issue. I see it on each of the stanchions I have removed so far, even on those that showed no visible rust stains around them before removal.

 

The bolts themselves can corrode on the underside of the head.  Again, a place where water can get to, but has limited access to air.  The problem with this is it can significantly weaken the bolt.  I have seen stainless bolts with this kind of corrosion where the head literally fell off.  So far I have found one bolt like this.  The head twisted off when I put torque on it to remove.  I am in the process now of drilling it out for removal. Not my idea of fun.

 

The last possible source of rust staining is the most serious, and is the real reason for making this a routine maintenance project.  When water finds its way down into the threads of the bolts it begins to corrode the steel plate that Amel set into the fiberglass. The resulting rust irresistibly expands and will destroy the fiberglass around it in a very slow motion explosion. This requires a complex, and expensive repair.

 

The impact wrench has been successful at removing the bolts so far (except the one that broke!)  After removal the heads are beat up enough that I am replacing them with the most corrosion resistant machine screws I can find--of 316L stainless. 

 

The rail has a joint about a meter forward of the aft corner.  Once you get the rear two stanchions unbolted, that piece can be removed. (The stanchion all the way back on the transom is through bolted, not in a tapped hole.)

 

Once you get a few stanchions unbolted, you will have enough "wiggle room" to lift each of the stanchion bases up, clean them up, and get some caulking under them.  Since the stainless screws are going to be threaded into steel backing plates, they should be generously treated with Tef-Gel or whatever  brand of anti-corrosion thread lubricant is your favorite.  Then all will be better for another decade!



Bill Kinney

SM160, Harmonie

Annapolis, MD, USA





 

 

 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Looking for suggestions on galley refrigerator

eric freedman
 

There was a piece of foam near the air intake for the compressor coil it degrade and caused the reefer to overheat.

Possibly you have the same problem.

Fair Winds

Eric

Kimberlite Amel Super Maramu #376

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...] On Behalf Of thomas.kleman
Sent: Sunday, August 05, 2018 4:36 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Looking for suggestions on galley refrigerator

 

 

Hello- I own SM2K #422. The galley refrigerator seems incapable of getting to 47 degrees F, even when it has been defrosted. OK I'm in Bonaire where it's hot right now but........I've done the best I can on the door seal and have insulated the evaporator connection behind the unit pretty well.

 

In the settee units, I have lined the interior of both of them with Kevothermal vacuum insulated panels (R value of this stuff is 60 for 1 inch....it comes thinner as well). This isn't practical for the galley refrigerator because the outside fits too tightly in its place and the inside has too many irregularities to build a vacuum insulated panel mosaic.

 

I don't want to replace it.........it works and having a new unit wouldn't be great aesthetically (and getting the wood panel off the old unit to remedy that looks difficult).

 

I've considered increasing the size of the evaporator.......even though re-siting the evaporator drip tray and drain is likewise kind of a pain.........

 

So I'm in the "scratching my head" place right now considering solutions. I was wondering if anyone had done anything creative.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SM Running Rigging

greatketch@...
 


Ryan,

The logic applies, in that the line size needs to match the drive wheel.  My genoa car control lines are 10mm. The line drives have an Amel logo on them, so I assume they are a custom design. The 10 mm lines seem to work well.  Occasionally they slip under very high loads, but that seems to do with needing tension adjustment rather than being the wrong size.  If anyone has used larger line in this application and been happy with the result, I'd love to hear it.

These control lines need to be very tight, and very low stretch, to work.  As the sheet loads up, it pushes the car back toward the line drive.  If there is ANY slack, the line unloads from the drive wheel and  the car then "adjusts itself" aft.

I have had no reason to change from 10mm at this time.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


---In amelyachtowners@..., <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote :

That's an excellent tip, Bill.  Do you know if the same logic applies to the genoa car controls?  Those things appear to be unique to Amel, but they are the same basic design as the Andersen.

Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Wed, Aug 8, 2018 at 3:50 PM greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

On any lines working with an Andersen Line Tender you'll need to follow Andersen's insistance



and use 12 mm line. This is the mainsail outhaul line, and the mainsail traveler line.

The story is that the 10 mm line used by Amel was bigger and better than everybody else's 10 mm line.  But whatever the cause, in my experience, if you go to your local chandlery and buy 10 mm line as specified in the Amel documents, it WILL slip under load.
 
I installed one of these Andersen Line Tenders as part of my mizzen traveler upgrade.  (one of the best things I did to the boat!) https://fetchinketch.net/boat-projects/mizzen-traveler/ When I first installed it I used 10mm lines because that is what Amel documents specified for the identical application on the main traveller...  they didn't work. When I actually measured the main traveller lines, they were 12 mm OD not 10mm.  Swapping up to 12 mm line solved the issue.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


---In amelyachtowners@..., <karkauai@...> wrote :

Thanks, Miles.  I hope you’re having a good Summer.

  I think I have a good picture of the manual furling rig in my mind.  Makes sense to use the same line as the one to drop the main sail.  Do you know if it’s 10 mm? 12mm?

The lists of SM rigging already have lines listed for the outhaul and traveler and jib car lines.  Yes, same material, but I guess 12mm may be what’s recommended now instead of 10mm.  So the “Tack Line” is listed as something different.  Still trying to guess what they’re talking about.

I’ll post pics of everything when the upfit is complete.

Hi to Carol.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SM Running Rigging

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bill.

I like your mizzen traveler set up. I wish it would move from my nice to have list. Trouble is all on the must have list gets priority.

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean pearl

On 09 August 2018 at 03:11 "greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

On any lines working with an Andersen Line Tender you'll need to follow Andersen's insistance



and use 12 mm line. This is the mainsail outhaul line, and the mainsail traveler line.

The story is that the 10 mm line used by Amel was bigger and better than everybody else's 10 mm line.  But whatever the cause, in my experience, if you go to your local chandlery and buy 10 mm line as specified in the Amel documents, it WILL slip under load.
 
I installed one of these Andersen Line Tenders as part of my mizzen traveler upgrade.  (one of the best things I did to the boat!)  https://fetchinketch.net/boat-projects/mizzen-traveler/ When I first installed it I used 10mm lines because that is what Amel documents specified for the identical application on the main traveller...  they didn't work. When I actually measured the main traveller lines, they were 12 mm OD not 10mm.  Swapping up to 12 mm line solved the issue.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


---In amelyachtowners@..., <karkauai@...> wrote :

Thanks, Miles.  I hope you’re having a good Summer.

  I think I have a good picture of the manual furling rig in my mind.  Makes sense to use the same line as the one to drop the main sail.  Do you know if it’s 10 mm? 12mm?

The lists of SM rigging already have lines listed for the outhaul and traveler and jib car lines.  Yes, same material, but I guess 12mm may be what’s recommended now instead of 10mm.  So the “Tack Line” is listed as something different.  Still trying to guess what they’re talking about.

I’ll post pics of everything when the upfit is complete.

Hi to Carol.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy



 

 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] changing cockpit cover installation from old Super Maramu to SM2K

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi, I originally had them done in Ft Lauderdale in 2009. I had them re done in Auckland NZ and at the same time had all the Amel originals replaced as they had come to the end of their life. Any competent canvas tradesman could do them.

I posted photos on the site in 2009 and I guess they are still there.

One thing to consider if you are replacing the Amel part. Anyone over 5'10" finds it a bit low. If you look you will see two of the  frames are sloping aft and the front one forward. Moving them towards upright (note I say towards, meaning an appropriate distance). can increase headroom significantly. Be sure to put a clear panel (with a zip over internal cover) between the dodger and the front frame. This increases forward view and view of the sails startlingly. 

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 09 August 2018 at 09:18 "James Cromie jamescromie@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Danny - I am interested to know where you had your cockpit enclosure made.  I would like to do something similar for my SM #347.   


Thanks,
James
Soteria 
SM347
On Aug 8, 2018, at 3:59 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Sounds great Kent. You must be getting close to your Pacific adventure. You are going to be blown away (as in the mind, not the boat) when you experience the variety of the Pacific islands.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 09 August 2018 at 01:45 "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Agreed, Danny.

I have a full cockpit enclosure, but it’s getting very tired after 10 years.  I can’t stand up in the cockpit without bending over a bit.

I’m removing the old cockpit cover and installing a new frame that attaches to the dodger and both mizzen shrouds on each side to cover the whole cockpit..  It will have a full cockpit enclosure, and I’ll be able to stand up and see all around with the “Bimini” up all the time and with the full enclosure in place.  I’m adding two more flexible solar panels on this as well.  It will have two large “windows” that allow viewing the sails, with covers to keep the sun out when not in use.  I’m also making a full sunscreen enclosure that will help with insects as well.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

Hi Kent,

I'm not sure what you mean by a bimini type top but I offer this anyway. I think the most valuable addition to Ocean Pearl was the full cockpit enclosure, from the windscreen to behind the mizzen. Obviously we used the existing Amel bars and covers and attached to them.

In 47000 miles (I clicked over 47000 today) sailing we have never donned wet weather gear.  When sailing down wind in moderate to strong winds and rain, without the rear curtains life would be miserable.

And you most certainly need full front and side protection cause that is where the big sea splashes come in.

While the top from the Amel frame to our "behind mizzen" bar is zip removable we seldom remove it. As are all the side and back curtains The side and rear curtains roll up and down easily. This cover system turns the cockpit into an all weather extension of the cabin. I decided when we were looking for a boat a full cockpit enclosure was non negotiable. I was not going to ask Yvonne to bake to the sun and freeze in the rain for the two years voyage we had planned.(10 years ago)

I'll say again, that cockpit enclosure is invaluable for the increased pleasure it gives.

And those guys and gals in their bimini "unprotected" twin wheel rear helm stations that look so flash in the marinas are wrapped up in wet weather gear and getting wet top and bottom

Kind Regards

Danny


 

 

 


 


 



 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] changing cockpit cover installation from old Super Maramu to SM2K

James Cromie
 

Danny - I am interested to know where you had your cockpit enclosure made.  I would like to do something similar for my SM #347.   

Thanks,
James
Soteria 
SM347

On Aug 8, 2018, at 3:59 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Sounds great Kent. You must be getting close to your Pacific adventure. You are going to be blown away (as in the mind, not the boat) when you experience the variety of the Pacific islands.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 09 August 2018 at 01:45 "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Agreed, Danny.

I have a full cockpit enclosure, but it’s getting very tired after 10 years.  I can’t stand up in the cockpit without bending over a bit.

I’m removing the old cockpit cover and installing a new frame that attaches to the dodger and both mizzen shrouds on each side to cover the whole cockpit..  It will have a full cockpit enclosure, and I’ll be able to stand up and see all around with the “Bimini” up all the time and with the full enclosure in place.  I’m adding two more flexible solar panels on this as well.  It will have two large “windows” that allow viewing the sails, with covers to keep the sun out when not in use.  I’m also making a full sunscreen enclosure that will help with insects as well.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

Hi Kent,

I'm not sure what you mean by a bimini type top but I offer this anyway. I think the most valuable addition to Ocean Pearl was the full cockpit enclosure, from the windscreen to behind the mizzen. Obviously we used the existing Amel bars and covers and attached to them.

In 47000 miles (I clicked over 47000 today) sailing we have never donned wet weather gear.  When sailing down wind in moderate to strong winds and rain, without the rear curtains life would be miserable.

And you most certainly need full front and side protection cause that is where the big sea splashes come in.

While the top from the Amel frame to our "behind mizzen" bar is zip removable we seldom remove it. As are all the side and back curtains The side and rear curtains roll up and down easily. This cover system turns the cockpit into an all weather extension of the cabin. I decided when we were looking for a boat a full cockpit enclosure was non negotiable. I was not going to ask Yvonne to bake to the sun and freeze in the rain for the two years voyage we had planned.(10 years ago)

I'll say again, that cockpit enclosure is invaluable for the increased pleasure it gives.

And those guys and gals in their bimini "unprotected" twin wheel rear helm stations that look so flash in the marinas are wrapped up in wet weather gear and getting wet top and bottom

Kind Regards

Danny


 

 


 


 




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: SM Running Rigging

Ryan Meador
 

That's an excellent tip, Bill.  Do you know if the same logic applies to the genoa car controls?  Those things appear to be unique to Amel, but they are the same basic design as the Andersen.

Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Wed, Aug 8, 2018 at 3:50 PM greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

On any lines working with an Andersen Line Tender you'll need to follow Andersen's insistance



and use 12 mm line. This is the mainsail outhaul line, and the mainsail traveler line.

The story is that the 10 mm line used by Amel was bigger and better than everybody else's 10 mm line.  But whatever the cause, in my experience, if you go to your local chandlery and buy 10 mm line as specified in the Amel documents, it WILL slip under load.
 
I installed one of these Andersen Line Tenders as part of my mizzen traveler upgrade.  (one of the best things I did to the boat!) https://fetchinketch.net/boat-projects/mizzen-traveler/ When I first installed it I used 10mm lines because that is what Amel documents specified for the identical application on the main traveller...  they didn't work. When I actually measured the main traveller lines, they were 12 mm OD not 10mm.  Swapping up to 12 mm line solved the issue.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Thanks, Miles.  I hope you’re having a good Summer.

  I think I have a good picture of the manual furling rig in my mind.  Makes sense to use the same line as the one to drop the main sail.  Do you know if it’s 10 mm? 12mm?

The lists of SM rigging already have lines listed for the outhaul and traveler and jib car lines.  Yes, same material, but I guess 12mm may be what’s recommended now instead of 10mm.  So the “Tack Line” is listed as something different.  Still trying to guess what they’re talking about.

I’ll post pics of everything when the upfit is complete.

Hi to Carol.
Kent
SM 243
Kristy




Re: changing cockpit cover installation from old Super Maramu to SM2K

philipp.sollberger@...
 


Hi Kent,

Many thanks for your offer. That's a great service!

With some pictures and the measurement it will help me already totally for my changing cockpit cover project.

Philipp


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] changing cockpit cover installation from old Super Maramu to SM2K

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Sounds great Kent. You must be getting close to your Pacific adventure. You are going to be blown away (as in the mind, not the boat) when you experience the variety of the Pacific islands.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 09 August 2018 at 01:45 "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Agreed, Danny.

I have a full cockpit enclosure, but it’s getting very tired after 10 years.  I can’t stand up in the cockpit without bending over a bit.

I’m removing the old cockpit cover and installing a new frame that attaches to the dodger and both mizzen shrouds on each side to cover the whole cockpit..  It will have a full cockpit enclosure, and I’ll be able to stand up and see all around with the “Bimini” up all the time and with the full enclosure in place.  I’m adding two more flexible solar panels on this as well.  It will have two large “windows” that allow viewing the sails, with covers to keep the sun out when not in use.  I’m also making a full sunscreen enclosure that will help with insects as well.

Kent
SM 243
Kristy

Hi Kent,

I'm not sure what you mean by a bimini type top but I offer this anyway. I think the most valuable addition to Ocean Pearl was the full cockpit enclosure, from the windscreen to behind the mizzen. Obviously we used the existing Amel bars and covers and attached to them.

In 47000 miles (I clicked over 47000 today) sailing we have never donned wet weather gear.  When sailing down wind in moderate to strong winds and rain, without the rear curtains life would be miserable.

And you most certainly need full front and side protection cause that is where the big sea splashes come in.

While the top from the Amel frame to our "behind mizzen" bar is zip removable we seldom remove it. As are all the side and back curtains The side and rear curtains roll up and down easily. This cover system turns the cockpit into an all weather extension of the cabin. I decided when we were looking for a boat a full cockpit enclosure was non negotiable. I was not going to ask Yvonne to bake to the sun and freeze in the rain for the two years voyage we had planned.(10 years ago)

I'll say again, that cockpit enclosure is invaluable for the increased pleasure it gives.

And those guys and gals in their bimini "unprotected" twin wheel rear helm stations that look so flash in the marinas are wrapped up in wet weather gear and getting wet top and bottom

Kind Regards

Danny


 

 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] changing cockpit cover installation from old Super Maramu to SM2K

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Mark,

the insect screen extras are good but what we needed but never moved from the nice to have to the must have list was sun shades side and back. That setting sun during sundowners is pesky.

Cheers

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl


On 08 August 2018 at 23:48 "'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Danny,

 

I had to laugh about you never wearing wet weather gear. We have a similar enclosure setup on Cream Puff. I’m not sure I even know where the wet weather gear is anymore. While we don’t have near as many miles as you, we love the setup and agree the fully enclosed cockpit is invaluable.

 

We also made matching panels with insect screens. They can be easily substituted for the clear panels of the enclosure. These have proven wonderful for two reasons. First, it obviously keeps the bugs out on anchor. Second, they provide shade while letting air circulate the cockpit.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Bonaire

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, August 8, 2018 4:11 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] changing cockpit cover installation from old Super Maramu to SM2K

 

 

Hi Kent,

I'm not sure what you mean by a bimini type top but I offer this anyway. I think the most valuable addition to Ocean Pearl was the full cockpit enclosure, from the windscreen to behind the mizzen. Obviously we used the existing Amel bars and covers and attached to them.

In 47000 miles (I clicked over 47000 today) sailing we have never donned wet weather gear.  When sailing down wind in moderate to strong winds and rain, without the rear curtains life would be miserable.

And you most certainly need full front and side protection cause that is where the big sea splashes come in.

While the top from the Amel frame to our "behind mizzen" bar is zip removable we seldom remove it. As are all the side and back curtains The side and rear curtains roll up and down easily. This cover system turns the cockpit into an all weather extension of the cabin. I decided when we were looking for a boat a full cockpit enclosure was non negotiable. I was not going to ask Yvonne to bake to the sun and freeze in the rain for the two years voyage we had planned.(10 years ago)

I'll say again, that cockpit enclosure is invaluable for the increased pleasure it gives.

And those guys and gals in their bimini "unprotected" twin wheel rear helm stations that look so flash in the marinas are wrapped up in wet weather gear and getting wet top and bottom

Kind Regards

Danny

On 08 August 2018 at 04:19 "Kent Robertson karkauai@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi Philipp,

 

I am going to replace my SM 2K cockpit enclosure with a Bimini type top.  If you want my framework, I will ship it to you at your cost.

Kent

Kristy

SM 243

Currently St Michaels MD USA


On Jul 28, 2018, at 11:01 AM, philipp.sollberger@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Hi dear Super Maramu Experts,

 

I think about to change my old installation of the cockpit cover on my SM#124 to the installation on the SM2K.

For this action I asked AMEL in La Rochelle and NV Equipment as well, but unfortunately I didn't get an answer that they could help.

Does anybody has a map with the dimensions of the inox tubes and also where to fix them on the cockpit triangle.

 

Many thanks for all support!

 

Philipp

SM#124, Félicie, Bâle

 

 

 


 


 

 


 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat drain hose blocked

thomas.kleman <no_reply@...>
 

On my 53 (hull 422), the fridge hose for the interior drip tray leads under the steps behind the refrigerator; it's the small hose entering the copper fitting that goes to the bilge in the engine room. This pull the hose off and blow into it.......if it's clear (back to the drip tray), your problem is in the fitting........just take a piece of rigid wire and clean out the copper fitting where the hose was attached. Another thing to check is that the hose run from the back of the fridge to the fitting is uniformly downhill........that there is no loop in the hose. That would cause a problem draining as well.

Tom Kleman
SV L'ORIENT


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Frigoboat drain hose blocked

ya_fohi
 

Thanks to all for your suggestions, I will follow up. In the meantime I just have it draining into a jar in the fridge so no great urgency.

Cheers,
Paul


Paying Amel for parts order-solution

eric freedman
 


Re: SM Running Rigging

Paul Osterberg
 

To get the “ manual” head sail furling to work, one need an continuous line going through a block attached to a heavy duty shock cord ( must be tension on the furling line all the time else it will slip) at the stern of your boat up to the sheeve at the Genua furler I also have a low friction ring attached close to the sheve to make maximum angle that the furling line touches the sheeve .The problem is how do you attached the continuous line and there is a solution to that. Splice a loop of the core of the furling line at each end the just take a Thin dyneema core and tie it together and you have a continuous line that can be taken apart. I also use that to make my Genoa sheet longer when gybing the Genua with booth pools out, but only then to avoid to much rope in the cockpit. I have posted a few photos on how I have arranged the manual furling in the photo section
Paul on SY Kerpa SM 259


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] paying Amel for parts order

Craig Briggs
 

Hey, Ryan, just put it on José's card 
Craig


---In amelyachtowners@..., <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote :

Thank you all for the suggestions.  I guess my problem is unique.  This is not a case of the bank declining the purchase for fraud reasons (i.e. it's in France).  I had expected that, and was prepared for it.  The bank is not declining the purchase; they're never even getting the purchase attempt, so something is going wrong before that point in the process.  The cards were both Visas, for what it's worth.

I sent a wire via Western Union, since I already had an account with them.  I suspect TransferWise would require an extra ACH round-trip to verify my account, which would add about 3 days to the process, but if I was starting from scratch I probably would have gone with them.  Western Union is still slow by wire standards, but it should only take about 3 days total.

Thanks,
Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA

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