Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Ric Gottschalk <ric@...>
 

Greeting,

On my Santorin SN24 the pedestal seat is bolted in place and does not move. Even with cushions on the backrest and seat it is just hard enough to keep the crew from falling asleep on watch. Hence 90% of the time we just push the autopilot button and kickup our feet on the cockpit seats. Only had 1 crew who would ever sit there for hours pushing buttons to scroll thru the plotter, change light intensity, go to port 1 degree then strbd 3 degrees and try to calibrate the depth sounder in the gulf stream  

Ric Gottschalk

SN24 Bali Hai

Annapolis

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Thursday, August 23, 2018 2:59 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 

 

The Santorin has a pedestal seat. Ours sits on the pedestal post (not bolted) and therefore does 2 handy things.
1. It can be lifted off at anchor and gives more cockpit space
2. It swivels, so that when heeled you can turn the seat so your back is always dead downhill.
No problems with the fitting, but the moulded base support does give it the strength required.

Ian ‘Ocean Hobo’ SN96


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Alan Leslie
 

I agree the helm seat is great. The nav station stool terrible
We changed the navstation stool to this....much more comfortable in port and at sea, and it folds back out of the way.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Pat,

I regard the SM helm seat as a great design and a vital safety item. I have a lot of ocean miles behind me and in the vigorous seaways we encounter out there its fixed place stability is a huge safety factor. I would never have a swiveling seat. In big rough seas, oh boy. Likewise, even more so the tube up the sides and across the back. When you are moving around the cockpit in rough conditions it is a fantastic "grab when I'm off balance" hand hold. Moving around the cockpit in a seaway I am using that hand hold all the time. Bad accidents on yachts at sea are often caused by falls.As we age our bones become brittle and our balance less. Henri gave us hand holds every where for good reason. Swiveling padded comfort seats are for the marina and harbour set. Not for serious off shore.

Kind Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean Pearl

On 24 August 2018 at 01:19 "Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Pat,

You know what I am going to say...yada, yada, don't change it because...yada, yada.

But, FYI, Judy and I sat in that seat in a cyclone in the middle of the IO. It is perfect! Don't change it.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system  referred to  above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:01 AM greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Pat,

The concern I’d have about sitting in a typical pedestal seat is not rough seas, but rather heeling. There are many very comfortable helm seat built for high end motor yachts, but they all assume that the boat is basically flat. I have not yet seen a pedestal seat I’d want to sit in when heeled at 15 degrees.

The other issue around a pedestal is structural. The deck in that area might need strengthening to support a single point of attachment of a pedestal. Note for example, the way the nav station seat pedestal is built into the boat.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA

 

 


 


 


Re: Helm Seat

Ian Park
 

The Santorin has a pedestal seat. Ours sits on the pedestal post (not bolted) and therefore does 2 handy things.
1. It can be lifted off at anchor and gives more cockpit space
2. It swivels, so that when heeled you can turn the seat so your back is always dead downhill.
No problems with the fitting, but the moulded base support does give it the strength required.

Ian ‘Ocean Hobo’ SN96


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

ngtnewington Newington
 

On Amelia I love the helm seat. At sea in all weather I have found it great.
The chart table seat on the other hand is awful! However as with all things in life afloat there is only so much space. The corridor to the aft cabin precludes having something really comfy ie larger.

I guess my general doctrine applies to all be it lovers or boats:
“Be to their virtues ever kind and their faults a little blind”
Nick (Amelia 54 )

On 23 Aug 2018, at 18:45, Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Bill, I too sit elsewhere as well most of the time , but still spend a fair amount of time at the helm. I have also considered changing out  the Nav seat.

Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Thu, Aug 23, 2018 11:47 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 
Pat,

I am pretty sure we have very similar seats.  Of course, we all use our boats differently.  Most of the time when we are on passage, I don't use the helmseat, but prefer lounging further back in the cockpit were there is better back support, and places to put my feet up.  If the helm seat was my go-to spot I might be looking for something to make it more comfortable.

I did something similar, but less radical, at the nav station.  Our boat had a simple, flat, bar-stool seat there.  I found myself sliding off backwards when heeled on starboard tack. 

We swapped out for a seat that was similar, except for a stainless rail as a low back rest that works great keeping my butt in place. It also gives us an extra handhold at a critical place in the cabin.  It had the additional advantage that it raised me 3 inches higher--enough I can actually type at the navstati on.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, I too sit elsewhere as well most of the time , but still spend a fair amount of time at the helm. I have also considered changing out  the Nav seat.
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Thu, Aug 23, 2018 11:47 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 
Pat,

I am pretty sure we have very similar seats.  Of course, we all use our boats differently.  Most of the time when we are on passage, I don't use the helmseat, but prefer lounging further back in the cockpit were there is better back support, and places to put my feet up.  If the helm seat was my go-to spot I might be looking for something to make it more comfortable.

I did something similar, but less radical, at the nav station.  Our boat had a simple, flat, bar-stool seat there.  I found myself sliding off backwards when heeled on starboard tack. 

We swapped out for a seat that was similar, except for a stainless rail as a low back rest that works great keeping my butt in place. It also gives us an extra handhold at a critical place in the cabin.  It had the additional advantage that it raised me 3 inches higher--enough I can actually type at the navstati on.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

eric freedman
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

 

Mark,

Eric is using an abbreviation. It is DEXRON II ATF. However, you cannot find DEXRON II because it is no longer made. Dexron VI replaced Dexron II and III.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 10:25 AM isaac_02906@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Eric,

Would you mind posting the updated list of approved fluids from ZF?  I looked long and hard for Dex II and could not find it.

Mark Isaac
SM391, Lulu
South Freeport, Maine


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

greatketch@...
 

Pat,

I am pretty sure we have very similar seats.  Of course, we all use our boats differently.  Most of the time when we are on passage, I don't use the helmseat, but prefer lounging further back in the cockpit were there is better back support, and places to put my feet up.  If the helm seat was my go-to spot I might be looking for something to make it more comfortable.

I did something similar, but less radical, at the nav station.  Our boat had a simple, flat, bar-stool seat there.  I found myself sliding off backwards when heeled on starboard tack. 

We swapped out for a seat that was similar, except for a stainless rail as a low back rest that works great keeping my butt in place. It also gives us an extra handhold at a critical place in the cabin.  It had the additional advantage that it raised me 3 inches higher--enough I can actually type at the navstation.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Mark Isaac
 

Hi Eric,

Would you mind posting the updated list of approved fluids from ZF?  I looked long and hard for Dex II and could not find it.

Mark Isaac
SM391, Lulu
South Freeport, Maine


Re: Santorin spinnaker question

Beaute Olivier
 

one more picture


Re: Installing diesel heating on a Super Maramu

svperegrinus@yahoo.com
 

We had an Eberspächer Airtronic D5 installed in La Rochelle three years ago.  This is the brand and model Amel ordinarily installed on SM's where the buyer requested heating.

This install is easy on many SMs that were originally sold to the U.S. customers because if I understand correctly many of these Amels had a bunch of options included as standard.  The valuable factiry option here is "forced air ventilation".  Of course any number of Euroland boats also checked this option at build time, but, critically, not all.

If your boat has "forced air ventilation", the installation is not quite trivial, but "light".  The furnace is hung from the ceiling of the long cockpit portside locker, exactly replacing the two 24V fans installed there by the factory.  In this case, all the ducting to the forward, main and aft cabins obviously already exists.  The main additions are:

(1) The Eberspächer temperature sensor to be added on the port side of the dining table, above the oval cubbyhole, right on the mahogany.
(2) The furnace exhaust escape, where your hull will be breached on the port side, at the level of the sole of the long port locker
(3) The fuel pump, which will tap somewhere around the racor filters and run diagonally and upward towards port
(4) A bit of the ducting inside the long port locker should be upgraded to heater-rated ducting.  I guess you should change all of the ducting from the original thin-Amel-factory stuff, but we did not, and the boat has yet to catch on fire.
(5) The Eberspächer controller needs be installed somewhere.  We   put in on the galley's aft bulkhead, inward of the watermaker controls.  Some people put it on the removable piece of wood outward of the 230V electric panel.

We supplemented the default wall controller with a remote controller, so we can start/stop/adjust the heater from the aft cabin.  It is wireless, a bit smaller than a car fob's, and it introduces the ability to schedule automated heating cycles (say, Mo-Fri, 5am to 6am).  In the U.S. market, back in 2015, this was not available, even though it was offered in the European market.  We bought it from HEATSO, the British company Eric of Kimberlite recommended.  Note our remote is the _orange_backlit_version, which is compatible with the standard European _orange_backlit_bukhead_ controller.  In the U.S., they were still giving away a 70's-style controller with rotary buttons.

After three years of winter use, the thing has proven 100% reliable.

The thing is too noisy, so we hate it.

Yet we love it and need it because we sail in winter and live aboard all year.  We installed the Eberspächer silencer for the aft cabin duct because it was easy and cheap, but didn't install the silencers for the other two heating ducts, and most critically did not install the INTAKE silencer because hull #350 still has the short intake above the long cockpit locker.    At some point in later hulls Amel put the intake at the bottom of the small port locker, so the Eberspächer intake silencer may be easy to install in these lucky cases.  In our case, the intake sounds like we have a helicopter jet turbine about to take off from the cockpit.

Any Amels not having the forced air option preinstalled should install a quiet Hydronic heater.  I know that's what I would do.

Cheers,

Peregrinus
SM2K N°. 350 (2002)
En route, Porto Kayo to Koroni


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Santorin spinnaker question [1 Attachment]

 

Olivier, Thanks for that. I assumed the masthead top was the same as the SM.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 10:09 AM Beaute Olivier atlanticyachtsurvey@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from Beaute Olivier included below]

Hello Herbert, Alan and Bill,

the Santorin main mast was not fitted with the welded aluminum like on the SM2K.
Here are pictures of an SM (before SM2K) masthead with a stainless steel support bolted onto the aluminum flat part at the top. It is, of course, isolated with a plastic sheet to prevent galvanic corrosion.
This plate must be strong and the welded eye that supports the block's shackle must be reinforced.

Good luck.

Olivier


Re: Santorin spinnaker question

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello Herbert, Alan and Bill,

the Santorin main mast was not fitted with the welded aluminum like on the SM2K.
Here are pictures of an SM (before SM2K) masthead with a stainless steel support bolted onto the aluminum flat part at the top. It is, of course, isolated with a plastic sheet to prevent galvanic corrosion.
This plate must be strong and the welded eye that supports the block's shackle must be reinforced.

Good luck.

Olivier


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, Thanks for the explanation. If you re pickled after three years and then ran it for a long time to flush it out ,would that get you back to a good set of membranes? Hate to buy new ones ,these were new less than four years ago.
Thanks,
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners
Sent: Thu, Aug 23, 2018 10:32 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

 
If the membrane is pickled with sodium metabisufite (also called sodium pyrosufite) the issue with long term storage (beyond about 1 year) is not damage to the membranes from the pickling solution, but rather that the pickling solution losses its biostatic properties and the membranes foul from biological growth.  

When dissolved in water sodium metabisufite gradually hydrolyses to release sulfur dioxide leaving a solution of sodium sulfite. Sulfur dioxide is a strong reducing agent, and a very effective microbiocide.  Once all of the sodium metabisulfite hydrolyses, and the resulting sulfur dioxide reacts and dissipates, there is nothing left to protect the membranes from biological growth.  The usual recommendation is that the membranes should be re-pickled after a year to keep them safe.  I would guess that timeframe is actually highly variable depending on initial water quality, pH, bioburden, temperature, and other variables.

This is the same reason that membranes sold "wet" have a relatively short shelf life.  It is not the membranes that "go bad" rather it is the pickling solution.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Watermaker and transmission fluid

Craig Briggs
 

Bill,
Thanks for the explanation - makes sense. Given the membrane is fouled, I would guess the danger may be that, even though you might be able to run the system and produce fresh water, that will be contaminated no matter how long you run it.  Sound right? Wonder if fresh pickling would destroy the old fouling. (Or maybe just bite the bullet and buy new membranes to stay on the safe side.)
Craig SN68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <greatketch@...> wrote :

If the membrane is pickled with sodium metabisufite (also called sodium pyrosufite) the issue with long term storage (beyond about 1 year) is not damage to the membranes from the pickling solution, but rather that the pickling solution losses its biostatic properties and the membranes foul from biological growth.  

When dissolved in water sodium metabisufite gradually hydrolyses to release sulfur dioxide leaving a solution of sodium sulfite. Sulfur dioxide is a strong reducing agent, and a very effective microbiocide.  Once all of the sodium metabisulfite hydrolyses, and the resulting sulfur dioxide reacts and dissipates, there is nothing left to protect the membranes from biological growth.  The usual recommendation is that the membranes should be re-pickled after a year to keep them safe.  I would guess that timeframe is actually highly variable depending on initial water quality, pH, bioburden, temperature, and other variables.

This is the same reason that membranes sold "wet" have a relatively short shelf life.  It is not the membranes that "go bad" rather it is the pickling solution.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, That is why I posted my question, and stated that my main concern is that it would be a stable seat. While I know it would be more comfortable 100% of the time ,I am concerned about the stability in that .01% of time when conditions are at its worse. I would not want any sense of movement in a helm seat.
Thanks,
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners]
To: amelyachtowners Sent: Thu, Aug 23, 2018 10:44 am
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 
Pat,

All I am saying is, until you experience the security of that helm seat design in heavy conditions, I believe you would not change it. I believe that after you experience those conditions, your understanding of the design will change.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 8:38 AM Patrick Mcaneny sailw32@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
Bill, I would install a metal backing plate under the deck , so structurally I am not too concerned. It is that the tube is sleeved (allowing for height adjustment)and attachment points under the seat may combine to allow a degree of movement that concerns me. My seat now only has a slight curvature built in for adjusting to heel ,you may have the same seat. The chair I am looking at has side bolsters that mimics that somewhat. Since we are generally on auto pilot , I could swivel the seat seat towards windward and have a 15 degree recline,might be pretty comfortable while still be able to monitor gauges. My main concern is that it may look a bit big and movement,that would bother me.
Thanks,
Pat
SM123


-----Original Message-----
From: greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
To: amelyachtowners <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Thu, Aug 23, 2018 9:01 am
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Helm Seat

 
Pat,

The concern I’d have about sitting in a typical pedestal seat is not rough seas, but rather heeling. There are many very comfortable helm seat built for high end motor yachts, but they all assume that the boat is basically flat. I have not yet seen a pedestal seat I’d want to sit in when heeled at 15 degrees.

The other issue around a pedestal is structural. The deck in that area might need strengthening to support a single point of attachment of a pedestal. Note for example, the way the nav station seat pedestal is built into the boat.

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Annapolis, MD, USA


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy and novel way to remove membrane end caps.

 

Ian, Yes, I did mix up the solutions...I like yours a lot, but would like Eric's if he included the beer.

Eric, if you have compressed air on board, it isn't as messy.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 9:52 AM Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Bill,


 I think you've mixed us up--mine is the solution with the beer; Eric's is strictly teetotal ( I know, it's hard to believe he's a real sailor!)


 Ian


From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 23 August 2018 14:41:39
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy and novel way to remove membrane end caps.
 


Ian, 

You could improve on your method by adding one of Eric's steps...the beer.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:47 AM Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@hotmail..com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Alternatively.....take a short piece of webbing and make a loop, trapping the ends of the loop onto the end cap with a jubilee clip.  Sit down in the cockpit with a beer. Put the loop over a cleat on the mizzen mast and give the tube a sharp tug.  Bingo! (  only two hands needed and you don't get wet ! )


Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of michael winand mfw642000@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 23 August 2018 06:21:08
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy and novel way to remove membrane end caps.
 


Nice method 
Michael 


On Thu, 23 Aug 2018 at 12:46, eric kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]
 


Once you have the membrane assembly apart disconnect the membranes from each other. Put a 1/2 inch tubing over the hose nipple with a hose clamp. This is connected to a water supply, dock or boat water, turn on the water. Let the air escape and then put your finger over the hole where the water is escaping. 

Hold the hole closed with your finger. As the water pressurizes the vessel  the end caps will slide out due to water pressure . Just hold the loosest end cap  in place until the second one comes out.
Easiest way yet to remove the end caps. 3 hands is helpful.

Oh don't forget new O rings.
Fair Winds,
Eric
Sm 376 Kimberlite

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 05:33 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... 





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy and novel way to remove membrane end caps.

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Bill,


 I think you've mixed us up--mine is the solution with the beer; Eric's is strictly teetotal ( I know, it's hard to believe he's a real sailor!)


 Ian


From: amelyachtowners@... on behalf of Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners]
Sent: 23 August 2018 14:41:39
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy and novel way to remove membrane end caps.
 


Ian, 

You could improve on your method by adding one of Eric's steps...the beer.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 6:47 AM Ian & Judy ianjudyjenkins@hotmail..com [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Alternatively.....take a short piece of webbing and make a loop, trapping the ends of the loop onto the end cap with a jubilee clip.  Sit down in the cockpit with a beer. Put the loop over a cleat on the mizzen mast and give the tube a sharp tug.  Bingo! (  only two hands needed and you don't get wet ! )


Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Greece


From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...> on behalf of michael winand mfw642000@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: 23 August 2018 06:21:08
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Easy and novel way to remove membrane end caps.
 


Nice method 
Michael 


On Thu, 23 Aug 2018 at 12:46, eric kimberlite@... [amelyachtowners]
 


Once you have the membrane assembly apart disconnect the membranes from each other. Put a 1/2 inch tubing over the hose nipple with a hose clamp. This is connected to a water supply, dock or boat water, turn on the water. Let the air escape and then put your finger over the hole where the water is escaping. 

Hold the hole closed with your finger. As the water pressurizes the vessel  the end caps will slide out due to water pressure . Just hold the loosest end cap  in place until the second one comes out.
Easiest way yet to remove the end caps. 3 hands is helpful.

Oh don't forget new O rings.
Fair Winds,
Eric
Sm 376 Kimberlite

On Wed, Aug 22, 2018 at 05:33 PM, Danny and Yvonne SIMMS simms@... 





Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Santorin spinnaker question [1 Attachment]

 

Herbert:

Put the above through the existing hole at the masthead and attach your shackle to the 2 loops.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970

Any opinions and conclusions expressed in this message are solely those of the author and should not be construed as representing the opinion of an expert. Manufacturers' and Expert's precautions must be considered when dealing with mechanical and/or electrical systems to ensure that you are NOT harmed, and/or the device and/or system is NOT ruined. If in doubt, do not touch any mechanical and/or electrical device or system referred to above.


On Thu, Aug 23, 2018 at 9:12 AM herbert@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 
[Attachment(s) from herbert@... [amelyachtowners] included below]

thanks Alan! that seems to be a strong Aluminium extension to the Mast-Head, professional solution.  Cannot do that now, but maybe a stainless steel plate, screwed on the masthead, with rubber between the aluminium and the steel, would do the job also.

Currently there is a hole at the masthead-plate where a shackle was installed, I did not like the solution with the steel-shackle going through the aluminum plate (hard steel chaving against soft aluminium) and therefore removed the shackle, but maybe a strong dyneema line attached to the masthead-plate would also do it as a very simple solution.  any recommendations are welcome 

the foto attached shows the "old configuration" with the shackle where the block was fixed (next to the old B&G masthead unit, foto was made looking down at the top of the mast), I removed it when we serviced and repainted the mast. The hole is still there and could be used to attach a dyneema line with a block...

thx again, herbert

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