Date   

Guma - SM2000 hull 261 for sale

Keith Carter <keithcarter88@...>
 

Guma is all set up for a trip around the world.  Sadly, I had an accident skiing in March and can no longer walk - so the round the world trip will have to be done by other means. 
My lovely boat Guma is for sale.  She’s a well looked-after SM2000 from 1999, with all the usual kit plus some extras (but nothing of which Monsieur Amel would disapprove) including solar panels on a targa frame and Webasto heating. Guma is on the hard in Kos in the Greek Peloponnese. 

Message me on keithcarter88 {at} gmail {dot} com


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main outhaul rope

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Hi Bill,

yes I tried to get Kevlar and had to take dyneema 12mm. I fitted it very tightly but useless, as soon as the breeze came up it slipped dramatically. I agree with you about it diminishing in diameter but I think the casing is very slick too. It would seem 14mm might be a try but I doubt if it will work. 

Regards

Danny

SM 299 Ocean pearl

On 01 November 2018 at 07:37 "Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

 

Danny,

Amel used Kevlar 10mm on the SM. It is nearly impossible to find.

Amel suggests 12mm Dyneema:
The issue was not with the strength because Dyneema line is stronger than Kevlar. The issue is that most rope manufacturers are taking fiber from the middle of the rope and 10mm isn't really 10mm anymore. I purchased some 10mm that I could squeeze with my fingers to 7mm. Look at the Anderson Line Tender. You will see that if you can squeeze 10mm to 7mm, the line will certainly slip.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



On Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 12:31 PM Danny Simms sailorman.ds@... [amelyachtowners] < amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

 

Hi All,
A little while ago a number of you posted on replacing the control line for the mainsail out haul. I remember dyneema was not successful. Can some one remind me of what type was the best.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl

 

 

 


 


 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Main outhaul rope

 

Danny,

Amel used Kevlar 10mm on the SM. It is nearly impossible to find.

Amel suggests 12mm Dyneema:
The issue was not with the strength because Dyneema line is stronger than Kevlar. The issue is that most rope manufacturers are taking fiber from the middle of the rope and 10mm isn't really 10mm anymore. I purchased some 10mm that I could squeeze with my fingers to 7mm. Look at the Anderson Line Tender. You will see that if you can squeeze 10mm to 7mm, the line will certainly slip.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus

Amel School  http://www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



On Wed, Oct 31, 2018 at 12:31 PM Danny Simms sailorman.ds@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi All,
A little while ago a number of you posted on replacing the control line for the mainsail out haul. I remember dyneema was not successful. Can some one remind me of what type was the best.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl


Nikimat. I have a question for you

Alan Grayson
 

Hi Alex, you had a post on your website about your aft A/C unit tripping the main GFI on the 220v panel. I am having the same issue. I didn't see on that post if you found out what the problem actually was you just mentioned that the unit did not work. Do you remember what the problem was?

Regards

Alan Grayson

SV Ora Pai SM 406

Ft Lauderdale



Main outhaul rope

Danny Simms
 

Hi All,
A little while ago a number of you posted on replacing the control line for the mainsail out haul. I remember dyneema was not successful. Can some one remind me of what type was the best.
Regards
Danny
SM 299 Ocean Pearl


New file uploaded to amelyachtowners

amelyachtowners@...
 

Hello,

This email message is a notification to let you know that
a file has been uploaded to the Files area of the amelyachtowners
group.

File : /Mizzen furler gearbox/SM_RENVOI D ANGLE D ARTMON TRINGLE 35.pdf
Uploaded by : thomas_soraya <svgarulfo@gmail.com>
Description : Mizzen Furler gearbox - SM & 54 provided by Amel

You can access this file at the URL:
https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/amelyachtowners/files/Mizzen%20furler%20gearbox/SM_RENVOI%20D%20ANGLE%20D%20ARTMON%20TRINGLE%2035.pdf

To learn more about file sharing for your group, please visit:
https://help.yahoo.com/kb/index?page=content&y=PROD_GRPS&locale=en_US&id=SLN15398

Regards,

thomas_soraya <svgarulfo@gmail.com>


Navionics vs C-map?

Duane Siegfri
 

I'm looking at charts for my B&G plotter.  If anyone has some insight on either of these it would be appreciated.

I understand C-map has the Explorer Charts information, that would be a plus for the Bahamas.  


I have Navionics on my phone so I was considering buying the C-map charts and thus have them both available. 


Thanks,

Duane




Re: Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

SV Perigee
 

We have SM#396 - Perigee, purchased late 2016.

The previous owner had upgraded to FURUNO TZT chartplotter (version 1, which includes a rotary dial), DRS4 radar, new Furuno AIS (50 = Tx+Rx).  And we are glad he did.

We have upgraded the A/P.  Held to Raymarine, but the latest EVO-400 series model, retaining the legacy linear drive (refer also to the last point below about staying with Raymarine).  We replaced the existing linear drive with a new unit, serviced the old, and placed that into spares.  We have only a linear drive, not a rotary drive on the wheel, so our redundancy is provided by the spare drive, another rudder sensor unit, a spare drive controller (the grey box), a spare control head complete wiring harness, and the new generation EVO 'brain' which incorporates the heading sensor.

The main issue we have with this setup is getting the radar and AIS data off the Furuno network.  Both are fed to the TZT chartplotter via an Furuno ethernet hub, and NOT then shared on to the NMEA2000 network. We can view the TZT program, including radar/AIS (as if looking at the chartplotter directly) via WiFi and dedicated app on an iPad  - it works, slowly but surely, in both control and 'view-only' modes.

However, I would prefer to be able to extract the AIS data (at a minimum) and share it via the NMEA network - for use by either iSailor (which we run as a continuous iPad-based NAV backup to the Furuno TZT chartplotter), or to OpenCPN (just starting with this), or to be available for use by other displays/devices.

One alternative I am looking at is to have a dedicated AIS that shares it's track-plots via the N2K bus.  I am looking at the Vesper XB-8000 Class B AIS Transponder with WiFi.  (If my understanding is correct, I would then get all info on the N2K bus available via WiFi.)

We replaced the legacy 5x B&G Analogue instruments at the helm with 3x Triton2 displays.  This was due to the failure of the sonic-speed - I wanted to have STW as an input to the NAV system.  If everything had continued working OK (or if I was not finicky about STW), then I would have left 'as-is', and not started down the upgrade path until something else failed. 

That said, we are happy with the result.  With the new Triton2 instruments at the helm, we like the wind and depth tapes for improved situational awareness. The standard set-up is speed info on the left display, wind on the center display, and depth on the right.  We do however have different modes, where each of the helm displays shows different info depending on whether in harbour / shallow water, departure & arrival (Coastal), no wind (motoring to WPT on A/P), and sailing offshore (deep water).  I would also like to be able to feed AIS into the Triton2 helm instruments because one of the available screens can show a plan-view-display of AIS traffic (but then I would likely want a fourth display for that - where does it stop?).

Another consideration.  With the extension of the N2K backbone for wind, depth and boat speed, and now with all data natively on the N2K bus, I wished to remove the NMEA2000<->0183 converter between the TZT chart plotter and the B&G Hydra2000 unit at the navigation station.  This is because I discovered the the converter was introducing noise that was making the HF almost unuseable.  But with the Hydra decommissioned, one loses valuable info at the NAV STN.  Sure, the information is available on the chart plotter, but then one has to power up the chart plotter to see it (which uses more power and generates more heat).  So, to replace the functionality of the Hydra, I settled on a B&G Vulcan7.  More functionality than the Triton2 displays, but with built-in GPS (redundancy), another source of basic charting information should the TZT be out of service (and it has been), wind-tapes at the nav station (great), along with a host of other info not readily available on the TZT.  But without going to the Hydra5000 (because the Vulcan range, with the exception of the no-longer-available V5, has pretty much the same functionality as the new Hydras, that is, IF you have a dedicated chart plotter such as the Furuno TZT).

Another thing to think about when designing your new N2K system, is how the N2K network is powered.  Mine is powered by the Furuno TZT Chart Plotter.  The TZT does not need to be powered on, but the Circuit Breaker for the NAV station does need to be on.  Meaning that, all the power supplies for any equipment powered by the NAV station 24V bus are also powered up.  Equals power consumption and heat at the nav station.  Meaning also, that the whole N2K bus is powered up, including the displays at the helm. I am still contemplating the next change, which would be to install a switch panel for the independent 24-to-12V converters powered by the 24V bus.  And then split the N2K bus into two (from an electrical supply perspective, but retaining the common data bus).  Firstly to have a power source for the _sensors to nav-station side_ (and this would also be powered independently of the TZT display, allowing the removal of the TZT without having to wire in a separate power supply for the N2K bus).  And a second power supply for the _nav-station to helm_ side of the N2K network.  I would also take the VHF off the general bus, and place it on it’s own breaker (perhaps onto the HF breaker), so that I do not need to power up the whole NAV Station for when I just want the VHF on.

Speaking of VHF, I replaced the VHF with an ICOM IC-424G, which has built-in GPS (yet even more redundancy).  But have not yet wired in the extension command mic to the helm.

Still deciding on the panel layout for the NAV STN, for when I finally get around to removing the original Furuno GP-80 GPS Navigator, and the now superceded Hydra2000 display.

Last consideration.  If you think you might ever wish to control your autopilot from downstairs at the nav station, or using your helm displays, well, with B&G instruments and Raymarine A/P, this is not possible.  Sure, the Furuno TZT chart plotter (and B&G Vulcan7) can output course information that the A/P uses for it’s track functions, and the TZT and V7 can see rudder-position (and other) information coming from the Raymarine A/P.  But to directly control the A/P in heading or wind mode, or to change modes (heading versus wind-vane versus track mode) and so on, this is not possible.  It might be a rare case when you might want to do this - bad weather, short-handed, or failure of the A/P control head at the helm.  But something to think about.  I did not research this closely enough.  If I had been aware of this limitation, then I might have changed to a B&G autopilot (retaining the Raymarine linear drive), in preference to staying with Raymarine for the upgrade.  This would have allowed me to control the autopilot from the V7 downstairs.  The cost of the A/P upgrade would have been about the same.

Hope this provides food for thought, in addition to my prior posting on the forum about electronic upgrades.

David
Perigee, SM#396,
Bonaire


Re: Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

Juan de Zulueta
 

Hi Vic,

My boat is a super maramu 1990. All my electronics were destroyed by a thunderstorm in the harbour of St Raphael a few years ago.
I changed all the electronics and removed a few hundreds of kilos of old cables.
I put in place a raymarine network :
2 x I70 multi functions instrument displays
1 a20 multifunction display
2 x I60 wind indicators
1 x p70 automatic pilot display
1 x EVO1/ACU400 automatic pilot

This interfaced with radar 4g lowrance/ simrad and 2 x hds 9 touch lowrance and ais.

Everything is working nicely.
The new autopilot is really great.
The 4g lowrance radar is extremely powerful up to 36 miles and with a very low power consumption.
I kept the lowrance since they were the only devices not destroyed by the thunderstorm.

Best regards.

SM Ophelie X

Juan de Zulueta
France


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

John Clark
 

Hi Vic,
  I second everything Bill K said.   I chose to run with Raymarine out of convenience.  The previous owner had just installed a new ACU-400/EVO-100 autopilot...and West Marine had deep discount on their new Quantum radar and es78 chart plotter.   So far the B&G hydra 2000 system(not replaced because we have 2x spares of each component) talks to the Raymarine through the es78 via the NMEA 0183 input just fine.  I inherited a Furuno FA-50 AIS which shares the 183 bus without issue.  

As Bill said goo with one of the big four and you will be OK.  

                 John
SV Annie  SM37
Tyrell Bay, Carriacou

On Mon, Oct 29, 2018 at 7:07 PM greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 


Vic,

We are a bit ahead of you in our electronics upgrades. For the foreseeable future, I think we will be happy with what we now have.  

I haven't seen a big difference in the functionality and robustness of the systems from the Big4 (Garmin, Raymaine, Furuno, and Navico). Most of the choice depends on how you like the software user interface.  The big place where the feature set has been jumping around has been in Radar.  The various manufactures have been leapfrogging each other in the past few years, but I think at the moment, they have all landed about in the same place with reasonably good implementations of doppler radar and low power broadband systems.

With any new system you will end up moving to a NMEA2000 network. Almost all of the various manufacturers equipment is compatible--however Raymarine and to a lesser extent, Navico do use proprietary connectors. Fortunately adapters are available.

I have gone almost entirely with Navico B&G instruments, as much because I am familiar with their user interface as any other reason.  They use the much of the same hardware as Navico's Simrad brand, but the software tends to be much more sailing focused.

If you go "all-in" with the B&G sailing instruments, using the Hydra 5000 system, you'll end up with a powerful system that can have more sailing features than the other brands.  How important that is to you depends on how much of a sailing "geek" you are.

When our original Hydra2000 died there were a number of replacement options we considered. We ended up selecting a H5000 CPU.  One of the big reasons for this upgrade was it was the only way we could keep our B&G 218 mast head wind sensor. The combination of needing to rewire the mast, and throwing away a nearly new 218 on the mast, PLUS a working spare 218 was just not where we wanted to go. Top it off with the fact that the 218 is one of the best wind instruments out there, and we felt we really needed to keep it on the boat. We went with the standard Hydra, not the Hercules or Performance software upgrades.

B&G has recently changed the offerings on their autopilot computers.  The new NAC models have been downgraded a little bit in functionality from a sailing perspective from the older AC24 and AC42 models.  I am sure this was to open up more room in the market for the higher priced and feature rich H5000 autopilot which functions with the H5000 CPU.

One downside of the switch to the new H5000 CPU was that it does not have native support for the Sonic Speed sensor.  Our original unit still works, and is a great tool.  I haven't yet written it off completely, I am hoping I can make the two talk together, but for now my speed data is exclusively from our Airmar CS4500.  We also lost the old B&G analog gauges.  I know they are dear to the hearts of many old-time sailors, but the electronic displays have long since been my go-to, so I haven't really missed old analogs.

We kept our reliable Raymarine Autopilot drives but they needed a little bit of adapting.  Raymarine is the only manufacturer I know of who uses 12 volt clutches on their 24V drives.  All the other brands expect a 24V clutch if the drive is 24V. A simple solution is to drop a resistor in line, of equal resistance to the AP drive clutch coil, to drop the voltage.  In our case a simple and cheap 15 Ohm, 10Watt rated resistor did the trick perfectly.

Maretron instruments have an excellent reputation, and are one of the few manufacturers who try very hard to implement "pure" NMEA2000 instruments. For general information displays, they can be hard to beat.

We have a Raymarine AIS that came to us with the boat; a high-end Simrad fishfinder to support my ongoing fishing addiction; and a backup autopilot computer, an old Raymarine ST6000 that has the advantage it is autonomous and shares no sensors with the rest of the instruments. Our MFD is a 12" B&G Zeus Touch.  No longer in the catalog, it has been reliable and functional.

Our radar is a B&G 3G broadband unit, and the newest Halo models have me looking, but the extra features are not quite worth the cost to upgrade.

Good luck with the changes!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Solomans Island, Maryland, USA
The southward migration has begun.


---In amelyachtowners@..., wrote :

Hi everyone,


I'm about to start the refit of hull 248. I actually have it hauled and the masts down at the moment, so it's the perfect time to get a few details sorted.


As I'm working through the prep, I wanted to reach out and ask if anyone had any thoughts on best choice(s) for electronics/navigation/instruments? Not worried about cost or any of that, just trying to get what works best. I've had good past experiences in general with Simrad, Garmin, and Maretron, but have never used them on an Amel.


Any thoughts are appreciated!


Thanks,

Vic


Re: Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

greatketch@...
 


Vic,

We are a bit ahead of you in our electronics upgrades. For the foreseeable future, I think we will be happy with what we now have.  

I haven't seen a big difference in the functionality and robustness of the systems from the Big4 (Garmin, Raymaine, Furuno, and Navico). Most of the choice depends on how you like the software user interface.  The big place where the feature set has been jumping around has been in Radar.  The various manufactures have been leapfrogging each other in the past few years, but I think at the moment, they have all landed about in the same place with reasonably good implementations of doppler radar and low power broadband systems.

With any new system you will end up moving to a NMEA2000 network. Almost all of the various manufacturers equipment is compatible--however Raymarine and to a lesser extent, Navico do use proprietary connectors. Fortunately adapters are available.

I have gone almost entirely with Navico B&G instruments, as much because I am familiar with their user interface as any other reason.  They use the much of the same hardware as Navico's Simrad brand, but the software tends to be much more sailing focused.

If you go "all-in" with the B&G sailing instruments, using the Hydra 5000 system, you'll end up with a powerful system that can have more sailing features than the other brands.  How important that is to you depends on how much of a sailing "geek" you are.

When our original Hydra2000 died there were a number of replacement options we considered. We ended up selecting a H5000 CPU.  One of the big reasons for this upgrade was it was the only way we could keep our B&G 218 mast head wind sensor. The combination of needing to rewire the mast, and throwing away a nearly new 218 on the mast, PLUS a working spare 218 was just not where we wanted to go. Top it off with the fact that the 218 is one of the best wind instruments out there, and we felt we really needed to keep it on the boat. We went with the standard Hydra, not the Hercules or Performance software upgrades.

B&G has recently changed the offerings on their autopilot computers.  The new NAC models have been downgraded a little bit in functionality from a sailing perspective from the older AC24 and AC42 models.  I am sure this was to open up more room in the market for the higher priced and feature rich H5000 autopilot which functions with the H5000 CPU.

One downside of the switch to the new H5000 CPU was that it does not have native support for the Sonic Speed sensor.  Our original unit still works, and is a great tool.  I haven't yet written it off completely, I am hoping I can make the two talk together, but for now my speed data is exclusively from our Airmar CS4500.  We also lost the old B&G analog gauges.  I know they are dear to the hearts of many old-time sailors, but the electronic displays have long since been my go-to, so I haven't really missed old analogs.

We kept our reliable Raymarine Autopilot drives but they needed a little bit of adapting.  Raymarine is the only manufacturer I know of who uses 12 volt clutches on their 24V drives.  All the other brands expect a 24V clutch if the drive is 24V. A simple solution is to drop a resistor in line, of equal resistance to the AP drive clutch coil, to drop the voltage.  In our case a simple and cheap 15 Ohm, 10Watt rated resistor did the trick perfectly.

Maretron instruments have an excellent reputation, and are one of the few manufacturers who try very hard to implement "pure" NMEA2000 instruments. For general information displays, they can be hard to beat.

We have a Raymarine AIS that came to us with the boat; a high-end Simrad fishfinder to support my ongoing fishing addiction; and a backup autopilot computer, an old Raymarine ST6000 that has the advantage it is autonomous and shares no sensors with the rest of the instruments. Our MFD is a 12" B&G Zeus Touch.  No longer in the catalog, it has been reliable and functional.

Our radar is a B&G 3G broadband unit, and the newest Halo models have me looking, but the extra features are not quite worth the cost to upgrade.

Good luck with the changes!

Bill Kinney
SM160, Harmonie
Solomans Island, Maryland, USA
The southward migration has begun.


---In amelyachtowners@..., <vic.fryzel@...> wrote :

Hi everyone,


I'm about to start the refit of hull 248. I actually have it hauled and the masts down at the moment, so it's the perfect time to get a few details sorted.


As I'm working through the prep, I wanted to reach out and ask if anyone had any thoughts on best choice(s) for electronics/navigation/instruments? Not worried about cost or any of that, just trying to get what works best. I've had good past experiences in general with Simrad, Garmin, and Maretron, but have never used them on an Amel.


Any thoughts are appreciated!


Thanks,

Vic


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

michael winand
 

Hi Vic 
We just fitted axiom pro 12 at the helm with a i70 and a 7 inch axiom at the navigation table. Ais. So far have kept the original radar. 
This was a needed upgrade as the hydra mast head was not complete. I have brand new spare b &g sonic speed transducers that came as spare parts. 
We went to a boat show to test drive the various brands. 
Found that the raymarine is easy to use. 

On Tue, 30 Oct 2018 at 7:22 am, Mike Johnson mike.k.johnson@... [amelyachtowners]
wrote:
 

Hi Vic,

We refitted with Furuno TZ2 and radar.  Works well with laptop etc. Only minor niggle is the NMEA 2000 AIS (digital yacht) is having difficulty communicating with the plotter.

Regards

Mike & Peta

Solitude
SM2K #461

On 29 Oct 2018, at 17:55, vic.fryzel@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi everyone,


I'm about to start the refit of hull 248. I actually have it hauled and the masts down at the moment, so it's the perfect time to get a few details sorted.


As I'm working through the prep, I wanted to reach out and ask if anyone had any thoughts on best choice(s) for electronics/navigation/instruments? Not worried about cost or any of that, just trying to get what works best. I've had good past experiences in general with Simrad, Garmin, and Maretron, but have never used them on an Amel.


Any thoughts are appreciated!


Thanks,

Vic


Re: Helm station light

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Mark,
Do either of the two cut off wires have 0 resistance, such that you could use that for the negative?
Cheers, Craig Briggs, SN68


---In amelyachtowners@..., <mark_pitt@...> wrote :

The dome light at the helm station of Sabbatical III no longer works.  My multi-meter shows only 18 volts and there is substantial resistance on the positive (blue) wire but none on the negative (black) wire.  So I need to pull a new wire.  The existing (original) wire is a grey, round cable containing four wires, two of which are cut off at each end.  It is easy to find in the ceiling space revealed by the sliding ceiling panel just forward of the autopilot locker in the galley.  It disappears by itself into a hole and then apparently comes up in the center section of the hard dodger.  There seems to be a rubber gland where this part of the dodger sits on the deck.  I guess that the electrical cable goes through that gland.


My question is:  Do I have to remove the dodger in order to replace this electrical cable? I have pulled on this cable with only moderate force and it did not budge.  I wish to avoid removing the dodger at this point in time.  Has any one replaced this cable?  Thanks.


   Mark Pitt

   Sabbatical III, SM#419, Lanzarote, Canary Islands



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: mizzen furler failure [2 Attachments]

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi,

Thanks Kelly and Ryan,

We are at the same point of disassembly. So far, soft cleaning of the accessible interface between the plastic sleeve and the metal parts yielded no results; still stuck. 

There is very little way to hold the outer metal tube in place. And, should I try to get the inner tube pressed out, it’s going to be tricky to hold the outer tube as the flange is tiny. 

I’m really keen to hear what trick Derick’s rigger used to solve the issue.


Thanks
Thomas

GARULFO 
A54-122
Aruba


On Sun, 28 Oct 2018 at 10:48, Kelly Ran naryllek@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hi Thomas,

We were not able to free the inner tube and outer sleeve. I do not think the bushing should rigidly couple to either part. In any case, the inner tube should turn pretty easily inside the sleeve.

The most dissasembly we could do was unthread the horizontal part all the way and remove the forward part of the inner tube. The inner tube is 2 parts, and the forward section is bolted on.

If you detach the foil, you can screw on the horizontal part again ... the bevel gears will start meshing as you engage more threads, but you won't really be driving anything (as the foil is not attached). You will need to take care that the "pinned" position corresponds to the foil position that you want.

FWIW the new furler gearbox that we received from Amel is buttersmooth and infinitely easier to use than our original seized gearbox.  I fear that only my left arm will get a workout (outhaul), as the right arm (furling) does not need much effort anymore.  (The new part also has a seal that seems to have completely disintegrated on the old part. Which makes me think that if you dissasemble and grease the part, it will still need a seal. This is a red annular seal that goes around the base of the foil attachment part as it exits the gearbox. (There is also a neoprene-ish washer inside the foil attachment part to dampen the foil's axial motion?))

Keep us updated on your progress; we will want to refurbish our old gearbox when we have more time. Thanks and good luck,
kelly + ryan
SM233 Iteration
Newport

On Sat, Oct 27, 2018 at 4:31 PM 'S/V Garulfo' svgarulfo@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 


Hi Derick, Ryan and Kelly, 

We have the same situation with our mizzen gearbox. The horizontal tube is seized; the outer sleeve, the nylon bushing and the inner tube coupling the gears to the winch handle female bit are all solidly stuck together. 
Is there any advice on how to make them work freely again? Is the nylon bushing meant to be solidly coupled to either the outer sleeve or the inner tube?

Also, as a result of that seizure, I think the thread between the horizontal elements and the gearbox appears to have slipped. Any idea if that could be remediated in any way?

Thanks


Thomas
GARULFO
A54-122
Aruba

On Wed, 19 Sep 2018 at 19:18, Ryan Meador ryan.d.meador@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Thanks, Derick.  That's great info, and matches the diagram I received from Amel (which I intend to upload to the files section when I get a chance).  Do you have any idea how the rigger separated the pieces of the tube?  Also, did you simply screw it back in, and it turns freely enough that it doesn't unscrew itself again?


Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Tue, Sep 18, 2018 at 11:37 PM derickgates@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Ryan,

I had the same problem on Brava. The piece in your picture had frozen up, and I needed to take it to a rigger. The rigger was able to remove the inner tube from the outer tube, and clean and regrease it so that then it turned freely. If you then disengage the gearbox from the mizzen foil, you can remove it and see how the piece you have pictured screws into the gearbox. There are only a few threads between the two pieces. While you have the gearbox out, you can grease it too.

Derick Gates
SM2K #400 Brava

Currently on the hard in Antigua


Re: Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

John Clanton
 

Vic,

There are plenty of folks on this forum with more experience than me, and I'm sure they can provide their experiences over a number of years with various platforms.  So my comments come from general experience on the water in power and sail, and a healthy respect for wanting to avoid things not working at critical times.

The standard package being delivered by Amel in recent years is Furuno chart plotter, autopilot and radar, coupled with B&G wind instruments.  I have a Furuno NavNet TZ Touch 2 plotter, Furuno NavPilot 711C autopilot, Furuno DRS4D radar, and B&G Hydra 5000 wind instrumentation.  I have been very happy with the system and other than a few initial operator errors, have found it to work consistently and flawlessly. 

I have the Furuno AIS blackbox system integrated into the NavNet, and am firmly in the camp that a reliable AIS system is the best value safety system that any boat can have.

In previous boats, I have specified Furuno gear and would have upgraded to them had Amel not already had them as standard.  The reasons I chose them reflects my own approach to risk management, and will certainly not be everyone's choice.

1. Aside from Furuno and Garmin, I believe that every other brand has been through a corporate spin-off, restructuring, or consolidation, which always leaves me wondering about product support after such a change.  I also worry about change in manufacturing processes with one of these events.

2. Furuno is widely used by commercial vessels of all sizes, and (to my knowledge) they only serve the maritime market.

3. Their service network is well developed, and can typically be found anywhere there is a commercial port.

4. My experience is that they are robust and designed beyond what a fair-weather day-sailor would need.

They are clearly not the choice for the budget minded sailor, but I place a value on my peace of mind and my passengers that more than compensates for their higher price.

For what it's worth.


John W. Clanton
S/V Devereux
Amel 55, no. 65







Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

Mike Johnson
 

Hi Vic,

We refitted with Furuno TZ2 and radar.  Works well with laptop etc. Only minor niggle is the NMEA 2000 AIS (digital yacht) is having difficulty communicating with the plotter.

Regards

Mike & Peta

Solitude
SM2K #461

On 29 Oct 2018, at 17:55, vic.fryzel@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi everyone,


I'm about to start the refit of hull 248. I actually have it hauled and the masts down at the moment, so it's the perfect time to get a few details sorted.


As I'm working through the prep, I wanted to reach out and ask if anyone had any thoughts on best choice(s) for electronics/navigation/instruments? Not worried about cost or any of that, just trying to get what works best. I've had good past experiences in general with Simrad, Garmin, and Maretron, but have never used them on an Amel.


Any thoughts are appreciated!


Thanks,

Vic


Electronics: complete refit of hull 248, 1999 SM

Vic Fryzel
 

Hi everyone,


I'm about to start the refit of hull 248. I actually have it hauled and the masts down at the moment, so it's the perfect time to get a few details sorted.


As I'm working through the prep, I wanted to reach out and ask if anyone had any thoughts on best choice(s) for electronics/navigation/instruments? Not worried about cost or any of that, just trying to get what works best. I've had good past experiences in general with Simrad, Garmin, and Maretron, but have never used them on an Amel.


Any thoughts are appreciated!


Thanks,

Vic


Helm station light

Mark Pitt
 

The dome light at the helm station of Sabbatical III no longer works.  My multi-meter shows only 18 volts and there is substantial resistance on the positive (blue) wire but none on the negative (black) wire.  So I need to pull a new wire.  The existing (original) wire is a grey, round cable containing four wires, two of which are cut off at each end.  It is easy to find in the ceiling space revealed by the sliding ceiling panel just forward of the autopilot locker in the galley.  It disappears by itself into a hole and then apparently comes up in the center section of the hard dodger.  There seems to be a rubber gland where this part of the dodger sits on the deck.  I guess that the electrical cable goes through that gland.


My question is:  Do I have to remove the dodger in order to replace this electrical cable? I have pulled on this cable with only moderate force and it did not budge.  I wish to avoid removing the dodger at this point in time.  Has any one replaced this cable?  Thanks.


   Mark Pitt

   Sabbatical III, SM#419, Lanzarote, Canary Islands



Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Unknown Wood piece [2 Attachments]

tfortner1975
 

That looks like a well varnished seat that goes in a tender. With the plastic flap end pieces, they slide down into the handles.  That’s my quick guess. 

Google ‘highfield tender seat’ 

On Oct 29, 2018, at 8:21 PM, carcodespam@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

I have found this piece of wood in my Sharki #60, build 1982.
Length is 85 centimeter (33.46 "), width is 20 centimeter (7.87 ") and thickness is 24 millimeter (1 ").
Each side has a plastic piece attached as seen in the pics.
What for is that ?

Gerhard
Sharki #60



3rd fridge unit

Alan Grayson
 

Hi All, I would like to add the 3rd fridge unit under the fwd settee.

Are the boxes the same size or are they shaped differently?

Is there anyone out there in the US who has a mold made up? 

Would you be willing to ship the mold?

Or be willing to let me arrange a local fiberglasser to make up the box using your mold and ship the box to me in Ft Lauderdale

Does anyone have any other options?

Regards

Alan Grayson

SV Ora Pai SM 406

Ft Lauderdale

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