Date   

Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

Sv Garulfo
 

54 poles again:

Agreed they are big and heavy. They can be managed solo but it’s easier with 2 people. What I think people would find the trickiest is over reaching at the bow to pass the sheet in the block.

I second the great idea to leave them to rest on the bow seat. 

Our mast base has 3 poles attachment fittings, on forward and one on each side for twin pole setup. In that configuration you can have both poles resting on the seat when not used. When using only the forward one, the staysail gets in the way and we just rest and lash it on the handrail. 

During our Atlantic crossing, we setup the twin pole configuration before we left and removed it 17 days later on the other side. We did extend the genoa sheets to be able to use the sail on either side. 

Happy sailing 

Thomas
GARULFO 
A54-122
Panama



On Sat, 9 Feb 2019 at 09:17, COURTNEY GORMAN Itsfun1@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

The second pole was an option on the 54

Courtney 
Trippin
54 #101
Benner Bay St Thomas 


On Feb 9, 2019, at 9:11 AM, Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Jeff,


I am not on the boat for the winter, so can not measure the stem fitting. My poles are normally stored on deck. So there is no track on the mast but fittings at the base of the mast. Consequently they are very long. The twin pole set up is for using the ballooner one side and the genoa the other. This is the classic Amel trade wind rig. I guess not all the 54’s were set up exactly the same. NicK
.
On 9 Feb 2019, at 12:40, JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:



Nick,
I'm curious, on 2 fronts..
I have 54 #14. There is only 1 pole, mounted on a track on the forward side of the mast. Where is your second pole mounted? Is it possible to send a picture?
I am considering mounting a receptor for a pole on the downhaul track (used to tighten the mainsail head), and using a telescopic pole to mount onto the receptor fitting. I'd have to store the pole on deck. It would only be used for a code zero deployment on the starboard side. 
Also, could you measure your stem fitting? Barry Connor 54 #14 has the 6.5mm stem fitting and is looking into replacing it with the Amel modified 20mm version.  If you have that similar 6.5mm fitting, you may want to contact Amel and express a desire to replace it also. Perhaps they would consider offering that item to owners if enough people express a desire to replace the under-manufactured part.    
Thanks.
Best Regards,
Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

On Sat, Feb 09, 2019 at 02:06 AM, Nick ngtnewington@...[amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

RE POLES ON THE 54

I have a 54 with twin aluminium poles. I can manage them alone but they are big and quite heavy.. One trick I have found is that when at sea and likely to be using them, but not actually using them. I  leave them clicked into their mounts at the base of the mast and lying horizontally lashed to the teak bow seat. They are then ready to hoist. They are secure do not get in the way. When it comes to sailing downwind, I am no fan of reaching up unless in light airs.. In my opinion poles are essential.
Nick s/y Amelia 019 54


On 8 Feb 2019, at 17:57, grove.ken@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for taking the time for such a detailed description. The flavor of your information more or less matches  the relative degree of differences I was expecting between the three models, but with much more detail about exactly how (and why) they differ.


Can you elaborate a little more on the pole differences between the 53 and 54, especially as it relates to short handed sailing? The majority of the time it would be just my wife and I, and I'd be even more comfortable if it could be safely sailed by even just my wife should I get sick or injured. How much heavier and more cumbersome are the bigger 54 poles to handle? Are they still manageable enough that a typical female could handle them? I assume it would be highly advised to make sure they are the lighter carbon fiber variety.

You mentioned the extra difficulty on the 55 around docks due to the higher freeboard. Any other material differences you would note between the three models as it relates to easy / safe short handed sailing?




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences [1 Attachment]

Courtney Gorman
 

The second pole was an option on the 54
Courtney 
Trippin
54 #101
Benner Bay St Thomas 


On Feb 9, 2019, at 9:11 AM, Nick Newington ngtnewington@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Hi Jeff,


I am not on the boat for the winter, so can not measure the stem fitting. My poles are normally stored on deck. So there is no track on the mast but fittings at the base of the mast. Consequently they are very long. The twin pole set up is for using the ballooner one side and the genoa the other. This is the classic Amel trade wind rig. I guess not all the 54’s were set up exactly the same. NicK
.
On 9 Feb 2019, at 12:40, JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:



Nick,
I'm curious, on 2 fronts.
I have 54 #14. There is only 1 pole, mounted on a track on the forward side of the mast. Where is your second pole mounted? Is it possible to send a picture?
I am considering mounting a receptor for a pole on the downhaul track (used to tighten the mainsail head), and using a telescopic pole to mount onto the receptor fitting. I'd have to store the pole on deck. It would only be used for a code zero deployment on the starboard side. 
Also, could you measure your stem fitting? Barry Connor 54 #14 has the 6.5mm stem fitting and is looking into replacing it with the Amel modified 20mm version.  If you have that similar 6.5mm fitting, you may want to contact Amel and express a desire to replace it also. Perhaps they would consider offering that item to owners if enough people express a desire to replace the under-manufactured part.    
Thanks.
Best Regards,
Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

On Sat, Feb 09, 2019 at 02:06 AM, Nick ngtnewington@...[amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

RE POLES ON THE 54

I have a 54 with twin aluminium poles. I can manage them alone but they are big and quite heavy. One trick I have found is that when at sea and likely to be using them, but not actually using them. I  leave them clicked into their mounts at the base of the mast and lying horizontally lashed to the teak bow seat. They are then ready to hoist. They are secure do not get in the way. When it comes to sailing downwind, I am no fan of reaching up unless in light airs. In my opinion poles are essential.
Nick s/y Amelia 019 54


On 8 Feb 2019, at 17:57, grove.ken@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for taking the time for such a detailed description. The flavor of your information more or less matches  the relative degree of differences I was expecting between the three models, but with much more detail about exactly how (and why) they differ.


Can you elaborate a little more on the pole differences between the 53 and 54, especially as it relates to short handed sailing? The majority of the time it would be just my wife and I, and I'd be even more comfortable if it could be safely sailed by even just my wife should I get sick or injured. How much heavier and more cumbersome are the bigger 54 poles to handle? Are they still manageable enough that a typical female could handle them? I assume it would be highly advised to make sure they are the lighter carbon fiber variety.

You mentioned the extra difficulty on the 55 around docks due to the higher freeboard. Any other material differences you would note between the three models as it relates to easy / safe short handed sailing?




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

ngtnewington Newington
 

Hi Jeff,

I am not on the boat for the winter, so can not measure the stem fitting. My poles are normally stored on deck. So there is no track on the mast but fittings at the base of the mast. Consequently they are very long. The twin pole set up is for using the ballooner one side and the genoa the other. This is the classic Amel trade wind rig. I guess not all the 54’s were set up exactly the same. NicK
.

On 9 Feb 2019, at 12:40, JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:



Nick,
I'm curious, on 2 fronts.
I have 54 #14. There is only 1 pole, mounted on a track on the forward side of the mast. Where is your second pole mounted? Is it possible to send a picture?
I am considering mounting a receptor for a pole on the downhaul track (used to tighten the mainsail head), and using a telescopic pole to mount onto the receptor fitting. I'd have to store the pole on deck. It would only be used for a code zero deployment on the starboard side. 
Also, could you measure your stem fitting? Barry Connor 54 #14 has the 6.5mm stem fitting and is looking into replacing it with the Amel modified 20mm version.  If you have that similar 6.5mm fitting, you may want to contact Amel and express a desire to replace it also. Perhaps they would consider offering that item to owners if enough people express a desire to replace the under-manufactured part.    
Thanks.
Best Regards,
Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14

On Sat, Feb 09, 2019 at 02:06 AM, Nick ngtnewington@...[amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

RE POLES ON THE 54

I have a 54 with twin aluminium poles. I can manage them alone but they are big and quite heavy. One trick I have found is that when at sea and likely to be using them, but not actually using them. I  leave them clicked into their mounts at the base of the mast and lying horizontally lashed to the teak bow seat. They are then ready to hoist. They are secure do not get in the way. When it comes to sailing downwind, I am no fan of reaching up unless in light airs. In my opinion poles are essential.
Nick s/y Amelia 019 54


On 8 Feb 2019, at 17:57, grove.ken@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for taking the time for such a detailed description. The flavor of your information more or less matches  the relative degree of differences I was expecting between the three models, but with much more detail about exactly how (and why) they differ.


Can you elaborate a little more on the pole differences between the 53 and 54, especially as it relates to short handed sailing? The majority of the time it would be just my wife and I, and I'd be even more comfortable if it could be safely sailed by even just my wife should I get sick or injured. How much heavier and more cumbersome are the bigger 54 poles to handle? Are they still manageable enough that a typical female could handle them? I assume it would be highly advised to make sure they are the lighter carbon fiber variety.

You mentioned the extra difficulty on the 55 around docks due to the higher freeboard. Any other material differences you would note between the three models as it relates to easy / safe short handed sailing?




Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

JEFFREY KRAUS
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

ngtnewington Newington
 

RE POLES ON THE 54
I have a 54 with twin aluminium poles. I can manage them alone but they are big and quite heavy. One trick I have found is that when at sea and likely to be using them, but not actually using them. I  leave them clicked into their mounts at the base of the mast and lying horizontally lashed to the teak bow seat. They are then ready to hoist. They are secure do not get in the way. When it comes to sailing downwind, I am no fan of reaching up unless in light airs. In my opinion poles are essential.
Nick s/y Amelia 019 54


On 8 Feb 2019, at 17:57, grove.ken@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Thanks for taking the time for such a detailed description. The flavor of your information more or less matches  the relative degree of differences I was expecting between the three models, but with much more detail about exactly how (and why) they differ.


Can you elaborate a little more on the pole differences between the 53 and 54, especially as it relates to short handed sailing? The majority of the time it would be just my wife and I, and I'd be even more comfortable if it could be safely sailed by even just my wife should I get sick or injured. How much heavier and more cumbersome are the bigger 54 poles to handle? Are they still manageable enough that a typical female could handle them? I assume it would be highly advised to make sure they are the lighter carbon fiber variety.

You mentioned the extra difficulty on the 55 around docks due to the higher freeboard. Any other material differences you would note between the three models as it relates to easy / safe short handed sailing?


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

Ken Grove
 

Thanks for taking the time for such a detailed description. The flavor of your information more or less matches  the relative degree of differences I was expecting between the three models, but with much more detail about exactly how (and why) they differ.

Can you elaborate a little more on the pole differences between the 53 and 54, especially as it relates to short handed sailing? The majority of the time it would be just my wife and I, and I'd be even more comfortable if it could be safely sailed by even just my wife should I get sick or injured. How much heavier and more cumbersome are the bigger 54 poles to handle? Are they still manageable enough that a typical female could handle them? I assume it would be highly advised to make sure they are the lighter carbon fiber variety.

You mentioned the extra difficulty on the 55 around docks due to the higher freeboard. Any other material differences you would note between the three models as it relates to easy / safe short handed sailing?


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: AGM battery equalisation

 

Paul,

I agree with Alan. Start shopping for batteries. Actively cruising battery lifetimes are normally between 3 and 4 years.

Best,

Bill Rouse
Amel School  
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550

+1(832) 380-4970



On Fri, Feb 8, 2019 at 9:20 AM greatketch@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

I agree with Alan, a difference in voltage of 0.4 indicates a serious imbalance on the batteries pairs.  Normal AGM batteries are especially sensitive to chronic undercharging, and the batteries that are at 12.3 volts likely haven't been brought up to full charge for a while.


Bill Kinney


Re: AGM battery equalisation

greatketch@...
 

I agree with Alan, a difference in voltage of 0.4 indicates a serious imbalance on the batteries pairs.  Normal AGM batteries are especially sensitive to chronic undercharging, and the batteries that are at 12.3 volts likely haven't been brought up to full charge for a while.

Bill Kinney


Re: AGM battery equalisation

Alan Leslie
 

Paul,
My advice and that of others is that if you are going to replace the batteries, you should replace all of them at the same time.
The low voltage batteries will certainly drain power from the higher voltage ones and in the process they will all fail at some point.
Any series/parallel battery arrangement at least needs to have e.g. in a 24v system of paralled banks of 2 x 12v batteries in series all the mid points of those series units connected together to try to balance the voltages across each battery and best to also install a battery balancer that will ensure that mid point stays at half whatever the charging voltage is.
We have this arrangement but with 4 x 6v batteries in series and 3 banks of those paralleled. The batteries are AGM and they have been in the boat for 5 years this April with no noticeable loss of capacity - yet.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: AGM battery equalisation

ya_fohi
 

Bill,

Thanks for your feedback. I have charged the batteries for three days then disconnected. I then measured the initial voltage after disconnection then again after at least 12 hours. They all show a drop of 0.1 - 0.2 V over that period, and their final voltages range between 12.3 and 12.7V which according to my lookup table is between 69% and 88% capacity. I guess that after fouir years I expect some loss of capacity, but should I be comcerned? Is ther a chance that the low ones may be drawing down the good ones and so should I replace/remove them?

Cheers,
Paul


Re: Dinghy for a 54

cpp_berkeley <no_reply@...>
 

I have a Highfield 310CL and it fits perfectly, fully inflated, bow facing aft on the aft deck on passage. Clears the mizzen traveller and the tubes don't intrude into the cockpit space.

The disadvantage is that it's barely long enough to fit on the Simpson davits (with Suzuki 20AS motor on) so the motor rubs a bit on the davit arm. 

I think the Highfield 340 would be too long to comfortably fit on the aft deck without deflating the tubes. Given that's its resting place on anything other than short daysails in calm weather, we opted for the 310.

Hope this helps.

Scott
A54 #69 Tengah


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

Danny Simms
 

Hi Joel,
I didn't ask the question but I enjoyed and appreciated your comprehensive and well thought out  reply. Lots of good information.
Regards
Danny
SM 299
Ocean Pearl

On Thu, 7 Feb 2019 at 09:46, jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:
 

Hello Ken. Here is more than anyone wants to know about the evolution, sailing performance and basic individual qualities of the Amel SM 53, 54, and 55.

 

As background, I was Amel’s sole representative for all North America for more than three decades. During this time, I had several Amel SM 53’s made available to me as demonstration boats for potential purchasers to try based in Fort Lauderdale. I also owned two Amel SM 53’s in my name that I used as demonstration boats during the last five years of SM 53 production. I have more than 40,000 miles at sea in the SM 53.

 

I also owned an Amel 54 and put about 20,000 miles on that boat and a variety of other  54’s travelling to boat shows, bringing them up from the Caribbean for resale and sometimes just to goof off and go sailing with client friends.

 

Amel made available to me in Fort Lauderdale a new Amel 55 for a bit more than a year. I was able to put about 3,000 miles on that boat performing test sails and travelling to boat shows.

 

I have sold more Amel boats on this side of the Atlantic than everyone else put together and know these boats technically very well.  I say that not for my ego but so you can learn that there is very little you can  ask me about an Amel that I won’t know. Amel’s training was that good and they spent a lot of money every year giving me recurrent training to make sure I knew as much about the boats as they did. I have a lot of very genuine enthusiasm for Amel boats and the people at Amel.

 

The SM 53 was a boat designed by Captain Henri Amel with the capable assistance of Jacques Carteau who was Amel’s right hand man for his entire working life. As you may know, Henri Amel was almost completely blind and Carteau was the one who took Amel’s ideas and put them on paper. The SM 53 was the culmination of everything Henri Amel, a very experienced offshore sailor, had learned. This was the last boat Amel and Carteau created together. The SM 53 is an exceptionally sea kindly boat, probably the best, by a small margin, compared to the Amel 54 and 55. I had several occasions to be at sea when I would have preferred to be anywhere else, and I mean anywhere, in all three boats and the SM 53 is the most predictable, linear and vice less of all three, again by a small but noticeable margin. While the boat has no pretense as a racer, if you have good sails and you know how to use them, the SM 53 performs well in any breeze above about 6 knots and absolutely flies in big breeze. I have been quite secure in wind of 40 knots plus very comfortably rolling off a 220 miles a day, in total control. In adverse seas the boat doesn’t pound much and, again, remains predictable and easy to manage at all times by a competent cruising couple. It is hard to come to grief in any Amel boat if you don’t do anything deliberately stupid. Moving boats to place them in boat shows means restricted schedules because to not show up on time is not an option. Neptune knows this and would usually punish me for past evils with really crappy weather. I never felt anything more than healthy levels of fear when at sea in an Amel.

 

A comfortable liveaboard and the easiest of all three to own and take care of, the only problem today is in finding a good SM 53 that has been well owned and  competently cared for its entire life and not messed up by unwanted or ill-conceived ‘improvements’ .

The youngest one is 14 years old and one bad owner can quickly erase the efforts of several good ones.

 

The Amel 54 was the last boat with complete Amel DNA as it was designed by The Amel Design Group which was composed of all the Amel management, Jacques Carteau, department heads of all the different construction disciplines, the After Sales Service team, of course all of us sales people. This well qualified and knowledgeable group was well led and managed by Jean Jacques Lemonnier who was being groomed to be the next Chairman of Amel. Captain Amel was retired by this time and living down in the south of France.

 

After building 479 SM 53, we knew what folks liked and didn’t like about the 53 and a lot of attention was paid to correcting deficiencies and adding improvements that SM 53 owners said they wanted. These mostly focused on liveability with a better galley with more refrigeration/freezer space, stall showers, and a centerline queen berth in the aft cabin, as well as a forward facing navigation station, two ‘easy chairs’ in the saloon and lots more ports and hatches, all of which were opening ( except the four ‘windows’ in the hull ) which greatly enhanced natural ventilation and brought much more daylight into the boat. The 54 had about 13% more internal volume than the SM 53 and when you consider that volume is a cube, this quite a bit more space. The aft locker easily swallows a 310 hard bottom inflatable to keep it out of sight when you are away from the boat. The boat sails pretty much like a larger SM 53 and is marginally faster in 10 knots of breeze and better. Some SM 53 owners say that they are faster. Nope. More sail area, longer waterline, more powerful/wider sections aft for more powerful reaching.

I have sailed with several 53’s while enjoying my 54 and I always had a bit more turn of speed, especially off the wind. Both boats are comparably stiff and go to weather about the same. There are two quite large poles for the 54’ Amel downwind ballooner system instead of two short ones and two medium ones on the SM 53. These big poles are more difficult to maneuver, especially when they are aluminum instead of lighter carbon fiber. One person can still set the ballooner but it takes a bit more energy and planning. I did not order the poles on my 54 but opted for a code zero and some other off the wind sales which gave me slightly better off the wind performance without the poles and with the boat rolling a lot less with more pressure on the sails.. It was about a wash speed wise with the same arrival time while sailing a slightly longer course. The Amel 54 was designed to have a staysail which greatly  the rigs versatility and adaptability to conditions. The Amel 53 was designed NOT to have a staysail ( really, Captain Amel  was dead set against this ) and if you find one that does, make sure it was installed so the loads for the stay are carried down and into the stem and not terminated on the deck or on the soft mahogany vertical separation/nonstructural bulkhead in the foredeck lockers. This is the advice of Jacques Carteau who should know better than anyone. I have seen this modification done incorrectly on more Amel SM 53’s than ones done the right way. In conclusion, the Amel 54 is a more comfortable boat to live aboard, has a better cockpit and dodger, even more storage space and is still easy for two to manage. Jacques Carteau retired at the end of the development of the Amel 54. Captain Amel passed away about the same time as the last SM 53 was built in 2005, just before the 54 was introduced.

 

The Amel 55 pointed toward the new direction now fully seasoned Chairman Jean Jacques Lemonnier wanted to move the company toward. The overall design was more focused on the type of cruising Mr. Lemonnier liked to do and where he thought the cruising sailboat market was evolving. It was the first Amel where the boat was designed by an outside firm, the well respected firm of Berret-Racoupeau in La Rochelle. Overall, the 55 has a much more modern appearance. The layout and engineering of systems was still done by Amel and the quality of construction was every bit as good as previous Amel boats. Berret-Racoupeau designs many racer/cruisers and outright racing boats. The hull form of the 55 is more performance oriented than previous Amel boats designed in house. The boat sails better on every point of sail and is faster in the same breeze than any previous Amel sailboat. Like most higher performance sailboats, the hull’s  forefoot is flat to promote surfing. This can cause the boat to pound when in choppy seas or when coming off the tops of breaking waves. The freeboard is taller than previous Amel boats which makes for a very voluminous interior. It also makes the boat much more lively when maneuvering in and about the marina and dockside. The powerful bow thruster was up to task but if I were to order one today, I would get a stern thruster too if a lot of marina and dockside living were in order. Two can still manage the boat but you need to be on your toes and stay ahead of the boat when in tight quarters. The booms are mounted higher on the masts allowing easier movement on deck but raising the center of effort which increases heeling and the rate at which degrees of heel are acquired. Quite different than the 53 and 54. One thing I noted quickly is that the dodger is about as good as it gets for all weather  operation, but you are located much higher off the water than in Amel boats that came before. A lot move movement with a quicker motion at the end of this longer arm. The long term liveability of the 55 is superb and the accommodations have a much more modern look and provide a very comfortable place to spend a lot of time. The galley in the 55 is as close to perfection as my wife and I had ever encountered.

 

In a nutshell, The 53 and 54 are much more similar performance wise than they are different. They feel slightly different under way and the 54 is slightly faster. The 54 is a better live aboard.

The 55 is a whole new class of Amel boat which sacrifices a little bit of sea kindliness for a well enhanced increase in performance.

 

I hope this is helpful and I would be happy to answer any further questions you might have.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 11:03 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

 

I intend on buying either a Super Maramu, 54, or 55 in the next 1-2 years. It's easy finding feature differences (length, layouts, etc) or aesthetic differences between the models, but it's been difficult finding information on the relative sailing characteristics of the three hulls. 

 

Can anyone give me commentary on how differently these three boats sail from your experiences? How much difference in light wind performance? Heavy seas? Any other operational or performance differences between them that you think would be relevant in making a choice? 

 

I know the right answer is to get each on the water and test them myself, but given difficulties in finding them nearby, that's not realistic, so there is a good chance I'll have to rely on user feedback to pick a model and then focus my actual on-water tests to the hulls I'm actually intending to purchase. I'm assuming the sailing performance between these three hulls is small enough that it's likely to boil down to how new a boat I'm willing to pay for.


Re: performance differences

Joerg Esdorn
 

Hi Ken, sorry for the late reply but as an owner of a recent Amel 55, I wanted to share  a few thoughts with you.  I have not sailed a A53 or A54, and I bet Joel's extensive summary of the differences is right on but I hope you will find my remarks useful nonetheless.  I have sailed a lot of different boats over the last 50 years so I can put the performance of the A55 in perspective.  I grew up sailing on my family's Arpege half tonner and Nicholson 38 yawl long keeler, have sailed extensively on a Moody 425 sloop and have owned most recently J105 and J44 race boats.  I have sailed my A55 some 7,000 miles in total, from La Rochelle to Gibraltar, up the Spanish, French and Italian waters to the Aegean and back to Sicily.  We've seen 35 knots on the nose West of Gibraltar, 45 knots in the Medicane Zorbas last year (downwind) and many many days of light wind sailing, with more than a fair share upwind.  In all those conditions the boat has done great and any pounding has been minimal, particularly
 as compared to the prior race boats I have owned or sailed on.  Pounding is not a factor that I would be concerned about - it's a trade off for being able to make better headway into the wind in heavy air conditions than with a more traditionally shaped boat.  The ample volume upfront makes the boat go over the waves rather than through them, which results in less hobby horsing but some pounding.     

I bet a more important difference between these three designs is the light air upwind performance.  If you look at the keel of an A55 and a A53 and A54, you will notice dramatic differences.  The keel of the 53 and the A54 is very wide to accommodate the water tank and the bulb is edgy, unlike what you see on other cruising boats nowadays.  The water tank on the A55 is not in the keel, so the keel could be designed like a modern performance keel.  It is much narrower at the base and the bulb is  shaped much rounder.  As a result, the A55 sails well upwind, very well for a ketch that is this heavy.   It makes it practical to sail upwind in 6 - 8 knots of true wind, pointing 28 - 30 degrees to the apparent wind.  This means the boat will tack through 95 degrees with only a modest amount of leeway, much less I bet than the prior models with their wide keels.  As the breeze picks up to something like 14 knots, you will be able to sail closer to the apparent wind, 26-28 degrees, tacking through 90 degrees.  As a result, even in light air, you are able to cover 30 or more miles upwind during a normal Mediterranean day to the next anchorage without using the engine all the time.  I enjoy that sort of thing and I bet I would be much less happy with one of the prior Amel models. 

A couple more things which don't go to your question directly but were very important to my decision to spring for a new A55 over a used A54.  First, my wife much preferred the light colored wood inside and the big hull windows of my A55 over the more traditional look of the prior boats.  Second, we liked the 3 cabin layout with 3 fairly evenly sized cabins, which enables us to sail with friends and family in much more comfort and privacy than in the prior designs.  We have sailed with 6 people for many weeks and everybody has a great, fixed bunk and ample personal storage.

Good luck with your choice!    

  


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gas struts for fridge/freezer lid and engine hatch

Barry Connor
 

OK, thank’s.
connor_barry at yahoo dot com

Best
Barry


On Feb 7, 2019, at 13:55, JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Barry,
What's your email address?
I'll send the photos to you.
Jeff


On Wed, Feb 06, 2019 at 11:15 AM, Barry Connor connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Yes, please send them to me, I always have trouble finding things in the files.



Best
Barry


On Feb 6, 2019, at 17:03, jmkraus jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Barry, if you are changing the furler mechanization, you have access to the stem fitting. It's easy to remove. Bill Rouse put a bunch of photos of the new fitting in the files section of the site. I'd be happy to send them directly to you and help you with the project. I had a buddy male .e a new one here in ny and another machine shop in Mayaguez trim it to fit. Let me know. Regards, jeff


Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.

-------- Original message --------
From: "Barry Connor connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 2/6/19 11:49 AM (GMT-04:00)
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gas struts for fridge/freezer lid and engine hatch

 

Hi Jeff,

Yes, mine is also 6.5mm without the twist. (Just kidding, I feel for you). I remember looking at yours and I immediately checked mine. My boat has been across the pond and back before I bought. Just been around the Med since. I have thought about this and will be very conscious of the pressure on this from now. The replacement furlong systems all have space for a 20mm stem. I just had discussions at the Dusseldorf show with Profurl about this and the answer was to bush out my 6.5mm stem with spacers to upgrade to Profurl and Barmar. AMEL are using Profurl on the new 50 and soon to be released 60. Both of these are now going to be sloops. No more ketch rigs from AMEL. No more 55’s.  No more C-Drive keel propellers either. They both will have a through hull shaft drive.
Regarding the struts. I just spoke to a UK company StrutsDirect, very helpful. Replacement for the galley fridge strut -
 “F-SD02-150” E2. Eye Ends. About £20 but shipping to Sicily is £60. I might get it delivered to friend in UK.

Regards

Barry and Penny
“Lady Penelope II”
AMEL 54. #17
Marina di Ragusa. Sicily


On Feb 6, 2019, at 16:21, jmkraus jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

It is the fitting protruding thru the deck which the headsail furler mechanization is attached to. It is a vertical stainless fitting with a 3/4 inch pin that secures the bae of the furler mechanization. Mine was 6.5mm amel "modified" the fitting to 20mm soon after #14, my hull#. 



Sent from my Sprint Samsung Galaxy S7.

-------- Original message --------
From: "Barry Connor connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: 2/6/19 11:11 AM (GMT-04:00)
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gas struts for fridge/freezer lid and engine hatch

 

Hi Jeff,


Sorry, I don’t understand your question about the ‘stem’ fitting. Is this on the bow for the furler?

Barry


On Feb 6, 2019, at 15:54, JEFFREY KRAUS jmkraus@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

Barry,
I was able to get the strut in Martinique at the refrigeration specialist's store. He had a selection of them. Perhaps you could find one at a similar refrigeration outlet locally.

On a separate subject, I see you are 54 #17. I wonder if your stem fitting is the thin 6.5mm version that my 54 #14 had, or if it was built with the "modified" 20mm fitting that Amel installed in later versions. Could you let me know? I'd like to pin down when the change to the 20mm stem fitting begins.
Thanks.
Best Regards,
Jeff Spirit Amel 54 #14


On Wed, Feb 06, 2019 at 09:46 AM, Barry Connor connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

I am wanting to replace the gas strut for the lift up lid on the galley fridge/freezer.

The original unit does not have a maker name - brand name printed on the strut. On the strut and the same for the lift up hatch for the engine compartment is a symbol of what looks like 3 sails in 3 squares.

Does anyone have information on where to get the correct struts. The pressure on the fridge strut is 300N and the overall length is 410mm.

Much appreciate any assistance.

Regards

Barry and Penny
"Lady Penelope II"
Amel 54. #17
Marina di Ragusa   Sicily


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Gas struts for fridge/freezer lid and engine hatch

JEFFREY KRAUS
 


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

Joel,

Perfect summary.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970
My calendar: 
https://theamelschool.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html


On Wed, Feb 6, 2019, 3:46 PM jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... wrote:
 

Hello Ken. Here is more than anyone wants to know about the evolution, sailing performance and basic individual qualities of the Amel SM 53, 54, and 55.

 

As background, I was Amel’s sole representative for all North America for more than three decades. During this time, I had several Amel SM 53’s made available to me as demonstration boats for potential purchasers to try based in Fort Lauderdale. I also owned two Amel SM 53’s in my name that I used as demonstration boats during the last five years of SM 53 production. I have more than 40,000 miles at sea in the SM 53.

 

I also owned an Amel 54 and put about 20,000 miles on that boat and a variety of other  54’s travelling to boat shows, bringing them up from the Caribbean for resale and sometimes just to goof off and go sailing with client friends.

 

Amel made available to me in Fort Lauderdale a new Amel 55 for a bit more than a year. I was able to put about 3,000 miles on that boat performing test sails and travelling to boat shows.

 

I have sold more Amel boats on this side of the Atlantic than everyone else put together and know these boats technically very well.  I say that not for my ego but so you can learn that there is very little you can  ask me about an Amel that I won’t know. Amel’s training was that good and they spent a lot of money every year giving me recurrent training to make sure I knew as much about the boats as they did. I have a lot of very genuine enthusiasm for Amel boats and the people at Amel.

 

The SM 53 was a boat designed by Captain Henri Amel with the capable assistance of Jacques Carteau who was Amel’s right hand man for his entire working life. As you may know, Henri Amel was almost completely blind and Carteau was the one who took Amel’s ideas and put them on paper. The SM 53 was the culmination of everything Henri Amel, a very experienced offshore sailor, had learned. This was the last boat Amel and Carteau created together. The SM 53 is an exceptionally sea kindly boat, probably the best, by a small margin, compared to the Amel 54 and 55. I had several occasions to be at sea when I would have preferred to be anywhere else, and I mean anywhere, in all three boats and the SM 53 is the most predictable, linear and vice less of all three, again by a small but noticeable margin. While the boat has no pretense as a racer, if you have good sails and you know how to use them, the SM 53 performs well in any breeze above about 6 knots and absolutely flies in big breeze. I have been quite secure in wind of 40 knots plus very comfortably rolling off a 220 miles a day, in total control. In adverse seas the boat doesn’t pound much and, again, remains predictable and easy to manage at all times by a competent cruising couple. It is hard to come to grief in any Amel boat if you don’t do anything deliberately stupid. Moving boats to place them in boat shows means restricted schedules because to not show up on time is not an option. Neptune knows this and would usually punish me for past evils with really crappy weather. I never felt anything more than healthy levels of fear when at sea in an Amel.

 

A comfortable liveaboard and the easiest of all three to own and take care of, the only problem today is in finding a good SM 53 that has been well owned and  competently cared for its entire life and not messed up by unwanted or ill-conceived ‘improvements’ .

The youngest one is 14 years old and one bad owner can quickly erase the efforts of several good ones.

 

The Amel 54 was the last boat with complete Amel DNA as it was designed by The Amel Design Group which was composed of all the Amel management, Jacques Carteau, department heads of all the different construction disciplines, the After Sales Service team, of course all of us sales people. This well qualified and knowledgeable group was well led and managed by Jean Jacques Lemonnier who was being groomed to be the next Chairman of Amel. Captain Amel was retired by this time and living down in the south of France.

 

After building 479 SM 53, we knew what folks liked and didn’t like about the 53 and a lot of attention was paid to correcting deficiencies and adding improvements that SM 53 owners said they wanted. These mostly focused on liveability with a better galley with more refrigeration/freezer space, stall showers, and a centerline queen berth in the aft cabin, as well as a forward facing navigation station, two ‘easy chairs’ in the saloon and lots more ports and hatches, all of which were opening ( except the four ‘windows’ in the hull ) which greatly enhanced natural ventilation and brought much more daylight into the boat. The 54 had about 13% more internal volume than the SM 53 and when you consider that volume is a cube, this quite a bit more space. The aft locker easily swallows a 310 hard bottom inflatable to keep it out of sight when you are away from the boat. The boat sails pretty much like a larger SM 53 and is marginally faster in 10 knots of breeze and better. Some SM 53 owners say that they are faster. Nope. More sail area, longer waterline, more powerful/wider sections aft for more powerful reaching.

I have sailed with several 53’s while enjoying my 54 and I always had a bit more turn of speed, especially off the wind. Both boats are comparably stiff and go to weather about the same. There are two quite large poles for the 54’ Amel downwind ballooner system instead of two short ones and two medium ones on the SM 53. These big poles are more difficult to maneuver, especially when they are aluminum instead of lighter carbon fiber. One person can still set the ballooner but it takes a bit more energy and planning. I did not order the poles on my 54 but opted for a code zero and some other off the wind sales which gave me slightly better off the wind performance without the poles and with the boat rolling a lot less with more pressure on the sails.. It was about a wash speed wise with the same arrival time while sailing a slightly longer course. The Amel 54 was designed to have a staysail which greatly  the rigs versatility and adaptability to conditions. The Amel 53 was designed NOT to have a staysail ( really, Captain Amel  was dead set against this ) and if you find one that does, make sure it was installed so the loads for the stay are carried down and into the stem and not terminated on the deck or on the soft mahogany vertical separation/nonstructural bulkhead in the foredeck lockers. This is the advice of Jacques Carteau who should know better than anyone. I have seen this modification done incorrectly on more Amel SM 53’s than ones done the right way. In conclusion, the Amel 54 is a more comfortable boat to live aboard, has a better cockpit and dodger, even more storage space and is still easy for two to manage. Jacques Carteau retired at the end of the development of the Amel 54. Captain Amel passed away about the same time as the last SM 53 was built in 2005, just before the 54 was introduced.

 

The Amel 55 pointed toward the new direction now fully seasoned Chairman Jean Jacques Lemonnier wanted to move the company toward. The overall design was more focused on the type of cruising Mr. Lemonnier liked to do and where he thought the cruising sailboat market was evolving. It was the first Amel where the boat was designed by an outside firm, the well respected firm of Berret-Racoupeau in La Rochelle. Overall, the 55 has a much more modern appearance. The layout and engineering of systems was still done by Amel and the quality of construction was every bit as good as previous Amel boats. Berret-Racoupeau designs many racer/cruisers and outright racing boats. The hull form of the 55 is more performance oriented than previous Amel boats designed in house. The boat sails better on every point of sail and is faster in the same breeze than any previous Amel sailboat. Like most higher performance sailboats, the hull’s  forefoot is flat to promote surfing. This can cause the boat to pound when in choppy seas or when coming off the tops of breaking waves. The freeboard is taller than previous Amel boats which makes for a very voluminous interior. It also makes the boat much more lively when maneuvering in and about the marina and dockside. The powerful bow thruster was up to task but if I were to order one today, I would get a stern thruster too if a lot of marina and dockside living were in order. Two can still manage the boat but you need to be on your toes and stay ahead of the boat when in tight quarters. The booms are mounted higher on the masts allowing easier movement on deck but raising the center of effort which increases heeling and the rate at which degrees of heel are acquired. Quite different than the 53 and 54. One thing I noted quickly is that the dodger is about as good as it gets for all weather  operation, but you are located much higher off the water than in Amel boats that came before. A lot move movement with a quicker motion at the end of this longer arm. The long term liveability of the 55 is superb and the accommodations have a much more modern look and provide a very comfortable place to spend a lot of time. The galley in the 55 is as close to perfection as my wife and I had ever encountered.

 

In a nutshell, The 53 and 54 are much more similar performance wise than they are different. They feel slightly different under way and the 54 is slightly faster. The 54 is a better live aboard.

The 55 is a whole new class of Amel boat which sacrifices a little bit of sea kindliness for a well enhanced increase in performance.

 

I hope this is helpful and I would be happy to answer any further questions you might have.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 11:03 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

 

I intend on buying either a Super Maramu, 54, or 55 in the next 1-2 years. It's easy finding feature differences (length, layouts, etc) or aesthetic differences between the models, but it's been difficult finding information on the relative sailing characteristics of the three hulls. 

 

Can anyone give me commentary on how differently these three boats sail from your experiences? How much difference in light wind performance? Heavy seas? Any other operational or performance differences between them that you think would be relevant in making a choice? 

 

I know the right answer is to get each on the water and test them myself, but given difficulties in finding them nearby, that's not realistic, so there is a good chance I'll have to rely on user feedback to pick a model and then focus my actual on-water tests to the hulls I'm actually intending to purchase. I'm assuming the sailing performance between these three hulls is small enough that it's likely to boil down to how new a boat I'm willing to pay for.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

Colin - ex SV Island Pearl
 

Great summary of the three boats Joel. Your experience totally shows through here. For the benefit of those new in the group, we have pretty current experience circumnavigating in 53 and I can certainly concur with all Joel's comments regarding the 53 and 54, both of which I would be happy to own.

We very nearly purchased the 54 before Michel-Henri, the then Amel technician in the Canary Islands gave us some tips gained from owners who had moved up from the 53 to the 54. He then showed us a  "never yet cruised" 2001 model 53 which he had personally cared for and maintained from new for 10 years for her previous owners. Since we had already looked at 21 other Amels around the world by that stage, we knew right away that this was the one and purchased her in 2011.

For the next six years my work commitments dictated and we had little time to sail locally in Australia, but eventually started cruising in early 2017.

Now more than half the way around the world, we are currently anchored in Tobago Keys, having just crossed the Atlantic Ocean from Cape Town, and before this spending a full year visiting most Indian Ocean Islands/Countries after cruising Australia and SE Asia in 2017.

During this time we have had virtually trouble free cruising compared to every other brand of boat out there we have met who are circumnavigating at present (including many new boats). What's more we have faced many challenging conditions such as 3 days of mid- Indian Ocean gale conditions where the boat totally shone through in up to 50 kts wind and slamming through and surfing down six meter white water mountainous swells. Never ever did we feel unsafe and we were out there totally alone.

This is our 7th cruising yacht and my personal thoughts on the Amel 53 only is that it is the perfect "round the world" boat where most often (thus far anyway) one is sailing down wind. This is both because of it's nicely rounded hull shape at the rear edges making it a very forgiving boat if you make mistakes in bad conditions. Also due to it's superior pole system with straight (rather than swept back) spreaders you can actually run "dead" 180' down wind for days on end without damaging your main sail.

The 53 is not a particularly fast boat (and we have sailed with 54's on some passages which are certainly a bit quicker) but we have now done many 200nm plus sailing days which most boats out there simply cannot ever achieve, and she can certainly move when she needs to. 

On this last point you now unfortunately also have to consider, if circumnavigating, how fast your boat can "run away", under both motor and sail! A sad reality out there now is that this could actually happen to you.

We do not carry weapons on board and have actually been chased twice (off Belitung in Indonesia and off Brazil recently) and on both occasions were fortunate to be able to outrun these boats under both power and sail with the Yanmar 75hp and an autoprop and a lot of fuel in board. On both occasions the other boat appeared to be able to maintain about 9.2kts and we were very fortunate with wind both times.

Before we left Durban three respected local sailors at the Point YC told us it would be virtually impossible in October to sail directly from Durban down the trecherous South African coast and around the Cape of Good Hope to Cape Town non-stop. Again being in a 53 we actually did this because we had the confidence in our boat to set off early, before the ideal weather window, and then simply sail or motor sail through the bad conditions at the other end of the weather window when actually rounding the Cape.

Every day we are out here I am thankful to be sailing an Amel as I am now convinced these boats are probably "over engineered" and almost indestructible and totally purpose built to sail the world. Furthermore the boat is easy for both Lauren and I to actually sail due to the control systems.

Apart from minor things that will always go wrong on any boat from time to time such as toilet pumps and today tge chain counter, we have had total trouble free operation compared to others. Whats more is that because of her sea kindly motion, hard dodger, lovely helm seat, and easy finger tip controls, both Lauten and I can sail het in most conditions and we always seem to arrive at our destination well rested and relaxed compared to others.


Colin Streeter
SV Island Pearl II, SM #332
Tobago Keys

On Thu, 7 Feb. 2019, 04:01 Peter Buckley carhartt@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... wrote:
 

Hi Joel. Thank you for your insight into the Amel growth and evolution.

I am not sure if you remember, but you showed me a Super Maramu on the canals in Florida 5 years ago.

We ended up purchasing an Amel Mango “Gradiva” for 3 + years and would sill have her if my daughter didn’t get chronically seasick! She was a fantastic yacht and mostly well maintained by the previous owner.

Our plan is to get our daughter through school and then find a 54 and sail again. Your information has always been invaluable.

Kind Regards

Peter

-- 
Peter Buckley

83 Twelfth Avenue
Raymond Island VIC 3880

Phone: 0428 427 786



From: "jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Reply-To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2019 15:44:11 -0500
To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

Hello Ken. Here is more than anyone wants to know about the evolution, sailing performance and basic individual qualities of the Amel SM 53, 54, and 55.

 

As background, I was Amel’s sole representative for all North America for more than three decades. During this time, I had several Amel SM 53’s made available to me as demonstration boats for potential purchasers to try based in Fort Lauderdale. I also owned two Amel SM 53’s in my name that I used as demonstration boats during the last five years of SM 53 production. I have more than 40,000 miles at sea in the SM 53.

 

I also owned an Amel 54 and put about 20,000 miles on that boat and a variety of other  54’s travelling to boat shows, bringing them up from the Caribbean for resale and sometimes just to goof off and go sailing with client friends.

 

Amel made available to me in Fort Lauderdale a new Amel 55 for a bit more than a year. I was able to put about 3,000 miles on that boat performing test sails and travelling to boat shows.

 

I have sold more Amel boats on this side of the Atlantic than everyone else put together and know these boats technically very well.  I say that not for my ego but so you can learn that there is very little you can  ask me about an Amel that I won’t know. Amel’s training was that good and they spent a lot of money every year giving me recurrent training to make sure I knew as much about the boats as they did. I have a lot of very genuine enthusiasm for Amel boats and the people at Amel.

 

The SM 53 was a boat designed by Captain Henri Amel with the capable assistance of Jacques Carteau who was Amel’s right hand man for his entire working life. As you may know, Henri Amel was almost completely blind and Carteau was the one who took Amel’s ideas and put them on paper. The SM 53 was the culmination of everything Henri Amel, a very experienced offshore sailor, had learned. This was the last boat Amel and Carteau created together. The SM 53 is an exceptionally sea kindly boat, probably the best, by a small margin, compared to the Amel 54 and 55. I had several occasions to be at sea when I would have preferred to be anywhere else, and I mean anywhere, in all three boats and the SM 53 is the most predictable, linear and vice less of all three, again by a small but noticeable margin. While the boat has no pretense as a racer, if you have good sails and you know how to use them, the SM 53 performs well in any breeze above about 6 knots and absolutely flies in big breeze. I have been quite secure in wind of 40 knots plus very comfortably rolling off a 220 miles a day, in total control. In adverse seas the boat doesn’t pound much and, again, remains predictable and easy to manage at all times by a competent cruising couple. It is hard to come to grief in any Amel boat if you don’t do anything deliberately stupid. Moving boats to place them in boat shows means restricted schedules because to not show up on time is not an option. Neptune knows this and would usually punish me for past evils with really crappy weather. I never felt anything more than healthy levels of fear when at sea in an Amel.

 

A comfortable liveaboard and the easiest of all three to own and take care of, the only problem today is in finding a good SM 53 that has been well owned and  competently cared for its entire life and not messed up by unwanted or ill-conceived ‘improvements’ .

The youngest one is 14 years old and one bad owner can quickly erase the efforts of several good ones.

 

The Amel 54 was the last boat with complete Amel DNA as it was designed by The Amel Design Group which was composed of all the Amel management, Jacques Carteau, department heads of all the different construction disciplines, the After Sales Service team, of course all of us sales people. This well qualified and knowledgeable group was well led and managed by Jean Jacques Lemonnier who was being groomed to be the next Chairman of Amel. Captain Amel was retired by this time and living down in the south of France.

 

After building 479 SM 53, we knew what folks liked and didn’t like about the 53 and a lot of attention was paid to correcting deficiencies and adding improvements that SM 53 owners said they wanted. These mostly focused on liveability with a better galley with more refrigeration/freezer space, stall showers, and a centerline queen berth in the aft cabin, as well as a forward facing navigation station, two ‘easy chairs’ in the saloon and lots more ports and hatches, all of which were opening ( except the four ‘windows’ in the hull ) which greatly enhanced natural ventilation and brought much more daylight into the boat. The 54 had about 13% more internal volume than the SM 53 and when you consider that volume is a cube, this quite a bit more space. The aft locker easily swallows a 310 hard bottom inflatable to keep it out of sight when you are away from the boat. The boat sails pretty much like a larger SM 53 and is marginally faster in 10 knots of breeze and better. Some SM 53 owners say that they are faster. Nope. More sail area, longer waterline, more powerful/wider sections aft for more powerful reaching.

I have sailed with several 53’s while enjoying my 54 and I always had a bit more turn of speed, especially off the wind. Both boats are comparably stiff and go to weather about the same. There are two quite large poles for the 54’ Amel downwind ballooner system instead of two short ones and two medium ones on the SM 53. These big poles are more difficult to maneuver, especially when they are aluminum instead of lighter carbon fiber. One person can still set the ballooner but it takes a bit more energy and planning. I did not order the poles on my 54 but opted for a code zero and some other off the wind sales which gave me slightly better off the wind performance without the poles and with the boat rolling a lot less with more pressure on the sails.. It was about a wash speed wise with the same arrival time while sailing a slightly longer course. The Amel 54 was designed to have a staysail which greatly  the rigs versatility and adaptability to conditions. The Amel 53 was designed NOT to have a staysail ( really, Captain Amel  was dead set against this ) and if you find one that does, make sure it was installed so the loads for the stay are carried down and into the stem and not terminated on the deck or on the soft mahogany vertical separation/nonstructural bulkhead in the foredeck lockers. This is the advice of Jacques Carteau who should know better than anyone. I have seen this modification done incorrectly on more Amel SM 53’s than ones done the right way. In conclusion, the Amel 54 is a more comfortable boat to live aboard, has a better cockpit and dodger, even more storage space and is still easy for two to manage. Jacques Carteau retired at the end of the development of the Amel 54. Captain Amel passed away about the same time as the last SM 53 was built in 2005, just before the 54 was introduced.

 

The Amel 55 pointed toward the new direction now fully seasoned Chairman Jean Jacques Lemonnier wanted to move the company toward. The overall design was more focused on the type of cruising Mr. Lemonnier liked to do and where he thought the cruising sailboat market was evolving. It was the first Amel where the boat was designed by an outside firm, the well respected firm of Berret-Racoupeau in La Rochelle. Overall, the 55 has a much more modern appearance. The layout and engineering of systems was still done by Amel and the quality of construction was every bit as good as previous Amel boats. Berret-Racoupeau designs many racer/cruisers and outright racing boats. The hull form of the 55 is more performance oriented than previous Amel boats designed in house. The boat sails better on every point of sail and is faster in the same breeze than any previous Amel sailboat. Like most higher performance sailboats, the hull’s  forefoot is flat to promote surfing. This can cause the boat to pound when in choppy seas or when coming off the tops of breaking waves. The freeboard is taller than previous Amel boats which makes for a very voluminous interior. It also makes the boat much more lively when maneuvering in and about the marina and dockside. The powerful bow thruster was up to task but if I were to order one today, I would get a stern thruster too if a lot of marina and dockside living were in order. Two can still manage the boat but you need to be on your toes and stay ahead of the boat when in tight quarters. The booms are mounted higher on the masts allowing easier movement on deck but raising the center of effort which increases heeling and the rate at which degrees of heel are acquired. Quite different than the 53 and 54. One thing I noted quickly is that the dodger is about as good as it gets for all weather  operation, but you are located much higher off the water than in Amel boats that came before. A lot move movement with a quicker motion at the end of this longer arm. The long term liveability of the 55 is superb and the accommodations have a much more modern look and provide a very comfortable place to spend a lot of time. The galley in the 55 is as close to perfection as my wife and I had ever encountered.

 

In a nutshell, The 53 and 54 are much more similar performance wise than they are different. They feel slightly different under way and the 54 is slightly faster. The 54 is a better live aboard.

The 55 is a whole new class of Amel boat which sacrifices a little bit of sea kindliness for a well enhanced increase in performance.

 

I hope this is helpful and I would be happy to answer any further questions you might have.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 11:03 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

 

I intend on buying either a Super Maramu, 54, or 55 in the next 1-2 years. It's easy finding feature differences (length, layouts, etc) or aesthetic differences between the models, but it's been difficult finding information on the relative sailing characteristics of the three hulls. 

 

Can anyone give me commentary on how differently these three boats sail from your experiences? How much difference in light wind performance? Heavy seas? Any other operational or performance differences between them that you think would be relevant in making a choice? 

 

I know the right answer is to get each on the water and test them myself, but given difficulties in finding them nearby, that's not realistic, so there is a good chance I'll have to rely on user feedback to pick a model and then focus my actual on-water tests to the hulls I'm actually intending to purchase. I'm assuming the sailing performance between these three hulls is small enough that it's likely to boil down to how new a boat I'm willing to pay for.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

Bob Grey
 

Joel, owning a 55 and sailed with owners of earlier Amel, I would have to agree your synopsis is 100% accurate, although I would prefer the sea kindliness of an 54, I am still enamoured with the 55 after 5 years for exactly the reasons you enunciated, It’s my 3 bedroom luxury apartment with sea views, yes It pounds close hauled in heavy seas but off the wind (60deg apparent) it is a joy to sail, the center hard cockpit is unmatched in comfort, and after close to 20,000 miles still look forward to the next voyage.😎😀.

Owners of Amel 55 should adopt the motto “If it doesn’t blow there, don’t try to sail there” the pleasure factor will then never drop below 100%

I am however disappointed Amel has ceased production of the 55 and 65 to focus on the weekend / day sailor market with the 50 and 60. I would have brought a new 55 in a few more years as I still think the brand quality is fabulous.

Bob Grey
55 #25 Renaissance 3.
Sent from Yahoo Mail for iPad

On Thursday, February 7, 2019, 20:01, Peter Buckley carhartt@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:

 

Hi Joel. Thank you for your insight into the Amel growth and evolution.

I am not sure if you remember, but you showed me a Super Maramu on the canals in Florida 5 years ago.

We ended up purchasing an Amel Mango “Gradiva” for 3 + years and would sill have her if my daughter didn’t get chronically seasick! She was a fantastic yacht and mostly well maintained by the previous owner.

Our plan is to get our daughter through school and then find a 54 and sail again. Your information has always been invaluable.

Kind Regards

Peter

-- 
Peter Buckley

83 Twelfth Avenue
Raymond Island VIC 3880


Email: carhartt@...


From: "jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Reply-To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2019 15:44:11 -0500
To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

Hello Ken. Here is more than anyone wants to know about the evolution, sailing performance and basic individual qualities of the Amel SM 53, 54, and 55.

 

As background, I was Amel’s sole representative for all North America for more than three decades. During this time, I had several Amel SM 53’s made available to me as demonstration boats for potential purchasers to try based in Fort Lauderdale. I also owned two Amel SM 53’s in my name that I used as demonstration boats during the last five years of SM 53 production. I have more than 40,000 miles at sea in the SM 53.

 

I also owned an Amel 54 and put about 20,000 miles on that boat and a variety of other  54’s travelling to boat shows, bringing them up from the Caribbean for resale and sometimes just to goof off and go sailing with client friends.

 

Amel made available to me in Fort Lauderdale a new Amel 55 for a bit more than a year. I was able to put about 3,000 miles on that boat performing test sails and travelling to boat shows.

 

I have sold more Amel boats on this side of the Atlantic than everyone else put together and know these boats technically very well.  I say that not for my ego but so you can learn that there is very little you can  ask me about an Amel that I won’t know. Amel’s training was that good and they spent a lot of money every year giving me recurrent training to make sure I knew as much about the boats as they did. I have a lot of very genuine enthusiasm for Amel boats and the people at Amel.

 

The SM 53 was a boat designed by Captain Henri Amel with the capable assistance of Jacques Carteau who was Amel’s right hand man for his entire working life. As you may know, Henri Amel was almost completely blind and Carteau was the one who took Amel’s ideas and put them on paper. The SM 53 was the culmination of everything Henri Amel, a very experienced offshore sailor, had learned. This was the last boat Amel and Carteau created together. The SM 53 is an exceptionally sea kindly boat, probably the best, by a small margin, compared to the Amel 54 and 55. I had several occasions to be at sea when I would have preferred to be anywhere else, and I mean anywhere, in all three boats and the SM 53 is the most predictable, linear and vice less of all three, again by a small but noticeable margin. While the boat has no pretense as a racer, if you have good sails and you know how to use them, the SM 53 performs well in any breeze above about 6 knots and absolutely flies in big breeze. I have been quite secure in wind of 40 knots plus very comfortably rolling off a 220 miles a day, in total control. In adverse seas the boat doesn’t pound much and, again, remains predictable and easy to manage at all times by a competent cruising couple. It is hard to come to grief in any Amel boat if you don’t do anything deliberately stupid. Moving boats to place them in boat shows means restricted schedules because to not show up on time is not an option. Neptune knows this and would usually punish me for past evils with really crappy weather. I never felt anything more than healthy levels of fear when at sea in an Amel.

 

A comfortable liveaboard and the easiest of all three to own and take care of, the only problem today is in finding a good SM 53 that has been well owned and  competently cared for its entire life and not messed up by unwanted or ill-conceived ‘improvements’ .

The youngest one is 14 years old and one bad owner can quickly erase the efforts of several good ones.

 

The Amel 54 was the last boat with complete Amel DNA as it was designed by The Amel Design Group which was composed of all the Amel management, Jacques Carteau, department heads of all the different construction disciplines, the After Sales Service team, of course all of us sales people. This well qualified and knowledgeable group was well led and managed by Jean Jacques Lemonnier who was being groomed to be the next Chairman of Amel. Captain Amel was retired by this time and living down in the south of France.

 

After building 479 SM 53, we knew what folks liked and didn’t like about the 53 and a lot of attention was paid to correcting deficiencies and adding improvements that SM 53 owners said they wanted. These mostly focused on liveability with a better galley with more refrigeration/freezer space, stall showers, and a centerline queen berth in the aft cabin, as well as a forward facing navigation station, two ‘easy chairs’ in the saloon and lots more ports and hatches, all of which were opening ( except the four ‘windows’ in the hull ) which greatly enhanced natural ventilation and brought much more daylight into the boat. The 54 had about 13% more internal volume than the SM 53 and when you consider that volume is a cube, this quite a bit more space. The aft locker easily swallows a 310 hard bottom inflatable to keep it out of sight when you are away from the boat. The boat sails pretty much like a larger SM 53 and is marginally faster in 10 knots of breeze and better. Some SM 53 owners say that they are faster. Nope. More sail area, longer waterline, more powerful/wider sections aft for more powerful reaching.

I have sailed with several 53’s while enjoying my 54 and I always had a bit more turn of speed, especially off the wind. Both boats are comparably stiff and go to weather about the same. There are two quite large poles for the 54’ Amel downwind ballooner system instead of two short ones and two medium ones on the SM 53. These big poles are more difficult to maneuver, especially when they are aluminum instead of lighter carbon fiber. One person can still set the ballooner but it takes a bit more energy and planning. I did not order the poles on my 54 but opted for a code zero and some other off the wind sales which gave me slightly better off the wind performance without the poles and with the boat rolling a lot less with more pressure on the sails.. It was about a wash speed wise with the same arrival time while sailing a slightly longer course. The Amel 54 was designed to have a staysail which greatly  the rigs versatility and adaptability to conditions. The Amel 53 was designed NOT to have a staysail ( really, Captain Amel  was dead set against this ) and if you find one that does, make sure it was installed so the loads for the stay are carried down and into the stem and not terminated on the deck or on the soft mahogany vertical separation/nonstructural bulkhead in the foredeck lockers. This is the advice of Jacques Carteau who should know better than anyone. I have seen this modification done incorrectly on more Amel SM 53’s than ones done the right way. In conclusion, the Amel 54 is a more comfortable boat to live aboard, has a better cockpit and dodger, even more storage space and is still easy for two to manage. Jacques Carteau retired at the end of the development of the Amel 54. Captain Amel passed away about the same time as the last SM 53 was built in 2005, just before the 54 was introduced.

 

The Amel 55 pointed toward the new direction now fully seasoned Chairman Jean Jacques Lemonnier wanted to move the company toward. The overall design was more focused on the type of cruising Mr. Lemonnier liked to do and where he thought the cruising sailboat market was evolving. It was the first Amel where the boat was designed by an outside firm, the well respected firm of Berret-Racoupeau in La Rochelle. Overall, the 55 has a much more modern appearance. The layout and engineering of systems was still done by Amel and the quality of construction was every bit as good as previous Amel boats. Berret-Racoupeau designs many racer/cruisers and outright racing boats. The hull form of the 55 is more performance oriented than previous Amel boats designed in house. The boat sails better on every point of sail and is faster in the same breeze than any previous Amel sailboat. Like most higher performance sailboats, the hull’s  forefoot is flat to promote surfing. This can cause the boat to pound when in choppy seas or when coming off the tops of breaking waves. The freeboard is taller than previous Amel boats which makes for a very voluminous interior. It also makes the boat much more lively when maneuvering in and about the marina and dockside. The powerful bow thruster was up to task but if I were to order one today, I would get a stern thruster too if a lot of marina and dockside living were in order. Two can still manage the boat but you need to be on your toes and stay ahead of the boat when in tight quarters. The booms are mounted higher on the masts allowing easier movement on deck but raising the center of effort which increases heeling and the rate at which degrees of heel are acquired. Quite different than the 53 and 54. One thing I noted quickly is that the dodger is about as good as it gets for all weather  operation, but you are located much higher off the water than in Amel boats that came before. A lot move movement with a quicker motion at the end of this longer arm. The long term liveability of the 55 is superb and the accommodations have a much more modern look and provide a very comfortable place to spend a lot of time. The galley in the 55 is as close to perfection as my wife and I had ever encountered.

 

In a nutshell, The 53 and 54 are much more similar performance wise than they are different. They feel slightly different under way and the 54 is slightly faster. The 54 is a better live aboard.

The 55 is a whole new class of Amel boat which sacrifices a little bit of sea kindliness for a well enhanced increase in performance.

 

I hope this is helpful and I would be happy to answer any further questions you might have.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 11:03 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

 

I intend on buying either a Super Maramu, 54, or 55 in the next 1-2 years. It's easy finding feature differences (length, layouts, etc) or aesthetic differences between the models, but it's been difficult finding information on the relative sailing characteristics of the three hulls. 

 

Can anyone give me commentary on how differently these three boats sail from your experiences? How much difference in light wind performance? Heavy seas? Any other operational or performance differences between them that you think would be relevant in making a choice? 

 

I know the right answer is to get each on the water and test them myself, but given difficulties in finding them nearby, that's not realistic, so there is a good chance I'll have to rely on user feedback to pick a model and then focus my actual on-water tests to the hulls I'm actually intending to purchase. I'm assuming the sailing performance between these three hulls is small enough that it's likely to boil down to how new a boat I'm willing to pay for.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

Peter Buckley
 

Hi Joel. Thank you for your insight into the Amel growth and evolution.

I am not sure if you remember, but you showed me a Super Maramu on the canals in Florida 5 years ago.

We ended up purchasing an Amel Mango “Gradiva” for 3 + years and would sill have her if my daughter didn’t get chronically seasick! She was a fantastic yacht and mostly well maintained by the previous owner.

Our plan is to get our daughter through school and then find a 54 and sail again. Your information has always been invaluable.

Kind Regards

Peter

-- 
Peter Buckley

83 Twelfth Avenue
Raymond Island VIC 3880

Phone: 0428 427 786

Email: carhartt@...


From: "jfpottercys@... [amelyachtowners]" <amelyachtowners@...>
Reply-To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Date: Wed, 6 Feb 2019 15:44:11 -0500
To: <amelyachtowners@...>
Subject: RE: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

Hello Ken. Here is more than anyone wants to know about the evolution, sailing performance and basic individual qualities of the Amel SM 53, 54, and 55.

 

As background, I was Amel’s sole representative for all North America for more than three decades. During this time, I had several Amel SM 53’s made available to me as demonstration boats for potential purchasers to try based in Fort Lauderdale. I also owned two Amel SM 53’s in my name that I used as demonstration boats during the last five years of SM 53 production. I have more than 40,000 miles at sea in the SM 53.

 

I also owned an Amel 54 and put about 20,000 miles on that boat and a variety of other  54’s travelling to boat shows, bringing them up from the Caribbean for resale and sometimes just to goof off and go sailing with client friends.

 

Amel made available to me in Fort Lauderdale a new Amel 55 for a bit more than a year. I was able to put about 3,000 miles on that boat performing test sails and travelling to boat shows.

 

I have sold more Amel boats on this side of the Atlantic than everyone else put together and know these boats technically very well.  I say that not for my ego but so you can learn that there is very little you can  ask me about an Amel that I won’t know. Amel’s training was that good and they spent a lot of money every year giving me recurrent training to make sure I knew as much about the boats as they did. I have a lot of very genuine enthusiasm for Amel boats and the people at Amel.

 

The SM 53 was a boat designed by Captain Henri Amel with the capable assistance of Jacques Carteau who was Amel’s right hand man for his entire working life. As you may know, Henri Amel was almost completely blind and Carteau was the one who took Amel’s ideas and put them on paper. The SM 53 was the culmination of everything Henri Amel, a very experienced offshore sailor, had learned. This was the last boat Amel and Carteau created together. The SM 53 is an exceptionally sea kindly boat, probably the best, by a small margin, compared to the Amel 54 and 55. I had several occasions to be at sea when I would have preferred to be anywhere else, and I mean anywhere, in all three boats and the SM 53 is the most predictable, linear and vice less of all three, again by a small but noticeable margin. While the boat has no pretense as a racer, if you have good sails and you know how to use them, the SM 53 performs well in any breeze above about 6 knots and absolutely flies in big breeze. I have been quite secure in wind of 40 knots plus very comfortably rolling off a 220 miles a day, in total control. In adverse seas the boat doesn’t pound much and, again, remains predictable and easy to manage at all times by a competent cruising couple. It is hard to come to grief in any Amel boat if you don’t do anything deliberately stupid. Moving boats to place them in boat shows means restricted schedules because to not show up on time is not an option. Neptune knows this and would usually punish me for past evils with really crappy weather. I never felt anything more than healthy levels of fear when at sea in an Amel.

 

A comfortable liveaboard and the easiest of all three to own and take care of, the only problem today is in finding a good SM 53 that has been well owned and  competently cared for its entire life and not messed up by unwanted or ill-conceived ‘improvements’ .

The youngest one is 14 years old and one bad owner can quickly erase the efforts of several good ones.

 

The Amel 54 was the last boat with complete Amel DNA as it was designed by The Amel Design Group which was composed of all the Amel management, Jacques Carteau, department heads of all the different construction disciplines, the After Sales Service team, of course all of us sales people. This well qualified and knowledgeable group was well led and managed by Jean Jacques Lemonnier who was being groomed to be the next Chairman of Amel. Captain Amel was retired by this time and living down in the south of France.

 

After building 479 SM 53, we knew what folks liked and didn’t like about the 53 and a lot of attention was paid to correcting deficiencies and adding improvements that SM 53 owners said they wanted. These mostly focused on liveability with a better galley with more refrigeration/freezer space, stall showers, and a centerline queen berth in the aft cabin, as well as a forward facing navigation station, two ‘easy chairs’ in the saloon and lots more ports and hatches, all of which were opening ( except the four ‘windows’ in the hull ) which greatly enhanced natural ventilation and brought much more daylight into the boat. The 54 had about 13% more internal volume than the SM 53 and when you consider that volume is a cube, this quite a bit more space. The aft locker easily swallows a 310 hard bottom inflatable to keep it out of sight when you are away from the boat. The boat sails pretty much like a larger SM 53 and is marginally faster in 10 knots of breeze and better. Some SM 53 owners say that they are faster. Nope. More sail area, longer waterline, more powerful/wider sections aft for more powerful reaching.

I have sailed with several 53’s while enjoying my 54 and I always had a bit more turn of speed, especially off the wind. Both boats are comparably stiff and go to weather about the same. There are two quite large poles for the 54’ Amel downwind ballooner system instead of two short ones and two medium ones on the SM 53. These big poles are more difficult to maneuver, especially when they are aluminum instead of lighter carbon fiber. One person can still set the ballooner but it takes a bit more energy and planning. I did not order the poles on my 54 but opted for a code zero and some other off the wind sales which gave me slightly better off the wind performance without the poles and with the boat rolling a lot less with more pressure on the sails.. It was about a wash speed wise with the same arrival time while sailing a slightly longer course. The Amel 54 was designed to have a staysail which greatly  the rigs versatility and adaptability to conditions. The Amel 53 was designed NOT to have a staysail ( really, Captain Amel  was dead set against this ) and if you find one that does, make sure it was installed so the loads for the stay are carried down and into the stem and not terminated on the deck or on the soft mahogany vertical separation/nonstructural bulkhead in the foredeck lockers. This is the advice of Jacques Carteau who should know better than anyone. I have seen this modification done incorrectly on more Amel SM 53’s than ones done the right way. In conclusion, the Amel 54 is a more comfortable boat to live aboard, has a better cockpit and dodger, even more storage space and is still easy for two to manage. Jacques Carteau retired at the end of the development of the Amel 54. Captain Amel passed away about the same time as the last SM 53 was built in 2005, just before the 54 was introduced.

 

The Amel 55 pointed toward the new direction now fully seasoned Chairman Jean Jacques Lemonnier wanted to move the company toward. The overall design was more focused on the type of cruising Mr. Lemonnier liked to do and where he thought the cruising sailboat market was evolving. It was the first Amel where the boat was designed by an outside firm, the well respected firm of Berret-Racoupeau in La Rochelle. Overall, the 55 has a much more modern appearance. The layout and engineering of systems was still done by Amel and the quality of construction was every bit as good as previous Amel boats. Berret-Racoupeau designs many racer/cruisers and outright racing boats. The hull form of the 55 is more performance oriented than previous Amel boats designed in house. The boat sails better on every point of sail and is faster in the same breeze than any previous Amel sailboat. Like most higher performance sailboats, the hull’s  forefoot is flat to promote surfing. This can cause the boat to pound when in choppy seas or when coming off the tops of breaking waves. The freeboard is taller than previous Amel boats which makes for a very voluminous interior. It also makes the boat much more lively when maneuvering in and about the marina and dockside. The powerful bow thruster was up to task but if I were to order one today, I would get a stern thruster too if a lot of marina and dockside living were in order. Two can still manage the boat but you need to be on your toes and stay ahead of the boat when in tight quarters. The booms are mounted higher on the masts allowing easier movement on deck but raising the center of effort which increases heeling and the rate at which degrees of heel are acquired. Quite different than the 53 and 54. One thing I noted quickly is that the dodger is about as good as it gets for all weather  operation, but you are located much higher off the water than in Amel boats that came before. A lot move movement with a quicker motion at the end of this longer arm. The long term liveability of the 55 is superb and the accommodations have a much more modern look and provide a very comfortable place to spend a lot of time. The galley in the 55 is as close to perfection as my wife and I had ever encountered.

 

In a nutshell, The 53 and 54 are much more similar performance wise than they are different. They feel slightly different under way and the 54 is slightly faster. The 54 is a better live aboard.

The 55 is a whole new class of Amel boat which sacrifices a little bit of sea kindliness for a well enhanced increase in performance.

 

I hope this is helpful and I would be happy to answer any further questions you might have.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: amelyachtowners@... <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tuesday, February 5, 2019 11:03 AM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: [Amel Yacht Owners] performance differences

 

 

I intend on buying either a Super Maramu, 54, or 55 in the next 1-2 years. It's easy finding feature differences (length, layouts, etc) or aesthetic differences between the models, but it's been difficult finding information on the relative sailing characteristics of the three hulls. 

 

Can anyone give me commentary on how differently these three boats sail from your experiences? How much difference in light wind performance? Heavy seas? Any other operational or performance differences between them that you think would be relevant in making a choice? 

 

I know the right answer is to get each on the water and test them myself, but given difficulties in finding them nearby, that's not realistic, so there is a good chance I'll have to rely on user feedback to pick a model and then focus my actual on-water tests to the hulls I'm actually intending to purchase. I'm assuming the sailing performance between these three hulls is small enough that it's likely to boil down to how new a boat I'm willing to pay for.


Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Painting boat S of Hurricane belt

seagasm
 

Thank you Steve

Kind Regards
Barry Ferguson

Tradewinds III SM 171

On 7/2/19 4:00 pm, Stephen Davis flyboyscd@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 
First, all the tan gel coat is sanded of by several workers over a period of a week. After some prep work, the boat is masked, and decks sprayed with a white primer. More finish prep work is done to the primed decks, and then decks are sprayed with 3 coats of Awlgrip egg shell white color. All the grooves are now masked with a fine line tape. Decks are now sprayed with 3 coats of Awlgrip castle tan color mixed with fine Awlgrip grit. The mixed in grit gives you a better non skid than the original decks. You now pull the fine line tape, and voila...beautiful new decks. 

This is a very labor intensive process, and requires a yard in some part of the world with lower labor cost to make it cost effective. You also need a fairly talented painting contractor to do the work, and an owner willing to be there to keep everyone honest. It our case, all of that happened in Trinidad in 2016. 

Let me know if you need any other info or pictures of the end result. 

Regards,

Steve Davis
Aloha SM 72
Hawaii

On Feb 6, 2019, at 17:24, Barry Ferguson seagasm@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:

 

On the subject of the deck strips, in order to retain the timber grain effect of the stripes, how was the preparation achieved. Obviously, by sanding the deck would sand away the timber grain effect to a smoother finish.

Kind Regards
Barry & Robyn
Tradewinds III SM 171

On 7/2/19 9:41 am, Bill Rouse brouse@... [amelyachtowners] wrote:
 
No, it is a match to waterline color of the Amel 55.

I guess the non-directed question was not meant for me.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool..com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970
My calendar: 
https://theamelschool.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html

On Wed, Feb 6, 2019, 4:14 PM 'Mark Erdos' mcerdos@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... wrote:
 

Bill,

 

Is the Awlgrip (Desert Sand) a match to the deck color?

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: amelyachtowners@... [mailto:amelyachtowners@...]
Sent: Wednesday, February 6, 2019 4:57 PM
To: amelyachtowners@...
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Painting boat S of Hurricane belt

 

 

Since you didn't specify who you were asking, I will answer: Awlgrip desert sand is what I used on BeBe 387. It is the color of the 55.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Admiral, Texas Navy
Commander Emeritus
Amel School www.amelschool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970
My calendar: 
https://theamelschool.blogspot.com/p/calendar.html

 

On Wed, Feb 6, 2019, 1:41 PM svplanb@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@... wrote:

 

What was the color of Awlgrip that you used on the hull above the waterline?