Date   

Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

amelforme
 

Mark, density was never considered. If you never have laminated fiberglass, it is not intuitive to consider the process. Vela and I are on the way to Puerto Rico. When I get a moment, I will draw you a feeble cross section which shows layer by layer. Might be helpful to imagine that the deck mold is upside down until the deck is removed and joined by six laminates around the entire perimeter to the hull that is still in its mold.
Cindy probably has this figured out and is just being kind....

Keep Smiling ! 
Joël

JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On Mar 10, 2019, at 5:02 PM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

Joel,

 

You can call me dense, but I still do not understand if the dark brown gel-coat was added to the mold as a first step or done after the deck was removed from the mold as a last step?

 

Cindy says, hi.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of amelforme
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 3:00 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

Hi Mark and Cindy. I saw this process in action many times over the years. The “grooves” between the faux teak planks are recessed on the finished deck. On the mold they are quite proud of the planking. The dark brown of the “ grooves “ are the first thing to be done well before the brown of the deck is applied over. This dark  brown gel coat, I was told, had a wax component that surfaced and supplied a barrier against the atmosphere for proper curing. The brown gel coat of the decking was applied on top of the grooves/very dark brown gel coat.

 

I might add that the gals doing this process were very skilled and experienced at this process. They also had incredible focus and would not respond to conversation while doing this.

 

Having restored the plank separating gel coat with gel coat by brush and also the paint method by the striping tool, you will achieve better cosmetic results with the striping tool, especially the first few times you do it until you acquire some skills.

 

Hope this is helpful.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Erdos
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 11:56 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

James,

 

I feel very enlighten. Thank you. However, a question still nags me. If the deck stripes were applied by the French ladies of Amel, did they do it in the mold so the underside of the deck stripes were exposed to air, or did they paint the stripes once the decks were removed from the mold? If it is the latter, then the products and technique used by Amel seems like it would be the option to go with.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:16 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

Mark,

 

   That is not a stupid question, in fact it is a great one!  It is certainly possible to recoat gelcoat with new gelcoat.  In general however it is important to understand that the gelcoat used for boatbuilding are “air inhibited cure”.  This means that the exposure to air prevents a full cure so the surface remains soft and tacky.  This is a benefit when boatbuilding since this increases the bond between the gel coat and the layers of fibreglass being added.  The gelcoat against the mold itself cures nice and hard since air is excluded. So there are additives that can be used with regular gelcoat or coatings that can applied allow the gelcoat to fully cure.  One is simply a wax additive which floats to the surface and helps exclude the air, another option is to spray the fresh gelcoat with PVA which is poly vinyl acetate, it just forms a film over the gelcoat to exclude the air. You can just wash the PVA off with water later after the gel coat is fully cured. There are also some specialty additives that you can purchase from major suppliers of polyester resins, some of which work well when patching gelcoat.  So you want to use one of these options to help your gelcoat cure properly on the surface if you are using regular boat building type gel coat.  There are also non air inhibited gel coats and I have used one called Simtec Prestec which can be tinted to any colour.  The material cures hard as glass without any additives but for some reason the UV resistance is inferior. I have never looked into the reason but there could be other non air inhibited gel coats that have better UV resistance.  New gelcoat will bond pretty well to old gel coat if you really roughen up the surface and do not have any contaminants on the surface.  60-80 grit would not be too coarse.  I am absolutely sure that if done correctly that gel coat will outlast any one part paint and possibly even the two part paints.  Unfortunately gel coat is not too easy to brush on.   So you have to apply it smoothly since It does not self level like paints do..  Adding some styrene thinner can help with brushing some but mostly you need to apply it as smooth as possible via your technique.  The good thing with the gel coat is that if you have thick or uneven spots you can come back and sand and polish out those areas but what a lot of work that would be if you had a lot of them!  So yes, this is actually an excellent idea IMO.

 

Best,

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:50 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

 

I feel the need to ask a stupid question.

 

If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated. 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

 

 


Re: Tunesia

Gary Wells
 

I can only report on Marina Gammarth. 
I was there in Sept., 2018 for a few days.
The marina facilities are nice, but the complex is basically deserted. While there are many shop-front spaces available, they are all empty save one small service shop and an ATM.  No provisions available and a cab ride is required to go shopping.
.
I also had an extremely distasteful experience with the Customs officers there. The Immigration office was fine, but Customs officer came aboard and systematically began emptying drawers and cupboards onto the bed and setees. They questioned the sources and purposes of my wife's jewelery, our U.S. emergency money and our prescriptions. Each item was ceremoniously inspected (some were phone-photographed) 
It got bad, so I finally asked "What do I need to do?" and I received "Well, perhaps a gift." as a reply.

I was under the impression that Government officials had stopped playing that game but it is apparently not so in Gammarth. 
I was very disappointed and cannot recommend the marina for that reason alone.

Gary W. 
SM 209, Adagio
BVI/USVI


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Mark Erdos
 

Joel,

 

You can call me dense, but I still do not understand if the dark brown gel-coat was added to the mold as a first step or done after the deck was removed from the mold as a last step?

 

Cindy says, hi.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of amelforme
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 3:00 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

Hi Mark and Cindy. I saw this process in action many times over the years. The “grooves” between the faux teak planks are recessed on the finished deck. On the mold they are quite proud of the planking. The dark brown of the “ grooves “ are the first thing to be done well before the brown of the deck is applied over. This dark  brown gel coat, I was told, had a wax component that surfaced and supplied a barrier against the atmosphere for proper curing. The brown gel coat of the decking was applied on top of the grooves/very dark brown gel coat.

 

I might add that the gals doing this process were very skilled and experienced at this process. They also had incredible focus and would not respond to conversation while doing this.

 

Having restored the plank separating gel coat with gel coat by brush and also the paint method by the striping tool, you will achieve better cosmetic results with the striping tool, especially the first few times you do it until you acquire some skills.

 

Hope this is helpful.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Erdos
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 11:56 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

James,

 

I feel very enlighten. Thank you. However, a question still nags me. If the deck stripes were applied by the French ladies of Amel, did they do it in the mold so the underside of the deck stripes were exposed to air, or did they paint the stripes once the decks were removed from the mold? If it is the latter, then the products and technique used by Amel seems like it would be the option to go with.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:16 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

Mark,

 

   That is not a stupid question, in fact it is a great one!  It is certainly possible to recoat gelcoat with new gelcoat.  In general however it is important to understand that the gelcoat used for boatbuilding are “air inhibited cure”.  This means that the exposure to air prevents a full cure so the surface remains soft and tacky.  This is a benefit when boatbuilding since this increases the bond between the gel coat and the layers of fibreglass being added.  The gelcoat against the mold itself cures nice and hard since air is excluded. So there are additives that can be used with regular gelcoat or coatings that can applied allow the gelcoat to fully cure.  One is simply a wax additive which floats to the surface and helps exclude the air, another option is to spray the fresh gelcoat with PVA which is poly vinyl acetate, it just forms a film over the gelcoat to exclude the air. You can just wash the PVA off with water later after the gel coat is fully cured. There are also some specialty additives that you can purchase from major suppliers of polyester resins, some of which work well when patching gelcoat.  So you want to use one of these options to help your gelcoat cure properly on the surface if you are using regular boat building type gel coat.  There are also non air inhibited gel coats and I have used one called Simtec Prestec which can be tinted to any colour.  The material cures hard as glass without any additives but for some reason the UV resistance is inferior. I have never looked into the reason but there could be other non air inhibited gel coats that have better UV resistance.  New gelcoat will bond pretty well to old gel coat if you really roughen up the surface and do not have any contaminants on the surface.  60-80 grit would not be too coarse.  I am absolutely sure that if done correctly that gel coat will outlast any one part paint and possibly even the two part paints.  Unfortunately gel coat is not too easy to brush on.   So you have to apply it smoothly since It does not self level like paints do..  Adding some styrene thinner can help with brushing some but mostly you need to apply it as smooth as possible via your technique.  The good thing with the gel coat is that if you have thick or uneven spots you can come back and sand and polish out those areas but what a lot of work that would be if you had a lot of them!  So yes, this is actually an excellent idea IMO.

 

Best,

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:50 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

 

I feel the need to ask a stupid question.

 

If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated. 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

 

 


Re: Maramu anchor and chain suggestions

amelforme
 

Further recollection recalls the fact that the girls used rather hard rollers instead of brushes. If you think about the configuration, a drip or mistake was pretty easy to correct soon after the fact. With the rollers,proper gel coat loading and perfect pressure
application were essential.
JOEL F. POTTER
CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST LLC
THE EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
Office 954-462-5869 

On Mar 10, 2019, at 5:11 PM, James Alton via Groups.Io <lokiyawl2@...> wrote:

Michael,

  Thanks for sharing your experience with the Rocna and for the insight on the Chrome Duplex, I had never heard of it until your post.  From the research I have done to date it appears that the Rocna would be a big step up in holding from my original Buegel anchor and it is well proven.   The Mantus is an anchor of interest to me as well, mostly because it seems to be unusually reliable in resetting.   It can of course be hard to separate the hype from fact so I am still pondering…   I am concerned a bit about how light the shank is on the Mantus. 

  I am really hoping to hear from another Maramu owner that has used the Mantus to know for sure if it would even fit my boat before I make my final decision but I understand that this anchor has not been around all that long so maybe no one has tried it yet.  The side profile and angle of the plough portion of the anchor is very similar to the Rocna which looks encouraging.  The shank is longer in the sizes I am looking at but I think that there should be enough deck space.   I have seen the Mantus on a few Super Maramus and they appear to fit pretty well.  If anyone with a Super Maramu would like to comment on what they think of this anchor on their Amel I would sure appreciate the input.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Mar 10, 2019, at 11:31 AM, amel@... wrote:

Hi James,

in my experience the Rocna has excellent holding power. I weathered the Medicane in Greece last October with this Anchor (45+ kn winds for several hours) and also used it on a couple of occasion with similar wind speeds.
It sets quite fast within 1-2 m of the drop point. It has some problems on weed, but so has nearly every other anchor.

Yes, I suggested that a stainless steel chain has a much better tendency to stow itself because it is more "slick". But as you pointed out, stainles steel is not stainless steel. While in cold waters like Northern Europe you may do ok with AISI 316 (1.4401) quality for a while (1.4571 would be better if you anchor often), in the Med and in tropical regions the only material you can use for any prolonged perios without corrosion problems is 1.4462 Chrome Duplex.
Unfortunately it has a price tag 4 times the one of galvanized steel - which did keep me away from it so far ;)



Re: Maramu anchor and chain suggestions

James Alton
 

Michael,

  Thanks for sharing your experience with the Rocna and for the insight on the Chrome Duplex, I had never heard of it until your post.  From the research I have done to date it appears that the Rocna would be a big step up in holding from my original Buegel anchor and it is well proven.   The Mantus is an anchor of interest to me as well, mostly because it seems to be unusually reliable in resetting.   It can of course be hard to separate the hype from fact so I am still pondering…   I am concerned a bit about how light the shank is on the Mantus. 

  I am really hoping to hear from another Maramu owner that has used the Mantus to know for sure if it would even fit my boat before I make my final decision but I understand that this anchor has not been around all that long so maybe no one has tried it yet.  The side profile and angle of the plough portion of the anchor is very similar to the Rocna which looks encouraging.  The shank is longer in the sizes I am looking at but I think that there should be enough deck space.   I have seen the Mantus on a few Super Maramus and they appear to fit pretty well.  If anyone with a Super Maramu would like to comment on what they think of this anchor on their Amel I would sure appreciate the input.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Mar 10, 2019, at 11:31 AM, amel@... wrote:

Hi James,

in my experience the Rocna has excellent holding power. I weathered the Medicane in Greece last October with this Anchor (45+ kn winds for several hours) and also used it on a couple of occasion with similar wind speeds.
It sets quite fast within 1-2 m of the drop point. It has some problems on weed, but so has nearly every other anchor.

Yes, I suggested that a stainless steel chain has a much better tendency to stow itself because it is more "slick". But as you pointed out, stainles steel is not stainless steel. While in cold waters like Northern Europe you may do ok with AISI 316 (1.4401) quality for a while (1.4571 would be better if you anchor often), in the Med and in tropical regions the only material you can use for any prolonged perios without corrosion problems is 1.4462 Chrome Duplex.
Unfortunately it has a price tag 4 times the one of galvanized steel - which did keep me away from it so far ;)



Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

James Alton
 
Edited

Joel,
 
   Many thanks for giving us the final word on how  the grooves in the Amel deck were originally gel coated  in the mold.  It is amazing to have input from someone that was actually at the factory when some of these amazing boats were built.   I now better understand why you were so impressed with the work that the “gals” did in painting these stripes!  Besides somehow cutting a straight line and holding the required thickness, they had to be very careful avoid any drips onto the rest of the prepared mold.  I would never have had the patience myself.   I will never look at my deck quite the same again.  (grin)
 
Thanks Joel,
 
James
SV Sueno, Maramu #220

On Mar 10, 2019, at 3:00 PM, amelforme <jfpottercys@...> wrote:
Hi Mark and Cindy. I saw this process in action many times over the years. The “grooves” between the faux teak planks are recessed on the finished deck. On the mold they are quite proud of the planking. The dark brown of the “ grooves “ are the first thing to be done well before the brown of the deck is applied over. This dark  brown gel coat, I was told, had a wax component that surfaced and supplied a barrier against the atmosphere for proper curing. The brown gel coat of the decking was applied on top of the grooves/very dark brown gel coat.
 
I might add that the gals doing this process were very skilled and experienced at this process. They also had incredible focus and would not respond to conversation while doing this.
 
Having restored the plank separating gel coat with gel coat by brush and also the paint method by the striping tool, you will achieve better cosmetic results with the striping tool, especially the first few times you do it until you acquire some skills.
 
Hope this is helpful.
 
All The Best, Joel   
 
          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.
                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY
UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE 
                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485
 
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Erdos
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 11:56 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint
 
James,
 
I feel very enlighten. Thank you. However, a question still nags me. If the deck stripes were applied by the French ladies of Amel, did they do it in the mold so the underside of the deck stripes were exposed to air, or did they paint the stripes once the decks were removed from the mold? If it is the latter, then the products and technique used by Amel seems like it would be the option to go with. 
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:16 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint
 
Mark,
 
   That is not a stupid question, in fact it is a great one!  It is certainly possible to recoat gelcoat with new gelcoat.  In general however it is important to understand that the gelcoat used for boatbuilding are “air inhibited cure”.  This means that the exposure to air prevents a full cure so the surface remains soft and tacky.  This is a benefit when boatbuilding since this increases the bond between the gel coat and the layers of fibreglass being added.  The gelcoat against the mold itself cures nice and hard since air is excluded. So there are additives that can be used with regular gelcoat or coatings that can applied allow the gelcoat to fully cure.  One is simply a wax additive which floats to the surface and helps exclude the air, another option is to spray the fresh gelcoat with PVA which is poly vinyl acetate, it just forms a film over the gelcoat to exclude the air. You can just wash the PVA off with water later after the gel coat is fully cured. There are also some specialty additives that you can purchase from major suppliers of polyester resins, some of which work well when patching gelcoat.  So you want to use one of these options to help your gelcoat cure properly on the surface if you are using regular boat building type gel coat.  There are also non air inhibited gel coats and I have used one called Simtec Prestec which can be tinted to any colour.  The material cures hard as glass without any additives but for some reason the UV resistance is inferior. I have never looked into the reason but there could be other non air inhibited gel coats that have better UV resistance.  New gelcoat will bond pretty well to old gel coat if you really roughen up the surface and do not have any contaminants on the surface.  60-80 grit would not be too coarse.  I am absolutely sure that if done correctly that gel coat will outlast any one part paint and possibly even the two part paints.  Unfortunately gel coat is not too easy to brush on.   So you have to apply it smoothly since It does not self level like paints do..  Adding some styrene thinner can help with brushing some but mostly you need to apply it as smooth as possible via your technique.  The good thing with the gel coat is that if you have thick or uneven spots you can come back and sand and polish out those areas but what a lot of work that would be if you had a lot of them!  So yes, this is actually an excellent idea IMO.
 
Best,
 
James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
 
On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:50 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:
 
I feel the need to ask a stupid question.
 
If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated. 
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia
 
 

 


Re: Dive cylinder fill compressor.

Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
 

Thanks mark

On 10 March 2019 at 09:51 Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

Danny,

 

I works very well. It is a bit noisy and takes about 30 mins to fill a full size tank. But it is a huge convenience to have aboard. When running of the genset, this will suck power so not much else can be run. Sorry, I forget the amps pulled.

 

As others have mentioned, buy lots of filters.

 

I was told by Joel to run it regularly, even if not filling tanks. I crank it up every couple of weeks for just a few minutes. Other than replacing filters and the HP air hose to the tank, it has been problem free.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2019 2:59 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Dive cylinder fill compressor.

 

Thanks Mark, just the information I need. It works well?

Regards

Danny

SM 299

Ocean Pearl

On 09 March 2019 at 23:12 Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

H Danny,

 

It is a Junior II by Bauer: https://www.bauer-kompressoren.de/products/breathing-air-sports/compact-line-100-140-lmin/junior-ii-100-lmin/

 

We have this on Cream Puff and was installed by Amel. The installation has the unit sitting on a sliding tray so you can take advantage of some storage when the unit is push far to port in the locker out of use.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Danny and Yvonne SIMMS
Sent: Saturday, March 9, 2019 3:45 AM
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Dive cylinder fill compressor.

 

Hi all,

when we bought Ocean Pearl the previous owner had removed the dive compressor. I would like to add this now. (belatedly) having finally moved from the must have list to the nice to have list. What make and model did Amel install and any other advice gratefully received. The 230 volt wiring is in place in the large cockpit  port locker.

Thanks in advance

Danny

SM 299 

Ocean Pearl

 

 


 


 

 



 


 


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

amelforme
 

Hi Mark and Cindy. I saw this process in action many times over the years. The “grooves” between the faux teak planks are recessed on the finished deck. On the mold they are quite proud of the planking. The dark brown of the “ grooves “ are the first thing to be done well before the brown of the deck is applied over. This dark  brown gel coat, I was told, had a wax component that surfaced and supplied a barrier against the atmosphere for proper curing. The brown gel coat of the decking was applied on top of the grooves/very dark brown gel coat.

 

I might add that the gals doing this process were very skilled and experienced at this process. They also had incredible focus and would not respond to conversation while doing this.

 

Having restored the plank separating gel coat with gel coat by brush and also the paint method by the striping tool, you will achieve better cosmetic results with the striping tool, especially the first few times you do it until you acquire some skills.

 

Hope this is helpful.

 

All The Best, Joel   

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Mark Erdos
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 11:56 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

James,

 

I feel very enlighten. Thank you. However, a question still nags me. If the deck stripes were applied by the French ladies of Amel, did they do it in the mold so the underside of the deck stripes were exposed to air, or did they paint the stripes once the decks were removed from the mold? If it is the latter, then the products and technique used by Amel seems like it would be the option to go with.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:16 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

Mark,

 

   That is not a stupid question, in fact it is a great one!  It is certainly possible to recoat gelcoat with new gelcoat.  In general however it is important to understand that the gelcoat used for boatbuilding are “air inhibited cure”.  This means that the exposure to air prevents a full cure so the surface remains soft and tacky.  This is a benefit when boatbuilding since this increases the bond between the gel coat and the layers of fibreglass being added.  The gelcoat against the mold itself cures nice and hard since air is excluded. So there are additives that can be used with regular gelcoat or coatings that can applied allow the gelcoat to fully cure.  One is simply a wax additive which floats to the surface and helps exclude the air, another option is to spray the fresh gelcoat with PVA which is poly vinyl acetate, it just forms a film over the gelcoat to exclude the air. You can just wash the PVA off with water later after the gel coat is fully cured. There are also some specialty additives that you can purchase from major suppliers of polyester resins, some of which work well when patching gelcoat.  So you want to use one of these options to help your gelcoat cure properly on the surface if you are using regular boat building type gel coat.  There are also non air inhibited gel coats and I have used one called Simtec Prestec which can be tinted to any colour.  The material cures hard as glass without any additives but for some reason the UV resistance is inferior. I have never looked into the reason but there could be other non air inhibited gel coats that have better UV resistance.  New gelcoat will bond pretty well to old gel coat if you really roughen up the surface and do not have any contaminants on the surface.  60-80 grit would not be too coarse.  I am absolutely sure that if done correctly that gel coat will outlast any one part paint and possibly even the two part paints.  Unfortunately gel coat is not too easy to brush on.   So you have to apply it smoothly since It does not self level like paints do..  Adding some styrene thinner can help with brushing some but mostly you need to apply it as smooth as possible via your technique.  The good thing with the gel coat is that if you have thick or uneven spots you can come back and sand and polish out those areas but what a lot of work that would be if you had a lot of them!  So yes, this is actually an excellent idea IMO.

 

Best,

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:50 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

 

I feel the need to ask a stupid question.

 

If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated. 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

 

 


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

James Alton
 

Mark,

   Another good question.  My impression from reading the posting about painting the deck stripes was that they were done after the deck was out of the mold but I could be wrong.  The stripes could certainly have been painted in the mold but I imagine it would have been super hard to keep the lines straight without taping since the stripe area would appear as a raised area in the mold.  Perhaps someone in the know could enlighten us?  

Best,

James
SV Sueno,  Maramu #220

On Mar 10, 2019, at 11:55 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

James,
 
I feel very enlighten. Thank you. However, a question still nags me. If the deck stripes were applied by the French ladies of Amel, did they do it in the mold so the underside of the deck stripes were exposed to air, or did they paint the stripes once the decks were removed from the mold? If it is the latter, then the products and technique used by Amel seems like it would be the option to go with. 
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:16 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint
 
Mark,
 
   That is not a stupid question, in fact it is a great one!  It is certainly possible to recoat gelcoat with new gelcoat.  In general however it is important to understand that the gelcoat used for boatbuilding are “air inhibited cure”.  This means that the exposure to air prevents a full cure so the surface remains soft and tacky.  This is a benefit when boatbuilding since this increases the bond between the gel coat and the layers of fibreglass being added.  The gelcoat against the mold itself cures nice and hard since air is excluded. So there are additives that can be used with regular gelcoat or coatings that can applied allow the gelcoat to fully cure.  One is simply a wax additive which floats to the surface and helps exclude the air, another option is to spray the fresh gelcoat with PVA which is poly vinyl acetate, it just forms a film over the gelcoat to exclude the air. You can just wash the PVA off with water later after the gel coat is fully cured. There are also some specialty additives that you can purchase from major suppliers of polyester resins, some of which work well when patching gelcoat.  So you want to use one of these options to help your gelcoat cure properly on the surface if you are using regular boat building type gel coat.  There are also non air inhibited gel coats and I have used one called Simtec Prestec which can be tinted to any colour.  The material cures hard as glass without any additives but for some reason the UV resistance is inferior. I have never looked into the reason but there could be other non air inhibited gel coats that have better UV resistance.  New gelcoat will bond pretty well to old gel coat if you really roughen up the surface and do not have any contaminants on the surface.  60-80 grit would not be too coarse.  I am absolutely sure that if done correctly that gel coat will outlast any one part paint and possibly even the two part paints.  Unfortunately gel coat is not too easy to brush on.   So you have to apply it smoothly since It does not self level like paints do..  Adding some styrene thinner can help with brushing some but mostly you need to apply it as smooth as possible via your technique.  The good thing with the gel coat is that if you have thick or uneven spots you can come back and sand and polish out those areas but what a lot of work that would be if you had a lot of them!  So yes, this is actually an excellent idea IMO.
 
Best,
 
James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220
 
On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:50 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:
 
I feel the need to ask a stupid question.
 
If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated. 
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia
 
 



Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Mark Erdos
 

James,

 

I feel very enlighten. Thank you. However, a question still nags me. If the deck stripes were applied by the French ladies of Amel, did they do it in the mold so the underside of the deck stripes were exposed to air, or did they paint the stripes once the decks were removed from the mold? If it is the latter, then the products and technique used by Amel seems like it would be the option to go with.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of James Alton via Groups.Io
Sent: Sunday, March 10, 2019 12:16 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Faux Teak and Deck Paint

 

Mark,

 

   That is not a stupid question, in fact it is a great one!  It is certainly possible to recoat gelcoat with new gelcoat.  In general however it is important to understand that the gelcoat used for boatbuilding are “air inhibited cure”.  This means that the exposure to air prevents a full cure so the surface remains soft and tacky.  This is a benefit when boatbuilding since this increases the bond between the gel coat and the layers of fibreglass being added.  The gelcoat against the mold itself cures nice and hard since air is excluded. So there are additives that can be used with regular gelcoat or coatings that can applied allow the gelcoat to fully cure.  One is simply a wax additive which floats to the surface and helps exclude the air, another option is to spray the fresh gelcoat with PVA which is poly vinyl acetate, it just forms a film over the gelcoat to exclude the air. You can just wash the PVA off with water later after the gel coat is fully cured. There are also some specialty additives that you can purchase from major suppliers of polyester resins, some of which work well when patching gelcoat.  So you want to use one of these options to help your gelcoat cure properly on the surface if you are using regular boat building type gel coat.  There are also non air inhibited gel coats and I have used one called Simtec Prestec which can be tinted to any colour.  The material cures hard as glass without any additives but for some reason the UV resistance is inferior. I have never looked into the reason but there could be other non air inhibited gel coats that have better UV resistance.  New gelcoat will bond pretty well to old gel coat if you really roughen up the surface and do not have any contaminants on the surface.  60-80 grit would not be too coarse.  I am absolutely sure that if done correctly that gel coat will outlast any one part paint and possibly even the two part paints.  Unfortunately gel coat is not too easy to brush on.   So you have to apply it smoothly since It does not self level like paints do..  Adding some styrene thinner can help with brushing some but mostly you need to apply it as smooth as possible via your technique.  The good thing with the gel coat is that if you have thick or uneven spots you can come back and sand and polish out those areas but what a lot of work that would be if you had a lot of them!  So yes, this is actually an excellent idea IMO.

 

Best,

 

James

SV Sueno

Maramu #220

 

On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:50 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

 

I feel the need to ask a stupid question.

 

If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated. 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

 

 


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

James Alton
 

Mark,

   That is not a stupid question, in fact it is a great one!  It is certainly possible to recoat gelcoat with new gelcoat.  In general however it is important to understand that the gelcoat used for boatbuilding are “air inhibited cure”.  This means that the exposure to air prevents a full cure so the surface remains soft and tacky.  This is a benefit when boatbuilding since this increases the bond between the gel coat and the layers of fibreglass being added.  The gelcoat against the mold itself cures nice and hard since air is excluded. So there are additives that can be used with regular gelcoat or coatings that can applied allow the gelcoat to fully cure.  One is simply a wax additive which floats to the surface and helps exclude the air, another option is to spray the fresh gelcoat with PVA which is poly vinyl acetate, it just forms a film over the gelcoat to exclude the air. You can just wash the PVA off with water later after the gel coat is fully cured. There are also some specialty additives that you can purchase from major suppliers of polyester resins, some of which work well when patching gelcoat.  So you want to use one of these options to help your gelcoat cure properly on the surface if you are using regular boat building type gel coat.  There are also non air inhibited gel coats and I have used one called Simtec Prestec which can be tinted to any colour.  The material cures hard as glass without any additives but for some reason the UV resistance is inferior. I have never looked into the reason but there could be other non air inhibited gel coats that have better UV resistance.  New gelcoat will bond pretty well to old gel coat if you really roughen up the surface and do not have any contaminants on the surface.  60-80 grit would not be too coarse.  I am absolutely sure that if done correctly that gel coat will outlast any one part paint and possibly even the two part paints.  Unfortunately gel coat is not too easy to brush on.   So you have to apply it smoothly since It does not self level like paints do..  Adding some styrene thinner can help with brushing some but mostly you need to apply it as smooth as possible via your technique.  The good thing with the gel coat is that if you have thick or uneven spots you can come back and sand and polish out those areas but what a lot of work that would be if you had a lot of them!  So yes, this is actually an excellent idea IMO.

Best,

James
SV Sueno
Maramu #220

On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:50 AM, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...> wrote:

I feel the need to ask a stupid question.
 
If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated. 
 
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia
 


Re: Faux Teak and Deck Paint

Mark Erdos
 

I feel the need to ask a stupid question.

 

If the original deck striping was done with tinted gel-coat and brushed by hand, then why does nobody use this option to recondition the deck stripes. After all, the gel-coat applied by the French ladies of Amel lasted a very long time. Having never really done much work with gel-coat other than the occasional patch, I don’t really understand why this would be a non-option. If someone could enlighten me, that would be appreciated.

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Santa Marta, Colombia

www.creampuff.us

 


Re: Maramu anchor and chain suggestions

@Sioned
 

Hi James,

in my experience the Rocna has excellent holding power. I weathered the Medicane in Greece last October with this Anchor (45+ kn winds for several hours) and also used it on a couple of occasion with similar wind speeds.
It sets quite fast within 1-2 m of the drop point. It has some problems on weed, but so has nearly every other anchor.

Yes, I suggested that a stainless steel chain has a much better tendency to stow itself because it is more "slick". But as you pointed out, stainles steel is not stainless steel. While in cold waters like Northern Europe you may do ok with AISI 316 (1.4401) quality for a while (1.4571 would be better if you anchor often), in the Med and in tropical regions the only material you can use for any prolonged perios without corrosion problems is 1.4462 Chrome Duplex.
Unfortunately it has a price tag 4 times the one of galvanized steel - which did keep me away from it so far ;)


Re: Maramu anchor and chain suggestions

James Alton
 

Michael,

   Thanks a lot for your help.  The 33kg Rocna does look like it is a great fit for the stock Amel anchor handling gear as you indicated and also shown in your photo.  The Rocna looks like a really strong anchor, especially the shank.  How do you find the holding of this anchor for your Maramu?  

   Has anyone used the Mantus 39kg or 48kg on their Maramu?  The Mantus appears to fit the SM2000 pretty well but I don’t know how much of a difference there between the Amel anchor handlers of these two models.  The reviews of this anchor look very positive so any comments about the Mantus positive or negative would be appreciated.

   It is really helpful to know about the anchor locker limits for rode length in order to prevent jamming.  I think that will limit the chain to no more than the 80m of chain that you suggested if I go with the 10mm size.  I am guessing that the 100m of the 8mm chain would probably fit without jamming?  I like the larger links of the 10mm since this allows  splicing up to 7/8” nylon direct to the chain.  

   I am guessing that you are saying that 100m  of the stainless 10mm  should work without jamming because it has less of a tendency to pile up due to the smoother links.  I have not used a stainless anchor chain before but having seen and experienced so many corrosion related failures in stainless over the years that without learning more about the stainless option I would tend to be more comfortable with the galvanized steel. 

Thanks again for the help!

James Alton
SV Sueno
Maramu #220



   

On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:01 AM, amel@... wrote:

Hi James,

I am running a 33kg Rocna on my Maramu #148 and it fits perfectly:

<rocna2018.png>

Never had problems with the anchor dangling to the hull (except for the few occasion when I forgot to haul it in completely after cleaning it and increasing speed to over 3.5 kn).

As for the chain, you shout be aware that with 100m you will have to sort out the chain in the locker when pulling it in, as it will pile up. Regularly my 100m chain will block on the last 10-20m if I do not deal with the pile in the locker in time.

Either stick to 80m or use (very expensive - you need chrome duplex steel in the warmer waters) stainless steel chain. I wouldn't recommend switching to 8mm chain even if it maybe stronger than standard 10mm chain. True, you save on weight, but you also loose the weight where you need it, in the water.

Michael Konz, SY Sioned, Maramu #148


Re: Maramu anchor and chain suggestions

Ric <ric@...>
 

I added a a port chain access to my Santorin and moved much of bitter end (150’ of 325’) to port.  Helps with our smaller lockers. 
Bali Hai SN 24
Annapolis 

Ric Gottschalk
Kitchen Magic Refacers, Inc

No employee or agent is authorized to conclude any binding agreement on behalf of Kitchen Magic Refacers, Inc without express written confirmation by a Officer of the Corporation

On Mar 10, 2019, at 10:00 AM, "amel@..." <amel@...> wrote:

Hi James,

I am running a 33kg Rocna on my Maramu #148 and it fits perfectly:

<rocna2018.png>

Never had problems with the anchor dangling to the hull (except for the few occasion when I forgot to haul it in completely after cleaning it and increasing speed to over 3.5 kn).

As for the chain, you shout be aware that with 100m you will have to sort out the chain in the locker when pulling it in, as it will pile up. Regularly my 100m chain will block on the last 10-20m if I do not deal with the pile in the locker in time.

Either stick to 80m or use (very expensive - you need chrome duplex steel in the warmer waters) stainless steel chain. I wouldn't recommend switching to 8mm chain even if it maybe stronger than standard 10mm chain. True, you save on weight, but you also loose the weight where you need it, in the water.

Michael Konz, SY Sioned, Maramu #148


Re: Sharki shaft alternator

Beaute Olivier
 

Hello Tom,

the prop shaft alternator can work with a MAXPROP. It is a bit tricky, but you should try this:
-while sailing (above 4 knots), start the engine and engage reverse idling
-while your engine is reversing, turn ON the key switch of your alternator
-then set the engine to neutral and stop it
Your MAXPROP should keep the reverse position unless:
a) your batteries are charged enough and the alternator will not oppose much power to the prop, therefore the prop will spin faster and will finally open and the shaft will stop
b) your boat speed is high (while surfing) and the prop will spin faster and will open

Good luck.

Olivier


On Friday, March 8, 2019, 7:24:20 PM GMT+1, amel46met <onboardaphrodite@...> wrote:


Hello 
Does anyone in the group use a Max Prop with the shaft alternator I have read that it does work any tricks?
Tom Deasy 
Maramu 125


On Mar 8, 2019, at 8:10 AM, marklesparkle59 <marklesparkle59@...> wrote:

Thanks Ian. I am struggling to get to grips with the electrical system. The engine/starboard alternator is charging but not sure about the domestic/port alternator and I dont really understand the data my shiney new clamp meter is giving me. I need to read a book I think.
Mark



Sent from my Samsung device


-------- Original message --------
From: Ian <parkianj@...>
Date: 08/03/2019 11:52 (GMT+00:00)
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sharki shaft alternator

Mark
On my Santorin you have to put the key in and switch on (next to your ameter). The green light comes on. It sends a current to the alternator to excite it and start it charging. You should turn off when finished using it and put your gear lever in reverse to stop the alternator charging before switching on the engine.
I believe the diodes in each of the engine and alternator should prevent any ‘issues’, but that is the prescribed Amel method.
My knowledge of electrics is limited - someone with a better understanding may chip in here.
The Santorin prop shaft pulley is quite a bit bigger too, so will turn the alternator faster. There is a significant drop in prop shaft speed as soon as you turn the alternator on.

Ian




Re: Maramu anchor and chain suggestions

@Sioned
 

Hi James,

I am running a 33kg Rocna on my Maramu #148 and it fits perfectly:



Never had problems with the anchor dangling to the hull (except for the few occasion when I forgot to haul it in completely after cleaning it and increasing speed to over 3.5 kn).

As for the chain, you shout be aware that with 100m you will have to sort out the chain in the locker when pulling it in, as it will pile up. Regularly my 100m chain will block on the last 10-20m if I do not deal with the pile in the locker in time.

Either stick to 80m or use (very expensive - you need chrome duplex steel in the warmer waters) stainless steel chain. I wouldn't recommend switching to 8mm chain even if it maybe stronger than standard 10mm chain. True, you save on weight, but you also loose the weight where you need it, in the water.

Michael Konz, SY Sioned, Maramu #148


Re: Prop shaft alternator

Craig Briggs
 

Hi Ian,  We experienced no speed difference after removing the shaft generator. The un-energized alternator just free-wheels when motoring and is pretty small, so, while there is some friction in the bearings, it is miniscule. (While sailing, of course, there is no rotation, thus no speed difference.)  We have the same engine as yours but without the turbo, that is, a Perkins Prima M50 vs. your Perkins Prima M80, aka Volvo TMD22. 
Craig Briggs, SN68 Sangaris


Re: Tunesia

Gerhard Mueller
 

On Sun, Mar 10, 2019 at 02:24 AM, hanspeter baettig wrote:
Hi James
I would like to chaim in
because I knew Tunesia very well. First of all: The Marina some mentioned is Hamamet not Gamamet. The Port name is Port de Jasmine. Monastair is ok even for 54 ft vessels. Quit small. Bizerte is a new marina, but emty, nowbody goes their. I don't now way. Tunesia is becoming a very poor country after the Yasmin Revolution 2011. But! Its a lovely country, specially if you speak french.
Rent a car and go south visiting this country. A lot of old "Römische Ruinen, " better conceives then in Rom
and a lot of fantastic mosaiques in the area of Cap Bon.
have a good time
Hanspeter
Hi Hanspeter
 
some corrections are needed:
Nobody was talking about "Gamamet" but about Marina de Gammarth which is in the north of the Tunis bay and newly opened 2 or 3 years before.
Bizerte is also crowded now.
When you wrote about Roman ruins yoou have to point to El Djem where is a large colosseum almost in a better state than the colosseum in Rom, Italy.
In the area of Cap Bon are no mosaiques. You can visit mosaiques either in the Bardo meseum in Tunis or also in the museum in the souk of Sousse.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


Re: Hawse Pipe Replacement

Thomas Kleman
 

Mark, others- I will send pics but just remember that my paper hooded anti-fiberglass flight suit easily puts 15-20 lbs on you, similar to TV.

I told the neighbors here in shelter bay marina that my forward torpedo doors we're sticking, then didn't smile and jumped into the chain locker again.

Thomas Kleman 
SV L'ORIENT
Shelter Bay Marina, Colon