Date   

Re: Furuno Weather Fax

James Cromie
 

haha!  

On Jun 16, 2019, at 10:31 PM, Craig Briggs via Groups.Io <sangaris@...> wrote:

James,   
They make OK dinghy anchors.
Then again, they are kind of bullet proof as legacy technology should you not have newer replacements and DIY weather forecasting is kind of cool if you're into that.
This is why they make chocolate and vanilla. 
Craig


Re: Petrol questions/survey

 

Joel,

Totally agree.

And, foredeck storage is good when you are stern-to in a marina.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Mon, Jun 17, 2019 at 8:33 AM amelforme <jfpottercys@...> wrote:

Another 2 cents…

If you can smell the aroma of gasoline, it is explosive.

As Mark said, the SSB tuner is NOT a spark or arc proof unit and it says so on the installation instructions. It is not unusual for them to make sparks capable of ignition of gasoline vapors. Gasoline vapor is much heavier than atmosphere and difficult to displace. The Amel 54 has special lockers on the port side for all flammables on board including gasoline as was a major request from SM 53 owners we asked/heard from.

I have resold two SM 53 where the furthest aft bulkhead in the owners cabin was displaced forward when the SSB tuner ignited gasoline vapors. This bulkhead is the weak link in an overpressure situation of the aft deck locker. In is not an inexpensive repair to do correctly.

Gasoline containers secured on the aft deck are less likely to get swept and cause damage to the stanchions, as they are generally travelling away from the boarding wave which diminishes the initial ‘pop’ of the wave strike. Containers on the foredeck area have the force of the wave strike increased by the speed that the boat is travelling increasing the initial pop which is the part of the wave action that does the most damage. I have seen stanchions that were twisted from this. Most damage to the life line tubes is caused by large people sitting on the middle of the span. I have spent a lot of time straightening bent stanchions and lifelines in preparing an otherwise nice listing for sale, it is tedious and not much fun.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:44 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

 

Mark, I also agree with you, I sometimes see some small amount of leakage of gas from tanks due to heat and expansion and would never store gas below for the reason you stated . I store my tanks far aft ,where they are less prone to be impacted by waves. 

Pat

SM #123

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jun 17, 2019 7:53 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

I often see world cruisers with cans lashed to stanchions. It seems many of the boats on which I observe this have a set up not as solid as Amel. I have never once heard of a large wave causing damage due to cans lashed. Improperly lashed, maybe. But not damage just because of the location. So I have to ask the question, has this ever happened?

 

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.”

(my 2¢) My school of thought is I would rather repair stanchion damage due to a freak wave (if this is possible) than to file an insurance claim because the back end of my boat blow up from gasoline fumes. In my lazarette there are several items that could spark highly explosive gas fumes such as a short in the SSB antenna tuner, outlets or power supplies. Plastic gas cans are not immune to leakage and the threat of a leak can be amplified by abrasion during passages. Gasoline fumes are highly explosive (and heavier than air) and should never be stored in an area not adequately vented.

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Leslie
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:42 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

 

1. 10 litre 
2. External outboard motor tank
3. Lazarette - the tank doesn't leak
4. No and I wouldn't do that

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Gears of bow thruster worn out after 12 times of use, two questions

 

If your bow thruster needs shims, it is the first time I have heard of this issue.

How much oil was in the bow thruster when the overhaul was done and the bow thruster reinstalled?

What type of oil did you use?

How much oil and/or water was in the bow thruster when you discovered the gears worn this time?

Do you know if the horizontal shaft is original? Is it worn? Did you replace it when the gears were replaced?

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Mon, Jun 17, 2019 at 2:11 AM Willem Kroes <kavanga@...> wrote:
Dear Amelians,

After installing a new kit with gears and bearings from Amel last October and after using the bow thruster not more than 12 times the gears are worn out like in October.

The diagnosis of the mechanic with some experience with Amel boats is that there was too much play between the vertical and horizontal gears and that spacers or shims are needed add to the bearings in order to set the gear wheels in a proper fixed position.

First question: is Amel selling a set of shims with different thickness (0.10 to 0.50 mm)?

Second question: What is your opinion about what the mechanic told me?

Best regards,

Willem Kroes

SM#351  KAVANGA

Now at anchor near the Aktio marina close to Preveza in Greece 


Re: Petrol questions/survey

amelforme
 

Another 2 cents…

If you can smell the aroma of gasoline, it is explosive.

As Mark said, the SSB tuner is NOT a spark or arc proof unit and it says so on the installation instructions. It is not unusual for them to make sparks capable of ignition of gasoline vapors. Gasoline vapor is much heavier than atmosphere and difficult to displace. The Amel 54 has special lockers on the port side for all flammables on board including gasoline as was a major request from SM 53 owners we asked/heard from.

I have resold two SM 53 where the furthest aft bulkhead in the owners cabin was displaced forward when the SSB tuner ignited gasoline vapors. This bulkhead is the weak link in an overpressure situation of the aft deck locker. In is not an inexpensive repair to do correctly.

Gasoline containers secured on the aft deck are less likely to get swept and cause damage to the stanchions, as they are generally travelling away from the boarding wave which diminishes the initial ‘pop’ of the wave strike. Containers on the foredeck area have the force of the wave strike increased by the speed that the boat is travelling increasing the initial pop which is the part of the wave action that does the most damage. I have seen stanchions that were twisted from this. Most damage to the life line tubes is caused by large people sitting on the middle of the span. I have spent a lot of time straightening bent stanchions and lifelines in preparing an otherwise nice listing for sale, it is tedious and not much fun.

 

Have fun with your Amel, Joel

 

          JOEL F. POTTER-CRUISING YACHT SPECIALIST~L.L.C.

                                           THE  EXPERIENCED AMEL GUY

UNSURPASSED AMEL MARKETING EXPERIENCE AND PRODUCT KNOWLEDGE

                                   Office 954-462-5869  Cell 954-812-2485

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Patrick McAneny via Groups.Io
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 8:44 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

 

Mark, I also agree with you, I sometimes see some small amount of leakage of gas from tanks due to heat and expansion and would never store gas below for the reason you stated . I store my tanks far aft ,where they are less prone to be impacted by waves. 

Pat

SM #123

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jun 17, 2019 7:53 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

I often see world cruisers with cans lashed to stanchions. It seems many of the boats on which I observe this have a set up not as solid as Amel. I have never once heard of a large wave causing damage due to cans lashed. Improperly lashed, maybe. But not damage just because of the location. So I have to ask the question, has this ever happened?

 

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.”

(my 2¢) My school of thought is I would rather repair stanchion damage due to a freak wave (if this is possible) than to file an insurance claim because the back end of my boat blow up from gasoline fumes. In my lazarette there are several items that could spark highly explosive gas fumes such as a short in the SSB antenna tuner, outlets or power supplies. Plastic gas cans are not immune to leakage and the threat of a leak can be amplified by abrasion during passages. Gasoline fumes are highly explosive (and heavier than air) and should never be stored in an area not adequately vented.

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Leslie
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:42 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

 

1. 10 litre 
2. External outboard motor tank
3. Lazarette - the tank doesn't leak
4. No and I wouldn't do that

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Petrol questions/survey

Chuck_Kim_Joy
 

Thanks to all for your time in replying. The rear small cockpit lockers are vented or at least a drain hole in the bottom. Port side cockpit locker will fit my 6 gal yamaha tank that came with the dinghy. These are great quality tanks. It fits perfectly there. Is that sufficient ventilation?

On Mon, Jun 17, 2019 at 1:42 AM Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:
1. 10 litre 
2. External outboard motor tank
3. Lazarette - the tank doesn't leak
4. No and I wouldn't do that

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: supplemental downwind sailing configuration for Super Maramu

James Cromie
 

It helps tremendously Joerg.  Sounds like I need both!
-James

On Jun 17, 2019, at 2:37 AM, Joerg Esdorn via Groups.Io <jhe1313@...> wrote:

James, my Code Zero is 100 m2 and the cloth is relatively light so it be used only up to 14 knots of apparent wind.  I chose the code zero because it is I am able to use it closer to the wind than a standard asym and I have a Parasailor as well for downwind work.  In light air, the apparent wind angle moves forward dramatically when the boat gets going.  So if I want to sail at a true wind angle of 90 because my course over the ground is in that direction, the apparent wind angle could be something like 60 degrees.  I also use the Code 0 in light running conditions because the Parasailor is no good in less than 7 Knots (and because the Code zero is much easier to set up than the Parasailor.  It really depends on how you would use the spinnaker.  I tend to sail rather than motor even in the very light stuff if I can get a sail to draw without banging.  If you always motor in below, say, 8 knots of true wind, just get a AP asym or a parasailor.  The Genoa will be fine in those conditions for reaching.  I hope that helps.   


Re: Petrol questions/survey

Patrick McAneny
 

Mark, I also agree with you, I sometimes see some small amount of leakage of gas from tanks due to heat and expansion and would never store gas below for the reason you stated . I store my tanks far aft ,where they are less prone to be impacted by waves. 
Pat
SM #123


-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Erdos <mcerdos@...>
To: main <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Sent: Mon, Jun 17, 2019 7:53 am
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

I often see world cruisers with cans lashed to stanchions. It seems many of the boats on which I observe this have a set up not as solid as Amel. I have never once heard of a large wave causing damage due to cans lashed. Improperly lashed, maybe. But not damage just because of the location. So I have to ask the question, has this ever happened?
 
We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.”

(my 2¢) My school of thought is I would rather repair stanchion damage due to a freak wave (if this is possible) than to file an insurance claim because the back end of my boat blow up from gasoline fumes. In my lazarette there are several items that could spark highly explosive gas fumes such as a short in the SSB antenna tuner, outlets or power supplies. Plastic gas cans are not immune to leakage and the threat of a leak can be amplified by abrasion during passages. Gasoline fumes are highly explosive (and heavier than air) and should never be stored in an area not adequately vented.
 
With best regards,
 
Mark
 
Skipper
Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275
Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama
www.creampuff.us
 
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Leslie
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:42 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey
 
1. 10 litre 
2. External outboard motor tank
3. Lazarette - the tank doesn't leak
4. No and I wouldn't do that

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Sailing /Rowing dinghy

Patrick McAneny
 

Bill, I agree with you, we have not needed to use our dinghy to propel us yet,but review how we would do that,in case we need to deploy in an emergency. I also have rescued a sailboat just before it was going up on a reef on the south coast of Grenada with my rib and its 18 hp two stroke. We also dinghy miles to snorkel and get groceries . Our 10.5 aluminum rib only weighs 98 lbs. ,we love it and it can do 25 to 30 mph in flat water ,just measured by my brother next to me on his jet ski the other day. BTW, we store two six gal. fuel tanks tied to the stanchions ,one is normally in the dinghy.
Pat
SM Shenanigans


-----Original Message-----
From: CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>
To: main <main@amelyachtowners.groups.io>
Sent: Sun, Jun 16, 2019 12:16 pm
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Sailing /Rowing dinghy

One downside is that what you have will not propel your boat to safety when necessary. If you have considered this and are OK with it, fine. But, if you haven't considered this, you need to re-think. You are going to places that you will need to self-rescue, and/or move your boat when you have no wind and no motor. It is hard to beat all of the advantages of a traditional RIB with a 10-20hp 2 cycle motor. I know of 2 SMs which were moved away from dangerous situations with a dinghy lashed to the stern quarter.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Sun, Jun 16, 2019 at 10:48 AM karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all,
Last year we built a 11.5 ft sailing/rowing dinghy in hopes that it would work as a tender instead of carrying gasoline and gasoline motor(s).  RIBs are nearly impossible to row, can’t sail them, but they are very stable and carry 4 people easily.

The Dink we built is a Chesapeake Light Craft PassageMaker design that was originally sold as a nesting hull.  It’s 11.5 ft LOA , rows easily, and sails well.  When both parts are bolted together it only weighs ~95 lbs.  Sounds great so far, eh?

Here are the down sides:
*It doesn’t truly nest.  So we’re now storing 11.5ft of hull in two parts.  The bigger aft part sets nicely on the aft deck,  we weren’t comfortable lashing the bow section on the forward deck, so it ended up on the aft deck over the lazarette...so we can’t access the lazarette at sea without moving it.

*It is so lightly built that it bounces around pretty violently when alongside Kristy in any kind of chop.  It is also under built and we had to add strength to the bulkheads where the pieces bolt together because of cracks that developed at the joint between planks and bulkheads.

*The rig is a gunter style Marconi sloop with a small jib.  It takes about 45 min to rig and derig.  It sails well but can’t be reefed as currently set up.  With the gunter spar it would take a major overhaul to rig for reefing and it would be an involved process, not something that would be easy and quick. When rigged and not sailing the boom is in the way of rowing.  

*It will carry 4 adults, but doing that and sailing would be impossible, I think.

We bought a Torqeedo electric outboard which pushes her along adequately, but it isn’t built tough enough for daily use in salt water.

i guess we will have to go back to the RIB and gas outboard.  Hoping someone out there has experience with a great nesting dinghy that’s truly built for use as a cruising tender.  There are a couple others that look better than the CLC PassageMaker but probably have many of the same issues.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243


Re: Petrol questions/survey

Mark Erdos
 

I often see world cruisers with cans lashed to stanchions. It seems many of the boats on which I observe this have a set up not as solid as Amel. I have never once heard of a large wave causing damage due to cans lashed. Improperly lashed, maybe. But not damage just because of the location. So I have to ask the question, has this ever happened?

 

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.”

(my 2¢) My school of thought is I would rather repair stanchion damage due to a freak wave (if this is possible) than to file an insurance claim because the back end of my boat blow up from gasoline fumes. In my lazarette there are several items that could spark highly explosive gas fumes such as a short in the SSB antenna tuner, outlets or power supplies. Plastic gas cans are not immune to leakage and the threat of a leak can be amplified by abrasion during passages. Gasoline fumes are highly explosive (and heavier than air) and should never be stored in an area not adequately vented.

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Alan Leslie
Sent: Monday, June 17, 2019 1:42 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

 

1. 10 litre 
2. External outboard motor tank
3. Lazarette - the tank doesn't leak
4. No and I wouldn't do that

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Furuno Weather Fax

karkauai
 

Mine has never worked.  I use Iridium and have an old iridium phone as backup.  But...before we cross the Pacific I’m going to get the SSB and Weatherfax working and learn how to use it in case the Iridium fails.

Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243

On Jun 17, 2019, at 1:35 AM, Alan Leslie <s.v.elyse@...> wrote:

Used it once just to see how it worked. Never used it again, de-installed it and put in a cupboard !
We use the fax decoder that comes with the Airmail client for Sailmail on a laptop connected to the SSB. It works very well.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Gears of bow thruster worn out after 12 times of use, two questions

Willem Kroes
 

Dear Amelians,

After installing a new kit with gears and bearings from Amel last October and after using the bow thruster not more than 12 times the gears are worn out like in October.

The diagnosis of the mechanic with some experience with Amel boats is that there was too much play between the vertical and horizontal gears and that spacers or shims are needed add to the bearings in order to set the gear wheels in a proper fixed position.

First question: is Amel selling a set of shims with different thickness (0.10 to 0.50 mm)?

Second question: What is your opinion about what the mechanic told me?

Best regards,

Willem Kroes

SM#351  KAVANGA

Now at anchor near the Aktio marina close to Preveza in Greece 


Re: supplemental downwind sailing configuration for Super Maramu

Joerg Esdorn
 

James, my Code Zero is 100 m2 and the cloth is relatively light so it be used only up to 14 knots of apparent wind.  I chose the code zero because it is I am able to use it closer to the wind than a standard asym and I have a Parasailor as well for downwind work.  In light air, the apparent wind angle moves forward dramatically when the boat gets going.  So if I want to sail at a true wind angle of 90 because my course over the ground is in that direction, the apparent wind angle could be something like 60 degrees.  I also use the Code 0 in light running conditions because the Parasailor is no good in less than 7 Knots (and because the Code zero is much easier to set up than the Parasailor.  It really depends on how you would use the spinnaker.  I tend to sail rather than motor even in the very light stuff if I can get a sail to draw without banging.  If you always motor in below, say, 8 knots of true wind, just get a AP asym or a parasailor.  The Genoa will be fine in those conditions for reaching.  I hope that helps.   


Re: Petrol questions/survey

Alan Leslie
 

1. 10 litre 
2. External outboard motor tank
3. Lazarette - the tank doesn't leak
4. No and I wouldn't do that

We NEVER have anything lashed to the stanchions.
One decent wave and it would be gone and damage the stanchions.

Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Furuno Weather Fax

Alan Leslie
 

Used it once just to see how it worked. Never used it again, de-installed it and put in a cupboard !
We use the fax decoder that comes with the Airmail client for Sailmail on a laptop connected to the SSB. It works very well.
Cheers
Alan
Elyse SM437


Re: Furuno Weather Fax

Craig Briggs
 

James,   
They make OK dinghy anchors.
Then again, they are kind of bullet proof as legacy technology should you not have newer replacements and DIY weather forecasting is kind of cool if you're into that.
This is why they make chocolate and vanilla. 
Craig


Furuno Weather Fax

James Cromie
 

Hello everyone - 

I'd like to ask of those on the forum who uses their Weatherfax units?  I don't even know to use the one on my boat.  It seems to me that it may be a legacy item and no longer serves much use because of newer and less bulky technology.

I'd like to know how many of you use this!

Thanks!
James
Soteria SM347.  Le Marin


Re: Petrol questions/survey

Alexandre Uster von Baar
 

On Nikimat (since you are new on the forum, will add lost during Hurricane Irma), I always store the gasoline “on” the deck (secure to the stanchions) never in the below storages (because of the gravity of the gasoline fume which would stay below and would risk to explode without using a blower).
Personally (but keep in mind I tend to overkill anything due to my little experience) I had 2 x 24 liter (almost 6 gallon) and 1 x 16 liter 2 cycle outboard tanks for my 15 hp 2 cycle Yamaha (I am sure this is more fuel than most other).
Just like Mark did, I also made Sunbrella cover for my 3 petrol tanks to protect from the sun.
Sincerely, Alexandre



--------------------------------------------

On Sun, 6/16/19, Mark Erdos <mcerdos@gmail.com> wrote:

Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Date: Sunday, June 16, 2019, 12:55 PM


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#1 – We have three
5-gallon containers in addition to the 6
gallon container in the dinghy. This has proven to be ample
supply even in the
most remote areas.

#2 – Gas cans
are lashed on the starboard rail just aft of the forward
sail locker forward of
the pole. I made canvas covers since the cans are not UV
protected

#3 – In plastic
gas cans

#4 – I wouldn’t
dare drill extra holes in the hull. Not even a minor
consideration.

 

 

 

With best
regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel
- Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently
cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

www.creampuff.us


 



From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
[mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of
Chuck_Kim_Joy

Sent: Sunday, June 16, 2019 9:38 AM

To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io

Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol
questions/survey



 

Greetings All,

When I purchased my boat there were petrol/gasoline jugs in
the life boat
locker (life boat is on the stern). I thought this was
normal protocol and
stayed with it until now. After some reading and discussion
I now realize this
is not the safest way to store petrol. I have a 3gal in the
dinghy and a 6gal
stored to refill. I must say that a season in the Caribbean
I saw many many
Amels. Few had any fuel lashed to the stanchions. Would it
be okay to store
petrol in locker while on passage then crack the lid, prop
it up a bit and let
it vent while at anchor or get it out of there pronto! Now
the survey.



1. How much petrol do you store

2. Where do you store it

3. How do you store it

4. Has anyone made a capped vent hole in lifeboat locker
similar to propane
locker



Best Regards and thanks for your time.

Chuck

Joy #388

In Grenada W.I (what a season)!


Re: Petrol questions/survey

Mark Erdos
 

#1 – We have three 5-gallon containers in addition to the 6 gallon container in the dinghy. This has proven to be ample supply even in the most remote areas.

#2 – Gas cans are lashed on the starboard rail just aft of the forward sail locker forward of the pole. I made canvas covers since the cans are not UV protected

#3 – In plastic gas cans

#4 – I wouldn’t dare drill extra holes in the hull. Not even a minor consideration.

 

 

 

With best regards,

 

Mark

 

Skipper

Sailing Vessel - Cream Puff - SM2K - #275

Currently cruising - Vista Mar, Panama

www.creampuff.us

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io [mailto:main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io] On Behalf Of Chuck_Kim_Joy
Sent: Sunday, June 16, 2019 9:38 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey

 

Greetings All,
When I purchased my boat there were petrol/gasoline jugs in the life boat locker (life boat is on the stern). I thought this was normal protocol and stayed with it until now. After some reading and discussion I now realize this is not the safest way to store petrol. I have a 3gal in the dinghy and a 6gal stored to refill. I must say that a season in the Caribbean I saw many many Amels. Few had any fuel lashed to the stanchions. Would it be okay to store petrol in locker while on passage then crack the lid, prop it up a bit and let it vent while at anchor or get it out of there pronto! Now the survey.

1. How much petrol do you store
2. Where do you store it
3. How do you store it
4. Has anyone made a capped vent hole in lifeboat locker similar to propane locker

Best Regards and thanks for your time.
Chuck
Joy #388
In Grenada W.I (what a season)!


Re: Petrol questions/survey

Alan Grayson
 

I have  6gal for the dinghy and 5gal for refill. When at anchor the 6 gal is stored in the dinghy and the 5 gal is tied to lifelines. When underway the dinghy is lashed to the aft cabin top and the cans are lashed under the dinghy. I lash the cans to the transom of the dinghy before totally lowering the dinghy. I also remove the plug of the dinghy to allow any vapors to escape.
Alan Grayson
SV Ora Pai SM 406
Washington DC
From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Chuck_Kim_Joy <clacey9@...>
Sent: Sunday, 16 June 2019 1:38:28 PM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Petrol questions/survey
 
Greetings All,
When I purchased my boat there were petrol/gasoline jugs in the life boat locker (life boat is on the stern). I thought this was normal protocol and stayed with it until now. After some reading and discussion I now realize this is not the safest way to store petrol. I have a 3gal in the dinghy and a 6gal stored to refill. I must say that a season in the Caribbean I saw many many Amels. Few had any fuel lashed to the stanchions. Would it be okay to store petrol in locker while on passage then crack the lid, prop it up a bit and let it vent while at anchor or get it out of there pronto! Now the survey.

1. How much petrol do you store
2. Where do you store it
3. How do you store it
4. Has anyone made a capped vent hole in lifeboat locker similar to propane locker

Best Regards and thanks for your time.
Chuck
Joy #388
In Grenada W.I (what a season)!


Re: Sailing /Rowing dinghy

ngtnewington Newington
 

I have a Caribe rib with 15hp, actually I have two 15’s and one 5. I want to sell one of the 15’s as that is crazy. So anyone interested let me know.
I have to say that over the years I have had a number of tenders. On my first boat it was a very solid GRP rowing dinghy. I was young and very strong then and would think nothing of rowing a mile each way. However since those days when I cruised on a shoestring I have a different horizon and expectations. 
I worked commercially running quite big vessels mostly with ribs and 25 hp Yamaha outboards. These boats are incredible work horses.

On an Amel  I would consider a solid rib with a 15 hp two stroke to be a formidable tool that can cope with quite a bit of weather and may well save your boat or your life and if you venture far it will pay for itself over and over. It is the family station wagon, it is the four wheel drive Landrover, the pick up truck. 
Do not skimp on a good dinghy if you go adventuring.

Nick

Amelia AML54-019 anchored off Corfu town


On 16 Jun 2019, at 19:16, CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...> wrote:

One downside is that what you have will not propel your boat to safety when necessary. If you have considered this and are OK with it, fine. But, if you haven't considered this, you need to re-think. You are going to places that you will need to self-rescue, and/or move your boat when you have no wind and no motor. It is hard to beat all of the advantages of a traditional RIB with a 10-20hp 2 cycle motor. I know of 2 SMs which were moved away from dangerous situations with a dinghy lashed to the stern quarter.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Sun, Jun 16, 2019 at 10:48 AM karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi all,
Last year we built a 11.5 ft sailing/rowing dinghy in hopes that it would work as a tender instead of carrying gasoline and gasoline motor(s).  RIBs are nearly impossible to row, can’t sail them, but they are very stable and carry 4 people easily.

The Dink we built is a Chesapeake Light Craft PassageMaker design that was originally sold as a nesting hull.  It’s 11.5 ft LOA , rows easily, and sails well.  When both parts are bolted together it only weighs ~95 lbs.  Sounds great so far, eh?

Here are the down sides:
*It doesn’t truly nest.  So we’re now storing 11.5ft of hull in two parts.  The bigger aft part sets nicely on the aft deck,  we weren’t comfortable lashing the bow section on the forward deck, so it ended up on the aft deck over the lazarette...so we can’t access the lazarette at sea without moving it.

*It is so lightly built that it bounces around pretty violently when alongside Kristy in any kind of chop.  It is also under built and we had to add strength to the bulkheads where the pieces bolt together because of cracks that developed at the joint between planks and bulkheads.

*The rig is a gunter style Marconi sloop with a small jib.  It takes about 45 min to rig and derig.  It sails well but can’t be reefed as currently set up.  With the gunter spar it would take a major overhaul to rig for reefing and it would be an involved process, not something that would be easy and quick. When rigged and not sailing the boom is in the way of rowing.  

*It will carry 4 adults, but doing that and sailing would be impossible, I think.

We bought a Torqeedo electric outboard which pushes her along adequately, but it isn’t built tough enough for daily use in salt water.

i guess we will have to go back to the RIB and gas outboard.  Hoping someone out there has experience with a great nesting dinghy that’s truly built for use as a cruising tender.  There are a couple others that look better than the CLC PassageMaker but probably have many of the same issues.

Any thoughts greatly appreciated.

Kent & Iris
Kristy
SM 243

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