Date   

Re: Always check your contractors' work

Chuck_Kim_Joy
 

Greetings All. 
Ken speaks the truth. We have engaged the 6.3 ft guy who rides his bike briskly up and down the dock but whose name escapes me. Our thermostat in the main salon quit working. He told me the company that makes the analog units was out of business and only digital thermostats were available. Here's the rub. Our units age made it incompatible with the new thermostat so a whole new unit was required. BS. Coastal climate out of Annapolis to the rescue again. Plenty of analog thermos. Still making them and that was the fix. 

Chuck 
Joy #388
Summer in SLC Utah Beeeutiful!

On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 6:04 PM Ken Powers SV Aquarius <ken@...> wrote:
Not all Caraibe's are the same.  I had my standing rigging replaced by
Caraibe, and I still think that they did a very good job.  But, the
Caraibe Refrigeration guys were idiots.  They told me that my aft
Climma Air-conditioning Unit "Had to be REPLACED!!".  I told them that
it was the Switch, not the unit.  The owner of Caraibe Refrigeration
got so upset he started screaming, and this guy is a 6' 3"..  In his
rage he sad, IF YOU DON'T WANT TO PAY, GO BACK TO YOUR BOAT".  Yes,
this was all in French, and I don't speak French.... But JP, the
previous owner of Aquarius was with me for translation, and JP looked
at me and told me what he said...  So, we just turned and walked away
from him..  And I never paid the bill for them to recharge the two
forward aircon units.  O' and I did have the switch replaced later,
and the Climma aircon can still freeze the aft cabin.

I think we all NEED to tell the other owners who did a good job, and
who didn't.  Name names, if workers do a good job, or bad!  We all
need to know.  If there is an owner that had a good experience with
Caraibe Refrigeration, they can speak for themselves.  But if you told
me that ...  "O, the Caraibe guys replaced my old Climma unit and the
new Unit is working great,"  I would say "you just got ripped off, and
your old Climma unit is probably installed in another boat working
just fine!"

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia


On 8/20/19, Scott SV Tengah <sv.tengah@...> wrote:
> Kent,
>
> I know it's Martinique, but I have had good experience with Caraibe Marine
> in Le Marin. They generally know Amels quite well. I had them redo my
> standing rigging and while all was not perfect, they fixed the problems
> without so much as a complaint. They really take pride in their work. I
> still had to double check everything but found far fewer problems than with
> other contractors.
>
> They do almost everything through their different "divisions" and while
> there's an argument that a monopoly is not good, having everything under the
> Caraibe umbrella means they can't point fingers at other contractors when
> something goes wrong.
>
> They have a decent relationship with and are very close to the Amel office
> down there. The Amel guys are very busy and don't do everything, but will
> gladly give technical advice to Caraibe Marine. The Amel guys aren't perfect
> at English so it's good that everyone is French. :)
>
> Let's just say I am literally sailing all the way back to Martinique for a
> few more items before heading through the Canal.
> --
> Scott
> 2007 A54 #69
> SV Tengah
> http://www.svtengah.com
>
>
>
>




Re: Forward Looking Sonar

Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

I think the EchoPilot 2D is AWESOME. Great performance for a
reasonable price. Yes, You can say, "O in a particular situation it
didn't work for me, so for that reason I'm going to wait til the price
to come down on the next best thing.... BUT, that's like saying "I
aint going to buy a VHF radio until I can get one for a dollar that
has a range of 50 miles." If you're leaving on a circumnavigation
now, in my opinion, you need a forward looking sonar on your boat...
And, if I would own an insurance company, I wouldn't insure a boat
sailing without a forward looking sonar. Yes, 3D would be better,
but 2 D can save your boat... AND YES EchoPilot 2D did help Aquarius
from hitting the reef in French Poly.

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia

On 8/20/19, karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
I had the EchoPilot 2-D on my boat when purchased 10 years ago. I found it
of little use because it only sees a little over a boat length ahead when
you really need it in water less than 4M deep. In muddy water if you are
looking for a channel, it only sees directly in front of the boat. You have
to turn the boat in hopes if identifying deeper water. I was rarely
successful, and was as likely to stumble on the channel as find it with the
sonar.
The transducer has since failed. I’m waiting until the 3D units get better
and cheaper before I replace it.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SN243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 11:34 AM, Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
<oliver.henrichsen@...> wrote:

Hi Scott,

To place the charger in the engineroom has some downsides:
- hunidity
- heat
- limited space so probably the charger is mounted sideways what lowers
airflow.
- long wires

I customized widened the switch area and drilled ventilation holes to the
alley.
I install 120mm thermocontrolled fans with heat alarms to blow fresh air
into the cabinet.

The 120A5000W fits vertical.

The lifepo is smaller than batteries before with same capacity so i could
install a new separation.

The starter batt is now behind the onan in the engine room.

No more dirty lead in the cabin. Hydrogen Should not be an issue as most
other yachts place the starter batt around the engine room.

Oliver from Vela Nautica

A54#39

Portugal

Sent from my Huawei Mobile


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel is going lithium
From: Scott SV Tengah
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
CC:


I guess this is a reminder that I still owe the group my writeup. :)

Oliver, how do you vent the compartment where you've installed the Victron
24/5000/120 inverter/charger? I mounted mine in the engine compartment
(connected with the recommended 2x pair of 50mm2 wires - not 95mm2 as I
previously mentioned) in the same location as the old Dolphin 100amp
charger, with the same ventilation from outside as the original Amel setup.


Even then, the charger/inverter gets damn hot especially when we are cooking
and the induction, microwave and boiler are drawing tons of current. Or when
it's charging at the full 120 amps.

Part of the reason I ask is that the electricians installed the Victron
150/35 MPPT in the same compartment where you installed your
charger/inverter (where the main battery switches are) and I'm getting very
high temperatures in that closed compartment after a full day's charging. If
you've figured out a good cooling solution, I'd rather implement that than
try to move my MPPT!

I was considering adding a little timer controlled 24v fan on the vent in
the battery compartment and connecting the two compartments, but haven't for
two reasons: (1) Amel kept the two compartments isolated. I am loathe to
violate that as they probably did that for a reason (2) The fan is just
another part to fail and I have enough things to keep up with already!


--
Scott
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com




Re: Always check your contractors' work

Ken Powers SV Aquarius
 

Not all Caraibe's are the same. I had my standing rigging replaced by
Caraibe, and I still think that they did a very good job. But, the
Caraibe Refrigeration guys were idiots. They told me that my aft
Climma Air-conditioning Unit "Had to be REPLACED!!". I told them that
it was the Switch, not the unit. The owner of Caraibe Refrigeration
got so upset he started screaming, and this guy is a 6' 3".. In his
rage he sad, IF YOU DON'T WANT TO PAY, GO BACK TO YOUR BOAT". Yes,
this was all in French, and I don't speak French.... But JP, the
previous owner of Aquarius was with me for translation, and JP looked
at me and told me what he said... So, we just turned and walked away
from him.. And I never paid the bill for them to recharge the two
forward aircon units. O' and I did have the switch replaced later,
and the Climma aircon can still freeze the aft cabin.

I think we all NEED to tell the other owners who did a good job, and
who didn't. Name names, if workers do a good job, or bad! We all
need to know. If there is an owner that had a good experience with
Caraibe Refrigeration, they can speak for themselves. But if you told
me that ... "O, the Caraibe guys replaced my old Climma unit and the
new Unit is working great," I would say "you just got ripped off, and
your old Climma unit is probably installed in another boat working
just fine!"

Ken Powers
Aquarius
Currently in Indonesia

On 8/20/19, Scott SV Tengah <sv.tengah@...> wrote:
Kent,

I know it's Martinique, but I have had good experience with Caraibe Marine
in Le Marin. They generally know Amels quite well. I had them redo my
standing rigging and while all was not perfect, they fixed the problems
without so much as a complaint. They really take pride in their work. I
still had to double check everything but found far fewer problems than with
other contractors.

They do almost everything through their different "divisions" and while
there's an argument that a monopoly is not good, having everything under the
Caraibe umbrella means they can't point fingers at other contractors when
something goes wrong.

They have a decent relationship with and are very close to the Amel office
down there. The Amel guys are very busy and don't do everything, but will
gladly give technical advice to Caraibe Marine. The Amel guys aren't perfect
at English so it's good that everyone is French. :)

Let's just say I am literally sailing all the way back to Martinique for a
few more items before heading through the Canal.
--
Scott
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com




Amel Mango Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Charles Bell
 

Can anyone tell me the correct location to store the Emergency tiller and rudder post extension on an Amel Mango?

The storage locations for all the other specialty parts on the boat make sense... but I cannot seem to find where the emergency tiller (180cm+ long) should be stored. When I took possession of my boat the emergency tiller was loose in the port cockpit lazarette. I just can't bring myself to think this is how the factory intended it to be stored.

I have read the posts regarding emergency tiller storage on the SM's. The emergency tiller arm on is too long to fit in the cabinets behind the pilot berth. The only location I have not eliminated is the bilge directly in front of the salon settee.

Did I miss something? Does anyone remember the factory storage location for the emergency tiller and supporting hardware?

Thank you,

Charles
SV Saturn
Amel Mango


Amel Mango Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Charles Bell
 

Can anyone tell me the correct location to store the Emergency tiller and rudder post extension on an Amel Mango?

The storage locations for all the other specialty parts on the boat make sense... but I cannot seem to find where the emergency tiller (180cm+ long) should be stored. When I took possession of my boat the emergency tiller was loose in the port cockpit lazarette. I just can't bring myself to think this is how the factory intended it to be stored.

I have read the posts regarding emergency tiller storage on the SM's. The emergency tiller arm on is too long to fit in the cabinets behind the pilot berth. The only location I have not eliminated is the bilge directly in front of the salon settee.

Did I miss something? Does anyone remember the factory storage location for the emergency tiller and supporting hardware?

Thank you,

Charles
SV Saturn
Amel Mango


Re: Always check your contractors' work

 

Scott,

All of the chargers on your Amel 54 are connected to the battery side of the Main Switch by Amel. It stands to reason that the output of the MPPT would also connect the the battery side of the Main Switch. BTW, it is important to connect the Negative output of the MPPT at least several feet from the shunt, otherwise the battery monitor readings are distorted. Regrettably, I have seen MPPT output connected to a single pair of batteries, but I have never seen anyone wire to a single battery as you stated...did you mean a single pair?

For some reason, unknown to me, the 110 amp 24 volt alternator is connected to the house side of the Main Switch. I really wish someone could tell me why.

It is a huge problem when workers respond with I have been "doing this for years" because regrettably they have years of experience doing it the wrong way and will never change.

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970



On Tue, Aug 20, 2019 at 3:25 PM karkauai via Groups.Io <karkauai=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
 Hmmm, I still don’t quite follow your explanation, Scott.
  If you have big enough cables from the batteries to the main 24V posts (ie no resistance at high amps), connecting at the post or the battery shouldn’t make any difference.  If they connected to one of the batteries in a series pair that is NOT connected to the main 24v post,  then the charge would almost certainly go to that battery preferentially.  If the cables are not big enough to give zero resistance, the charge would go preferentially to the closest battery.

If you mean that the + output cable from the MPPPs should be on the boat (load) side of the main battery switch, you would have to leave the switch “on” (“Marche”) to charge the batteries.  On Kristy with Victron Skylla-i Charger and wet cell lead acid batteries the output is to the + and - posts where all for pairs of batteries are connected in parallel.  The 3 MPPPs for the three pairs of solar panels are likewise connected to the same posts.  I can turn off the battery switch and still let the solar panels charge when I’m away from the boat.  The output can be monitored on remote panels, or by using the Bluetooth dongle on the MPPPs, but cannot be monitored with the primary 24V monitor which is on the boat side of the switch.  It’s not ideal because the four pairs are not completely balance-charged, but correcting that seems a lot more complicated.  So far this is working well for me.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 2:42 PM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I learned this through monitoring my batteries. 

The electrician connected the positive lead from the MPPT to the positive post of ONE of the batteries. His thought was that it would be like a bunch of interconnected cups. Once this first battery one got some charge, it would overflow the current into the next battery and so forth. I am no electrician so it sort of made sense at the time.

Well, monitoring showed me that this does not actually occur. The Battery1 that was directly connected to the MPPT was always higher voltage than the rest. The further away from the MPPT-Battery1 connection, the lower the voltage. The entire bank was being actively imbalanced!

Now I have the positive attached to the post where all the battery positives join. The batteries have remained balanced over the past year.

I can't remember where I read it, but a marine electrician stated that "in case it wasn't obvious, you connect the MPPT output to the load." I don't quite have it perfect as it's where all the batteries join, but I'm going to relocate the MPPT anyways, so I'll connect it to the load then.

Sorry, if my explanation isn't precise enough as I never studied engineering. Just lots of reading, lots of testing and lots of monitoring.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Always check your contractors' work

karkauai
 

 Hmmm, I still don’t quite follow your explanation, Scott.
  If you have big enough cables from the batteries to the main 24V posts (ie no resistance at high amps), connecting at the post or the battery shouldn’t make any difference.  If they connected to one of the batteries in a series pair that is NOT connected to the main 24v post,  then the charge would almost certainly go to that battery preferentially.  If the cables are not big enough to give zero resistance, the charge would go preferentially to the closest battery.

If you mean that the + output cable from the MPPPs should be on the boat (load) side of the main battery switch, you would have to leave the switch “on” (“Marche”) to charge the batteries.  On Kristy with Victron Skylla-i Charger and wet cell lead acid batteries the output is to the + and - posts where all for pairs of batteries are connected in parallel.  The 3 MPPPs for the three pairs of solar panels are likewise connected to the same posts.  I can turn off the battery switch and still let the solar panels charge when I’m away from the boat.  The output can be monitored on remote panels, or by using the Bluetooth dongle on the MPPPs, but cannot be monitored with the primary 24V monitor which is on the boat side of the switch.  It’s not ideal because the four pairs are not completely balance-charged, but correcting that seems a lot more complicated.  So far this is working well for me.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SM 243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 2:42 PM, Scott SV Tengah <Scott.nguyen@...> wrote:

[Edited Message Follows]

I learned this through monitoring my batteries. 

The electrician connected the positive lead from the MPPT to the positive post of ONE of the batteries. His thought was that it would be like a bunch of interconnected cups. Once this first battery one got some charge, it would overflow the current into the next battery and so forth. I am no electrician so it sort of made sense at the time.

Well, monitoring showed me that this does not actually occur. The Battery1 that was directly connected to the MPPT was always higher voltage than the rest. The further away from the MPPT-Battery1 connection, the lower the voltage. The entire bank was being actively imbalanced!

Now I have the positive attached to the post where all the battery positives join. The batteries have remained balanced over the past year.

I can't remember where I read it, but a marine electrician stated that "in case it wasn't obvious, you connect the MPPT output to the load." I don't quite have it perfect as it's where all the batteries join, but I'm going to relocate the MPPT anyways, so I'll connect it to the load then.

Sorry, if my explanation isn't precise enough as I never studied engineering. Just lots of reading, lots of testing and lots of monitoring.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: 100M of 10mm rated stainless steel anchor ‘AMEL’

jlm@jlmertz.fr
 

Hello Paul

Can you contact me 33 (0)663 393 174

Merci

JLMERTZ

on CottonBay


Le 20/08/2019 à 18:54, Paul Brown a écrit :
hello all,

I am up grading my chain to a higher strength rating for storm anchoring and have 100M of Rated stainless steel 10mm chain, which was supplied with the delivery of my A55#17 when she was launched early 2013. The chain is in excellent condition from my inspection and has not been extensively used as we have sail perhaps no more than 3000NM

if you would like to make an offer please contact me by email feeder.brown@...

We are sailing south of France to Sicily till October 


or reply to this thread 

regards Paul Fortuna II 55#17



Avast logo

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www.avast.com



Rocna 40 kg for sale, Euro 500

Joerg Esdorn
 

New is 1200 plus, never used, kept as a spare since new in 2016.  Located in Almerimar, Costa del Sol, until August 26.  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 Kincsem


Re: Always check your contractors' work

Scott SV Tengah
 
Edited

I learned this through monitoring my batteries. 

The electrician connected the positive lead from the MPPT to the positive post of ONE of the batteries. His thought was that it would be like a bunch of interconnected cups. Once this first battery one got some charge, it would overflow the current into the next battery and so forth. I am no electrician so it sort of made sense at the time.

Well, monitoring showed me that this does not actually occur. The Battery1 that was directly connected to the MPPT was always higher voltage than the rest. The further away from the MPPT-Battery1 connection, the lower the voltage. The entire bank was being actively imbalanced!

Now I have the positive attached to the post where all the battery positives join. The batteries have remained balanced over the past year.

I can't remember where I read it, but a marine electrician stated that "in case it wasn't obvious, you connect the MPPT output to the load." I don't quite have it perfect as it's where all the batteries join, but I'm going to relocate the MPPT anyways, so I'll connect it to the load then.

Sorry, if my explanation isn't precise enough as I never studied engineering. Just lots of reading, lots of testing and lots of monitoring.

--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Amel is going lithium

Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
 

You are right about additional heat, at this time its quite cool here but that will change soon.

But I just realized that we might use the old lead acid vent that is useless now. Its not huge but might get some heat out.

As I undestand AMEL did the same with the 60 and mounted heat issue gear under the bunk.

Oliver from Vela Nautica

A54#39

Portugal

Sent from my Huawei Mobile


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel is going lithium
From: Scott SV Tengah
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
CC:


I never considered adding more heat to the living spaces by venting it into the passageway/alley.
 
Perhaps my thinking is influenced by the high heat and high humidity I'm dealing with right now, but that passage berth, which is perfect for the off-watch crew member, gets warm enough as is. I'd be loathe to do anything that makes it even hotter.

But you're right, the charger/inverter is mounted sideways in the engine compartment. We directed outside air right near the charger/inverter intake, similar to the old Dolphin setup. The Dolphin lasted 12 years, so I presume the "salt air" won't cause damage. And we don't see output tapering even after running it near capacity for longer periods. We followed the Victron recs for line size and used some online calculators to verify, so I'm not too concerned about voltage drop. 

That said, neither solution is ideal, imo. Boats are always compromises, I guess!
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Parasailor for Mango

Barry Connor
 

Dear Joerg,

I now understand how the Parasailor can work on my Amel 54 without the bowsprit extension.

You only use 2 lines when the Parasailor is Port or Starboard of the bow. Therefore the lines that I thought would be up against the bow side rails are always slack and not putting pressure on the side rails.

Thanks again for your and Paul Brown's help with this issue. 

Best Regards

Barry and Penny
"Lady Penelope II"
Amel. 54. #17
Antibes,   France

On Monday, August 19, 2019, 8:00:13 PM GMT+2, Barry Connor via Groups.Io <connor_barry@...> wrote:


Hi Joerg,

Thank's for your info on the Parasailor.
I have attached a photo of my bowsprit. I would not have the light weight sail up when using the Parasailor. My thought is that if the Parasailor was straight ahead I would not have any issues with the lines but if the Parasailor was Port or Starboard then the lines coming in to the bowsprit would be touching my side rails at the bow.
I am looking at a 55 on the next dock and I think your bowsprit extends out further than mine.
I would like to hear from any 54's who have a Parasailor and how they get it to work?

Currently having my 14 year old Dessalator membranes replaced by the Antibes Desolator technician. Very helpful folk. My Dessalaotor control board blew and as it is no longer available they sent it to The Netherlands for repair. I am really putting in a plug to Nicholas the son of the Dessalator founder to accept "credit cards".

Best

Barry and Penny
"Lady Penelope II"
Amel. 54  #17
Antibes France


On Sunday, August 18, 2019, 11:56:15 PM GMT+2, Joerg Esdorn via Groups.Io <jhe1313@...> wrote:


Hi Barry, there have been several Parasailor threads recently.  Please check out my posts on using the Parasailor with the "Tacker".  If you do, you won't need a bow sprit.  I don't find I need a bow sprit on the 55 even with the "standard" setup with 2 sheets and 2 guys.  I run the guys over rings attached to a shackle on the anchor fitting forward of the forestay.   I talked to a Swiss 55 owner before I ordered my Parasailor  who had initially gotten a bow sprit and ended up not needing it.  I believe your bow setup is identical to that on the 55.  So I would recommend not getting one, at least initially.  The boat sails fine with or without mizzen but you gain additional speed with the mizzen unless you're below 160 degrees AWA, when the mizzen will partially blanket the Parasailor.  It's not necessary to deploy the running backstays for the Parasailor.  

Joerg Esdorn
A55 #53
Kincsem
Currently parked in Almerimar


Fw: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Amel 54 main mast seal

Barry Connor
 

To: Bob Hodkins
Amel  54. #31

Hope this gets to you as the old site stopped.

Barry

----- Forwarded Message -----

From: Barry Connor <connor_barry@...>
To: Barry Connor connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...>
Sent: Tuesday, August 20, 2019, 7:46:35 PM GMT+2
Subject: Re: [Amel Yacht Owners] Re: Amel 54 main mast seal

Dear Bob,

Thank's for all the detail regarding having your mast pad replaced in Martinique. I bought the pad from Sonja at Amel Hyeres and was planning to have it done this year when passing by Hyeres on my way to my staging area in the Canaries before crossing.
I might wait until I get to Martinique to get it done as they seem to have good system. Could be better than having a crane lift the mast whilst the boat is alongside a dock.

Can yo tell me how much they charged to jack up the mast with hydraulic jacks and change the pad?

We have just had Desolator technicians come on the boat at Vauban marina Antibes to change my 14 year old membranes which were less than 400 hours and install the repaired control board. I can not say how happy I am that I decided to let them do the work on the boat and not try to do it half hearted myself. My membranes looked horrible and really needed to be replaced even though they still worked, would not have lasted very much longer. They checked everything and tightened up and replaced some of my tubing for my fresh water after wash system which leaked sometimes, Ruedi on Amel 54 "Wasabi" will remember how this original installed tubing section does leak.. Stopped the salt water drip from the controller panel knob. The Dessalator factory technician was training a new French distributor agent to look after their systems. What I really noticed was that the system starts and changes quickly to "Good Quality" very quickly, less than 1 minute - it was taking about 5 minutes before I got "Good Quality". This could be an indication to other owners when to realize that you need to change your membranes.

Best regards

Barry and Penny
"Lady Penelope II"
Amel. 54. #17
Antibes,  France

On Monday, August 6, 2018, 6:26:54 PM GMT+2, Barry Connor connor_barry@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 

Thank's Bob,

This makes it easy to understand, I will only seal the outside edges with my 5200 which I believe will hold the pad together for awhile, I will be in the Caribbean in a year or so and would like to get the experts to do this for me.
Did they replace with an original pad?
I understand Amel are on August holiday, so I will inquire to get a pad when they are back.

Thank's again to all for the help and advise.

Best Regards

Barry and Penny
S/V Lady Penelope II
Amel 54. #17
Sailing Croatia

On Monday, August 6, 2018, 6:45:28 AM EDT, Bob Hodgins bobh@... [amelyachtowners] <amelyachtowners@...> wrote:


 

Barry,
I had my main mast pad changed in January this year in Martinique. I watched and here is what they did.

The jack system they had was specially made for the job. It was a single hand pump for the hydraulic, it was connected to two cylinders, one for each side of the mast. They placed large hard wood blocks on deck to distribute the load, on each side of the mast. The jack cylinders went on top of these blocks, and there was a custom made wood block that fit under the main winch on each side of the mast. When they pumped the jack, each side lifted exactly the same. They lifted it only about 35 or 40 cm, cleaned out the old pad and slid in the new one.

You might not want to be putting 5200 under the mast because it will be difficult to clean out with that limited space to work under the foot. On the outside of the mast might be OK.

My original pad was completely dissolved from age. I think the mast settled down that amount, and caused the rig to be loose. After installing the new pad, they tuned the rig using a tension gauge. I think they did a very good, professional job.

Bob Hodgins
Amel 54 #31
Currently in Raiatea, French Polynesia

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Re: Always check your contractors' work

Gregory Shea
 

Scott,
Could you explain in more detail what you mean by “I had no idea you're supposed to connect charger positive to the load and not the batteries, and especially not one of the batteries” in your Point 2.
This may be a learning experience for me too.

Greg Shea
Sharki 133, Preveza

On Aug 20, 2019, at 3:44 PM, Scott SV Tengah <sv.tengah@...> wrote:

had no idea you're supposed to connect charger positive to the load and not the batteries, and especially not one of the batteries.


100M of 10mm rated stainless steel anchor ‘AMEL’

Paul Brown
 

hello all,

I am up grading my chain to a higher strength rating for storm anchoring and have 100M of Rated stainless steel 10mm chain, which was supplied with the delivery of my A55#17 when she was launched early 2013. The chain is in excellent condition from my inspection and has not been extensively used as we have sail perhaps no more than 3000NM

if you would like to make an offer please contact me by email feeder.brown@...

We are sailing south of France to Sicily till October 


or reply to this thread 

regards Paul Fortuna II 55#17


Re: Always check your contractors' work

Gregory Shea
 

Scott, 
I wonder if you could explain in a bit more detail your statement in Point 2, "At the time, I had no idea you're supposed to connect charger positive to the load and not the batteries, and especially not one of the batteries."
This may be a learning experience for me too.

Greg Shea
Sharki 133 Cap des iles, Preveza


On Aug 20, 2019, at 3:44 PM, Scott SV Tengah <sv.tengah@...> wrote:

Like many, I have used contractors to do work on our A54 that we either don't have the time, skills nor tools to do ourselves. This is simply delegation and leveraging our time because we don't want to spend our lives working on the boat full time. We bought the boat to go sailing, not become boat technicians!

However, as I've been reminded again and again, always know what they are doing, why they're doing it and check to make sure they did it right.

This is a bit of a venting post because I had some electricians work on Tengah in southern Spain and they literally did almost everything wrong. And the work was far from free. I won't name them publicly, but if you're in southern Spain and considering electrical work, feel free to private message me and I'll let you know whether you should avoid that particular electrician.

A partial list:

1) They refused to read posts from this forum that I provided to them about the Amel isolated ground system. Their response, "I've been doing this for years, I don't need to read that." Well, installing the solar panels, they connected the solar panel negative to the arch, causing the Amel electrical leak detector to go nuts. Luckily I caught it before too much corrosion occurred.

2) From the MPPT controller, they connected both positive and negative directly to the batteries. For negative, this bypassed the shunt, so the battery monitor completely ignored the solar power output! Worse, for the positive, they wired it to ONE of the batteries. At the time, I had no idea you're supposed to connect charger positive to the load and not the batteries, and especially not one of the batteries. Luckily I caught that before too much damage occurred.

3) Yesterday, I noticed significantly reduced power output from my panels. I have a nearly 1kw array and the MPPT controller was outputting around 250w at midday into lithium batteries that were at 50% SOC. I spent a few hours checking everything, frustrated as hell because solar is just supposed to work without much maintenance. Turns out the culprit was that the electricians put bare wires into and out of the MPPT. So they either were too lazy or did not have the tools to put ferrules on the bare wire ends, which then slowly corroded enough to eventually limit power output. Moreover, one of the positive wire strands was very very close to shorting out!

4)  I asked for a neg/pos pair of wires on the arch from the 24v batteries so I could install a wifi extender in the near future. They provided those wires and two weeks later I was ready to install my wifi extender. For kicks, I put the multimeter to the wires and saw 35 volts! Turns out they connected those wires to the panels and not our 24v battery system. If I didn't check, the panels would have fried the wifi extender. And if they didn't, the wifi extender would have mysteriously turned off at night.

5) Finally, they put the MPPT into the enclosed space where the main battery switches are. With nearly 1000 watts flowing into the charge controller, it certainly heats up. By 4pm, that enclosed space gets over 50c! Now I have to find a way to move and re-wire the MPPT to a location with more ventilation.

I'm sure you have all either had or will have this experience. It almost seems that it takes more time to hire someone to do work on your boat than to do it yourself. But it's a necessary evil, so going forward, I generally educate myself about what they're doing before they're doing it and watch every step of the way to make sure they do it right. Easy for those of you with engineering backgrounds, a bit harder for those of us from the business world. :)

/End Venting


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Amel is going lithium

Scott SV Tengah
 

I never considered adding more heat to the living spaces by venting it into the passageway/alley.
 
Perhaps my thinking is influenced by the high heat and high humidity I'm dealing with right now, but that passage berth, which is perfect for the off-watch crew member, gets warm enough as is. I'd be loathe to do anything that makes it even hotter.

But you're right, the charger/inverter is mounted sideways in the engine compartment. We directed outside air right near the charger/inverter intake, similar to the old Dolphin setup. The Dolphin lasted 12 years, so I presume the "salt air" won't cause damage. And we don't see output tapering even after running it near capacity for longer periods. We followed the Victron recs for line size and used some online calculators to verify, so I'm not too concerned about voltage drop. 

That said, neither solution is ideal, imo. Boats are always compromises, I guess!
--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Forward Looking Sonar

karkauai
 

I had the EchoPilot 2-D on my boat when purchased 10 years ago.  I found it of little use because it only sees a little over a boat length ahead when you really need it in water less than 4M deep.  In muddy water if you are looking for a channel, it only sees directly in front of the boat.  You have to turn the boat in hopes if identifying deeper water.  I was rarely successful, and was as likely to stumble on the channel as find it with the sonar.
The transducer has since failed.  I’m waiting until the 3D units get better and cheaper before I replace it.

Kent Robertson
S/V Kristy
SN243

On Aug 20, 2019, at 11:34 AM, Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica <oliver.henrichsen@...> wrote:

Hi Scott,

To place the charger in the engineroom has some downsides:
- hunidity
- heat
- limited space so probably the charger is mounted sideways what lowers airflow.
- long wires

I customized widened the switch area and drilled ventilation holes to the alley.
I install 120mm thermocontrolled fans with heat alarms to blow fresh air into the cabinet.

The 120A5000W fits vertical.

The lifepo is smaller than batteries before with same capacity so i could install a new separation.

The starter batt is now behind the onan in the engine room.

No more dirty lead in the cabin. Hydrogen Should not be an issue as most other yachts place the starter batt around the engine room.

Oliver from Vela Nautica

A54#39

Portugal

Sent from my Huawei Mobile


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel is going lithium
From: Scott SV Tengah
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
CC:


I guess this is a reminder that I still owe the group my writeup. :)

Oliver, how do you vent the compartment where you've installed the Victron 24/5000/120 inverter/charger? I mounted mine in the engine compartment (connected with the recommended 2x pair of 50mm2 wires - not 95mm2 as I previously mentioned) in the same location as the old Dolphin 100amp charger, with the same ventilation from outside as the original Amel setup. 

Even then, the charger/inverter gets damn hot especially when we are cooking and the induction, microwave and boiler are drawing tons of current. Or when it's charging at the full 120 amps.

Part of the reason I ask is that the electricians installed the Victron 150/35 MPPT in the same compartment where you installed your charger/inverter (where the main battery switches are) and I'm getting very high temperatures in that closed compartment after a full day's charging. If you've figured out a good cooling solution, I'd rather implement that than try to move my MPPT!

I was considering adding a little timer controlled 24v fan on the vent in the battery compartment and connecting the two compartments, but haven't for two reasons: (1) Amel kept the two compartments isolated. I am loathe to violate that as they probably did that for a reason (2) The fan is just another part to fail and I have enough things to keep up with already! 


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com


Re: Always check your contractors' work

Arlo
 

I would recommend publically listing their name so that others can avoid them and they learn that their are repercussions for doing work incorrectly or poorly. Just my 2 cents...


Re: Amel is going lithium

Oliver Henrichsen, SV Vela Nautica
 

Hi Scott,

To place the charger in the engineroom has some downsides:
- hunidity
- heat
- limited space so probably the charger is mounted sideways what lowers airflow.
- long wires

I customized widened the switch area and drilled ventilation holes to the alley.
I install 120mm thermocontrolled fans with heat alarms to blow fresh air into the cabinet.

The 120A5000W fits vertical.

The lifepo is smaller than batteries before with same capacity so i could install a new separation.

The starter batt is now behind the onan in the engine room.

No more dirty lead in the cabin. Hydrogen Should not be an issue as most other yachts place the starter batt around the engine room.

Oliver from Vela Nautica

A54#39

Portugal

Sent from my Huawei Mobile


-------- Original Message --------
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel is going lithium
From: Scott SV Tengah
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
CC:


I guess this is a reminder that I still owe the group my writeup. :)

Oliver, how do you vent the compartment where you've installed the Victron 24/5000/120 inverter/charger? I mounted mine in the engine compartment (connected with the recommended 2x pair of 50mm2 wires - not 95mm2 as I previously mentioned) in the same location as the old Dolphin 100amp charger, with the same ventilation from outside as the original Amel setup. 

Even then, the charger/inverter gets damn hot especially when we are cooking and the induction, microwave and boiler are drawing tons of current. Or when it's charging at the full 120 amps.

Part of the reason I ask is that the electricians installed the Victron 150/35 MPPT in the same compartment where you installed your charger/inverter (where the main battery switches are) and I'm getting very high temperatures in that closed compartment after a full day's charging. If you've figured out a good cooling solution, I'd rather implement that than try to move my MPPT!

I was considering adding a little timer controlled 24v fan on the vent in the battery compartment and connecting the two compartments, but haven't for two reasons: (1) Amel kept the two compartments isolated. I am loathe to violate that as they probably did that for a reason (2) The fan is just another part to fail and I have enough things to keep up with already! 


--
Scott 
2007 A54 #69
SV Tengah
http://www.svtengah.com