Date   
Re: Lite gauge wire for bow lights

Matt Salatino
 

True, 18 gauge wire may be bigger than necessary, but I find it more robust, resisting breakage better than thinner wire, especially routing through difficult spaces. 
My 2¢, and your results may differ.  18 gauge is pretty thin.  

~~~⛵️~~~Matt

On Nov 4, 2019, at 9:00 PM, Craig Briggs SN 68 Sangaris via Groups.Io <sangaris@...> wrote:

Hi Matt,
That looks like Ancor wire - a quality product with the new yellow-red for DC Neg-Positive color coding - although I couldn't see for sure if it was Ancor. Looks like smallest gauge is 18, which is overkill for LED lights.  Bill Rouse's recommendation of the Belden 22 gauge 4 conductor cable may give a smaller diameter and it is round, not oval, so maybe easier running through the stanchion tubes and the flexibility of an extra pair of conductors (although I'm not sure what one would use them for other than future spares). 
FWIW, Craig

Re: Lite gauge wire for bow lights

Craig & Katherine Briggs SN 68 Sangaris Tropic Isle Harbor, FL
 

Hi Matt,
That looks like Ancor wire - a quality product with the new yellow-red for DC Neg-Positive color coding - although I couldn't see for sure if it was Ancor. Looks like smallest gauge is 18, which is overkill for LED lights.  Bill Rouse's recommendation of the Belden 22 gauge 4 conductor cable may give a smaller diameter and it is round, not oval, so maybe easier running through the stanchion tubes and the flexibility of an extra pair of conductors (although I'm not sure what one would use them for other than future spares). 
FWIW, Craig

Re: Lite gauge wire for bow lights

Thomas Kleman
 

Be careful Dan. Replacing bow light wire is how more than one SM owner (including me) heard a loud crack in the floor and began the dreaded bow locker floor replacement project. 

Tom and Kirstin
SV L'ORIENT SM2K 422
Bocas del Toro

Re: Lite gauge wire for bow lights

Matt Salatino
 

On Nov 4, 2019, at 11:35 AM, Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:

Quick question:  I am shopping for wire our return to BeBe next week and wanted to buy a spool of wire for rewiring bow and stern lights and possibly other things.   I thought I would check for recommendations on the best wire.  Brand? And most versatile wire size (particularly with respect to feeding it through the ss tubing of the bow pulpit to the light fixtures.     

I will be installing LED lights so current will be low for this application, but I would like to have a versatile wire for other potential (lower voltage/current) applications. 

I have seen that there are posts with the instructions for re-wiring the bow lights so I am not looking for that information right now.  

Thanks and regards,  Daniel & Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM#387 

Re: Lite gauge wire for bow lights

 

Dan,

I used the following for low amperage connections. It is small cable and will probably be easier to route through the stanchions.
 

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   


On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 10:35 AM Dan Carlson <carlsdan61@...> wrote:
Quick question:  I am shopping for wire our return to BeBe next week and wanted to buy a spool of wire for rewiring bow and stern lights and possibly other things.   I thought I would check for recommendations on the best wire.  Brand? And most versatile wire size (particularly with respect to feeding it through the ss tubing of the bow pulpit to the light fixtures.     

I will be installing LED lights so current will be low for this application, but I would like to have a versatile wire for other potential (lower voltage/current) applications. 

I have seen that there are posts with the instructions for re-wiring the bow lights so I am not looking for that information right now.  

Thanks and regards,  Daniel & Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM#387 

Lite gauge wire for bow lights

Dan Carlson
 

Quick question:  I am shopping for wire our return to BeBe next week and wanted to buy a spool of wire for rewiring bow and stern lights and possibly other things.   I thought I would check for recommendations on the best wire.  Brand? And most versatile wire size (particularly with respect to feeding it through the ss tubing of the bow pulpit to the light fixtures.     

I will be installing LED lights so current will be low for this application, but I would like to have a versatile wire for other potential (lower voltage/current) applications. 

I have seen that there are posts with the instructions for re-wiring the bow lights so I am not looking for that information right now.  

Thanks and regards,  Daniel & Lori Carlson on sv BeBe, SM#387 

Re: ZF Hurth Transmission

Arthur Sundqvist
 

Thank you. I Will check

Skickat från min iPhone

4 nov. 2019 kl. 14:14 skrev Craig Briggs SN 68 Sangaris via Groups.Io <sangaris@...>:

Hi Arhur,
Hopefully it's from the drain plug on the underside that has a sealing washer you can easily replace.
Craig

Re: ZF Hurth Transmission

Arthur Sundqvist
 

Thanks. I Will check...
What is Transmission Shaft seal.

Skickat från min iPhone

4 nov. 2019 kl. 14:11 skrev CW Bill Rouse <brouse@...>:


It is a leak from the reversing transmission. Check the cap for the filter and the high pressure line to the shaft brake. 

If the above doesn't reveal the leak, place white paper towels so that you can narrow it down to a specific location. You will probably need to clean everything and tape paper towels in place. Hopefully it is not a transmission shaft seal.


--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Mon, Nov 4, 2019, 5:35 AM Arthur Sundqvist <arthur@...> wrote:
There is some red ATF oil drops  coming from the transmission box.
A small leak. What can this be?
SM435. Vista
Fair winds to all
Kindest regards
arthur

Re: ZF Hurth Transmission

Craig & Katherine Briggs SN 68 Sangaris Tropic Isle Harbor, FL
 

Hi Arhur,
Hopefully it's from the drain plug on the underside that has a sealing washer you can easily replace.
Craig

Re: ZF Hurth Transmission

 

It is a leak from the reversing transmission. Check the cap for the filter and the high pressure line to the shaft brake. 

If the above doesn't reveal the leak, place white paper towels so that you can narrow it down to a specific location. You will probably need to clean everything and tape paper towels in place. Hopefully it is not a transmission shaft seal.


--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Mon, Nov 4, 2019, 5:35 AM Arthur Sundqvist <arthur@...> wrote:
There is some red ATF oil drops  coming from the transmission box.
A small leak. What can this be?
SM435. Vista
Fair winds to all
Kindest regards
arthur

Re: Maramu 1984 - Genoa - Original sailpan overlap

 

I'll add some more opinion to the Genoa size discussion.

I don't understand the advantage of changing the geometry of the Genoa, when considering that Amel SMs were designed primarily as downwind passage makers with the option of setting furling twin headsails and poles. Changing the size of the furling Genoa doesn't make sense to me, but changing it without changing its twin (ballooner) really doesn't make sense. 

The SM Genoa is the most powerful of all the SM sails. It has a bullet-proof furler which will routinely last 20 years without service or even greasing. All of the SM sails, as designed, allow for balanced sailing.  I would like to understand the benefit of reducing the Genoa's designed potential power.

And, more importantly, when owners speak of modifying an Amel design, you know that I am the one raising the Amel flag. 


--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Yacht Owners School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   

On Mon, Nov 4, 2019, 3:17 AM smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
Hi there

Ours genoa 150% or perhaps even 160% when we purchased the boat

We reduced it to 135 with a new sail and that seemed like a good compromise to us and got us around the North Atlantic very well. 

We pull  the big old one out of retirement for the downwind trade winds passage East to West but at all other times used the 135%

If you go this route .... its well worth checking the smaller sail's clew is cut so it can still be poled out and reefed whilst poled etc 

Ours was cut high which worked well fo the poles but just too high so that I can’t reach the leech line or clew without gymnastics - also worth considering imo

As a related aside......my next trip ... (if it happens!) .... for downwind work we will use the 135% and have a dedicated 110ish% strong sail piston hanked onto a removable forestay for pole plus pole downwind work with double headsails

Ive done this before and tried other things like cruising chutes and small spinnakers but for simplicity it cant be beaten in my humble opinion. 

The main genoa on the furler as the throttle and the smaller bullet proof one hanked on and up for the whole passage (unless it gets seriously windy). 

I appreciate that SM have the choice of the double headsails up the same foil and the means to release this which looks pretty awesome so probably more of a consideration for vintage Maramu folk

All the best and happy sailing 

Miles

Maramu 162 1986

Re: salt water leaking out of speed sensor

 

It is in a PVC tube which may fill with water, if the sensor in the tube is not sealed with RTV silicone. It isn't a problem since the inside end of the tube is well above the water line. Take a photo of the sensor/leak and send it to me. I'll give you more info after I see the photo. brouse@... 

Best,

CW Bill Rouse
Amel Yacht Owners School - www.AmelYachtOwnersSchool.com
720 Winnie St
Galveston Island, TX 77550
+1(832) 380-4970

On Mon, Nov 4, 2019, 1:05 AM Randall Walker <sailingalbedo@...> wrote:
Speed sensor. I have been on the hard for a few months now prepping to be splashed in 3 weeks.
I have water (salty) a very small amount seeping from the speed sensor at the front of the keel. My question is has anyone ever had to find the route to the sensor within the keel?

Randall,
A-54 #56

ZF Hurth Transmission

Arthur Sundqvist
 

There is some red ATF oil drops  coming from the transmission box.
A small leak. What can this be?
SM435. Vista
Fair winds to all
Kindest regards
arthur

Re: Maramu window ply interior removal

Ian
 

Yes, glued under the edge line of the wood then replaced it. I shaved the foam off the back of the vinyl that was behind the wood to ensure a good fit with the window again.
Ian


On 4 Nov 2019, at 08:55, smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard@...> wrote:


this looks great! thanks for sharing and i like the smaller panels so might copy!
So re the headliner by the ply window trim  - did you glue this in place then replace the ply trim over the top as per the original installation?
All the very best
Miles

On Monday, November 4, 2019, 07:46:22 AM GMT, Ian <parkianj@...> wrote:


Miles
Photo of aft cabin with the panels held in place by screwed in battens.
The original decorative battens were fewer, but I have added more to make the panels smaller and more manageable. Works well. Self adhesive Velcro makes positioning easy until the battens are screwed in place.
> On 3 Nov 2019, at 21:23, smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Hi there fellow Amelians
>
> Thanks to Ian on Ocean Hobo for describing how the interior ply window panels come out on his SN. Apparently remove window screws and bolts and the ply will come away with some persuasion. So in effect the window screws and through bolts hold the ply interior in place on the SN.
>
> Does anyone on the group have direct experience of this on a Maramu? Is it the same ?
>
>
> I have a troublesome leak on the main coach roof and it’s effecting  the ply around the windows and damaging the veneer. Grr.
>
> I am failing to locate the source . I think it’s from the handrail or the main hatch above the table so have tarped these and will apply a process of elimination but the answer probably lies in headliner removal
>
> The headliner ticks under the window ply so hence the question!
>
> I do wish Amel had used screwed into headliner panels. Seems to make so much sense for many reasons and wonder why they didn’t. Can’t imagine it was a cost cutting thing. Perhaps aesthetics but I’d trade those for simplicity. Perhaps the newer models have adopted this ?

>
> All the best and happy sailing for those afloat
>
> Miles
> Maramu 162
> In the hard !
> Plymouth uk

>
>
>


Re: Maramu 1984 - Genoa - Original sailpan overlap

smiles bernard
 

Hi there

Ours genoa 150% or perhaps even 160% when we purchased the boat

We reduced it to 135 with a new sail and that seemed like a good compromise to us and got us around the North Atlantic very well. 

We pull  the big old one out of retirement for the downwind trade winds passage East to West but at all other times used the 135%

If you go this route .... its well worth checking the smaller sail's clew is cut so it can still be poled out and reefed whilst poled etc 

Ours was cut high which worked well fo the poles but just too high so that I can’t reach the leech line or clew without gymnastics - also worth considering imo

As a related aside......my next trip ... (if it happens!) .... for downwind work we will use the 135% and have a dedicated 110ish% strong sail piston hanked onto a removable forestay for pole plus pole downwind work with double headsails

Ive done this before and tried other things like cruising chutes and small spinnakers but for simplicity it cant be beaten in my humble opinion. 

The main genoa on the furler as the throttle and the smaller bullet proof one hanked on and up for the whole passage (unless it gets seriously windy). 

I appreciate that SM have the choice of the double headsails up the same foil and the means to release this which looks pretty awesome so probably more of a consideration for vintage Maramu folk

All the best and happy sailing 

Miles

Maramu 162 1986

Re: Maramu window ply interior removal

smiles bernard
 

this looks great! thanks for sharing and i like the smaller panels so might copy!
So re the headliner by the ply window trim  - did you glue this in place then replace the ply trim over the top as per the original installation?
All the very best
Miles

On Monday, November 4, 2019, 07:46:22 AM GMT, Ian <parkianj@...> wrote:


Miles
Photo of aft cabin with the panels held in place by screwed in battens.
The original decorative battens were fewer, but I have added more to make the panels smaller and more manageable. Works well. Self adhesive Velcro makes positioning easy until the battens are screwed in place.
> On 3 Nov 2019, at 21:23, smiles bernard via Groups.Io <smilesbernard=yahoo.com@groups.io> wrote:
>
> Hi there fellow Amelians
>
> Thanks to Ian on Ocean Hobo for describing how the interior ply window panels come out on his SN. Apparently remove window screws and bolts and the ply will come away with some persuasion. So in effect the window screws and through bolts hold the ply interior in place on the SN.
>
> Does anyone on the group have direct experience of this on a Maramu? Is it the same ?
>
>
> I have a troublesome leak on the main coach roof and it’s effecting  the ply around the windows and damaging the veneer. Grr.
>
> I am failing to locate the source . I think it’s from the handrail or the main hatch above the table so have tarped these and will apply a process of elimination but the answer probably lies in headliner removal
>
> The headliner ticks under the window ply so hence the question!
>
> I do wish Amel had used screwed into headliner panels. Seems to make so much sense for many reasons and wonder why they didn’t. Can’t imagine it was a cost cutting thing. Perhaps aesthetics but I’d trade those for simplicity. Perhaps the newer models have adopted this ?

>
> All the best and happy sailing for those afloat
>
> Miles
> Maramu 162
> In the hard !
> Plymouth uk

>
>
>


Re: Maramu window ply interior removal

James Lochhead
 

Hi,

I removed the ply when I replaced the windows.  I have some photos but not with me.  There is a timber molding running the length of the window at the top and the bottom.  Removing that exposes nuts that go right through the window from the outside.  I will see if I can find some photos when I get home.


--

James
Maramu #147 (1984)

Re: Maramu 1984 - Genoa - Original sailpan overlap

James Lochhead
 

Thanks.  150 does seem like alot.  I am not sure exactly the % lap on our current Genoa however the previous owner advised that when he replaced it he got it made smaller.  He said in hindsight that was a mistake.

We have been sailing a lot in SE Asia and could definitely made use of a larger Genoa at times.
--

James
Maramu #147 (1984)

Re: Maramu 1984 - Genoa - Original sailpan overlap

James Lochhead
 

Thanks Karen.  I have reached out to Dave.
--

James
Maramu #147 (1984)

Re: Maramu 1984 - Genoa - Original sailpan overlap

Ian
 

James
I replaced my 150% Genoa with a 130% in Trinidad.
Coming back across the Atlantic to UK the difference in size with the ballooner and poles set the difference in size was noticeable visually, but didn't affect downwind performance or boat balance.
I have thought that if/when I plan another ocean passage I would get another ballooner made to fit the Genoa track. Two lightweight sails make a lot of sense and would certainly be easier to store than a Genoa. I would just drop my 130 onto the deck and lash it to the rail. Easy enough in light downwind conditions.
The 130% performs much better here in UK weather conditions even when it's furled (with foam luff).

Ian

Ocean Hobo SN96