Date   
Re: A54 fridge circulation pump

Teun BAAS
 

Hi Arno,

 

In your message below “ On the other hand the continuous flow of water makes keeps growth of whatever wants to settle in the circuit also minimal.   “ I was of the same opinion and feared my AC line would be even more gooked up than the fridge/freezer line but amazingly when I flushed, prior to my departure to USA, while on the hard all lines with fresh water the fridge & freezer exiting fresh water was far more discolored than the AC exiting fresh water.

 

Later on somebody explained to me that marine life can NOT survive in stationary salt water; therefore dies hence the bad smell. Apparently marine life needs flowing water to survive which explains all the growth on my sea chest strainer as well as the little in line filters/strainers I have for the freezer; AC and SPECTRA water maker lines.

 

Best Regards Teun

SV AMELIT  A54  #128

 

On the hard in COOMERA (near BRISBANE) QLD AUSTRALIA

January 14, 2020 16:46:11

 

USA cell: +1 832 477 8842

AUSTRALIA cell: +61 5951 8909

 

You can follow AMELIT via this link: https://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/AMELIT

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arno Luijten via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 05:09
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 fridge circulation pump

 

Hi Nick,

Thanks for your observations. I fully agree the insulation of especially the freezer is the main problem. As Oliver suggested in previous postings, changing the insulation with a better one really makes a big difference. But he also said it's a hell of a project. In the mean time we are using circulation pumps like cookies.
Fact is that Flojet claims to supply you a pump for continuous duty but it's not. Even at 80% duty cycle the thing drops dead after less then a year. That should not happen. As said by others, brushed motors are simply not suitable for this task.
So the idea of replacing the pump-motor itself is quite good but you will need to carefully select what motor to replace it with.

I've looked at the sea-water circuit and I'm thinking about a way to clean it, but that is not so simple. I think the easiest is to pump some descaling fluid though the circuit and let is soak for a while. On the other hand the continuous flow of water makes keeps growth of whatever wants to settle in the circuit also minimal.

It's a pity that Flojet does not sell a brushless variant of the pump. That would make the problem much better to cope with.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121

Re: A54 fridge circulation pump

Teun BAAS
 

I also had at least 3 Flojet pumps going out on me since Q1 2018; usually the freezer temperature would go up - over 1 ½ year period in NEW CALEDONIA the freezer unit was checked for leaks & serviced at least 2 or 3 times. In vain I tried to get locally BARNACLE BUSTER, couldn’t bring it back with me from USA. In VANUATU I had freezer problems again and luckily another AMEL 54 owner (Bob HODGINS/SV GALLIVANT) had ½ gallon BB and we flushed the fridge/freezer for about 5 hours: unbelievable amount of junk coming out of the system. Everything worked fine for 1 or 2 months but during passage from NOUMEA to BUNDABERG the freezer created problems again.  

 

I am determined to solve this problem permanently and take drastic action as I need a fully functional freezer. Therefore last month agreed with a (German) marine refrigeration specialist @ THE BOAT WORKS YARD (an excellent, world class 55 acres facility with every marine service you can think of on-site) in COOMERA AUSTRALIA that on my return from USA we would check & service the refrigeration, freezer as well as A/C systems. He also suggested taking out the current element out of the freezer and replacing with a unit curving inside the freezer box therefore giving more efficient freezer space. However, he is not willing to change for me the insulation of the freezer box where I believe the main problem is as I can see the temperature rising quickly when I turn the system off for my 2 weekly cleaning of the little in line filter/strainer. The previous owner also installed in both the fridge as well as the AC lines an in line anti-algae/growth anti fouling system; originally SPECTRA but they sold the product line to HALDEN MARINE and is now called BIO-GUARD. I have the 500 for the fridge & freezer line and the 1000 for the A/C systems.

 

I really would like to hear from a A54 owner who has gone thru the process of replacing the horizontal freezer (under the saloon bench) insulation how to go about this.

 

I will be in USA until early March and then return to AUSTRALIA.

 

Best Regards Teun

SV AMELIT  A54  #128

 

On the hard in COOMERA (near BRISBANE) QLD AUSTRALIA

January 14, 2020 16:24:11

 

USA cell: +1 832 477 8842

AUSTRALIA cell: +61 5951 8909

 

You can follow AMELIT via this link: https://forecast.predictwind.com/tracking/display/AMELIT

 

 

 

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Jamie Wendell via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, January 14, 2020 10:49
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] A54 fridge circulation pump

 

I have had many, many motor failures using the Flojet pumps you all are referencing - often they last less than a year. In many instances the failures have caused my refrigeration units to shut down, and in one case in Martinique I had to replace the evaporator on the freezer under the seat.
I have determined that the failures occur most often as the boat battery voltage drops off (tough to keep at 100%), and that is one reason I am considering upgrading to Lithium batteries this year.
Maybe I have been too complacent and have just blindly bought new replacement pumps, but now (with 3 failed motors on board), I am determined to solve this issue once and for all.
Based on all the email conversation, can someone let me know which pump will work well? I have never checked the incoming voltage at the pump, but I am surprised to hear it is 12 volts vs. 24. I have used 24 volt motors in service, and I am not sure where the step-down occurs - maybe in the pump controller?
Any recommendations would be helpful, as I have seen many ideas.
Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
A54 Phantom

Re: Repairing holes in aft cabin trunk / deck

Germain Jean-Pierre
 

Congratulations! Rascal is a good vessel.  

In my opinion, I’d leave well enough alone because the LR is easily accessible ans easily deployed from this location.  Try repealing the bolts with the appropriate product from 3M or Sikaflex..

Enjoy her!

Jean-Pierre Germain, SY Eleuthera, SM 007, New Zealand




On 15 Jan 2020, at 11:11, Kevin Fox via Groups.Io <foxkm@...> wrote:

Greetings All.  My family and I are excited to be the new owners of Rascal.  I've been following this forum for over a year and am impressed by, and appreciative of, all the knowledge that Amel owners are willing to share.  I hope to get up to speed quickly and do my part to help others.

Rascal has a life raft mounted in a rack on the cabin trunk immediately aft of the mizzen mast. We’re not big fans of this location and plan to move it. One of the issues is that there are leaks around some of the bolts. There are twelve total, in groups of three. We can see the screw heads in the aft head and in the passageway just outside the aft head.
 
If we remove the rack we’ll need to fill the holes. I’ve seen information on how to clean out holes in fiberglass decks, including trying to remove some of the coring around the hole if wet, in preparation for filling them with thickened epoxy. Are there any tricks or special procedures for this type of repair on an Amel?
 
I don’t think we’ll be able to access the bottom of the fiberglass from inside the boat, so I’m guessing that we’ll need to use high viscosity (well-thickened) epoxy. Am I correct that there is space between the cabin ceiling and the fiberglass?
 
Another approach might be to put new, low-profile bolts in these holes and re-bed them well. Replacement bolts might also solve the issue of what to do with the holes left in the cabin ceiling. 
 
Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thank you!

<IMG_3549.JPG>


<IMG_3550.JPG>


<IMG_1190.jpg>


----
Kevin and Elise Fox
SM2k #404 Rascal
Charleston, SC

Repairing holes in aft cabin trunk / deck

Kevin Fox
 

Greetings All.  My family and I are excited to be the new owners of Rascal.  I've been following this forum for over a year and am impressed by, and appreciative of, all the knowledge that Amel owners are willing to share.  I hope to get up to speed quickly and do my part to help others.

Rascal has a life raft mounted in a rack on the cabin trunk immediately aft of the mizzen mast. We’re not big fans of this location and plan to move it. One of the issues is that there are leaks around some of the bolts. There are twelve total, in groups of three. We can see the screw heads in the aft head and in the passageway just outside the aft head.
 
If we remove the rack we’ll need to fill the holes. I’ve seen information on how to clean out holes in fiberglass decks, including trying to remove some of the coring around the hole if wet, in preparation for filling them with thickened epoxy. Are there any tricks or special procedures for this type of repair on an Amel?
 
I don’t think we’ll be able to access the bottom of the fiberglass from inside the boat, so I’m guessing that we’ll need to use high viscosity (well-thickened) epoxy. Am I correct that there is space between the cabin ceiling and the fiberglass?
 
Another approach might be to put new, low-profile bolts in these holes and re-bed them well. Replacement bolts might also solve the issue of what to do with the holes left in the cabin ceiling. 
 
Any suggestions would be much appreciated. Thank you!







----
Kevin and Elise Fox
SM2k #404 Rascal
Charleston, SC

Re: Mango Bonding

Arlo
 

BTW I did look through the forum's files and photos and there were references to wiring diagrams in the post, I could not find them in the files or pic section.....

Mango Bonding

Arlo
 

Hello all, Since our 1985 Mango was hauled out for a new cutlass bearing and bottom paint, I thought I'd check the bonding system. The strap in the bilge was corroded, as suspected and will be replaced. The rudder post, and zinc's appear to show zero resistance which is great news. I am in the process of checking the rest of the system and see that some of the braided bonding straps are starting to become weak, brittle and generally in need of replacing (not all but some). So 2 questions or my fellow Amelians.... (Yes I read through all 691 post on here about the Bonding system)

1) I understand that electricity travels on the outside of the wire's surface, thus flat copper tinned woven straps instead of round wires, but does any one have any thoughts if its better to go back in with the same sort of copper tinned straps or wires for the bonding system? Seems like these straps reached the end of their life in many areas of the boat.

2) I have an original Amel Mango wiring diagram (its very large) but it does not indicate the bonding system on it. Anyone know how Amel originally routed the Mango's (or similiar year  1985 Amel) bonding system through the boat? 

Re: Sailing higher latitudes

marklesparkle59
 

I am enjoying the high latitudes chat. Thank you for your stories. Hoping for more.
Mark 
Sea Hobo
Sharki #96



Sent from my Samsung device

Re: Sailing higher latitudes

Orion Martin
 

Thank you for your reply Ian, Judy and Peter. That is very encouraging that an SM would cope well in higher latitudes (provided adequate heating was on hand). I know all too well the central heating powers of a fine whisky, single malt or blended:) 

As part of my research I was looking at steel hull boats for potential higher latitude sailing, but there were too many things about steel boats that I felt wouldn't provide the level of comfort that an SM could. As it is I regard the SM s close to perfect a boat as you can get ( for my needs anyway), however it was the durability of the boat that I was concerned with sailing higher latitudes. Your posts assuage any concerns I had about heating, condensation and durability. Wishing you fair winds:)

Re: A54 fridge circulation pump

Sv Garulfo
 

Hi All,
After 3 flojets (full time liveaboard, typically running 1fridge+1 freezer, lifespan 8-14mths), we have installed and been running on the Marco UP-2P 24v for a 1.5 months, as recommended earlier in related thread ( (#48365) + (#49456)). So far so good but still early days to say, and yes it is noisier than the Flojet.

@Scott, I thought you mentioned earlier in sep that you had ordered the Marco UP-2P 24v too, and were either running it or planning to soon. What was your experience with it? 

Thanks,
Soraya
GARULFO A54-122
Nuku Hiva, Marquesas, FP 

On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 at 08:44, Jamie Wendell <mysticshadow54@...> wrote:
I have had many, many motor failures using the Flojet pumps you all are referencing - often they last less than a year. In many instances the failures have caused my refrigeration units to shut down, and in one case in Martinique I had to replace the evaporator on the freezer under the seat.
I have determined that the failures occur most often as the boat battery voltage drops off (tough to keep at 100%), and that is one reason I am considering upgrading to Lithium batteries this year.
Maybe I have been too complacent and have just blindly bought new replacement pumps, but now (with 3 failed motors on board), I am determined to solve this issue once and for all.
Based on all the email conversation, can someone let me know which pump will work well? I have never checked the incoming voltage at the pump, but I am surprised to hear it is 12 volts vs. 24. I have used 24 volt motors in service, and I am not sure where the step-down occurs - maybe in the pump controller?
Any recommendations would be helpful, as I have seen many ideas.
Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
A54 Phantom

Pump

Stefan Deerberg
 

Hi together!

I had this German pump in use for many years on my traditional wooden Charter Vessel.
It works 24/7 with 12 people on board.
I never got any problems with this.




May it’s a solution for Amel boats.

Stefan 



Stefan Deerberg 

CEO Deerberg GmbH 
Unternehmer/ Entrepreneur

Lilienthalstraße 1
21335 Lüneburg
Germany

Mobil: +49 172 7757444


Re: A54 fridge circulation pump

Jamie Wendell
 

I have had many, many motor failures using the Flojet pumps you all are referencing - often they last less than a year. In many instances the failures have caused my refrigeration units to shut down, and in one case in Martinique I had to replace the evaporator on the freezer under the seat.
I have determined that the failures occur most often as the boat battery voltage drops off (tough to keep at 100%), and that is one reason I am considering upgrading to Lithium batteries this year.
Maybe I have been too complacent and have just blindly bought new replacement pumps, but now (with 3 failed motors on board), I am determined to solve this issue once and for all.
Based on all the email conversation, can someone let me know which pump will work well? I have never checked the incoming voltage at the pump, but I am surprised to hear it is 12 volts vs. 24. I have used 24 volt motors in service, and I am not sure where the step-down occurs - maybe in the pump controller?
Any recommendations would be helpful, as I have seen many ideas.
Thanks,
Jamie Wendell
A54 Phantom

Re: SM leaking ATF fluid #solution

Rob Smith
 

Bill
Many thanks for your speedy reply. I believe it's the seal that has gone as that is where it is leaking from. I will have a go at changing it. 

Many thanks for your help. 

Rob

FORESIGHT SM #152

On Tue, 14 Jan 2020, 16:25 CW Bill Rouse, <brouse@...> wrote:
Rob,

I have not personally experienced this issue. Your ZF 25 holds 0.75 liters of fluid. Is it possibly overfilled? You do not screw in the dipstick to check the level.

If not, it probably is a worn sealing ring. If so, maybe this will help you:

image.png
5.2 Removing and disassembling the
actuating lever cover plate

5.2.1 Always set actuating lever to neutral
position.
5.2.2 Remove hex nuts (22) from cover
plate (9), using 13 mm spanner (wrench),
and take off spring washers (4).
5.2.3 Remove cover plate assembly (12),
lever (6) and actuating cam (11).
5.2.4 Remove screw (7) from lever (6).
Pull off lever (6). Remove actuating cam
(11) and needle bearing (70) only in
models ZF 12 M - 15 M - 25 M - 30 M.
Remove actuating cam sealing ring (8).

==========================

6.3 Assembling the shifting fork in
gearbox section side shifting cover

6.3.1 Insert shifting fork (15) into gearbox
section (1) side the actuating lever
in such a way that the long arm of the
fork points downwards.
6.3.2 Insert shifting rod (16) through
bores in gearbox and shifting fork.
6.3.3 Fit screw plug (17) to gearbox,
making certain that the clearance between
shifting rod (16) and screw plug
(17) is min. 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
Seal screw plug with Loctite 242 (ZF 3
M - 5 M only O-Ring).
6.3.4 Check shifting fork for easy
movability.
6.4 Pre-assembling the actuating
lever cover plate

Use punch tool to press sealing ring (8)
into cover plate (9). Spread antifriction
bearing grease between sealing lips.

6.4.1 Insert actuating cam assembly (11)
into cover plate (9).
6.4.2 Fit actuating lever (6).
IMPORTANT:
Clearance between actuating lever and
cover plate 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
6.4.3 Clamp actuating lever by means
of retaining screw (7), using a 13 mm
spanner (wrench). Screw in with torque
of 20 Nm.

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar
cloudHQPowered by
cloudHQ


On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 8:28 AM Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:
Hello I have ATF fluid leaking from the gear lever on my gearbox.
Any suggestions?

Rob smith
Foresight
SM#152

Re: SM leaking ATF fluid #solution

 

Rob,

I have not personally experienced this issue. Your ZF 25 holds 0.75 liters of fluid. Is it possibly overfilled? You do not screw in the dipstick to check the level.

If not, it probably is a worn sealing ring. If so, maybe this will help you:

image.png
5.2 Removing and disassembling the
actuating lever cover plate

5.2.1 Always set actuating lever to neutral
position.
5.2.2 Remove hex nuts (22) from cover
plate (9), using 13 mm spanner (wrench),
and take off spring washers (4).
5.2.3 Remove cover plate assembly (12),
lever (6) and actuating cam (11).
5.2.4 Remove screw (7) from lever (6).
Pull off lever (6). Remove actuating cam
(11) and needle bearing (70) only in
models ZF 12 M - 15 M - 25 M - 30 M.
Remove actuating cam sealing ring (8).

==========================

6.3 Assembling the shifting fork in
gearbox section side shifting cover

6.3.1 Insert shifting fork (15) into gearbox
section (1) side the actuating lever
in such a way that the long arm of the
fork points downwards.
6.3.2 Insert shifting rod (16) through
bores in gearbox and shifting fork.
6.3.3 Fit screw plug (17) to gearbox,
making certain that the clearance between
shifting rod (16) and screw plug
(17) is min. 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
Seal screw plug with Loctite 242 (ZF 3
M - 5 M only O-Ring).
6.3.4 Check shifting fork for easy
movability.
6.4 Pre-assembling the actuating
lever cover plate

Use punch tool to press sealing ring (8)
into cover plate (9). Spread antifriction
bearing grease between sealing lips.

6.4.1 Insert actuating cam assembly (11)
into cover plate (9).
6.4.2 Fit actuating lever (6).
IMPORTANT:
Clearance between actuating lever and
cover plate 0.5 mm (0.02 in).
6.4.3 Clamp actuating lever by means
of retaining screw (7), using a 13 mm
spanner (wrench). Screw in with torque
of 20 Nm.

--
CW Bill Rouse Amel Owners Yacht School
Address: 720 Winnie, Galveston Island, Texas 77550 
   
View My Training Calendar
cloudHQPowered by
cloudHQ


On Tue, Jan 14, 2020 at 8:28 AM Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...> wrote:
Hello I have ATF fluid leaking from the gear lever on my gearbox.
Any suggestions?

Rob smith
Foresight
SM#152

Re: SM leaking ATF fluid #solution

Leopold Hauer
 

Hello
It is a easy repair, you must open the 4 screws besides the lever  and mount a new radial sealing ring (SD 20x26x4)  see foto. The sealing is part nr. 8image1.JPG

Leo
SM YinYang # 69 Fiji
Von meinem iPad gesendet

Am 14.01.2020 um 15:28 schrieb Rob Smith <robfromcornwall.1966@...>:

Hello I have ATF fluid leaking from the gear lever on my gearbox.
Any suggestions?

Rob smith
Foresight
SM#152

SM leaking ATF fluid #solution

Rob Smith
 

Hello I have ATF fluid leaking from the gear lever on my gearbox.
Any suggestions?

Rob smith
Foresight
SM#152

Skarki Headspace / Celing Height

MATTHIAS GRAWE
 

Hello,
as a potential owner of a Sharki from 1982 I am interested in knowing:
1. salon headspace (ceiling height)
2. dimension of mattress (sleeping surface) in rear cabin when maximized.
Cannot find any dimensional drawings in the internet.
Can anybody help? Thank you
Best
Matthias

Re: Sailing higher latitudes

Peter Killen
 

Hi Orion,

When we owned Pure Magic (433) we sailed her from Ireland to Antarctica and back.  We had an eberspacher heater fitted from new and apart from it breaking down for one 24 hour period (due to a leak in the fuel line) it worked 24 hours per day faultlessly.  When not working, the temperature plummeted and it was intensely cold.  Our air-conditioning system could not cope.
We never had a problem with condensation on the windows.
We also sailed to Svalbard Labrador and Greenland and from time to time encountered plenty of ice.  Obviously one has to be very careful, but we never had too much problem pushing through.  I have never noticed any scratching damage from ice on either PM or on an earlier boat in which we were trapped for some time in ice.
Of course in certain conditions, a boat can be very badly damaged or indeed lost.  We came across one metal boat in Antarctica which was badly chewed up around the bow and stern areas and was remarkably lucky to have survived.
And yes it’s true.We did spend most of the time in Warm furry slippers, which we had purchased in Ushuaia and which were ideal.  With the cockpit area closed off by the curtain, we used to leave the companionway hatch open, and warm air from below made it very comfortable when helming!
We only used sea boots when on deck.

Peter Killen

On 14 Jan 2020, at 10:04, ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@...> <ianjudyjenkins@...> wrote:

Hi Orion,

We spent a couple of seasons in the Beagle channel and know of at least two SMs that went to the Antarctic peninsula. One owner boasted  of cruising down there sitting in the cockpit with the cockpit curtain closed wearing his slippers .
We didn't find the cold a problem. We used the three reverse cycle Climmas to dry and ventilate the boat and we blessed our Eberspacher which we ran on a daily basis. The Eberspacher agent back in England couldn't believe he was the first guy to service it after 12 years.

 Plus, we had two domestic fan heaters on board, 2 and 3 kw, so if we came back to really cold boat we could put nearly 10,000 Btu through it in minutes.  We did put bubblewrap on the inside of the main hatch in the saloon . We had no condensation in the bilges.

 Sealing off the cockpit with the curtain or a full enclosure makes a huge difference.

 Winter  liveaboards in Scandinavia and North America survive quite happily so I wouldn't have any qualms about keeping warm in a cold climate.  Oh, and  never forget the central heating powers of a good malt whisky.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Kilada, Greece

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Orion Martin <poonz1@...>
Sent: 13 January 2020 20:49
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Sailing higher latitudes
 
Hello everyone,

Just a quick question to see if anyone has had experience sailing higher latitudes, even as far as the Antarctic peninsula? I recall seeing a photo of an Amel Super Maramu in Svalbard, and my interest was piqued when Stefan asked about the prospect of installing a diesel heater to an SM. At some point I would like to sail to higher latitudes, and I'm fully aware of the need to look out for and push away bergy bits and growlers (small ice blocks) from the yacht as it can abrade (or worse damage irreparably) the exterior of a SM. However, I was concerned about the comfort level considering the SM is not insulated, so a diesel heater would be the absolute minimum required to endure a stint in higher latitudes.

Any thoughts or experience shared is most appreciated.

Orion

Re: A54 fridge circulation pump

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Nick,

Thanks for your observations. I fully agree the insulation of especially the freezer is the main problem. As Oliver suggested in previous postings, changing the insulation with a better one really makes a big difference. But he also said it's a hell of a project. In the mean time we are using circulation pumps like cookies.
Fact is that Flojet claims to supply you a pump for continuous duty but it's not. Even at 80% duty cycle the thing drops dead after less then a year. That should not happen. As said by others, brushed motors are simply not suitable for this task.
So the idea of replacing the pump-motor itself is quite good but you will need to carefully select what motor to replace it with.

I've looked at the sea-water circuit and I'm thinking about a way to clean it, but that is not so simple. I think the easiest is to pump some descaling fluid though the circuit and let is soak for a while. On the other hand the continuous flow of water makes keeps growth of whatever wants to settle in the circuit also minimal.

It's a pity that Flojet does not sell a brushless variant of the pump. That would make the problem much better to cope with.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121

Re: Power to 24v panel - easy to isolate?

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Scott,

The main feeder cable to the 24 volt panel is coming from the busbar-stud that sits on the wall that separates the battery compartment from the compartment that contains the main power switches. There are several cables stacked together there, one of those goes to the 24V panel. But be aware the 24 volt panel does not switch all consumers. The nav-area has a separate line. This also feeds the 24V-12V converters in the cabinet under the nav table. So disabling the  24V panel does not eliminate all power draw.

You may want to have a look at this product. It can handle 500A: https://tbs-electronics.com/product-category/dc-modular-fuseholders-busbars/
This means you can use it in your primary battery cable. Do think about how to connect this as you will need to be able to charge the battery even if the switch has disconnected the battery. So the charger should be connected directly to the battery. If I remember correctly Amel  connected the chargers on the battery side of the main power switches as well. So even if you disconnect all power the batteries can still be charged.

Regards,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121

Re: Sailing higher latitudes

ianjenkins1946 <ianjudyjenkins@hotmail.com>
 

Hi Orion,

We spent a couple of seasons in the Beagle channel and know of at least two SMs that went to the Antarctic peninsula. One owner boasted  of cruising down there sitting in the cockpit with the cockpit curtain closed wearing his slippers .
We didn't find the cold a problem. We used the three reverse cycle Climmas to dry and ventilate the boat and we blessed our Eberspacher which we ran on a daily basis. The Eberspacher agent back in England couldn't believe he was the first guy to service it after 12 years.

 Plus, we had two domestic fan heaters on board, 2 and 3 kw, so if we came back to really cold boat we could put nearly 10,000 Btu through it in minutes.  We did put bubblewrap on the inside of the main hatch in the saloon . We had no condensation in the bilges.

 Sealing off the cockpit with the curtain or a full enclosure makes a huge difference.

 Winter  liveaboards in Scandinavia and North America survive quite happily so I wouldn't have any qualms about keeping warm in a cold climate.  Oh, and  never forget the central heating powers of a good malt whisky.

 Ian and Judy, Pen Azen, SM 302 Kilada, Greece


From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> on behalf of Orion Martin <poonz1@...>
Sent: 13 January 2020 20:49
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io>
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Sailing higher latitudes
 
Hello everyone,

Just a quick question to see if anyone has had experience sailing higher latitudes, even as far as the Antarctic peninsula? I recall seeing a photo of an Amel Super Maramu in Svalbard, and my interest was piqued when Stefan asked about the prospect of installing a diesel heater to an SM. At some point I would like to sail to higher latitudes, and I'm fully aware of the need to look out for and push away bergy bits and growlers (small ice blocks) from the yacht as it can abrade (or worse damage irreparably) the exterior of a SM. However, I was concerned about the comfort level considering the SM is not insulated, so a diesel heater would be the absolute minimum required to endure a stint in higher latitudes.

Any thoughts or experience shared is most appreciated.

Orion