Date   
Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Brent Cameron
 

Good catch Gerard! I meant the Rod Antennas in your terminology of course. I was referring to the fact that rather than a simple 1/4 wavelength antenna that is Omni directional (like our sailing VHF/AIS antennas) or the ones you see on home routers, the Rod ones are relatively flat in the horizontal plane. Your highly directional antennas of course are much better but then need to be aimed at the source as your diagrams show. Sorry for the confusion. I’ll blame it on my iPhone!  LOL. 

Brent Cameron, Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Brent Cameron
 

Jorge, I use a UK three SIM for when I’m travelling in Europe and they have a wonderful roaming plan. I get about 20G for 15 British Pounds (you can even get unlimited for about twice that). and it works in over 90 countries including many of the islands in the Caribbean (not Bermuda or Mexico though). I got it on Amazon and I do the top ups from PayPal so it works even though I don’t have a Uk credit card or address. 

Brent Cameron, Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Gerhard Mueller
 

Brent
Do you have mixed the idioms "directional antenna" and "rod antenna" perhaps?
Please see the diagrams above to make things clear.
Would you like I post a picture of a rod antenna and a directional antenna to see its difference?
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece

Re: vetus coupling removal

MICHELE LUCCIOLA
 

Hi Herbert,
I did this job the last year....the only suggestion I can tell you is to remove the  gearbox with the  the vetus coupling installed (just dismount the fixings on the flange on the engine); in this way you can easily remove the axle on a bench because the space to work with the engine installed is very unconfortable. In fact also if you want to use an extractor (I did one with long arms) you have to pull the engine back to have a little bit of room....anyway you have to use not gentle manners to have a good results...but is better to work on a bench that in the engine compartment...in this way you can also change the  seal of the gearbox easily once removed the little shaft.
Just for your use i attach a pdf in which there is an explanation of the job....but I prefer to put the gearbox out of the boat with the shaft attached and to do the job in a confortable and safe way...
regards
Michele

Re: Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Arno,

 

Many thanks for that. I was intending to do something along those lines. A photo would be good if you don’t mind. I may struggle to find 5200 here in Cariacou so it may have to wait a bit. I am surprised that Amel did not design a way to stow the tiller in that obvious location!

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Arno Luijten
Sent: 22 January 2020 10:25
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

 

Hi Paul,

I used a piece of pontoon wood (whatever that hard-wood is called) and cut strips of 30-40 cm from it. I then put these on the bulkhead vertically so they would create a hook to prevent the emergency tiller falling off the small ledge.
The bulkhead is not very thick, 12 mm or so. So to fix the wood I used screws of only 10 mm sticking out of the pontoon wood. To make sure the things would hold I put 3M 5200 compound between the bulkhead and the wood. So the screws were more there to keep the wood in place during the setting of the 5200. Make sure you sand and de-grease the surface of the bulkhead at the point of attachment. 3M 5200 is incredibly strong so I have no worries about detaching. It has been fine for 1.5 years now. I also put some small blocks of wood on the ledge at either end of the tiller to prevent it from sliding left or right. I can make a picture if you want.

Cheers,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Brent Cameron
 

Those directional antennas generally have a +/- 3  degree plane off vertical. Using the old (and very handy)  1 in 60 rule (1 degree at 60nm is equal to a distance across that arc of 1 nautical mile or 6000 feet).it’s easy to calculate that if you are say 1/10 mile from the source antennas, then you can be as much as 30 feet off plane and still get a decent signal. ( 6000/ 60 / 10 * 3 degrees = 30’)   I’m not sure that I’d put the directional antenna on top of the Mizzen as the extra height isn’t doing you any favours up really close  but Eric has a good solution (at say 15’ off the water) as that would easily allow you to hit an antenna at that elevation but also up to 45 in at that distance (the further out you are, the less it’s a problem- 1/2 mile would be 150’, 1 mile is 300, etc. ’Anyway, unless you are sitting right on top of the source antenna, in which case your computers would likely get Wi-Fi anyway, it won’t make much difference where you mount it.  The range is still likely to be fairly close just because of the signal strength so unlike VHF (or AIS),  boosting your antenna to get additional line of sight isn’t going to make much difference anyway. 

Brent Cameron, Future Amel owner & Amel Owner's Registry Moderator

On Jan 22, 2020, 10:27 AM -0500, Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...>, wrote:
Gerhard, thanks for including those diagrams.  That makes it a lot more clear what I was trying to say in my earlier post.  The directional antennas are great if you can be sure it will always be pointed in the right direction.  On a mooring, it's not going to work very well.

You bring up a good point about the DHCP configuration.  The easiest way to fix it is isn't to turn off DHCP on one of them, it's to ensure they assign from separate IP ranges and ensure one is plugged into the uplink port of the other.  Then the downstream router will get an IP from the upstream one just like any other device.  I recall this was very easy to set up with the Mikrotik routers.

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Wed, Jan 22, 2020 at 5:31 AM Gerhard Mueller via Groups.Io <carcode=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
I still have the old Ubiquiti Bullet 2HP which is similiar to the Groove.
Depending the conditions I use 2 different kinds of antennas.
The usual rod antenna has the characteristics as shown below:
<WiFi-Rundstrahlantenne.png>
360 degrees horizontal but only a small angle vertically.
That means the antenna should be mounted as near as possible to the horizontal line to the access point.
However a directional antenna has this characteristic:
<WiFi-Sektorantenne.png>
That is nearly same quality horizontal and vertically.
So if you know the direction to the access point take this one.

Another thing to know: My Bullet as well the Groove are routers. When you attach them to another router in your network on board the boat then only one router in the network can be configured as DHCP server which handles the IP addresses in your network. Otherwise the network is blocked.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece


--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Gerhard Mueller
 

Joerg

Correct, the bandwith is often very poor. It is a little better at night times when most users are asleep. But a nice antenna helps a lot. When you have a poor signal strength you have also a small bandwith. That is the way the WiFi protocol works.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Joerg Esdorn
 

I have the Bad Boy Unleashed WIFI extender system Amel offered as an option on the 55.  It has worked well enough but I have found that in the Med, WIFI is usually useless because of lack of bandwidth.  I Found that in most marinas I visited the WIFI was overloaded at the times I wanted to use it.   Restaurants WIFI I found no better, typically worse.  So I installed a 4G SIM card in my Redbox router (Mailasail) which gives me WIFI via a 4G LTE connection on the boat.  In most countries in the Med, cheap 4G SIM cards are available which typically give you 10G or more for $10.  I found this solution cost effective and much less stressful than trying to get a decent WIFI connection.  It requires you to get a new SIM card in each country, though.  

joerg esdorn
A55 Kincsem
Vigo, Spain

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Ryan Meador
 

Gerhard, thanks for including those diagrams.  That makes it a lot more clear what I was trying to say in my earlier post.  The directional antennas are great if you can be sure it will always be pointed in the right direction.  On a mooring, it's not going to work very well.

You bring up a good point about the DHCP configuration.  The easiest way to fix it is isn't to turn off DHCP on one of them, it's to ensure they assign from separate IP ranges and ensure one is plugged into the uplink port of the other.  Then the downstream router will get an IP from the upstream one just like any other device.  I recall this was very easy to set up with the Mikrotik routers.

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Wed, Jan 22, 2020 at 5:31 AM Gerhard Mueller via Groups.Io <carcode=me.com@groups.io> wrote:
I still have the old Ubiquiti Bullet 2HP which is similiar to the Groove.
Depending the conditions I use 2 different kinds of antennas.
The usual rod antenna has the characteristics as shown below:

360 degrees horizontal but only a small angle vertically.
That means the antenna should be mounted as near as possible to the horizontal line to the access point.
However a directional antenna has this characteristic:

That is nearly same quality horizontal and vertically.
So if you know the direction to the access point take this one.

Another thing to know: My Bullet as well the Groove are routers. When you attach them to another router in your network on board the boat then only one router in the network can be configured as DHCP server which handles the IP addresses in your network. Otherwise the network is blocked.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece

Re: Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Arno Luijten
 

Hi Paul,

I used a piece of pontoon wood (whatever that hard-wood is called) and cut strips of 30-40 cm from it. I then put these on the bulkhead vertically so they would create a hook to prevent the emergency tiller falling off the small ledge.
The bulkhead is not very thick, 12 mm or so. So to fix the wood I used screws of only 10 mm sticking out of the pontoon wood. To make sure the things would hold I put 3M 5200 compound between the bulkhead and the wood. So the screws were more there to keep the wood in place during the setting of the 5200. Make sure you sand and de-grease the surface of the bulkhead at the point of attachment. 3M 5200 is incredibly strong so I have no worries about detaching. It has been fine for 1.5 years now. I also put some small blocks of wood on the ledge at either end of the tiller to prevent it from sliding left or right. I can make a picture if you want.

Cheers,

Arno Luijten
SV Luna,
A54-121

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Gerhard Mueller
 

I still have the old Ubiquiti Bullet 2HP which is similiar to the Groove.
Depending the conditions I use 2 different kinds of antennas.
The usual rod antenna has the characteristics as shown below:

360 degrees horizontal but only a small angle vertically.
That means the antenna should be mounted as near as possible to the horizontal line to the access point.
However a directional antenna has this characteristic:

That is nearly same quality horizontal and vertically.
So if you know the direction to the access point take this one.

Another thing to know: My Bullet as well the Groove are routers. When you attach them to another router in your network on board the boat then only one router in the network can be configured as DHCP server which handles the IP addresses in your network. Otherwise the network is blocked.
--
Gerhard Mueller
Amel Sharki #60
Currently Kalamata, Greece

Re: Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Peter Forbes
 

Paul,

We drilled right through and put a small (1mm) bolt through with washers each side  and we sealed it [so very small hole]. As to the height - I am not on board and will not be until May but it is not difficult to measure from inside and calculate the height for the hole.

When I’m on board again I can measure up from the sole of the lazerette but I expect you will have done it by then.

The bolt holds a canvas type pair of straps and the steering gear is held tight.

Peter

Peter Forbes
Carango Amel 54 035
La Rochelle
00447836 209730
07836 209730

On 22 Jan 2020, at 04:54, Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown <paul.dowd@...> wrote:



Thanks all for the feedback.

 

My idea was to fix a couple of steel bars to prevent them from falling out. These would be mounted just below the lazarette shelf, rotating up to prevent the tiller from falling out. However, I do not know how far into the GRP I can drill, so that info would be useful. Peter, you say you drilled through – how deep? Is it necessary to drill all the way through? And if so at exactly what height?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Forbes
Sent: 21 January 2020 17:32
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

 

On Carango we use the little shelf on the forward bulkhead of the lazarette we drilled through the bulkhead into the rear cabin taking care that we drilled through so the holes were behind the ledge above the head of the double berth and out of sight. it was not too difficult and a works well.

 

Peter

Carango Amel 54 035

La Rochelle

00447836 209730

07836 209730



On 21 Jan 2020, at 21:22, Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:



Hi Paul;

 

I did think about this issue. My thoughts were that there are so few cases of the tiller being needed in a 54, as far as my research showed, that the location allocated by Amel would be adequate. In the unlikely event of a steering issue, we would be well motivated to remove the items required to get to the tiller. We may revisit this issue, if we hear sufficient arguments to the contrary.

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 11:45 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

 

Hi all,

 

For the A54 I have yet to hear of any successful remedy to the problem of emergency tiller storage, and so far mine has been lying at the bottom of the stern lazarette which is far from ideal. Having just tried to figure out a good place I can see that on the narrow shelf top forward part of the stern lazarette there is a good place (see attached photo) but it needs something to keep in in place. Does any one know how thick the GRP is there before I start drilling?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

eric freedman
 

Hi Ryan,
When I had Kimberlite made Amel mounted a bar between the backstays for our KVH Sat phone. Since we have the go- and no KVH we have extra space on the platform to mount the Groove.
Fair Winds,
Eric
SM 376 Kimberlite

On January 21, 2020 at 10:47 PM Ryan Meador <ryan.d.meador@...> wrote:

Eric, where did you mount your Groove?

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 10:37 PM eric freedman < kimberlite@...> wrote:
I have been using the groove 52 antenna and router for a few years . It picks up a weak signal and I get great connections. Right now no one on my dock has internet except me.
Fair Wind,
Eric
SM 376 kimberlite

On January 21, 2020 at 2:26 PM David Crisp < david@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I'm going to be cruising the Mediterranean for the next few years. For internet/email access my primary channel will be mobile/4G although I'll use WiFi when available. Consequently I'm looking to install a good antenna/router system for 4G and WiFi.  I see there's one or two ready assembled products available from people like Digital Yacht or I could buy my own components and maybe get more bang for my Euro plus get even more job self-satisfaction!

Does anyone have any experience they can share?

Regards
David Crisp
SV Wilna Grace

 


 

Re: Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown
 

Thanks all for the feedback.

 

My idea was to fix a couple of steel bars to prevent them from falling out. These would be mounted just below the lazarette shelf, rotating up to prevent the tiller from falling out. However, I do not know how far into the GRP I can drill, so that info would be useful. Peter, you say you drilled through – how deep? Is it necessary to drill all the way through? And if so at exactly what height?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Peter Forbes
Sent: 21 January 2020 17:32
To: main@amelyachtowners.groups.io
Subject: Re: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

 

On Carango we use the little shelf on the forward bulkhead of the lazarette we drilled through the bulkhead into the rear cabin taking care that we drilled through so the holes were behind the ledge above the head of the double berth and out of sight. it was not too difficult and a works well.

 

Peter

Carango Amel 54 035

La Rochelle

00447836 209730

07836 209730



On 21 Jan 2020, at 21:22, Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:



Hi Paul;

 

I did think about this issue. My thoughts were that there are so few cases of the tiller being needed in a 54, as far as my research showed, that the location allocated by Amel would be adequate. In the unlikely event of a steering issue, we would be well motivated to remove the items required to get to the tiller. We may revisit this issue, if we hear sufficient arguments to the contrary.

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 11:45 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

 

Hi all,

 

For the A54 I have yet to hear of any successful remedy to the problem of emergency tiller storage, and so far mine has been lying at the bottom of the stern lazarette which is far from ideal. Having just tried to figure out a good place I can see that on the narrow shelf top forward part of the stern lazarette there is a good place (see attached photo) but it needs something to keep in in place. Does any one know how thick the GRP is there before I start drilling?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Ryan Meador
 

Eric, where did you mount your Groove?

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 10:37 PM eric freedman <kimberlite@...> wrote:
I have been using the groove 52 antenna and router for a few years . It picks up a weak signal and I get great connections. Right now no one on my dock has internet except me.
Fair Wind,
Eric
SM 376 kimberlite

On January 21, 2020 at 2:26 PM David Crisp <david@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I'm going to be cruising the Mediterranean for the next few years. For internet/email access my primary channel will be mobile/4G although I'll use WiFi when available. Consequently I'm looking to install a good antenna/router system for 4G and WiFi.  I see there's one or two ready assembled products available from people like Digital Yacht or I could buy my own components and maybe get more bang for my Euro plus get even more job self-satisfaction!

Does anyone have any experience they can share?

Regards
David Crisp
SV Wilna Grace

 

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

eric freedman
 

I have been using the groove 52 antenna and router for a few years . It picks up a weak signal and I get great connections. Right now no one on my dock has internet except me.
Fair Wind,
Eric
SM 376 kimberlite

On January 21, 2020 at 2:26 PM David Crisp <david@...> wrote:

Hi Everyone,

I'm going to be cruising the Mediterranean for the next few years. For internet/email access my primary channel will be mobile/4G although I'll use WiFi when available. Consequently I'm looking to install a good antenna/router system for 4G and WiFi.  I see there's one or two ready assembled products available from people like Digital Yacht or I could buy my own components and maybe get more bang for my Euro plus get even more job self-satisfaction!

Does anyone have any experience they can share?

Regards
David Crisp
SV Wilna Grace

 

Re: Mobile communications - 4G, WiFi

Ryan Meador
 

I decided to build my own system.  I think it was lower cost, and it's great knowing that I can troubleshoot and repair every aspect of it.  I've been meaning to do a full writeup on how I did it for my blog for some time, but I haven't gotten around to it... I'll give you the unpolished version:

  1. I bought a Mikrotik hAP AC Lite router.  This supports both 2.4GHz and 5GHz WiFi, it has Ethernet, it has USB, and it can be easily powered from our onboard 24VDC power system (just cut the end off the wall adapter, taking care to match the polarity when you connect to the onboard wiring).  This is the "indoor" router that acts as my access point.  I mounted it above the bookshelf next to the nav station.
  2. I bought a Mikrotik GrooveA 52 with antenna (more on the antenna later).  This is powered via Power-over-Ethernet, has a single Ethernet port, is compatible without 24VDC power system, and it's weatherproof.  This is the "outdoor" station that connects to the marina's free WiFi network (2.4GHz or 5GHz).
  3. I installed the GrooveA on the main backstay with the included zip ties, then ran outdoor-rated Ethernet cable down the backstay and inside the boat (I had a hole at the base of the mizzen already from an old radar installation that was on the backstay).  This cable plugs into the uplink port on the hAP router and a PoE injector (included with the GrooveA, I believe).  You may want to consider putting it on the mizzen mast instead (see below re: antenna).
  4. I configured the GrooveA, which is very user friendly. You just put it in CPE mode and it's ready to scan for and connect to WiFi networks, so that's basically done.
  5. The hAP was a little trickier.  This is why I've been holding off on writing it up for my blog... I need to make sure I'm not missing any steps.  If you're good with networking, you can probably figure it out just like I did.  Things I remember:
    1. You need to give them different IP addresses so you can connect to both of them for configuration.  I believe you have to do the hAP first.
    2. You need to configure the hAP firewall to allow packets through (there's some setting like "forward")
  6. At this point, you have functioning WiFi!  Yay!  And when you get to a new marina, you just pop open your browser, connect to the GrooveA's IP address, and select the new network.
  7. But you also want LTE.  Remember that USB port on the hAP?  You can buy a USB dongle that goes in there.  There are a ton of supported models on the Mikrotik website, but I went with the Huawei E3372.  Take care to get one that matches the LTE bands in use in the region(s) you're going to be.  Some of them even support external antennas (mine does not).
  8. I use Google Fi as my phone provider, so it was a simple matter of requesting an extra data SIM card from them to put into the LTE dongle, then plugging that into the hAP.  You'll want to ensure you only plug in either the LTE dongle or the GrooveA, not both at the same time, unless you like running your data bill up.  It's possible to set them up to automatically switch back and forth, but I'm not going to go into that detail.
This setup has worked very well for over a year.  There is one small flaw... the antenna included with the GrooveA has high gain and is quite polarized, so the signal comes out in a thin plane perpendicular to the antenna (I believe there was a related discussion on this list about VHF antennas recently).  This is normally a good thing, if it's lined up with the access point in the marina or on shore.  Problem is, I mounted it on the backstay, which is slanted.  So it's easy for the signal to miss the access point.  I partially solved this by buying a lower gain antenna, which has a wider signal pattern.  A better way to solve it would be to mount it vertically, likely on the mizzen mast.  I was going to put it up on the mizzen spreader, but that's too high to use in our home marina -- the marina access points are only about 6' off the ground -- so my signal would go right over them.  If you're always going to be at anchor, it would probably work wonders up there.

I hope that brain dump wasn't too much.  If I get that written up for my blog soon, I'll drop you a link to that.

Ryan and Kelly
SM 233 Iteration
Boston, MA, USA


On Tue, Jan 21, 2020 at 2:26 PM David Crisp <david@...> wrote:
Hi Everyone,

I'm going to be cruising the Mediterranean for the next few years. For internet/email access my primary channel will be mobile/4G although I'll use WiFi when available. Consequently I'm looking to install a good antenna/router system for 4G and WiFi.  I see there's one or two ready assembled products available from people like Digital Yacht or I could buy my own components and maybe get more bang for my Euro plus get even more job self-satisfaction!

Does anyone have any experience they can share?

Regards
David Crisp
SV Wilna Grace

Re: Too many VHF aerials?

Brent Cameron
 

Thanks David.  There are no dumb questions when it comes to antennas on sailboats.  The specification is called LMR-400 and  TMS is the brand name (Times Microwave Systems) which is just one of several companies that make it to that specification - they were the original creator but there are others now.  That said, the specification really talks to the signal characteristics of the cable but NOT to the construction so even among vendors such like TMS there are several different types of LMR-400 cable with different construction and capabilities.  Scott has said that the Amel 54 needs a minimum bend radius of about 2.5” and you can get LMR-400 cables from TMS with minimum bend radius’s of down to 1”.   (Part number TMS LMR-400-UF which is designed to be a drop in replacement for the RG-8 typical cables used in our masts).      I have not looked at all of the potential vendors but I do know that there are other flexible versions in addition to the UF (Ultra Flexible).    I”m not recommending a specific brand of cable or a particular vendor but here is a spec sheet for the UF cable I found on the web.  https://www.pasternack.com/images/ProductPDF/LMR-400-UF.pdf. It’s also fairly widely available even on Amazon.  

To summarize, ideally you want a cable that is flexible, has the attenuation specifications of at least LMR-400 if possible and is rated for outdoors use over our typical temperature ranges.   If you look at LMR-400 cable types, and find one rated for outdoor and is flexible, it should work as designed.  I just did a quick look up and saw Alibaba said that there were 475 Chinese companies making LMR-400 cables alone!    I’m sure you can find one in the Med that will work.  Hope that helps.  

Brent

--
Brent Cameron

Future Amel Owner & Amel Owner Registry Moderator

Oro-Medonte, Ontario, Canada

Re: Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Peter Forbes
 

On Carango we use the little shelf on the forward bulkhead of the lazarette we drilled through the bulkhead into the rear cabin taking care that we drilled through so the holes were behind the ledge above the head of the double berth and out of sight. it was not too difficult and a works well.

Peter
Carango Amel 54 035
La Rochelle
00447836 209730
07836 209730

On 21 Jan 2020, at 21:22, Mohammad Shirloo <mshirloo@...> wrote:



Hi Paul;

 

I did think about this issue. My thoughts were that there are so few cases of the tiller being needed in a 54, as far as my research showed, that the location allocated by Amel would be adequate. In the unlikely event of a steering issue, we would be well motivated to remove the items required to get to the tiller. We may revisit this issue, if we hear sufficient arguments to the contrary.

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 11:45 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

 

Hi all,

 

For the A54 I have yet to hear of any successful remedy to the problem of emergency tiller storage, and so far mine has been lying at the bottom of the stern lazarette which is far from ideal. Having just tried to figure out a good place I can see that on the narrow shelf top forward part of the stern lazarette there is a good place (see attached photo) but it needs something to keep in in place. Does any one know how thick the GRP is there before I start drilling?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 


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Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

Re: Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

Mohammad Shirloo
 

Hi Paul;

 

I did think about this issue. My thoughts were that there are so few cases of the tiller being needed in a 54, as far as my research showed, that the location allocated by Amel would be adequate. In the unlikely event of a steering issue, we would be well motivated to remove the items required to get to the tiller. We may revisit this issue, if we hear sufficient arguments to the contrary.

 

Respectfully;

 

 

Mohammad and Aty

B&B Kokomo

Amel 54 #099

 

From: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io <main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io> On Behalf Of Paul Dowd and Sharon Brown via Groups.Io
Sent: Tuesday, January 21, 2020 11:45 AM
To: main@AmelYachtOwners.groups.io
Subject: [AmelYachtOwners] Amel 54 Emergency Tiller Storage Location

 

Hi all,

 

For the A54 I have yet to hear of any successful remedy to the problem of emergency tiller storage, and so far mine has been lying at the bottom of the stern lazarette which is far from ideal. Having just tried to figure out a good place I can see that on the narrow shelf top forward part of the stern lazarette there is a good place (see attached photo) but it needs something to keep in in place. Does any one know how thick the GRP is there before I start drilling?

 

Cheers,

Paul

S/Y Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98

 


--
Cheers
Paul
Ya Fohi - Amel 54 #98